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EVENTS: CRAIG FERGUSON, GREAT PUMPKIN WALK 22 FILM: “JACK GOES BOATING,” “IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY” 32 URBAN JOURNAL: ARE VOTERS FIT TO VOTE?

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THEATER REVIEW: “ONE MAN BAND” AT DOWNSTAIRS CABARET 24 CHOW HOUND: TALA VERA, CORK & FORK 11 CROSSWORD, mr. wiggles 43

RON CARTER • THE PACK A.D. • deanna witkowski • CASIOTONE FOR THE PAINFULLY ALONE • HIGH ON fire • subsoil • and more music, page 12

OCTOBER 13-19, 2010 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 40 No 5

News. Music. Life.

It’s an unnecessary scene, but a delicious one.” MOVIES, PAGE 33

Rare organ rediscovered. NEWS, PAGE 4

Preview of congressional elections. NEWS, PAGE 6

The Ying Quartet on its new line-up. CLASSICAL, PAGE 21

VOTE NOW: Best of Rochester Final 4! 2010 BALLOT, PAGE 31

COVER STORY | BY RON NETSKY | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY MAX SEIFERT

Labor’s love lost

When did the Democratic Party lose blue-collar workers? According to Cornell University’s Jefferson Cowie, it was the 1970’s perfect storm of economic crisis, the rise of identity politics, and the decline of class politics. In the 1970’s, Cowie says, politics shifted from an economic platform to social and racial issues. As Democrats began bringing more women, minorities, and youth to the party, Republicans took advantage by appealing to the working class. Nixon brilliantly reached out to the “silent majority,” mostly white

males, on cultural values, on patriotism, on the war, and on machismo. Cowie traces the roots of blue-collar conservatism in his new book, “Stayin’ Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class.” The book also deals with the 1970’s more liberal outlook on labor. Today, Cowie says, Democrats tepidly represent working people’s economic interests, while Republicans aggressively represent their cultural interests. Nobody, he says, aggressively represents labor’s interests.


Mail Send letters to: themail@ rochester-citynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607with your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, and we don’t publish letters sent to other media.

How to solve Brockport’s problems — fairly

It was gratifying to find another news outlet in the Greater Brockport area focusing on the noteworthiness of our recent dissolution dust-up. Since I live here, I would like to make four observations. 1) Brockport University’s Stylus covered the issue better than any other news outlet. Its reporter went behind the “he said, she said” and investigated the facts. I hope that in this time of shrinking news outlets this writer and other talented Stylus people can find places that give their abilities full rein. 2) Property tax rates should not be isolated from real-estate costs. If property taxes are rolled into a mortgage payment, then total costs for a house in Brockport can fall below those for a similar house where property tax rates are lower but real estate costs more. 3) There must be a fairness issue with tax exemptions in Brockport — covering between 60 and 70 percent of all property. No one questions the benefits that the college and hospital confer on the local area or the benefits that the college confers on both state and nation. Nevertheless, the tax exemptions impose costs on Brockport homeowners that appear out of proportion to the benefits that fall within the village’s borders. There is a solution. The federal government and the State of Connecticut make payments to local governments in lieu of taxes (PILOTS in the jargon). New York State has a PILOT law that does little for places like Brockport. Brockport is not alone here, and it could, in alliance with similar municipalities, petition the legislature for a better PILOT law. 4) During the dissolution debacle, I read every dissolution study I could find. In almost every case, projected savings derived mainly from shifting the cost of police or fire departments to larger governments. Such cost shifting was possible without village dissolution. Dissolution alone had little impact on tax burdens. The implication for regional planning of public-safety resources almost jumped out of the studies. A preliminary glance at the  City

OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

local patchwork of police protection only reaffirms that implication. J. DENNIS CHASSE, BROCKPORT

Covering Jones and the Koran

Regarding “Muslims and the Media (Urban Journal, September 15): Despite the editor’s almost neurasthenic paralysis about where to draw the line between titillation and information, she raises an interesting, although well-worn, point. How much simpler it would have been had the agents of local law enforcement had simply arrested Jones for violation of civil rights and hate-speech offenses. Then the local AP tagline would have been “Local Minister to Be Tried for Hate Crimes,” and the number of news outlets carrying this lede would have been reduced by a factor of 10 to 20, as it would have been more cerebral than “Local Pastor to Burn Koran.” Then in the ensuing weeks, as claims and counter-claims progressed, interest would be further reduced by a factor of 100, as the public’s ability to maintain a historical thread is famously short-lived. (Witness the TARP origination during Bush’s administration, which has been completely replaced by the TARP actions during the Obama administration!) So, yeah: Because of the inability to distinguish right from wrong, the need to remain “politically correct,” and down-right stupidity, Pastor Jones incited an event which was fanned by equally feckless news-panderers to an international event. News organizations have a responsibility to place events IN CONTEXT. Giving equal time to Koran burning as worthwhile news, as opposed to exposing it for the malicious hate crime it is, completely ignoring the teachings of the “Good Book” which the self-same pastor was supposed to exemplify, furthers the smug stupidity of the news consumers, and by extension, of the news organizations themselves. Jefferson’s admonition, “Whenever the people are wellinformed, they can be trusted with their own government” has a correlative opposite. R RAPPORT, RUSH

Assessing Paladino

Even though I believe strongly that New York State government is bro-

ken, poorly managed, and seriously out of touch and that a complete turnover of elected officials is likely necessary, I do not intend to vote for Carl Paladino for governor for the following reasons: 1) The people I have known and respect in politics are those who are calm, thoughtful, gracious, intelligent, candid, courageous, willing to listen, and absolutely honest. New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg comes to mind. Rochester Mayor Bob Duffy is on my list. Carl Paladino is the antithesis of this. He is crude and volatile. An October 1 New York Times editorial says it well: “New York State has serious problems. New Yorkers are right to be frustrated and angry about Albany’s corruption and ineptitude. The last thing this state needs is an outof-control governor who can’t take the heat.” 2) Paladino lacks good judgment. To send racist e-mails and videos of bestiality, even to friends and even to “simply pass them on,” is grossly offensive. Some people do it, but I hold those who aspire to high elected office, especially those who want to “clean things up,” to the highest of standards. 3) Paladino has no solutions. We’re all “angry” about the mess we’re in, but anger is not the fix. The fix, whatever it may be, must be far reaching, coordinated, and sold to the people of New York with an abundance of courage, not anger. 4) He runs a sloppy shop. He may have made lots of money, but he does not appear to have done it by taking care of his employees. If OSHA records are accurate, his Ellicott Development Company has had six compliance inspections since 2005 (three this year alone) at different worksites resulting in 11 citations for serious violations bringing fines of several thousand dollars. Every visit resulted in at least one citation. Several are for repeat violations. It’s one thing to have made a mistake; it’s quite another to find yourself repeatedly facing OSHA, often for the same thing. I’ve been in hundreds of companies and I consistently find that where there are lots of problems, they always point to the leader. In my judgment, Paladino is already a poor leader, and I don’t trust him to suddenly get lots better leading the state. L.H. DAWSON, ROCHESTER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly October 13-19, 2010 Vol 40 No 5 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Chris Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music writer: Frank De Blase Music editor: Dale A. Evans Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Casey Carlsen, George Grella, Susie Hume, Laura Keeney, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Saby Reyes-Kulkarni, Todd Rezsnyak, Annie Rimbach, Mark Shipley, Rob Sickelco Editorial interns: Jesse Hanus, Caitlin Shapiro Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon, Jeffrey Marini Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2010 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Are voters fit to vote? To start this discussion, I turn to the New York Times’ wonderful Gail Collins and her October 8 column. Recapping some of the craziness in this election campaign, Collins brings up Nevada, where, she says, “voters find both candidates so loathsome that neither incumbent Harry Reid nor his Republican opponent, Sharron Angle, wants to come out and campaign.” And then Collins gives us this: “Angle did make an appearance last week at a rally of Tea Party supporters in Mesquite, where she responded to a question about ‘Muslims wanting to take over the United States’ by decrying the fact that Dearborn, Mich., and Frankford, Tex., were governed under Islamic law, called Sharia. Which, of course, they are not.” And then: “The Associated Press, which reported on this event, noted that while Dearborn does at least have ‘a thriving Muslim community,’ it was not clear why Angle picked on Frankford, Tex., which did not seem to have many Muslims, and also went out of existence around 1975.” Sharron Angle could very well be sitting in the United States Senate come next January. So could Christine O’Donnell, who has lied about graduating from college, has said that evolution is a myth, and whose claim to fame is opposing masturbation. Rich Iott, whose pastimes once included participating in Nazi re-enactments, could be representing part of Ohio in the House of Representatives. This is not an issue of the candidates’ approach to governing — whether they favor bank bailouts, tax cuts for the wealthy, cap and trade, abortion rights, or gay marriage. This is an issue of intelligence, of candidates’ intellectual fitness for office. It is also, I’m afraid, an issue of American voters’ fitness for citizenship. Fifty-two percent of Republicans, according to a recent Newsweek poll, believe that Obama “sympathizes with” or “probably sympathizes with the goals of Islamic fundamentalists who want to impose Islamic law around the world.” Democratic voters in South Carolina nominated a complete unknown for Senate — an unemployed man who hadn’t campaigned, has no money, and has been indicted on felony and misdemeanor pornography charges. The reason he won the Democratic primary, apparently, is that he isn’t a politician. What kinds of issues would these folks need to deal with in Congress? Pakistan,

This country needs thoughtful, intelligent legislators — and to get them, it needs thoughtful, intelligent voters.” for one. We don’t trust its leaders, and they don’t trust us. But we’re bound together in the conflict in Afghanistan, where the outcome will affect our own future and that of many parts of the world. We have to have Pakistan’s cooperation if we’re to defeat the Taliban. But Pakistan has been helping the Taliban, who, it figures, could help counter Pakistan’s chief security concern: India. And how about Iran, whose nuclear ambitions continue to be a major concern? Several news media are reporting that Israel intends to try to bomb Iran’s presumed nuclear sites, with or without our blessing. It may very well want not only our blessing but our participation. Will Congress support that? Will it insist on being involved in the decision? Then there’s our energy policy. And the economy. And health care. Education. Immigration…. Increasingly, special interests — with big money — are setting the nation’s agenda and influencing our laws. Will legislators be swayed by them, or by the country’s needs? Adding to the pain: Michael Tomasky’s article in the current issue of the New York Review of Books suggests what some legislators and candidates have in mind: “a series of investigations into the Obama administration, quite possibly leading to another impeachment drama.” Tomasky quotes a Politico report that some Republicans “are quietly gearing up for a possible season of subpoenas not seen since the Clinton wars of the late 1990’s.” This country needs thoughtful, intelligent legislators — and to get them, it needs thoughtful, intelligent voters. You don’t have to have a college degree to be an intelligent voter. You just have to do your homework. There are few indications, though, that most of us are willing to put out the effort.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Auction benefits Eastman House

An auction of photographs, art, books, and other items raised more than $650,000 for the George Eastman House. All of the items were donated. More than 300 people attended the live Sotheby’s auction, and there was an accompanying online auction.

Hevesi pleads guilty

Former State Comptroller Alan Hevesi pleaded guilty to a felony: second-degree receiving reward for official misconduct. Hevesi admitted approving a $250-million pension investment and received $1 million in return, says the New York Times. He faces up to four years in prison. The charge followed state and federal investigations into pay-toplay practices involving the pension fund.

Richards becoming a Democrat

The city’s chief attorney, Corporation Counsel Tom Richards, has filed to register with the Democratic Party. Richards has been floated as a possible replacement for Mayor Bob Duffy, should Duffy win his race for lieutenant governor. “I made that decision so I could keep my options open,” Richards said.

 City

Bus station financing approved

News

Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority’s board approved $47 million for a new transit center, with construction scheduled to begin next fall. The board also approved a $10.2 million project to expand RGRTA’s East Main Street facility.

THE ARTS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Don’t bet on Smith

Rare organ rediscovered

Former Deputy County Executive and, some say, Robutrad fall guy James Smith will not be joining the regional Off-Track Betting office. According to media reports, no one on OTB’s board would make a motion to appoint Smith as executive vice president. Smith resigned from the county last year and was later acquitted of misdemeanor crimes related to the Robutrad contractor scandal.

A musical gem has been residing in the choir loft at Parsells Avenue Community Church for more than 80 years, almost unknown by the broader community.

Deputy Mayor Malgieri out

City Deputy Mayor Patricia Malgieri is resigning to take a job in the private sector. Her resignation is effective in three weeks. Mayor Bob Duffy will appoint a replacement, says City Corporation Counsel Tom Richards.

OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

Dr. Peter Grinion, pastor of Parsells Avenue Community Church, with the church’s Skinner Opus 560 pipe organ. The organ was installed in 1925 and is largely unknown in the community outside the church. Photo by MATT DETURCK

The church has a Skinner Opus 560 pipe organ, with three manuals, 1,554 pipes, and 24 stops. The organ is difficult to see unless you’re in the loft, and its dark wood causes it to blend in with its surroundings. The organ was installed in 1925 with consultation from Harold Gleason, the first head of the organ department at the Eastman School of Music. Gleason was hired to help determine which instrument would be best for the church, says Cynthia Howk of the Landmark Society. “We’ve discovered it has never been altered,” Howk says. “This is very rare.” The Parsells organ has been drawing some high-profile attention lately. Rob Kerner and Peter DuBois, both from the Eastman School, have been to the church to check out the instrument. “Rob Kerner played like the first minute of every famous organ piece you’ve heard,” Howk says. “He put this organ through its paces like hasn’t

happened in probably 50 years. And it sounded fabulous.” Kerner is harpsichord and organ technician at Eastman. DuBois is director of the sacred-music diploma program and assistant professor of sacred music. The church, along with the Rochester Chapter of the American Guild of Organists, is holding an open house to reintroduce the Skinner organ to the community. It’s from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday, October 23, at the church, 345 Parsells Avenue. The event is free and open to the public, and attendees will be able to play the organ. You are encouraged to take your own music. Also, the Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative will hold a community concert at the church in April 2011.


As long as the new legislation is implemented properly, it’ll force government agencies to prioritize projects and make better use of limited funds. It’ll steer agencies toward investing in denser areas — cities, villages, and hamlets — and away from projects that’ll encourage future sprawl.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

eNVIRONMENT | by jeremy moule

Smart growth saves two kinds of green

Former commish: stop the cuts

From now on, New York’s state agencies will have to subject all of their proposed infrastructure projects to smart-growth principles. A law which recently took effect requires each agency to establish a smart-growth advisory panel using existing personnel. The panels will review all state-funded infrastructure projects and consider whether they fit smart-growth concepts. For example, they’ll examine whether a project improves existing infrastructure instead of building new infrastructure or encourages the reuse of already developed property. While the law applies to state agencies and state projects, it’ll also affect grant funding for local projects like sewer and road work. The new law will advance environmentally beneficial practices, such as preserving undeveloped land. Peter Fleischer, executive director of Empire State Future, says that there are also important economic benefits. Empire State Future advocates smart growth as a key to economic revitalization. “I think the bill could fundamentally transform New York for the better,” Fleischer says. As long as the new legislation is implemented properly, it’ll force government agencies to prioritize projects and make

better use of limited funds. It’ll steer agencies toward investing in denser areas — cities, villages, and hamlets — and away from projects that’ll encourage future sprawl, Fleischer Peter Fleischer. PHOTO PROVIDED says. For example, the law’s criteria favor investing in a city’s water system over building new pipes out to a rural area. New York is facing $80 billion in unmet infrastructure needs over the next 20 years, says a report released last year by the State Comptroller’s Office. The new law does contain loopholes. If an agency can justify new infrastructure that goes against smart-growth concepts, it can move a project forward. But that’s supposed to happen infrequently. The law’s effectiveness will depend on how it’s implemented across state government, however. With a new governor taking office, that’s the uncertain part.

Cost of War More names online, www. rochestercitynewspaper.com IRAQ TOTALS — 4,425 US ser-

vicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 98,170 to 107,152 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 8. There are no reports of American servicemen and servicewomen killed after September 27. AFGHANISTAN TOTALS — 1,321 US servicemen

The State Department of Environmental Conservation experienced significant staffing cuts under former Governor George Pataki. | The department lost 700 positions between 1995 and 2004, reducing staff to 3,300, says a 2004 analysis by a state environmental group. | Now, new plans from current Governor David Paterson’s administration would take DEC staffing even lower than during the Pataki years. The DEC would lay off 200 workers as part of a government-wide staffing reduction plan, bringing the total number of employees to 2,926. | Environmental groups are alarmed by the proposal. And former DEC Commissioner Erin Crotty has rebuked it, which is significant since Crotty served under Pataki. | “The DEC has more than shouldered its fair share in helping the state address its economic challenges. Enough is enough,” Crotty said in an opinion piece published last week in the Albany Times-Union. | “I seriously question the ability of the agency to conduct its statutory duties to protect our environment, natural resources, and public health with such limited resources,” she said. | With the potential for large-scale natural gas drilling and hydrofracking in the Marcellus and Utica Shales, staffing cuts at the DEC could be a serious problem.

and servicewomen and 816 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 8. Statistics for Afghani civilian casualties are not available. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from September 29 to October 6: -- Lance Cpl. Timothy M. Jackson, 22, Corbin, Ky. -- Sgt. Justin A.  Officer, 26, Wichita, Kan. -- Sgt. 1st Class Calvin B. Harrison, 31, San Antonio, Texas -- Staff Sgt. Willie J. Harley Jr., 48, Aiken, S.C. -- Spc. Luther W. Rabon Jr., 32, Lexington, S.C. -- Sgt. Anthony D. Matteoni, 22, Union City, Mich. -- Sgt. 1st Class Lance H. Vogeler, 29, Frederick, Md. SOURCES: iraqbodycount.org,

icasualties.org, Department of Defense

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


POLITICS | by JEREMY MOULE

Monroe has two tough congressional races All four of the congressional seats representing Monroe County are up for election this year, but only two are really in play. Democrat Louise Slaughter will most likely keep her 28th District seat, despite a challenge from Republican Jill Rowland. Slaughter typically beats her opponents by wide margins. Republican Chris Lee should keep his 26th District seat as well. His opponent, Democrat Philip Fedele, isn’t actively campaigning. That leaves the 25th and 29th Districts. In the 25th, incumbent Democrat Dan Maffei faces a challenge from Republican Ann Marie Buerkle. And in the 29th, Democrat Matthew Zeller and Republican Tom Reed are running for a seat left vacant by the sudden resignation of Eric Massa. The economy is the common, dominant theme in both races. Republicans Reed and Buerkle stress tax cuts and limited regulation to spur economic growth, business investment, and job creation. Buerkle says the stimulus didn’t work, while Reed says he can’t say whether the package was effective, though he disagrees with the philosophy that led to it. And both say Congress needs to extend the Bush tax cuts. They also want to repeal the health-care reform bill. “This really puts the government between the patient, their physician, and their hospital,” Buerkle says. Democrats Maffei and Zeller favor strong federal investment in clean energy technology and energy efficiency programs. Maffei says the stimulus program was successful because it limited tax increases and kept important projects moving forward. Zeller says the real problem with the stimulus package was that it wasn’t targeted enough. It could have been used, he says, to advance clean energy policy and revitalize infrastructure. While both say the health-care bill wasn’t perfect — Zeller says he wouldn’t have voted for it — neither wants it repealed. The bill has critical components, they say, such as prohibiting insurance companies from denying coverage due to pre-existing conditions. And both say a bill that provides a federal guarantee for student loans, which was tacked on to the health-care bill, was necessary. It’ll make the loans more accessible, they say. All four candidates say that American troops shouldn’t be involved in nation-building.  City

OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

After congressional leaders wrangled out

a compromise health-care reform bill, Maffei voted for it. He had pushed for a public insurance option to make private insurers compete, but the bill was a start, he says. Congress, he says, still needs to find permanent cost-saving measures in the health-care system. Maffei voted for a clean energy bill and took considerable flack for it. The bill would have — it failed to get traction in the Senate — established a cap-and-trade program for carbon emissions. His district and Upstate New York in general is wellpositioned to prosper from clean energy development, Maffei says. Buerkle says cap-and-trade legislation is anti-business and that economic competitors like China and India don’t care about carbon emissions. She says health-care reform is better handled through an incremental approach, starting with tort reform and stopping “frivolous lawsuits.” Consumers should also be able to purchase insurance plans across state lines, she says. Buerkle says the government shouldn’t back student loans. It takes away the incentive for colleges to keep costs down, she says. She says she’s not in favor of “privatizing Social Security for seniors.” But she says there does need to be a reasonable discussion about the system’s future. As for education, Buerkle says that more power and authority belong with the states. She supports vouchers and school choice as well as tax credits for parents who send their children to private schools. Maffei says the US should shift the war on terror away from any one country and instead focus on global monitoring of potential terrorist activity. Military personnel can then be deployed to hot spots. Buerkle says the government needs to define its mission in Afghanistan and then achieve it. Both say the troops should not be involved in nation-building. The prospect of large-scale natural gas exploration in the Marcellus Shale is

looming across New York, but especially in the Southern Tier. The 29th District covers much of the region, and the Marcellus Shale-hydrofracking debate is spilling into the Zeller-Reed congressional race. Reed says the State Department of Environmental Conservation acted proactively by developing a regulatory framework for the wells before drilling


Democrat Matt Zeller (left) wants the federal government to focus on clean energy investment and incentives for businesses and homeowners who make their buildings energy efficient. Republican Tom Reed says holding down taxes and limiting regulations on business will improve the economy. PhotoS by MATT DETURCK

began. If the DEC says it can be done in a safe and reliable manner, then it’s time to move forward, he says. To boost renewable energy, Reed prefers incentives to a large-scale cap-andtrade program. Human activities play a role, he says, but are not the only cause of climate change. Zeller says climate change is a threat and human activities have contributed to that threat. The engineering behind Marcellus Shale hydrofracking is not sound, he says, and it comes with the possibility of irrevocable damage. The country should consider different options to meet its energy demands, Zeller says. For example, he says, Steuben County has 80,000 acres of idled land that could be used to grow switchgrass for biofuels. He also says the government should offer incentives

to people and businesses that make their homes and buildings energy efficient. On to health care: both men say the reform bill didn’t address the issue of medical costs. “To me, that is the number-one problem with health care,” Reed says. The Cleveland Clinic-style model where salaries doctors work cooperatively to treat patients is one possible solution, he says. “To me, the government is the last resort,” Reed says. Zeller says preventive care and more primary-care physicians will help. Better debt forgiveness programs for students who go into primary-care practice could help achieve that, he says. On Afghanistan, Zeller says the US needs to define its goal and then work to achieve a stable country. Reed says the mission of rooting out terrorists is not complete.

Are you being cell stalked? Cell-phone numbers are typically exempt from automated marketing calls and public directories. But it’s a slightly different situation for political campaigns. If you’re getting calls from campaigns on your cell, including polls by a candidate or political committee, chances are they’re legal. Most candidates build their phone lists from the voter registration cards on file at the Board of Elections, says Adam Bello, executive director of the Monroe County

Democratic Committee. So if people provide their cell phone numbers on their registration forms, they’re fair game. If you don’t want to receive electionrelated calls, there are a couple of steps you can take. First, just leave the phone number on the registration card blank. Or registered voters can call the BOE and ask to have their numbers removed from their registration records. The office’s phone number is (585) 753-1550. rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


LABOR’S LOVE LOST Jefferson Cowie traces the roots of blue-collar conservatism COVER STORY | BY RON NETSKY

Two posters are prominently displayed in Jefferson Cowie’s Cornell University office. The first, dealing with a workers’ protest, is no surprise; Cowie is associate professor of labor history at Cornell. But next to that is a poster promoting a 1970’s Bruce Springsteen gig at New York’s Bottom Line. For Cowie, the subjects are inexorably linked. In his new book, “Stayin’ Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class,” Cowie weaves popular culture into the narrative of labor history. The book traces the way some traditionally Democratic workers gravitated to the Republican Party as the left embraced minorities, feminists, and countercultural youth in the 1970’s. As the country braces for another election in which many workers appear poised to once again vote against what would seem to be their best interests, the reverberations of the 1970’s continue to be felt. The book also deals with the more liberal outlook on labor in the 1970’s that made it possible for Congress to pass the Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment Act in 1978. The bill, sponsored by then Senator Hubert Humphrey and Representative Augustus Hawkins (whose district included the turbulent Watts area in Los Angeles), called for the right to a job. The bill called for local planning councils to map out community needs involving transportation, child care, housing, health care, and other areas that could be filled with public- and private-sector jobs. Even though the bill was greatly compromised by amendments before it passed, Cowie finds it fascinating that the discussion even took place. He believes the playing field regarding labor issues has shifted far to the right in subsequent decades. In his view, we now think within such narrow parameters that a bill like HumphreyHawkins would be unimaginable today. Cowie, who serves as house professor and dean of William Keeton House, an innovative learning environment on Cornell’s West Campus, was not born to privilege. He grew up in Crystal Lake near Chicago, the son of a janitor. “When your dad works the nightshift at the same high school you’re going to, you  City

OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

have a portal on how the world works that very few people have,” Cowie says. That’s why one of the book’s themes: the hidden injuries of class, is so important to him In a recent interview, Cowie discussed his book and its relation to contemporary politics. The following is an edited version of that conversation. CITY: One of the central themes of your book is that the 1970’s was the decade that Democrats, the traditional party of unions and blue-collar workers, lost labor. What happened?

Cowie: The 1970’s is kind of an inverse of the 1930’s. During the 1930’s, the Democratic Party is as close to a labor party as it’s ever going to be. That continues for several decades through Johnson and then Nixon. Then what happens? Scholars debate whether it was an economic crisis that liberals had no solution to in ’73, ’74, ’75. Others have looked at the racial backlash, the rise of identity politics, and the decline of class politics. I look at it as a perfect storm: all of these things happening at the same time. In terms of race in the 1970’s, busing may have been necessary to integrate schools and level the educational playing field in cities, but it was not popular with many in the middle class.

The main character in the book, [autoworker] Dewey Burton — that’s what drives him to vote for George Wallace in 1972. That’s the axe that falls through the Democratic Party at that particular moment. We may be shocked today by the popularity of the Tea Party and figures like Glenn Beck, but in the 1970’s, Wallace, a segregationist, had a large following. If he hadn’t been shot, who knows how far he would have gone?

He runs as an independent in ’68, but he’s a viable Democratic candidate in 1972. He won the Michigan primary the day he was shot. To take the 1930’s-1970’s analogy a little farther, the 1930’s put politics on an economic platform: the 1970’s shifted it to a social and racial platform, which has pretty deep resonance in American culture.

So in some ways what’s going on now with the Tea Party and the Glenn Becks and cultural politics, they’re the descendents of Wallace. Also in the 1970’s, Democrats changed the presidential delegate selection process, bringing in more women, minorities, and youth. Meanwhile, Nixon sees an opening and embraces blue-collar workers, the majority of whom are white males.

Nixon is the greatest character in 20th century political history. He was a genius, he was crazy, he was paranoid, but he came up with the silent majority tactic after 1968: What can we do about workers? Basically, he wants to re-create the Republican Party in such a way that it’s a permanent successor to the [Franklin] Roosevelt Coalition. To do that he needs the working class. He brilliantly says we can’t attack the unions, but we can win their hearts and minds on these cultural values, on the war, on patriotism, on machismo. He reaches out. There’s a great campaign sticker, a picture of a hardhat in red, white and blue. It just says “Nixon,” and it captures the whole campaign. In the book you discuss the HumphreyHawkins Full Employment Act, which before it was gutted, would have guaranteed jobs.

On one hand it’s like it’s from another planet. But it was important enough for people to think they had to pass an empty shell of a bill. The lesson today from HumphreyHawkins is one of political imagination. People at one point said, maybe the role of the state is not just to prop up corporations, maybe the role of the state is to actually insure that citizens have jobs. This will take care of poverty, this will create unity in a divided population. We talked about that in a way we just don’t anymore. Now economic policy falls along orthodox lines. We have a vicious debate within very narrow parameters. There’s a possibility of having a discussion that’s a mile wide instead of six inches wide. Humphrey-Hawkins represents that wide discussion.

Jefferson Cowie. Photo PROVIDED

That bill harkened back to the Works Progress Administration of the Franklin Roosevelt era. In dealing with our current crisis, we’re putting stimulus money out there but not in the way Roosevelt did.

The New Deal had two phases. The first, the National Industrial Recovery Act, looked a lot like what we’re doing now. Roosevelt basically organized business owners to solve the problem. And that didn’t work. It was found to be unconstitutional and it didn’t save anything. it was a disaster. In 1935 we get a very different New Deal. That’s when you see Social Security and the National Labor Relations Act. That’s when you see the Fair Labor Standards Act in 1938. That’s when you see an approach where we’re going to give money to people so they can stimulate demand rather than allow corporations further power to control a messed-up situation.


Is it simplistic to put together the fact that we have a need for repairs on infrastructure and a need for jobs and wonder why we don’t have another Works Progress Administrationlike program, putting people directly to work?

No. I completely agree. The infrastructure is falling apart. We need transportation. And why are we not leaders in the development of green technology? I’m a big proponent of the Apollo Alliance, an attempt to revitalize the rust belt by developing green technologies. We’re here talking in this one closet of the house called economic policy and we never get out when there are all these other rooms to explore. The songwriter you believe consistently had his finger on the pulse of labor’s problems is Bruce Springsteen.

If you look at Springsteen’s career it captures the story extraordinarily well. There are these jazzy, crazy early albums and they’re full of life and possibility and there’s one line that really jumped out at me from “Greetings from Asbury Park.” He says, “Dockworker’s dreams mix with Panther schemes to someday own the rodeo.” The dockworkers, the labor union, the Black Panthers; it’s the blue-black alliance. By mid-decade it’s “Born to Run.” Got to get out. He’s in the car, ready to roll out of town, asking his girlfriend: are you with me or not? Then he does what no other artist of the day does, he goes back. In “Darkness On The Edge Of Town” Springsteen asks, who did we leave behind? Who are these people? I think his own fame freaked him out and he went back and said, where did I come from? He looks into that darkness in those factory towns and finds an inescapable despair and claustrophobia that really concern him. But when he puts out “Born in the USA,” the song is co-opted —and misunderstood — by Ronald Reagan, who sees it as a patriotic rallying cry to use in his campaign.

I hated “Born in the USA” when it came out because I thought my guy had been co-opted by mainstream society and the frat boys were now playing his music. I was in college and into punk. But when I went back as an adult and a scholar and looked at that song, I was blown away by how much he captured the moment and how many layers. You have this worker who fought in Vietnam, lost his job at the oil refinery, is this close to going to the penitentiary, and that story is absolutely dwarfed by the sonic chorus of this nationalist boom, boom, boom. As poetry it’s amazing, because even if you read it, it’s “Born in the USA, born in the USA, born in the USA,” then the story underneath all that chorus. So the workers are lost, lost in this reverberating sound machine of patriotism. The latest incarnation of the far right is the Tea Party. But the movement is funded by the Koch Brothers, oil barons with their own agenda. The Machiavellian tactics seem

to have changed. Have Nixon’s dirty tricks evolved into stealth funding?

They’re on steroids now. Nixon first figures this out and says we can’t harm the institutions of labor because they’ll bite us, so we’re going to leave those. But in the meantime we’re going to chip away. Then Reagan comes along and one of his first acts is chop the unions, get rid of PATCO (Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization). That’s a green light to corporations to declare war. You erase that economic identity and what’s left? Cultural politics. You’re right; a lot of this is Astroturf rather than grass roots. There are often institutions behind this stuff. But I do think the paradigm in which they’re operating is an incarnation of what came out of the 1970’s. Why do working people vote against their best interests?

The Democrats tepidly represent working people’s economic interests. Republicans aggressively represent their cultural interests. I don’t think anybody aggressively represents labor’s interests. I agree with Rick Pearlstein when he says Democrats need a 16-year plan. It’s not tomorrow, it’s not next year. Think of Goldwater in 1964 and how Republicans got to Reagan in 1980. And you’ve got to be able to fail. It’s all short-term calculus right now. The other problem is somebody’s really doing a really good job seeding conflict and division. And because Obama is the fulfillment of the 1960’s dream he becomes an easy target.

Yes, the whole multicultural embodiment that he is. Early on you saw the RooseveltObama comparisons: Time Magazine had him in the open-air limousine with the cigarette holder. [Paul] Krugman

called him Franklin Delano Obama. But in terms of economic problems, failed initiatives, and the disappointment of liberals, he might be looking a little more Carter-esque. Today’s issues of outsourcing and the implications of a global economy were not on the radar in the 1970’s. What are the challenges for labor in the future?

If you look at the trajectory of organized labor, it’s been downward since this one massive upheaval in the 1930’s and 1940’s. It peaked around 1955, went down slowly, and since the 1970’s it’s fallen off precipitously. Now we’re in a situation where public-sector unions are the strongest, private-sector unions are weak, and the writing on the wall is not good because you can’t support a unionized public sector on a non-union worker’s wages. I fear that we’re at the end of our rope as an empire. And empires in decline are scary things socially, culturally, and politically. Whether we’ll have the imagination to reinvent ourselves and rise to this challenge instead of rest on our bigotries as our laurels remains to be seen, but there’s no reason we could not. As Thomas Friedman has suggested, there’s a green economy to be built here. There’s a vibrant possibility for us to be technological leaders. America’s got one thing on its side: we invented rock ‘n’ roll. What I mean by that is there’s a creativity that comes out of some of the cultural tensions in this country, and rock ‘n’ roll is a product of that racial and class tension. If that energy and creativity could surface, what makes America great is that kind of thing rather than the rah, rah.

Cowie on pop culture

Cowie on the attacks on Obama

“There are pieces of popular culture that are popular because they tap into something deep in the psyche of the country, and ‘Saturday Night Fever’ was one of them.” “The idea that you start out in a small working-class community and one person is the chosen one, one person’s going to get out and the future belongs to that person. All of these other people aren’t going to get out: they’re buried in the past. They’re in Brooklyn and we’re never going to hear from them. Tony’s in Manhattan. It’s like Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Thunder Road’: ‘it’s a town full of losers, I’m pulling out of here to win.’”

Some of the far right have painted Obama as a Kenyan, Muslim socialist. “The terms of debate are incredible. I can almost not stand it. We have all of these problems and issues and we’re talking about that? But that’s where Republicans have been much more sophisticated than Democrats.” “The Democrats have selected to play on the Republican terrain. Reagan was such a shock that everyone in the Democratic Leadership Council said ‘we’ve got to shift to the right. Nobody wants liberalism anymore.’ But if you’re going to lose, you might as well lose with your own ideas and your own plans rather than losing with the other guy’s plans. You might as well go out swinging.” rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Teaching in urban schools

Nazareth College’s School of Education will present “Between Miracles and Metal Detectors: Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools,” a lecture by urban education expert Greg Michie at 6 p.m. on Monday, October 18. Michie has published numerous essays and taught in the Chicago public schools. The event will be held in the Arts Center, 4245 East Avenue.

Offshore turbines meeting

The Irondequoit Town Hall

will host a public meeting on Lake Ontario offshore turbines at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, October 19, at 1280 Titus Avenue. The purpose of the meeting is to allow residents to speak for or against the turbines.

Advice for big business

UR’s Simon School of Business will present a talk by Roselinde Torres, a partner in the Boston Consulting Group, at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, October 18. Torres has advised global corporations in a wide variety of industries including health care and financial services. The event will be held on the River Campus in the James S. Gleason Hall. Registration requested: 275-8163.

Looking at reproductive rights

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester-Syracuse Region will host “Changing the Conversation: Expanding the Reproductive Justice Movement to Support All Pregnant Women,” a talk by Lynn Paltrow, founder and director of the National Advocates for Pregnant Women, on Wednesday, October 20. Paltrow is a nationally known reproductive rights legal expert. The event is from noon to 2 p.m. and again beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency, 125 East Main Street. Tickets are $50. Reservations required: 546-2771. There will be a reception at 5:30 p.m.

A correction…

In the October 6 music section we misidentified Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra guest performer Ellis Hall.

…and an amplification

Last week, City reported that Joe Morelle was unanimously re-elected as chair of the Monroe County Democratic Committee. But a reader alerted us that there were, in fact, dissenting votes. It turns out Morelle was and was not unanimously re-elected to the job. During an MCDC meeting, a member made a motion to unanimously re-elect Morelle as the party’s chair. It passed, but two committee members cast dissenting votes. So technically, Morelle was unanimously re-elected, despite those two dissenting votes. 10 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010


Dining

Chicken enchiladas from new downtown Cali-Mex restaurant Tala Vera. Photo by MATT DETURCK

California, here we come [ CHOW HOUND ] BY SUSIE HUME

Three years ago, Bernard and Lisa Matthews made a major life change when, after living in Los Angeles for nearly 20 years, they picked up everything and moved to Rochester in search of a better environment to raise their three children. As of last month, the two have made another new venture, transitioning from careers in the music management and production industry to opening a new restaurant in downtown Rochester. The new restaurant, Tala Vera, focuses on Californian-Mexican cuisine (or Cali-Mex), food rooted in Southern California and the Baja peninsula. The Matthews say that while Rochester has a variety of outstanding Mexican restaurants, much of it is of the Tex-Mex or American-Mexican variety. The couple wanted to introduce the area to Cali-

Mex cuisine, which uses similar flavor profiles to traditional Mexican food, but has more of an emphasis on healthier, fresher ingredients like fish and vegetables (like avocado, corn, cabbage, and onion). Tala Vera offers both lunch and dinner, targeting its lunches at the downtown business crowd, while the expanded dinner menu features full-course meals with an upscale flair. Some of the lunch options include street tacos (with a choice of carne asada, pollo asada, or carnitas), baja fish tacos (featuring beer-battered cod), and enchiladas (filled with a five-cheese blend and covered in a sauce made with cocoa). For dinner, many of the same options are available, but are served plate-style with either a cup of soup or a tostada salad, as well as salsa fresco, rice, and black or refried beans. “There’s a general attitude here about Mexican, that you can fill up really full for very

cheap, and we really want to prove that Mexican can be fine dining, too,” Bernard says. “Our food will definitely fill you up, but it’s not a burrito as big as your head for $2.” As for Tala Vera’s interior, the couple spent months and thousands of dollars rehabbing the location, previously a storefront that had been vacant for more than six years. While the Matthews didn’t change the footprint of the space, nearly everything was redone, from walls and floors to a whole new kitchen. The resulting décor (textured white walls, rich wood trim, and wrought-iron flourishes) all add to the restaurant’s Mexican cantina-style atmosphere. In addition to lunch and dinner, the restaurant also offers a full bar (featuring margaritas, beer, and wine) and plans to offer late-night hours Thursdays through Saturdays that will feature live music. Thursdays will be open-mic jazz nights, which the Matthews will use as a vehicle to find acts for future Fridays and Saturdays performances. The owners have further put their music-industry background to use by building a stage that doubles as a recording studio, able to capture high-resolution recordings of performances. Tala Vera is located at 155 State Street. Lunch prices range from $5 to $9 and dinner prices range from $10 to $18. The restaurant is currently open Tuesday-Friday 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturdays 4:30-10 p.m., and is closed Sunday and Monday, but the owners plan to stay open until 2 a.m. Thursday-Saturday in the near future. For more information, call 546-3844 or visit tala-vera.com.

Island food in the falls

A new restaurant and bar has opened in the High Falls area in the location formerly occupied by Jimmy Mac’s. Caribbean Chateau offers a variety of Caribbean foods, as well as some American and CaribbeanAmerican fusion dishes. Specialty dishes include taso, a Haitian dish of deep-fried beef seasoned with Creole spices; steamed red snapper served with plantains; oxtails stewed with peppers, onions, and other island spices; and curried chicken, shrimp, or goat. Those with less adventurous tastes can choose from burgers, barbeque chicken, grilled lobster tail, or a fish fry (served with creamy grits instead of fries). In celebration of the business’s recent opening, its bar is currently offering a happy hour every Friday 5-7 p.m. featuring live music and free chicken wings. Caribbean Chateau Bar & Grill is located at 104 Platt Street. Lunch prices range from $6 to $11 and dinner prices range from $8 to $21. It is open MondayThursday 11 a.m.-midnight, FridaySaturday 1 p.m.-2 a.m., and Sunday 1-11

p.m.; the kitchen closes at 10 p.m. daily. For more information, call 423-0049 or visit caribbeanchateau.com.

Wine, food, and more

The Seneca County Chamber of Commerce will hold a two-day event titled Finger Lakes Cork & Fork on Friday, October 22, through Saturday, October 23. Friday 6-9 p.m. guests can attend the “Partners and Pairing” charity event, which benefits local food pantries. There they can taste a variety of tapas dishes made from local ingredients, each paired with its own locally made wine. Area winemakers and chefs will also be on hand for meet and greets. The main event, held Saturday 10 a.m.5 p.m., offers attendees the opportunity to sample local wines, produce, and dishes prepared by area restaurants. There will also be a variety of seminars where a local winemaker, farmer, or chef will show attendees how to create a dish using local ingredients and pair it with a local wine. Participants include chef Samantha Izzo from Simply Red Bistro at Sheldrake Point, chef Sean Agate from Divine Kitchen & Bar at the Hotel Clarence, and chef John McNabb from Knapp Winery & Vineyard Restaurant. Both events will be held at Rodman Lott and Sons Farm, located at 2973 State Route 414 in Seneca Falls. Tickets cost $50 for Friday night and $25 for Saturday; they are available online at corkandfork.showclix.com or by phone at 1-888-71-TICKETS as well as at the door (though prices are higher). For more information, call 315-568-2906 or visit fingerlakescorkandfork.com.

Closings

Two neighboring businesses — the Park Ave location of Piatza’s Pizza Gourmet and the Gingerbread House — have closed. Both the pizzeria and café were owned by Mike Duemmel, who also owned Little D’s House of Pizza on Lake Ave, which closed in August. Attempts to reach Duemmel for comment were unsuccessful. The downtown location of Simply Crepes (situated within the Bausch & Lomb building of the Rochester Public Library) has closed. Owner Pierre Heroux has stated that he chose not to renew the restaurant’s five-year lease, which began in 2006. Instead, Heroux is planning a new location for Simply Crepes in Raleigh, North Carolina, slated to open next year. The Pittsford and Canandaigua locations remain open. Have a food or restaurant tip for our Chow Hound? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Runner Runner, 2 AM Club Wednesday, October 27. Montage Music Hall, 50 N Chestnut St. 7 p.m. $10. ticketweb.com. 16+ show. [ POP/ROCK ] The Ataris Tuesday, November 2. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7 p.m. $10-$12. 800-745-3000, waterstreetmusic.com. [ CELTIC ROCK ] Enter the Haggis Wednesday, December 2. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. 800745-3000, waterstreetmusic.com.

High On Fire

Saturday, October 16 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St 7 p.m. | $15-$18 | 325-5600 [ METAL ] Aspiring guitar heroes may worship at the altar of

flashy solos and chunky riffs, but all three of the bands on this bill place a premium on timbre. High On Fire, Torche, and Kylesa all play varying strains of heavy rock/metal, but they all overlap in how they shape the guitar’s sound like a sculpture, where feedback, squeals, and complementary grains of distortion mesh into a carefully orchestrated whole. Headliner High On Fire frequently gets tagged as stoner- or sludgemetal, but the trio’s galloping, headbanging style breathes new life into genres mired in uniformity and restriction. Torche’s psychedelia, hooks, and rich vocal melodies lend themselves equally to humming and air-guitar, while opener Kylesa adroitly threads delicate new-wave atmospheres into its slow dirges. — BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

The Pack A.D. Tuesday, October 19 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave 9 p.m. | $7-$9 | 454-2966 [ GARAGE/BLUES ] The Pack A.D. is a savage and raw duo

straight out of the jungles of Vancouver. The sound is low-fi and to the point, its minimalism appearing out of necessity, not merely as a clever cop out. Guitarist Becky Black and drummer Maya Miller carry the torch lit by bands like The White Stripes and The Black Keys as they shed light on American music’s black roots. The Pack A.D. is sinister, salacious, and just about everything you need in a rock ’n’ roll band, and in your life in general. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

12 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

Music


Wednesday, October 13 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Mark Stuart & the Bastard Sons. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. PJ Elliott. Miceli’s, 1011 Rt 31, Macedon. 986-2954. 7-10 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. Subsoil performed at The Lovin’ Cup Friday, October 8. Photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Paderewski Celebration Sunday, October 17 Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave 3 p.m. | Free | 276-8900 [ CLASSICAL ] This year marks the 150th birthday of

pianist and composer Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860-1941). Paderewski was a virtuoso, with performances in Berlin, Vienna, Paris, London, Australia, and a sold-out Madison Square Garden. In the midst of all of this, Paderewski was a signatory to the Treaty of Versailles and was one of the first prime ministers of the newly independent Poland after the end of World War I. The afternoon will include performances of Paderewski compositions, along with readings from his memoirs, letters, and press reviews. — BY PALOMA A CAPANNA

Eddie Nebula’s Awesome Sound friday, October 15 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point 9 p.m. | $5 | 292-9940 [ ROCK ] I knew the nefarious Mr. Nebula wouldn’t go

too far after his previous Eddie Nebula and the Plague was put out to stud. You can’t keep all that anger and talent bottled up for too long without winding up on the evening news. Nebula’s new band, Eddie Nebula’s Awesome Sound, is still full of Nebula’s sarcastic wit and skyscraping vocal range, but there is a lot more dynamic variety and melodic hookery. Hints of this showed up a bit in the last Plague platter, and it looked like it might be the new direction for the band before Nebula pulled the plug last year. Tonight’s CD-release party is for an exciting new record with clever new songs well laid to tape along with plenty of rave-ups. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Iron Eyes Cody style [ review ] by frank de blase

After tripping the red carpet fantastic, I settled into my balcony seat to dig pianist/vocalist Ellis Hall with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra for a musical tribute to Ray Charles on Friday night at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. The last time I’d seen Charles was on this very stage, where he played, among other things, a rousing version of “It Ain’t Easy Being Green.” Hall truly embraces the spirit of Ray Charles, especially when he detours from the master’s music. Hall can certainly tear it up on Charles’ material, and he did so big time at the RPO’s Pops season opener Friday night. But it was on his original selections that you could really hear what Charles heard in him. With a voice more akin to Stevie Wonder than Brother Ray, Hall wailed bright and beautiful from his keyboard cockpit — his “cage,” as he called it. The man has got soul for miles and a range to match. On “Georgia On My Mind” his ending note was more of a crescendo, as he gave high C (and probably a few notes above it) a nice Hawaiian punch. The RPO offered lush support, while Hall’s three vocalists (including his daughter) were haunting and mesmerizing in their midnight-draped

display and beautiful harmonies. Their treatment on “You Don’t Know Me” brought a tear — Iron Eyes Cody style — to my eye. The RPO’s opening set with conductor Jeff Tyzik at the wheel was adventurous and fun. Opening with the disco-infused “A Fifth Of Beethoven,” the orchestra moved into Motown for a bit, where the vocal-less arrangements were perhaps a little clunky. However, the band got its groove back with a medley of instrumentals that picked up the pieces and rocked. With a bit of a British ska slant to its hip-hop, Subsoil bounded on to the Lovin’ Cup stage Friday night for a long set of lyrical play and beats. The group’s two MCs, Laz Green and Mooney Faugh, circled each other around the stage as they engaged in wordplay. The two of them batted about phrases and underscored one another like an argument where both sides are right. The keyboard-heavy swell beneath the consonant calamity was a tonally rich, chordal wash with jazzy augmentation and musical metaphor. Consequently I was left with the feeling that this band is more of a funk and soul outfit with its clever, lyrical staccato adding the hip and the hop.

[ Blues ] Ezra & the Storm. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. LastNote w/InFluent. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Live From Hochstein. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. World Music Series: The Singing Slide/Chitravina N Ravikiran. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. $10-$20. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 14

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Music

Wednesday, October 13 DJ M16. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Jazz ] Dave Mancini. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Bassist Ron Carter famously played in the second Miles Davis Quintet and has performed alongside some of the most legendary jazz musicians in the world. He’ll perform at and receive an honorary degree from Eastman School of Music this weekend. PHOTOS BY TAKEHIKO TOKIWA

Pulling the strings Ron Carter Quartet Saturday, October 16 Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 2:30 p.m. | $15-$25 | 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

The next time you see a bassist standing in the shadows behind the pianist and the horns, don’t be fooled. “He stands back there,” says Ron Carter, “but he’s in charge, man.” After talking to Carter, who will bring his quartet to Kilbourn Hall and receive an honorary doctoral degree from the Eastman School of Music on Saturday, you’re likely to come away with a renewed respect for — if not fear of — bassists. He’s not talking about the razzle-dazzle electric bass slappers of the last several decades. In fact, he believes those bassists are depriving themselves of one of his favorite aspects of playing. “They’re missing the fun of playing in bands with people and making them play different notes,” says Carter. “One of the things I enjoy the most is making the saxophone player inhale. If I get him to do that, man, I got him by the throat. Then he’s mine.” Among the saxophonists Carter has worked with over the years are Stan Getz, Eric Dolphy, Coleman Hawkins, Benny Golson, Sonny Rollins, Wayne Shorter, and Hank Mobley. So, which of those giants inhaled? “I’m not telling you names; I don’t want to embarrass those guys,” says Carter. “I’m going right at them full force, what I call playing a smash-mouth offense. When the bassist has the right skills and the right tools, he can make the band do whatever he wants. When I get to that frame of mind I’ve got those guys, man, and I love that feeling.” “Those guys” must enjoy the challenge, because

Carter is hands-down the most recorded bassist in jazz history. Of the thousands of albums 14 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

he’s appeared on, the saxophonists listed above are only the tip of an enormous iceberg. He’s also played with Bill Evans, Wes Montgomery, Astrud Gilberto, Herbie Hancock — the list literally goes on for 19 pages, with 100 albums per page, on the Allmusic website. “The thing that crosses my mind when I look back on those events is that being in New York, there are a lot of good bass players there,” says Carter, “and given how easy it is to travel coast to coast and from Europe to the States and back, these people who called me for their projects had all these choices and they felt that I was the best choice to make their project successful. I still find that an overwhelming experience, and a tremendous responsibility even after the project is done.” What goes through his mind when he listens to those records? “A lot of things,” Carter says. “Did I find the best notes for the moment? Did I get into the concept quickly enough? Did I have this particular player get to where he wanted to go faster? Did I prevent that? Did I make him go somewhere else? How was the sound of the bass? Did I play the best notes for the bass lines? Overall I think I did a pretty decent job.” To call that an understatement would be an understatement. Carter was, and is, in demand because of his inventive bass lines, melodic solos, and expansive instrumental vocabulary. And despite his constant selfevaluation, he never lacked self-confidence. Fresh out of school (he studied at the Eastman and the Manhattan schools of music) he was working on a daily basis with some of the world’s greatest musicians. But Carter can’t remember being apprehensive about a gig. “I never felt that I couldn’t do the job,” says Carter. “I never felt that the job was beyond my scope emotionally, physically, musically. No, I felt if the guy called me, I could deliver. I never felt any hesitation or reluctance to take the job, never felt that it was over my head.” Not even when Miles Davis called.

Carter was in his mid-20’s when he joined

the premier quintet in jazz. Besides Davis, the landmark group boasted Herbie Hancock on keyboards, Wayne Shorter on saxophone, and Tony Williams on drums. Five decades later the Miles Davis Quintet is still viewed as one of the greatest — and most experimental — groups of all time. “We were four young scientists in a laboratory, which was the bandstand, every night. And the head lab technician would bring in these various chemicals and tell us: make something happen. I never had any difficulty,” Carter says. Even though Davis was famous for starting a tune without announcing it, and leaving his band-mates to figure it out, Carter was in on the secret. “He would tell me what it was because I was the guy playing the intros.” He still cherishes the relationships he formed in that band and stays in touch with Hancock and Shorter, the other two surviving members. “Every Christmas Day I call them because I know they’re at home.” That band, and many others Carter has played with, epitomized the ideals of jazz, creating the music in the moment, with a vague map, but no preconceived path. There were times when Carter could actually feel himself venturing into uncharted territory. “My reaction was: what have we here?” he says. “Those kind of responses for me don’t take place until after the gig. That’s why it’s a little difficult for me to socialize after the set, when people want to talk, because I’m still hearing the set and they’re interfering with me analyzing what just took place.” Carter still has those moments during concerts on his busy schedule. “I kept thinking once I retired from school [Carter was a music professor at City College of New York for years] I’d slow down,” he says. “But now that I’m more available I have more chances to play and I’m taking advantage of it.” At Eastman his band will include three more stellar players: Jacky Terrasson on piano, Payton Crossley on drums, and Rolando Morales-Matos on percussion.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. German House-Keg, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Willardmania. TGIFriday’s-Greece Ridge Mall, 432 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 723-6300. 9 p.m. Free. Krazy Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 355 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Tom’s Original, 364 State Rt 104. 265-0055. 7 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.


Open Jammin’. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 613-4600. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Big Sam’s Funky Nation w/ Buddhahood, The Deep Blue Dream. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Deadbolt w/Club Sandwich & Devil Springs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 9 p.m. $10-$12.

Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Thursday, October 14

[ Classical ] Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] David Rovics, Ryan Harvey. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel. 7 p.m. $10. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free.

DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ ET & DJ Proof. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Provide & Friends. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 2929940. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. DJs Moreno & Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10 p.m. Free. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 11 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $2-$8.

Jazz Dawgs. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free. Katie Ernst Duo. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 461-5010. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara Trio. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

[ Jazz ] Dave Rivello Ensemble. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St, E Rochester. 586-1640. 8 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Thursday, October 14

Rochester Idol Karaoke. Landing Bar & Grille, 30 Main St, Fairport. 425-7490. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Mike Allen AKOS’ Avatars. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. Trio East. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315986-1936. 4 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free.

JAZZ | Filó Machado/Deanna Witkowski Duo

Deanna Witkowski is a superb New York City pianist who spent much of her youth in Rochester. She is also a wonderful singer, fluent in Portuguese. The winner of the 2002 Great American Jazz Piano Competition, Witkowski has been a guest on Marian McPartland’s “Piano Jazz” and played concerts throughout the United States and Brazil. That’s where she met Filó Machado, who is among the greatest performers (he’s a guitarist, composer, and vocalist) based in São Paulo. When they come together as a duo for one night at Tapas 177, you can expect to hear the finest Brazilian jazz of the season. Filó Machado/Deanna Witkowski Duo performs Friday, October 15, 6 p.m. at Tapas 177, 177 St Paul St. Free. 262-2090. — BY RON NETSKY Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.

16 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 454-7140. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Dave McGrath. TC Hooligans-Greece, Greece Ridge Ctr. 225-7180. 6 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Frankie & Jewels. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 7:30 p.m. Free. House on a Spring. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free.

Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free. Mae w/Terrible Things and Windsor Drive. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 546-3887, waterstreetmusic. com. 6:30 p.m. $13-$15. Seth Faergolzia. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free. TV Buddhas, Jellyroot. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7.

Roger Eckers/Fred Costello Duo. Luna Piena Bistro, 546 Merchants Rd. 288-0067. 9 p.m. Free. Sore Thumb Radio Live Broadcast w/Jeff Cosco. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 10 a.m. Free. The Bill Murray Experience, Summer Cult. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. Tony Montana. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8 p.m. Free.

Friday, October 15

[ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free. Mysterious Blues Band. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 8 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] “Who Killed James Joyce?” w/Sean Tyrrell. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. 586-9947. 7:30 p.m. $10. Basil Hall 135. Jeff Elliott. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Les Sampou. Cafe Veritas, 220 Winton Rd S. 309-2196. 8 p.m. $7-$15. Mark Fantasia. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Cosco & Sergei Antonoff. Eddie O’Briens Grille and Bar, 182 S Main Street, Canandaigua, Canandaigua. 8810. 8:30 p.m. Call for tix. Mrs Skannotto CD Release Party w/The Couchtesters, The Steakouts, Free For All, New Ways. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12.

[ Classical ] Baritone Derrick Smith: Hymns & Spirituals. First Presbyterian Church of Pittsford, 25 Church St. 586-5688. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. Community Organ Recital Series. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave, Penfield. 3817861. 7 p.m. Free. Crisol Latino: Oboe Memorabilia. Nazareth CollegeWilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jewel Hara. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free.


John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Spaghetti Opera XI. Inn on the Lake, 770 S Main St, Canandaigua. 394-5986. 6:30 p.m. $30. The Gift of Music: The Rhythm of Life. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. $10. [ Country ] 40 Rod Lightning. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. 8 p.m. Free. Blue Sky. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Mike Snow. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Annalyze. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free.

DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Jon Herbert w/DJ NickL & Marshall Vickers. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 2622090. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix. DJs Freddy Colon & Bobby Bass. KC Tea & Noodles, 363 S Goodman. 271-1420. 10 p.m. Free. DJs Peter Pizzutelli, Ease, Papi Chulo. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5. The Almighty NYAC DJ Crew. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Top 40 DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bill Dobbins Quartet. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 4541880. 8:30 p.m. Free. Bobby Dibaudo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Deanna Witkowski. Roberts Wesleyan College-Auditorium, 2301 Westside Dr, Chili. 5946000. 11a.m. Free. Deanna Witkowski and Filó Machado. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Madeline Forster. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 8:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara Band. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 9 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 8 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey & El Rojo Jazz Band. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi & Shared Genes. The Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave. 271-6650. 7 p.m. Free. The Westview Project. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 2326090. 6:30 p.m. Free. ZYDECO | Lil Pookie & the Zydeco Sensations

In many ways zydeco music is all about tradition. The skills and nuances and culture of zydeco are passed down through the generations orally and intimately, and it’s not uncommon for whole families to play the music. Such is the case with Jimmy “Lil Pookie” Seraile, whose grandfather and uncle are both zydeco greats. A native of zydeco hotspot Opelousas, Louisiana, Seraile grew up steeped in the sound of the swamps, so it was natural for him to take a shine to zydeco and make it his profession. But his concert this Saturday at the Harmony House will be a continuance of tradition in another way — Lil Pookie was the very first artist to play at the venue as part of the Rochester Cajun Zydeco Network’s concert series way back in January 2003. Lil Pookie & the Zydeco Sensations perform Saturday, October 16, 8 p.m. at the Harmony House, 58 E Main St, Webster. $12-$15. 727-4119. — BY RYAN WHIRTY

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Flaherty’s, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Karaoke King. Jeremiah’s Tavern, 1104 Monroe Ave. 461-1313. 11 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Open Jam w/Ryan Barclay Trio. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. 8:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Main Gallery, 108 W Miller St, Newark. 315597-5277. 7 p.m. Free. Songwriters Open Mic. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. 242-7840. 9-11 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 3 Peace, Fire Red. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 3524505. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Contraband. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 10 p.m. $5-$7. Eddie Nebula’s Awesome Sound CD Release w/Man vs Moon. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Hallelujah the Hills w/Kaylin Cervini. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Hi-Risers. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Friday, October 15 Inside Out. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Free. Mitty & The Followers. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m. Free. Now From Then. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Pietzsche Nietzsche. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $5. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free. Smokehouse. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Free. Smooth Talkers, Double EEs. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. The Meta Accord. Boulder Coffee Co, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Third Degree. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. Time Bandits. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8:30 p.m. Call for tix. Who Are You (Who Tribute), The Sound Remains The Same (Led Zeppelin Tribute). German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Youngbloods, Endyga, 31Goings Voices Of Descent, Yesterdays Heroes, Transcend The Skies, Before The Foundation. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 5:30 p.m. $10-$12. [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Saturday, October 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Lil’ Pookie and Zydeco Sensation. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. 727-4119. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Paul Strowe. Don’s Original Pub, 2055 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. 377-1040. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Paulsen Baker & Garvey. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 S Main St, Naples 14512. 374-6318. 7 p.m. $5-$15. Russell Fielder & Jim Rhody Duet. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 2161290. 7:30 p.m. Free. Songwriters in the Round. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 4750249. 8 p.m. $8. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free. Double Take. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione & the New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000. 8:30 p.m. Free. 18 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 355 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 7 p.m. Free. Steve Greene Trio. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Westview Project w/Doug Stone, sax. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7 p.m. Free.

INDIE ROCK | CASIOTONE FOR THE PAINFULLY ALONE Long before bands were adding a token keyboard player to revamp their take on pop songs, Owen Ashworth was quitting film school and gathering up old electronics back in 1997. Through his Casio Ashworth delivers slice-of-life stories about the 20somethings of his time, who were all hopped up on antidepressants and swimming in endless seas of disappointments. Ashworth was able to craft a lo-fi sound all on his own full of blips and bleeps, melancholy keyboard fingerings, and a heavy dose of fuzzy lyrical content too honest to ignore. While not retiring from music completely, Ashworth has decided to retire the Casiotone For The Painfully Alone moniker after this last tour. Let’s hope he maintains the heart and soul of his original work as he moves on. Casiotone For The Painfully Alone plays Saturday, October 16, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Mantlers and Auld Lang Syne share the bill. $6-$10. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY EMILY FAITH Teagan & the Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Community Organ Recital. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 325-4000. 7 p.m. Free. Eastman School Symphony Orchestra and Eastman Philharmonia. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8:30 p.m. Free. Great Lakes Guitar Society Concert. Reformation Lutheran Church, 111 N Chestnut St. greatlakesguitarsociety.org. 7 p.m. Free. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Ron Carter Quartet. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 2:30 p.m. $10-$20. [ Country ] Aces & Eights. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 8 p.m. Free. Double Cross. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9 p.m. Call for tix. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free.

DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Ease. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Howard & Mega Mix. Island Fresh Cuisine, 382 Jefferson Rd. 424-2150. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. R&B DJs. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. Shotgun Music. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Free. Top 40 DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bob Sneider Quartet. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 4541880. 8:30 p.m. Free. East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free. Hard Logic. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Broadway Karaoke w/Laura Marron. Park Avenue Pub, 650 Park Ave. 461-4140. 10:15 p.m. Free. Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 3520200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mickey Flynn’s, 196 Winton Rd. 288-7070. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/The Tin Man. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 137, Bleed the Messiah. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Brick City Limits. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 7 p.m. Call for tix. Casiotone for the Painfully Alone, Mantler, Auld Land Syne. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Catch 22. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 8722910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Ezra & the Storm. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Flying Sideburns. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m. Free. High On Fire w/Torche, Kylesa. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 7 p.m. $15-$18. Revision, Mosaic Foundation. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Rock With the Red: Surge. Clarendon Fire Hall, 638-5118. 9 p.m. $10. Sinzibukwood. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Stronghold, Chris Moore. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 8 p.m. Call for tix. This Other Life. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Free.


Wayward Son. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9 p.m. Free. Wilkes Booth w/Bangers Ball. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8:30 p.m. Call for tix.

Sunday, October 17 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 4 p.m. Call for tix. Fort Hill String Band. All Things Art, 65 S Main St., Canandaigua. 396-0087. 5-7 p.m. $2. Irish Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.

Irish Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 9 p.m. Free. Latin Night. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. PJ Elliott. Bay Street Hotel, Bay St, Sodus Point. 315-4832233. 9 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] A Brass and Organ Prism Concert. St Mary’s Church , 15 St Mary’s Pl. 377-6770, chambermusicrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. $30. Celebrating Five Years of the Italian Baroque Organ: Eastman Organists. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 5:30 p.m. $7-$10.

Eastman-Ranlet Series: Ying Quartet. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 3 p.m. $10-$20. Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. Mostly 19th Century. Nazareth College-Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. Music with Friends. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. 2 p.m. $10.

Pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski Celebrated through Music and Words. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 3 p.m. Free w/admission. Tina Signorelli/flute. 111 N Chestnut, 111 N Chestnut. 454-0367. 4 p.m. $10-$15. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Rainbow Skye. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. Noon. Free. DJ Selecta Preece. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free.

Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B HipHop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] Ben Thomas. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 3814000. 11:30 a.m. Free. Jazz Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Sunday, October 17

Tuesday, October 19

[ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free. Open Country Jam w/Randy. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 2-6 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free. Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 216-1070. 6 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Fritz’s Polka Band. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Big Brother & the Holding Company. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 8 p.m. $30-$40. Nicole Christian CD Release w/Alfie Smith, Baby Shark, Kirk Stevens. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Stand. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free.

Monday, October 18 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Amanda Ashley. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9 p.m. Free. John Akers. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Sore Thumb Radio Live Broadcast w/Jeff Cosco. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Gap Mangione & the New Blues Band. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Free. Silvertones Flute Choir. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720. 7 p.m. Free. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Crescent City Connection. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 4750249. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Lumiere. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mikolaj Trzaska, Steve Swell Duo. Bop Shop, 274 N Goodman St. 271-3354. 8 p.m. $15. Sarah Spencer’s TransAtlantic Band. Green Lantern Inn, 1 E Church St, Fairport. flowercityjazz.org. 6:30 p.m. $12. [ Pop/Rock ] Mad Happy, Cu-Cu, Mosart212, Lamodamixtapes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Pro-Am Open Jam. German House-Keg, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 9:30 p.m. Free.

20 City OCTOBER 13-19, 2010

[ Classical ] Eastman Brass Cavalcade. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. Free. Mostly 19th Century. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bobby Militello Quartet w/Gap Mangione. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 7:30 p.m. $18. Simon Fletcher. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Hotel Noize. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 6-9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Mo’s Mulberry St, 191 Lee Rd. 647-3522. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Too Tall. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Beau. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Amanda Ashley. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Infa Red Radiation Orchestra. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. The Pack AD. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

Wednesday, October 20 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 7:30 p.m. Free. PJ Elliott. Miceli’s, 1011 Rt 31, Macedon. 986-2954. 7-10 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Hadden Sayers Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6 p.m. Free.

[ Classical ] Composers Forum. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 7 p.m. Free. Live From Hochstein. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Dave Savine. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Eastman Jazz Ensemble and New Jazz Ensemble. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Jammin’. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 613-4600. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Agent Orange w/Poison Control Center, Gunnar Stahl, Insubordinates, Baby Shark. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 9 p.m. $8-$10. Entertainment Or Death Tour: Black Veil Brides, William Control, Motionless In White. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $13-$15. Jumbo Shrimp. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 6 p.m. Free.


Classical “Ayano’s name came up again, and this time we heard that she was available, so we sent her an e-mail right away,” David says. Two weeks went by and David said they started to get nervous. Shortly thereafter Ninomiya did respond, saying she’d be delighted to meet with the siblings as soon as she got back from Europe, where she was performing. From David’s perspective, Ninomiya was right from the first notes she played with the group. “Sometimes you can just know when you hear a few notes or a phrase from a musician...” he says. It was also obvious to Ninomiya that the group would be a good fit from her perspective. “You have a period where you are reading and playing together and mock rehearsing,” she says. “It was a time for discussing general musical goals and values, and seeing how you get along as people. All of it felt really good.” For the Yings, the transition to Ninomiya as a

The newest incarnation of the Ying Quartet, featuring new violinist Ayano Ninomiya, will make its local debut this weekend at Kilbourn Hall. PHOTO PROVIDED

Key changes for the Ying Quartet The Ying Quartet Sunday, October 17 Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. | $10-$20 | 454-2100, esm.rochester.edu [ PROFILE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

The Ying Quartet is the quartet in residence at the Eastman School of Music. The string ensemble won a Grammy in 2005 for classical crossover album and has received two other Grammy nominations. It has performed all over the world, from Carnegie Hall in New York City to the Sydney Opera House in Australia, and even the White House. It is the ensemble in residence at the Aspen Music Festival, and the group’s festival appearances have included Skaneateles and Tanglewood. The Ying Quartet has made beautiful music since 1992. The chamber-music group was originally composed of four siblings — violist Phillip Ying, cellist David Ying, and violinists Janet and Timothy Ying. In 2009 one of the brothers, Timothy, left the group and a new non-sibling member, Frank Huang, joined to fill the empty violin spot. Huang left earlier this year to join the Houston Symphony, and recently a new member has been added, violinist Ayano

Ninomiya. And with that new, fourth member, everything has changed for the Yings. “Ayano’s presence changes more than 25 percent of the quartet,” says Phillip Ying. “It changes 100 percent of the quartet.” Phillip recently spoke to City Newspaper from Tennessee, where the quartet was giving its first performances with its newest addition. The quartet will give its first Rochester recital this weekend, with a program that includes the Barber String Quartet, Op. 11, Anton Arensky’s String Quartet No. 1 in G Major, Op. 11, and Mendelssohn’s String Quartet in f minor, Op. 80. Phillip went on to explain how changing one quartet member can change the entire group. “It causes you to hear your own sounds through Ayano’s ears, and to rethink everything you’re doing. And that’s very refreshing,” he says. “You get a fresh surge of creative challenge.” Janet agreed. “When someone new joins, you want to be able to rethink things and be able to approach the same music with as much newness as you can.” Ninomiya joins the Yings as a top prizewinner

in the 2006 Tibor Varga Competition and the 2003 Naumburg International Violin Competition. She made her debut with the Boston Pops in 1999 and has performed all

over the globe, from Japan to Bulgaria, New York to Boston to Chicago. She was awarded her undergraduate degrees in music and French from Harvard College and received her master’s degree in music from the Juilliard School. In their separate interviews, Phillip, Janet, and David Ying were unanimous in the opinion that even if you’ve heard the Ying Quartet before, you will hear a new sound when the group performs on Sunday. “Even for the pieces we’ve played before, for example the Barber string quartet, the way Ayano views it is so different than the way we’ve done it in the past,” David says. “It’s even making a difference in how I hear Phil or Janet when we’re playing with Ayano.” Ninomiya came to the Ying Quartet later than the siblings had hoped. In 2009, when Timothy Ying announced he was leaving the quartet to pursue other interests, Phillip, Janet, and David began an extensive search process. “We asked as many people whose opinion we trusted for a recommendation, and Ayano’s name came up over and over,” David says. At that time, however, Ninomiya was already engaged with another quartet. So in April 2009, the Yings chose Huang to join the ensemble. After Huang left the quartet roughly a year later, Phillip, Janet, and David found themselves again searching for a violinist.

group member is a transition greater than a key change. At a fairly early stage, the Ying children were drawn to strings. Growing up in Illinois all four original members of the quartet played violin and cello. As they got more interested in chamber music, Phillip changed instruments to viola to complete the quartet. The children attended summer music camps and three of the four went directly on to study music at college. Phillip spent two years at Harvard studying economics before taking a sabbatical to Eastman School of Music for a year, and then officially switching colleges to study music. Once all four of them were at Eastman, the Yings started to collaborate and to think about a future in music. They won the Cleveland Quartet Competition in 1989 while they were students. As they were graduating from the Eastman School of Music, they won a grant to support chamber music in rural America from the National Endowment for the Arts and packed for Jessup, Iowa, where they gave their first public performance in 1992. They won the Naumburg Chamber Music Award in 1993. National newspapers and television started to cover “the Ying Family Quartet,” and the rest, as they say, was history. So how can this quartet stay together long into the future? The unanimous answer from the members was “flexibility.” As Ninomiya put it, “If you’re flexible, you’re able to try any new ideas that anybody in the group might have. You reach outside yourself.” “Any time you are trying to put people into a cohesive unit, you still have individuality of expression,” David says. “Getting that balance — using flexibility of thinking and hearing — is essential to having a great quartet.” rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Theater

“Brief Interviews with Hideous Men.” Thu Oct 14-Oct 20. University of Rochester International Theatre Program. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester. Thu-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Oct 20 8 p.m. $7-$13. 275-4088, rochester.edu/theatre. “Broken Images.” Through Oct 17. Kalidas presents play by Girish Karnad. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. ThuSat 7 p.m., Sun 1:30 p.m. $15$20. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Carry It On.” Through Nov 14. Featuring Maureen McGovern. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Previews Wed Oct 13-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., opens Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed Oct 20 7:30 p.m. $22-$59. 232-GEVA, gevatheatre.org. “The Children’s Hour.” Fri Oct 15-Oct 24. Nazareth College Department of Theatre Arts. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$12. 389-2170, naz.edu. “Church Basement Ladies 2: A Second Helping.” Wed Oct 16-Oct 30. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, Route 38A, Auburn. Wed Oct 13-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Tue-Wed Oct 20 2 & 7:30 p.m. $34-$38. 800457-8897, merry-go-round.com. “Harvey.” Through Oct 16. Black Sheep Theatre Coalition. Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $15. 414-3927, blacksheeptheatre.org. “One Man Band.” Through Oct 24. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 4 p.m. $29-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Rose.” Through Oct 24. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $16-$24. 4612000 x235, jcccenterstage.org. “Superhero!” Sat Oct 16. BVT for Kids! Bristol Valley Theater, 151 S Main St, Naples. Sat 2 p.m. $5$10. 374-9032, bvtnaples.org. Traveling Cabaret. Sun Oct 17. St. John’s Lutheran Church, 800 E Ridge Rd. Sun 3 p.m. $10$20/includes dinner. 787-2714 (reservations required). “The Zoo Story”/”Miss Mary Dugan.” Wed Oct 13-Oct 17. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Wed Oct 13-Sun 8 p.m. $10-$20. 234-1254, muccc.org.

Auditions Black Sheep Theatre Coalition. Mon Oct 18-Tue Oct 19. Casting for roles in “Witness for the Prosecution.” Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Mon-Tue 7 p.m. 359-1232, blacksheeptheatre.org. Rochester Ideal Singing Competition. Sat Oct 16. Singing competition for teens 13-19. Check website for more details. Marketplace Mall, 1 Miracle Mile Dr. Sat 1-4 p.m. $20. rochesterideal.com.

Art Exhibits [ Openings ] “The Energy Will Always Reassert Itself” by Eric Lainson Wed oct 22 City october 13-19, 2010

ART EVENT | “Psychedelic” Opening Party

When I say “mind-expanding,” what do you think? I’m not thinking about controlled substances, but of the creation of artwork — although sometimes the two go hand in hand. The 1960’s were an explosive time for experimentation with both, and this month the Memorial Art Gallery will kick off a post-60’s look at this genre of work, with “Psychedelic: Optical and Visionary Art Since the 1960’s.” The show explores will showcase vividly hued figurative and abstract works by Frank Stella, Deborah Remington, Robert Williams, Fred Tomaselli, Victor Vasarely, and Ray Rapp. The show will be exhibited in the Grand Gallery of the MAG (500 University Ave) from Sunday, October 17, through January 2, with public programs throughout that time including lectures, tours, and music. An exhibition opening party (groovy attire encouraged) will take place Saturday, October 16, 7:30-11 p.m., with your chance to preview the show, enjoy music from the 60’s, a psychedelic light show, go-go dancers, vintage autos, a screening of the 1969 film “Woodstock,” tarot-card readings, henna tattoos, and more. Advance tickets are required, cost $15-25, and may be purchased by calling 276-8939 or visiting mag.rochester.edu or the gallery admission desk. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 13. WestSide Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport. 5-7 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. Closing reception. New works by Hannah Waterman, Miles George, Seth Binnix, and Mychelle Dore Thu Oct 14. FLCC Honors House Alumni Art Gallery, 4340 Lakeshore Dr. 7 p.m. 394-3500, flcc.edu. With music by the Moho Collective. Director’s Choice: Ed Murr Illustration Fri Oct 15. MCC Mercer Gallery, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Noon. 292-2021. Artist’s workshop. “Garden of Desire” by Paul Brandwein Fri Oct 15. Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery, 714 University Ave. 6-8 p.m. 4612808, gildedsquare.com. Halloween themed work by David Crothers Fri Oct 15. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. 6-8 p.m. 3940030, prrgallery.com. “(in)securities & exchange” by Heather F. Wetzel Fri Oct 15. Hartnett Gallery, University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. 4-6 p.m. 275-4188, blogs.rochester. edu/Hartnett. “The Light of Universe,” paintings by Shamira Nicolas Fri Oct 15. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery, 277 N Goodman St. 5-8 p.m. 473-4000, artsrochester.org. “Howe, Jacque, Merrit & Zakin: Clay Works.” Sat Oct 16. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Drive. 4-6 p.m. roberts.edu. “3 Visions: The Work of Marie Starr, Till Fritzsching, and Richard

Lacey.” Sat Oct 16. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St., Macedon. 4-8 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@ yahoo.com. “Psychedelic: Optical & Visionary Art Since the 1960s” Sat Oct 16. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 7:30-11 p.m. $25. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Live music and entertainment. Advanced Painting Opening Mon Oct 18. Sage Art Center, UR River Campus. 4 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/college/AAH/ facilities/sage “Uzi Buzgalo: Wealth of Hands, A Mixed Media Exhibition.” Wed Oct 20. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. 2-6 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. Artist’s talk followed by reception. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Through Oct 31: “Jennifer Apetz, Milford Apetz: Two Generations.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 770-1923, japetz@ rochester.rr.com. 1975 Gallery at Surface Salon, 658 South Ave. Through Nov 12: “Cinemonstrum! A Celebration of Movie Monster Mythology.” Tue-Thu 12-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1975ish.com A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Through Nov 1: “Art with Asian Influence” duo exhibit with Evelyn Kitson and Christina Laurel. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,


Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery 494 East Ave. Through Oct 29: “Moments with Joy,” watercolor and acrylic by Joyce D. Cordone. By appt. only. 2448890, aauwrochester.org. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Through Dec 31: “Fade to White” Photography/Video Installation by Michael Rivera | Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8-$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Through Oct 31: “Thru “HIS” Eyes,” by Photographer Ron Schumaker. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Oct 14Nov 5: “The Light of Universe,” paintings by Shamira Nicolas. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Through Jun 30, 2011: “Magnificent Africa.” WedFri 6-9 p.m., Sat 3-6 p.m. 5632145, thebaobab.org. Barnes and Noble Gallery 3349 Monroe Ave, Pittsford. Through Oct 30: Rochester Area Colored Pencil Club 5th Annual Fall Show & Sale Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 586-6020, barnesandnoble.com. Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Dec 14: “3 Visions: The Work of Marie Starr, Till Fritzsching, and Richard Lacey.” MonThu Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo.com. Canaltown Coffee Roasters 1805 East Ave. Through Oct 30: “Coffee, Tea & Me,” Watercolor Paintings by Kathy Lindsley. MonThu 6:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri-Sat 7 a.m.-midnight, Sun 8 a.m.-4 p.m. kjlcom@rit.edu. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 14: “Original Stain: New Alternative Imaging.” Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri closed; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sun 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Through Oct 24: “Found not Lost” Repurposed Accessories by Samantha Benett-Lepel. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Nov 6: “Howe, Jacque, Merrit & Zakin: Clay Works.” | In the Northeastern Seminary, Through Nov 15: “A Global Portrait: Ink Wash Drawings by Barbara Stout.” Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. roberts.edu. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Through Oct 23: “History in the Making V: Ceramic Traditions, Contemporary Pots” National Juried Ceramics Exhibtion. MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame 36 S. Main St. Through Oct 31: “Capturing the Magic of Canandaigua Lake with Art by Ruth Haas.” Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-

THEATER | Fall performances

No matter what your tastes, local theater companies have you covered this week. The JCC’s Centerstage (1200 Edgewood Ave) will continue weekend performances of “Rose” through October 24. The story follows the life of a courageous, joyful, and feisty 80-yearold woman from a tiny Russian village to her eventual occupation as innkeeper of a Miami Beach hotel. Tickets are $16-$24 and can be purchased at the JCC, by calling 461-2000 x235, or by visiting jcccenterstage.org. First produced in the early 1930s, themes in “The Children’s Hour” are sadly still applicable in modern times. The play explores how a selfish child’s accusation of homosexuality destroys the lives of two young school teachers. The Nazareth College Department of Theatre will stage the play at Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave) Friday, October 15, through October 24. Tickets cost $10-$12; call 389-2170 or visit naz.edu for more information. Late modern philosopher David Foster Wallace penned “Brief Interviews with Hideous Men” (pictured) in 1999 as a collection of short stories of dark humor, alienation, and sexuality, which became a national bestseller and was made into a film a few years back. Twelve of the “interviews” were adapted into a play, which you can see performed by the University of Rochester’s International Theatre Program in the Todd Theatre on the UR’s River Campus. The show opens Thursday, October 14, and runs through October 23. Tickets cost $7-$13 and may be purchased online at rochester.edu/theatre or by calling 275-4088. Edward Albee’s “The Zoo Story” is paired with Manuel Igrejas’ “Miss Mary Dugan” for five performances at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave), Wednesday, October 13, through Sunday, October 17. The former play describes an unlikely interaction of opposites and a gradual shift during on a sunny day in Central Park, the latter focuses on the fabulous parties but lonely life of Mary Dugan, who has a crush on his handsome, mysterious neighbor, and must choose between the fantasy and the reality of a relationship. For tickets and more information, call 2341254, or visit muccc.org. Wednesday’s performance is “pay what you can,” after that tickets cost $15 prepaid or $18-$20 at the door. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 5 p.m.; Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 396-7210. FLCC Honors House Alumni Art Gallery 4340 Lakeshore Dr. Opens Oct 14: New works by Hannah Waterman, Miles George, Seth Binnix, and Mychelle Dore. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 394-3500, flcc.edu. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Through Feb 28, 2011: “Famous Faces,” by Jay Lincoln, Jennifer Cichello, Mr. PRVRT, and Rebecca Rafferty. Presented by Method Machine. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-

8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Flying Squirrel Community Space 285 Clarissa St. Through Oct 22: “Flying Carpets” by Sue Schickler. Mon-Wed 5-7 p.m. 473-1159, forty9her@aol.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Oct 30: “Recent Works” Paintings by Hope Zaccagni. Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Theater

Art Exhibits

James Lecesne returns to Downstairs Cabaret for his tour-de-force performance of “One Man Band.” PHOTO PROVIDED

Watch acting happen “One Man Band” Through October 24 Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. $29-$36 | 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com

around once; that split second is all it takes for his face, voice, and walk to change. Watch especially for the new ways his hands gesture and his eyes speak. Amidst the laughter, you get to watch acting happen. He also receives strong support from back-up vocalists Donna Accorso and Sheri Gross, and musical director Ann Marie Sanders.

[ REVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

Artie’s journey — there’s a second cliché to add

Homeless and aging, suspicious yet determined, Artie trudges onstage to wave a worn photo of Adele in the face of each passerby and ask demandingly, “Have you seen my wife?” When no one gives him a straight, let alone a polite, answer, he turns to the audience to tell the story of his obsessive hunt that began when Adele, who loved to dance, fled her stodgy husband and his grumpy disapproval of something as benign as wearing lipstick. It is, he says, the “after part of happily ever.” Through the people he meets, Artie eventually learns, as they say, to move on with his life. It sounds banal enough to justify the cliché in the previous sentence, but the effect of “One Man Band” is anything but tiresome. For that, you have to thank — and admire — shape-shifting James Lecesne who plays all six characters in this non-stop 90minute musical now at Downstairs Cabaret Theatre. He is always onstage as he darts from character to character, usually by spinning 24 City october 13-19, 2010

to the list — takes him on the road from his farm to Atlantic City with several unplanned stops along the way. The most interesting characters he meets are the tough survivor Mary Kaye, who hocks her watch to get wherever she’s going; elderly Madame Butarde, who still regrets the loss of her single lover long ago; and shrewd Pops Noonan, who lives in an insane asylum and teaches Artie the difference between two kinds of crazy. Nothing is more engaging than watching Lecesne as both Pops and Artie perform a vaudeville duet by himself. Let it be duly noted that the estimable Lecesne also wrote the book for this small yet ambitious tour de force. Marc Elliot and Larry Hochman collaborated on the 10 songs, none especially memorable, but taken together, a soothing example of contemporary pop made to fit the needs of a variety of characters. “Moonlight,” sung by Artie and reprised by Adele (or is it Adele look-alike Mary Kaye?), is the most melodic and affecting.

The play’s sporadic, fragmented narrative is

effective even though too many punch lines are dated or not funny enough. Similarly, too many of the songs sound interchangeable. Burdened with grating half rhymes or lines that are mere filler, they specialize in Oprahstyle bucking up, especially in the secondrate title number that ends the show. Much more importantly, though, Lecesne the writer and especially Lecesne the performer have drawn the characters sympathetically but with a sharp ironic eye. Regardless of which one he portrays, he is an actor of such magnetism and effervescence that he soon lifts you to a level of delight well beyond the play’s imperfections. At this point, I begin to wonder why you’re sitting there reading this rather than running off to see Lecesne help celebrate DCT’s 20th anniversary. After it had run for well over a decade on St. Paul Street, the theater went broke despite its having mounted a production of “Nunsense,” the longest-running show in Rochester history, and remained dark for three years. Since it reopened, says artistic director Christopher F. Kowalsky, it has mounted 260 productions. The opening show two decades ago starred James Lecesne in “One Man Band.” He has lost none of his pizzazz during the ensuing years. He may be less than a household name, but when you watch him work, mastery does not seem too strong a word to use.

Gallery r @ the Hungerford Building, Suite 258, 1115 E. Main St. Through Oct 16: “PORCH” An Exhibition in Conjunction with the Black Mountain North Symposium. By appointment. 908-433-0052, galleryr.org. Genesee Community College Lobby Arts Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Nov 2: Melissa Mance-Coniglio and Jeanne Nutting. Normal college hours. 343-0055 x 6814, genesee.edu. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Oct 17: “Colorama.” | Through Oct 31: “A Life Reviewed: George Eastman through the Viewfinder.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Oct 15-Nov 12: “Garden of Desire” by Paul Brandwein. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Oct 15-Nov 14: “(in)securities & exchange” by Heather F. Wetzel. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs. rochester.edu/Hartnett. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Nov 31: “Inspiration and Transformation,” photography by Betsy Phillips, Richard Harvey, and JFK/AJVK. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Oct 31: “Girl with Green Eyes” by Marsha Hammel. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Java Junction Coffee House 55 Main St., Brockport. Through Oct 30: “El Espiritu de Chiapas” An Interpretation of the Spirit of Chiapas, photographs by Deborah Benedetto and Deb Smith. SunWed 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Thu 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri-Sat 7 a.m.-8 p.m. 6379330, javajunctioncafe.com Joy Gallery 551 Genesee St. Through Oct 30: “Hard Work!” The artwork of Bradley Butler and Rick Minard. Noon-4 p.m. 4365230, joygallery.org. Legacy-Willow Pond 40 Willow Pond Way. Through Oct 22: Penfield Art Association’s Autumn Show. Daily 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 385-1269 Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Oct 15: “Orgullo Latino: Celebrating Our history and Heritage.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920, cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Oct 15: “A Cautionary Tale” Art by Tony Indorato. | Oct 16-Nov 12: Claire Mann. Sun 5-8 p.m.; Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 258-0403, thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Oct 17-Jan 2: “Psychedelic: Optical & Visionary Art Since the 1960s.” | Through Dec 12: “Episodes from an Unwritten History: Claude Bragdon and Fritz Trautmann” in Lockhart Gallery. | Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4$10. Thu night reduced price: $6


from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Nov 27: “September Art Crescendo 2010” Gallery Members Exhibition. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free624-7740, millartcenter.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Nov 28: Director’s Choice: Ed Murr Illustration | Through December: “Tribute to Hip Hop” Mural by Carmello (Melo) Ortiz.| Sibley Window Project (East Ave.) Torell Arnold “Bee-cause Art Means the World to Me.” Mon, Wed, Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tue, Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 292-2021. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Oct 23: Artwork by Bull, Burandt, Johns, Lindsay, Wager, and rare prints of Rochester waterways from the collection of John M. Topham. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2921430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 17: “Concurrence,” artwork by Mitch Messina and Karen Sardisco. Tue-Thu 1-4 p.m., FriSat 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Casa Italiana LeChase Lounge 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 12: “Forma” by Teri Giuliano. Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 389-2469, casa@naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Nov 19: “Nancy Rourke: Expressionist Paintings” and “Uzi Buzgalo: Wealth of Hands, A Mixed Media Exhibition.” Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat 1-3:30 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit. edu/dyerarts. Ock Hee’s Gallery 2 Lehigh St. Through Nov 6: “Cornucopia” by Alan Singer. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@ frontiernet.net. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Oct 16: “Waterway West: A Salute to the Erie Canal.” Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Oct 15-Nov 5: Halloween themed work by David Crothers. Mon-Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Oct 31: The Art Work of Nancy Topolski. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@recordarchive.com. Renaissance Art Gallery 74 St. Paul St. Through Oct 30: “Art: A Journey of the Mind” by Alida Meyer. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery. com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Nov 14: “Geometries” Recent Works by Christopher McNulty and Andy Gilmore. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Through Nov 30: “Slow & Steady,” photographs by Christin Boggs.

COMEDY | Craig Ferguson

Like many Americans, I first spied Scottish-American comedian, actor, and writer Craig Ferguson in his role as the strangely endearing, self-adoring jerk of a boss on “The Drew Carey Show.” Since 2005 he’s been the host of CBS’s “Late Late Show,” reporting on world news and pop culture with his blend of sarcasm and zaniness, tempting us to push bedtime back even further. Really, can they just give him Letterman’s slot already? You can catch Ferguson in a live performance during RIT’s Brick City Homecoming Weekend at the Gordon Field House (1 Lomb Memorial Dr.) on Friday, October 15, at 9 p.m. Tickets cost $45 for the general public, $30 for RIT faculty, staff, and alumni, $15 for RIT students, and can be purchased at the Gordon Field House, by calling 475-2509, or emailing cab@rit.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Robbins Gallery University of Rochester River Campus, Library Rd. Through Oct 15: “Tennyson’s Arthurian Poems in Art and Culture.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 275-0110, www.rochester.edu Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Oct 16: “Claude Bragdon & the Beautiful Necessity.” Call for hours 475-6766. SUNY Geneseo Lederer Gallery 1 College Circle, Brodie Hall. Oct 18-Dec 4: “El Sauce/Nicaragua.” Mon-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., FriSat 12:30-5:30 p.m. 243-6785. SUNY Geneseo Lockhart Gallery McClellan House, 26 Main St., Geneseo. Through Oct 16: A Retrospective of the Art of Gordon Miller. Mon-Thu:12:30-3:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. Closed for fall break Oct 8-12. geneseo.edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Oct 24: “ImageArt/Wish You Were Queer.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun noon-5 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. Call for appointment: 944-9220. WestSide Gallery SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport. Through Oct 13: “The Energy Will Always Reassert Itself” by Eric Lainson. Mon-Fri 5-7 p.m. 395ARTS, brockport.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua. Through Nov 19: “Mostly Bowls,” Ceramics by David MacDonald. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 3943500 x7369, gallery34@flcc.edu.

Art Events [ Wednesday, October 13Thursday, October 14 ] 18th Annual Adventures in Education. Rochester School for

the Deaf, 1545 St. Paul St. 5441240, Adventures@RSDeaf.org, 5-9 p.m. $20-250. “Freedom to Roam: A Photographer’s Quest to Protect America’s Wildlife.” [ Thursday, October 14 ] Chili Art Group Meeting. Chili Senior Center, 3235 Chili Ave. chiliartgroup@yahoo.com. 7 p.m. Free. Penfield Art Association 2010 Legacy Show Demo. LegacyWillow Pond, 40 Willow Pond Way, Penfield. ldelaney@ rochester.rr.com. 2-4 p.m. Free. [ Friday, October 15 ] Artist Luise Kaish at Friday Evening Service. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 244-7060, tbk.org. 6 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, October 16 ] “Psychedelic” Exhibition Party. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8939, mag. rochester.edu. 7:30-11 p.m. $25, advance tickets required. Into the Blue: The Art of the Cyanotype Workshop. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $100-110, registration required. Just a Sheet Artist Book 2-Day Workshop. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-9312, geneseearts.org. 1-4 p.m. $7585, registration required. Papermaking for Printers, Painters, & Photographers Workshop. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-9312, geneseearts.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $75-85, registration required. [ Saturday, October 16Sunday, October 17 ] Junior League of Rochester’s Holiday Market. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Art Events

Festivals

jlroch.org. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5, ages 12 and under free.

[ Saturday, October 16 ] Penfield Heritage Festival. Penfield’s Rothfuss Park, 1648 Five Mile Line Rd. penfield2010.org. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. Sierra Club Fall Family Festival. Tay House Lodge, Cobbs Hill Park, Hillside Ave. Peter Debes, 820-2018, phdebes@ frontiernet.net. 4-7 p.m. $10, $25 max for family.

[ Monday, October 18 ] Art-palooza: Drive By Press Printing Demo & Lecture. University of Rochester-Sage Art Center, 835 Wilson Blvd. stephanie.ashenfelder@ rochester.edu. Noon printing demo, 8 p.m. lecture. Free.

Comedy [ Thursday, October 14 ] Lo Brau Comedie presents “Guilty” hosted by Chris Collins. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 7:30-10 p.m. $5. [ Friday, October 15 ] Craig Ferguson. Rochester Institute of Technology-Gordon Field House, 149 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-7814, bch@rit. edu. 9 p.m. $15-45. Noche de Comedia / Night of Comedy. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. prfestival. com, president@prfestival.com. 8 p.m. $10-$15. [ Friday, October 15Saturday, October 16 ] 3rd Annual Rochester Improv Fringe Festival. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. 797-9086, improvvip.com/riff. html. Multiple times. $18.50 day pass, $32 weekend pass, $49 full pass. Multiple shows of improv comedy troupes and workshops. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Unleashed! Improv’s Elliot L. Spitzer Middle School Open House. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. unleashedimprov.com. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8.

Dance Events [ Wednesday, October 13 ] So You Think You Can Dance. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $36.50+. [ Friday, October 15 ] Family Dance Jamboree. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. annehw@rochester.rr.com. 7:30-9 p.m. $5-15. [ Saturday, October 16 ] National Dance Company of Ireland: Rhythm of the Dance. Roberts Wesleyan CollegeAuditorium, 2301 Westside Dr, Chili. 594-6408, roberts.edu/ clc. 7:30 p.m. $15-34.

Dance Participation [ Saturday, October 16 ] “Making Connections: Dance and Tai Chi.” Spurrier Dance Studio, University of Rochester, River Campus. 273-5150, rochester.edu/college/dance. 10-11 a.m. Free. Dance Lovers October Masquerade Ball. Inikori Dance Studio, 1100 University Ave. 746-3290, 325-3873. 7-11 p.m. $10-13. Ballroom dancing featuring a mix of foxtrot, waltz, Latin, and swing. 26 City october 13-19, 2010

[ Saturday, October 16Sunday, October 17 ] Holiday Market. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd. jlroch.org, juniorleagueholidaymarket@ gmail.com, 385-8590. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5. [ Sunday, October 17 ] Locafest Apple Fair. Rochester Folk Art Guild, 1445 Upper Hill Rd, Middlesex. 554-3945, livingsustainably.org. 1-5 p.m. Free.

Kids Events [ Friday, October 15 ] Junior Chefs: Freaky Friday. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 6-8 p.m. $15, registration required. Little Monster Bash. Eastside Family YMCA, 1835 Fairport Nine-Mile Pt. Rd. 341-4024, seana@rochesterymca.org, rochesterymca.org/eastside. 6-9 p.m. $5 individual/$10 per family of 5. Haunted house, hayrides, activity center, costume contest, food for purchase. All ages. [ Friday, October 15Saturday, October 16 ] Halloween Spooktacular. Bay View Family YMCA, 1209 Bay Rd., Webster. 341-3208, loriannf@ rochesterymca.org. 6-9 p.m. $5 individual/$10 per family of 5. Games, raffles, crafts, hayrides, monster house, music, costume contest, more. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Celebrate National Chemistry Week. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Included with museum admission: $10-12. Cool Kids: Wild Wings Birds of Prey. Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd, Batavia. 637-3984, generationcool.biz. 10 a.m. Free. Fall Fun Fest. Never Say Never Stables, 904-906 Maple Dr., Webster. 787-9835, nsnstables. org. 2-6 p.m. Free admission, donations appreciated for activiti. Pony rides, petting zoo, games, food, crafts, music, more. Make a Scarecrow. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc. org. 1-3 p.m. $3, reservations appreciated. Bring clothes and a pillowcase. Pumpkin Patch Cupcakes. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. booksense.com. 11 a.m. $10. Ages 6-12. Saturday at the Movies: “Tinker Bell & the Great Fairy Rescue.” Brighton Memorial Library,

2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 11 a.m. Free. Snacks are welcome. Superhero! Bristol Valley Theater, 151 S Main St, Naples, NY 14512. 374-9032, bvtnaples.org. 2 p.m. $5-10. BVT for Kids! Zoo Boo. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Blvd. 336-7213, senecaparkzoo.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $6-9. Trick-or-treat, maze, entertainment, and animals. [ Saturday, October 16Sunday, October 17 ] Trains Weekend. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. Sat 10 a.m.4 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. $9-11. Activities displays, and crafts. [ Sunday, October 17 ] Fall Family Funfest. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. 1:30-4 p.m. Free. Zumba, yoga, roller skating, Garth Fagan demo, arts & crafts, storytelling, pool games, more. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Drum ‘n’ Fun for Young Children. Rhythm Connect, 84 High St., Fairport. pgingras@u.rochester. edu. 6:30-7:15 p.m. Free.

Lectures [ Wednesday, October 13 ] Book Scouting Tips, Trips, and Resources. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. Bibliopphile Society 244-2505, oldscrolls.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Genesee Valley Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club Meeting. Eisenhart Auditorium, Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 987-1717, gvc-adk.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Hunbatz Men. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. donna.demay@yahoo.com, n_timmons@yahoo.com. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Joint Pain Seminar. Highland Hospital, 1000 South Ave., 2nd floor Collins Auditorium. 7842966, joint.urmc.edu. 6-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Keuka College Accelerated Studies for Adults Information Session. Monroe Community College, Damon Campus, Room 5057. 1-866-255-3852, kmorgan@ keuka.edu, academics.keuka. edu/asap/locations/mcc-damon. 6-7 p.m. Free. Presentation by Nancy Lynch, author of “Vietnam Mailbag, Voices from the War 1968-1972”. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, wood@ owwl.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Slide Presentation by Don Fox: “Face to Face: Images from a Different War.” Rochester Contemporary, 137 East Ave. 4612222, rochestercontemporary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. $1. [ Thursday, October 14 ] “How to Fund Your Child’s College Education” with Paul Craig of Alliance Advisory Group. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Informational Session: Foster Parenting. Brighton Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. 334-


9096, monroefostercare.org. 7-8 p.m. Free. Ages 21+. Learn What a Midwife Can Do For You. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Presentation by Nancy Lynch, author of “Vietnam Mailbag, Voices from the War 1968-1972”. Geneva Public Library, 224 Main St., Geneva. 315-781-2935. 6:30-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Respecting Life in Word and Deed. St. Joseph’s Church, 6105 Rush-LIma Rd, Rush. 334-6412, sstack@dor.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. The Neurobiology of Sexual Orientation: The Gay Brain Lecture. Lander Auditorium, Hutchinson Hall, University of Rochester River Campus. rochester.edu. 5-7 p.m. Free. Women in Insurance and Financial Services: Achieving Work-Life Balance. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Rd., Pittsford. wifsrochester.org. 7:45 a.m. $15-20, registration required. “Marketing: Going From Good to Great in 2011.” Mario’s Via Abruzzi, 2740 Monroe Ave. amarochester.org. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $20-45, registration required. [ Friday, October 15 ] “Explaining the Rightward Shift in US Politics and What We Can Do About It.” RIT Library, Idea Factory, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. iso. rochester@gmail.com. 7-8:45 p.m. Free. Return of the Mayan Wisdom With Mayan Elder/Daykeeper Hunbatz Men. Gossamer Woods Healing and Retreat Center, 2235 County Road #28, Canandaigua. 6634800, donna.demay@yahoo. com, consciousevolution.webs. com. 1-4 p.m. or 7-10 p.m. $75. The Neurobiology of Sexual Orientation: The Gay Brain Lecture II & Luncheon. Evarts Lounge, Helen Wood Hall, University of Rochester Medical Center. rochester.edu. 12-1 p.m. $8. [ Saturday, October 16 ] “Marxism and Political Organization” by Ashley Smith. RIT Library, Idea Factory, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. iso.rochester@ gmail.com. 6-7:45 p.m. Free. “Can the Working Class Unite?” with Sherry Wolf, author Sexuality and Socialism. RIT Library, Idea Factory, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. iso.rochester@ gmail.com. 3-4:45 p.m. Free. “Marx’s Theory of Working Class Revolution” by Alan Maass, author of The Case for Socialism. RIT Library, Idea Factory, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. iso.rochester@ gmail.com. 1-2:45 p.m. Free. Science Cafe: CSI Rochester. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 1-3 p.m. $6-7. Meet local scientists and detectives, discuss facts and myths surrounding CSI. [ Sunday, October 17 ] Breadtime Stories presented by Chet Fery. Greece Baptist Church, 1231 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160, greecebaptistchurch.org. 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Presentation by Nancy Lynch, author of “Vietnam Mailbag, Voices from the War 1968-1972.” Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720,

penfieldlibrary.org. 2:30-4 p.m. Free, registration required. The Gift of Corn. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc. org. 1-3 p.m. $3. [ Monday, October 18 ] “Between Miracles and Metal Detectors: Teaching and Learning In Urban Schools” with Greg Michie. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 3892525, naz.edu. 6 p.m. Free. Making Advanced Care Decisions…What Does the Clergy Think? Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000, rfjj.org. 7 p.m. Free, registration required. Nazareth College Presents Urban Education Expert and Author. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Brian Bailey 3892764. 6 p.m. Free. Vietnam Presentation. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. “Treating High Blood Pressure in 2010: How Low Is Low Enough?” with John Bisognano, MD, PhD. Henrietta Volunteer Ambulance Facility, 280 Calkins Rd. mendedheartsrochester.org. 7:15 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Brain Fitness with Barbara Bruce. The Gables at Brighton, 2001 South Clinton Ave. brookdaleliving.com. Noon. Free. Presentation by Nancy Lynch, author of “Vietnam Mailbag, Voices from the War 1968-1972.” Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 7-8 p.m. Free, registration required. “Historical Markers In and Around Victor.” Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St. 2232950. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, October 20 ] Diabetes Wake-Up Call. Diabetes HealthSource, 2400 S. Clinton Ave., Building H, Suite 135. 3417066. 5:30-6:30 p.m. $10. Informational Session: Foster Parenting. Quest Elementary School, 225 West Ave., Hilton. 334-9096, monroefostercare.org. 7-8 p.m. Free. Ages 21+. Lynn Paltrow “Changing the Conversation: Expanding the Reproductive Justice Movement to Support All Pregnant Women.” Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E Main St. 546-2771 x351, pprsr.org. 12-2 p.m. luncheon, 5:30-7:30 p.m. reception. $50, registration required. Opera Talk/Listening Series: “Friendships in Opera: Good and Bad” Presented by Chuck Lundeen. Fairport Public Library, 1 Village Landing, Fairport. 2239091, fairportlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. The Caroline Werner Gannett Project: Jeanne Gang “Assembly as Medium.” Rochester Institute of Technology-Webb Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. cwgp.org. 8 p.m. Free.

Literary Events [ Wednesday, October 13 ] Visiting Writers Series: Adam Frank. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab. org. 7 p.m. $3-6.

Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Irondequoit Public Library-Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E Ridge Rd. 336-6060. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: Discover New Writers: “The Last Chinese Chef” by Nichole Mones. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. 872-9735. 7 p.m. Free. Book Reading: Writers Forum Series: Fiction Writer and Poet Kirk Nesset. SUNY Brockport, 350 New Campus Drive, Cooper Hall, New York Room. 637-3645, brockportny.org. 8 p.m. Free. Women Who Love to Read: “The Girl From Ames: A Story of Women and a Forty-Year Friendship” by Jeffrey Zaslow. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.booksense. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Through Friday, October 15 ] Book Sale: Webster Library Fall Book Sale. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd, Webster. 8727075. Tue members preview 58:30 p.m., Wed-Thu 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free admission. Fri special: buy one, get one free, all day bag sale. [ Thursday, October 14 ] Peter Lovenheim “In The Neighborhood.” Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Road N. 4288204. 7 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “Rocket Boys” by Homer Hickam. Highland Library, 971 South Ave. 4288206. 12:30 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Irondequoit Public Library-Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E Ridge Rd. 336-6060. 3 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. The Good Bookstore, Episcopal Diocese of Rochester, 935 East Ave. 473-8634. Noon. Free. Book Discussion: Carolivia Herron, Author of “Nappy Hair.” Nazareth College-Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Office of Multicultural Affairs 389-2073. 6-8 p.m. Free. Book Group: The Greater Rochester Russell Set Meeting. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 415-5925, tmadigan@rochester.rr.com. 7 p.m. $3 for nonmembers. Ted Lechman on “David Bohm and the Implicate Order.” Poetry Reading: Just Poets Reading Series & Open Mic. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020, claudiastanek@gmail. com. 7-9 p.m. Free. Does not occur in December. Writing Class: Creative Writing. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020. 7 p.m. Free. [ Friday, October 15 ] Book Group: Young Adult Book Club: “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.booksense. com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Signing: Daniel J. Palmer “Rochetser’s Downtown Architecture 1950-1975.” Barnes & Noble @ RIT, 100 Park Point Dr. 475-2501, barnesandnoble. com. 1-3 p.m. Free. continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


Family

Literary Events Writing Class: Word Crafters Writer’s Group. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd. 4288304. 10 a.m. Free. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Jane Austen Society of North America. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 5866020. 1 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: Bible Study Group. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Book Signing: Paranormal Author Jo Lynne Valerie. Starry Nites Cafe, 696 University Ave. 271-2630, starrynitescafe.com. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free admission. Book Signing: Saturday Author Salon: “My Ma Ma” by Betty Genter. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260, liftbridge.booksense. com. 2 p.m. Free.

Local farms like Penfield’s Wickham Farms (pictured) offer all kinds of family-friendly activities during the fall. PHOTO BY KATHY LALUK

Pick a little, play a lot [ ACTIVITIES ] By Kathy Laluk

Modern Americans may associate fall with going back to school, cooler temperatures or leaves changing colors, but the season was originally all about the harvest.‘Tis the season to pick some apples or find that perfect pumpkin, and being the Flower City, Rochester and its surrounding communities is full of farms loaded with family-friendly fall fun. Note that this isn’t a comprehensive list of all the local farms; if your favorite didn’t make the list, share it at rochestercitynewspaper.com. As kids, my brother and I grew our own pumpkins in a field behind our house with some help from our grandparents. But when the frost got to them, Nana and Poppa would take us over to Bauman’s Farm in Webster (1340 Five Mile Line Rd., 6712820) to pick out pumpkins to carve for Halloween. Everyone’s got their own criteria (I prefer plump, round pumpkins), and Bauman’s prides itself on having a wide variety — something owner Jim Bauman says has actually gotten even better this year. “A lot of times it’s too wet, but this year’s crop is as close to perfect as you get, I think,” he says. “It’s been a while since we’ve had the perfect combination of rain and warm weather.” Another popular pumpkin patch in our area is Gro-Moore Farms (2811 E Henrietta Road, 359-3310, gromoore.com), which is also home to a petting zoo, train rides, mini golf, a haunted house, and a corn maze. You can also run up and down aisle after aisle of perfect orange orbs at Penfield’s Wickham Farms (1821 Fairport Nine Mile Point Road, 377-3276, wickhamfarms. com), Chase Farms Market in Fairport (459 Pannell Road, 315-986-4013, 28 City october 13-19, 2010

chasefarmsmarket.com), Cobble Creek Farm (5161 Ridge Road in Spencerport, 352-8484, cobblecreekfarm.net) and Stokoe Farms (656 South Road, in Scottsville, 889-0770, stokoefarms.com). Running through a pumpkin patch doesn’t

always tucker the kids out, so try letting them loose in the corn field. Many local farms have huge mazes cut into their acres of stalks — think crop circles, but more terrestrial and way more fun. On a recent trip to Long Acre Farms (1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon, 315-986-4202, longacrefarms. com), several pictures on the wall reminded me just how long it had been since I’d tried to find my way through what they call the “Amazing Maize Maze.” Hidden in the corn, or as Native Americans called it, maize (get the pun?), are 12 mailboxes with pieces of a map to lead you through the trails. If you’re up for a slightly spookier challenge, you can try to find your way in the dark on one of the Moonlight Maze nights, every Friday and Saturday in October (no moonlight hours Saturday, October 16). While you’re there, be sure to check out the corn cannon, petting zoo and bouncy pillow. By that time you’ll be ready for a homemade fry cake and cider slushie — tart and refreshing! Some other great corn fields to get lost in include the “Clue”-themed one at Zarpentine Farms in Hilton (163 Burritt Road, 392-3611, zarpentinefarm.com), the pirate-themed on the relatively new Country Way Corn Maze (2755 Penfield Road., 944-6459, countrywaycornmaze. com) and the mazes at Cobble Creek Farm and Wickham Farm.

Another common thread among most

of these farms is the fresh produce they sell, including crisp, delicious New York apples. A few places even let you pick your own. Wickham Farms puts ripe produce out on wooden tree cutouts for kids to pluck easily, but if you want to go out into the fields, try The Apple Farm in Victor (1640 State Route 444, 924-3420, thevictorapplefarm.com). Pick your own Red Delicious, Empire, and Spartan apples daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. One of the farm’s warm apple tarts and a glass of fresh-made cider is the perfect end to a visit. For me, there was only one place my family went for cider in Rochester: Schutt’s Apple Mill in Webster (1063 Plank Road, 872-2924, schuttsapplemill. com). Mom would grab a few gallons of cider and some cinnamon donuts, while my brother and I nibbled on homemade rock candy and pet the store’s rabbits. The store, which has been run by the Schutt family since 1916, also sells pumpkins and gourds in shapes and colors you didn’t know nature could produce. Out in Hilton, Kelly’s Farm Market & Bakery (611 Old Wilder Road, 392-8102, kellysfarmmarket.com) is renowned for its crumb-crust apple pie, but you can buy all kinds of amazing baked goods in its barn store. Or you can make some yourself with the apples you pick in the orchard out back. So take in those distinctly fall scents, enjoy a few fried cakes and some warm cider and get lost in a corn, apple, or pumpkin field. Because before you know it, the leaves will have fallen and winter will be here.

[ Sunday, October 17 ] Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. karen@wab.org. 2-3:30 p.m. Free, registration required. For teens, with local Vietnam Veterans. Book Discussion: History Book Club. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.booksense.com. 2 p.m. Free. “Nothing Like It in the World: The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 18631869” by Stephen E. Ambrose. Poetry Reading: Lori Nolasco, Pat Schwartz, and Ed Scutt. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. booksense.com. 1 p.m. Free. [ Monday, October 18 ] Writing Class: Writers Workshop. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. karina. churchill@yahoo.com, meetup. com/websterwriters/. 6-8 p.m. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Ink Spots & Coffee Grounds Writing Group. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 5866020. 7 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: Books Sandwiched In. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library, 115 South Ave. libraryweb.com. 12:1212:52 p.m. Free. “The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York” by Deborah Blum. Book Discussion: Greater Rochester Teen Read: Author Terry Trueman “Stuck in Neutral.” Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. 249-5481. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Book Group: Immortals: “A Great and Terrible Beauty” by Libba Bray. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. 872-9735. 7 p.m. Free. Book Signing: “Virgin Territory” by James Lecesne. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.booksense. com. 7 p.m. Free. Poetry Reading: Spoken Word Poetry Slam & Open Mic. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. Signups are taken throughout the night. Event starts at 8 p.m. Free. 389 Gregory St. Sign Ups begin at 6:45pm.


[ Wednesday, October 20 ] Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic: Monthly Story Slam. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 6:30 p.m. sign up, 7-9 p.m. event. Free.

Recreation [ Thursday, October 14 ] Fleet Feet Fundraiser for Special Olympics and Lesendi Project. Remington’s Pub, 425 Merchants Rd. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester. com. 6 p.m. workouts, 7 p.m. fund raising. Free, donations encouraged. Workouts, food, socializing, fund raising. [ Friday, October 15 ] Jupiter Over the Swamp. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Rd, Penfield. 425-9561. 6 p.m. Free. Bring flashlight and telescope or binoculars if you have them. Moonlight Maze. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon. 315-986-4202, longacrefarms.com. Enter between 5-9 p.m. $8.50-10. [ Friday, October 15Saturday, October 16 ] Spirits of the Past Tours. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 5386822, gcv.org. Departs every 10 minutes 6:30-9:30 p.m. $10-12, reservations required. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Barns of Pittsford Self-guided Tour. Get booklet from Little House, 18 Monroe Ave., Pittsford. 381-2941. 1-4 p.m. $10. GVHC Mendon Ponds Park Hike. Mendon Ponds Nature Center. Jon K. 323-1911. 11 a.m. Free. Moderate 8-10 mile hike around park.

RECREATION | Great Pumpkin Walk

It could be a romantic hand-in-hand walk, or a fun family photo op. You get to choose next weekend at the Great Pumpkin Walk in Canandaigua. Hundreds of hand-carved, candlelit pumpkins will embellish the mile-long path that will include a stop for refreshments. The walk is suitable for all ages, and strollers are allowed. Over the years pumpkin designs have included everything from the typical one-tooth smiling jack-o-lantern, to short statements about elections, goblins, and Peter Pan’s Tinkerbell. Presented by Ontario Pathways, the Pumpkin Walk will take place Saturday, October 16, 6:30-9:30 p.m. at the Ontario County Fairgrounds (County Road 10, Canandaigua). Should the weather fail to impress, a rain date is set for the same time on Sunday, October 17. Tickets cost $4, and children under 2 are free. No pets. Call 394-7968 the day of the event for prerecorded details. — BY CAITLIN SHAPIRO Geology of the Genesee Gorge. Parking lot of Seth Green Drive off St. Paul Blvd. Gene Gartland 621-6234. 10 a.m. Free. Great Pumpkin Walk. Ontario County Fairgrounds, County Rd. 10, Canandaigua. 394-7968, 234-7722. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $4, children under 2 free. Lucky 13 Amazing Maize Maze. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon. 315-986-4202, longacrefarms.com. 10-4 p.m. $8.50-10.

Mount Hope Cemetery Guided Walking Tours. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. Sat 1 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Free. Rochester Birding Association Beginner Birder Trip. Meet at Charlotte Beach parking lot. Kimberly 503-2534. 8 a.m. Free. [ Saturday, October 16Sunday, October 17 ] National Wildlife Refuge Week Celebration. Montezuma

National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East, Seneca Falls. 315-5685987, friendsofmontezuma. org. Sat 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free, registration required. Tree planting, wildlife watching, and art show.

[ Through Sunday, October 17 ] ImageOut Rochester Lesbian and Gay Film Festival. Various locations, visit site for info. imageout.org. Various hours. Call for pricing, tickets required.

[ Sunday, October 17 ] GVHC Finger Lakes Trail Maintenance Hike. I-390 exit 11 Park and Ride lot. Don R. 621-8794. 8:30 a.m. Free. Moderate 5-6 miles. Spirits of the EERIE Canal Haunted Canal Cruise. Spencerport Gazebo Dock. 210-6550, dawane@ ectoplasym.com, ectoplasym. com. 8 p.m. $30-$35. Tracking Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E River Rd, Rush. 533-1113, nymtmuseum. org. Departs every half hour from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $5-7.

[ Thursday, October 14 ] Girl’s Night Out for Breast Cancer. Gigi’s Italian Kitchen & Catering, 1770 Ridge Rd East. gigisitaliankitchen.com. 4 p.m., 6 p.m., and 8 p.m. $25, registration required. Safety Night with the Webster Fire Department. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. 872-9735. 7 p.m. Free. South Wedge Farmers Market. 100 Alexander St. (at S. Clinton, behind Boulder Coffee). suegs@ swfarmersmarket.org. 4-7 p.m. Stone Fest III Beer Tasting. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. 2322626, theoldtoad.com. 6 p.m. Free admission. Wildlife Defenders. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc. org. 11 a.m. $5.

[ Tuesday, October 19 ] Hill/Speed Workouts. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 6973338, fleetfeetrochester.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Special Events [ Wednesday, October 13 ] Big Read Film Series: “Platoon.” Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Free Beer and Pizza Tasting. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 877805-3570, sullyspubonline.com. 6-8 p.m. Free. Muslims and Christians in Conversation: Terrorism: Christain and Muslim Perspectives. Islamic Center of Rochester, 727 Westfall Rd. mshafiq5@zimbra.naz.edu. 7 p.m. Free. Weavers’ Guild of Rochester Meeting. First Baptist Church, 3182 Chili Ave. weaversguildofrochester.org/. 9:45 a.m. meeting, progra.m. 11 a.m. Free.

[ Thursday, October 14Saturday, October 16 ] Fright Night Rochester presents CAMP HACCAMO. Camp Haccamo, 125 Panorama Creek. 234-FEAR, frightnightrochester. com. Thu 7-11 p.m., Fri-Sat 7 p.m.-midnight. $15. [ Friday, October 15 ] Christopher Columbus Dinner Dance. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 334-6641. 6:30 p.m. $45, registration required. Hispanic Heritage Month: Closing Gala & Recognition. City Hall, 30 Church St. cityofrochester.gov. 5:30-8 p.m. Free. Pride Network 40th Anniversary After Hours. Bridge Lounge, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester River Campus. rochester.edu. 9 p.m.-midnight.

The Sound Talkers: Music of the 1960s Trivia. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 9 p.m. Free. Wine Tastings. Wine Sense, 749 Park Ave. 271-0590. 5-7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, October 16 ] ‘70s Laser Show. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc. org. 9:30 p.m. $9-10. No children under age 5 admitted. Big Brothers Big Sisters Celebrates the Seasons of New York with Mary Ann Esposito. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 2234210, casalarga.com. 5:45-7 p.m. Your Event Experience 7-10 p.m. $175, RSVP. College Diversity Roundtable: Conversations about Diversity at the College. Rooms 318 & 418, Gleason Hall, University of Rochester River Campus. rochester.edu. 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Creating a 1960s Memory Locket. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free, registration required. Five Course Dinner and Wine Tasting. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. 582-1830, thelowermill.com. 6:30 p.m. $60, reservations required. From the Archive Film Series: There is No Reality! Films of the Absurd. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. vsw. org. 7 p.m. Free. Healthy Family Scavenger Hunt. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000 x0, mycce.org/monroe. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $5 adults, kids under 18 free. Hunt through Highland Park, food, games, prizes, information. continues on page 30

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


Special Events NOTA Bagel Brunches. Merriman Park, Merriman St. and University Ave. 794-9558. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Volunteers and musicians sought. Pride Network 40th Anniversary Luncheon and Panel. Ballroom at the Meliora, University of Rochester River Campus. rochester.edu. 12-2 p.m. $10-15, registration required. Retreat: The Sanctification of Life: Becoming Love. The Assisi Institute, 595 Blossom Rd. Suite 313. info@assisi-institute.org. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $100. Roast Beef Dinner. West Bloomfield Congregational Church, Rt 5 & 20, W. Bloomfield. wbccoffice@ rochester.rr.com. 2-7 p.m. $5-9, children under 5 free. Saturday Evening Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. Dark until 10 p.m. Free. Weather permitting; call ahead. Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser. Spencerport Lions Club, American Legion Ferris Goodrich Post, 691 Trimmer Rd., Spencerport. 3525561. 4-7 p.m. $4-6. Tastings with Margaret at the Market: Apples. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-6907, pmarket@cityofrochester.gov. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Vietnam Memorial Tour. Highland Park, 120 Highland Ave. 3597092. 10-11:15 a.m. Free, registration required. Walk for Farm Animals. Wadsworth Square (Marshall St.). Rochester@walkforfarmanimals. org. 10 a.m. $15-$20 War on Film Video Series: “The Deer Hunter.” Geneva Public Library, 224 Main St., Geneva. karen@wab.org. 3-5:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Wine Harvest Dinner. Blue Heron Hills Golf Club, 1 Country Club Dr., Macedon. 315-986-5888 to registereverl@rochester.rr.com. 6 p.m. $65, registration required. “Bright Lights, Big City” Annual Dinner Auction. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 242-0900 x3328, kaspenleiter@ncmec. org, ncmecnyauction.org. 6-10 p.m. $150. [ Sunday, October 17 ] “Reduce Your Stress in an Hour or Less” with Holistic Instructor Margorie Baker Price. Bagel Bin Cafe, 2600 Elmwood Ave., Brighton. 461-4475, 12-1 p.m. booksigning, 1-2 p.m. seminar. Booksigning is free, Seminar $12 (register). Brighton Farmers’ Market. Brighton High School (1150 Winton Road S.). info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Canandaigua Comic Con. Inn on the Lake, 770 S Main St, Canandaigua. 394-8250, cancon2.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission. Chefs, Wine & Art. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 2-5 p.m. $25.

Community Garage Sale and Super Fleas. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-6907, pmarket@cityofrochester.gov. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Fall Arboretum Tours. Durand Eastman Park. Bob 261-1665, bob.bea@gmail.com. 2-4 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Grape Stompin’ Sundays. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 223-4210, casalarga.com. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Magical Evening for Young Audiences. Hurd Orchards, Rt 104 W & Monroe-Orleans County Line Rd, Holley. 638-8838, hurdorchards.com, yarochester. org. 4-7 p.m. $75 donation, RSVP required. Notre Dame Learning Center Pasta Dinner Fundraiser. St. Jude The Apostle Parish Hall, 41 Lyell Rd. 254-5110, ndlc@frontiernet.net. 12-4 p.m. $4-8, RSVP. Pamper Me Pink 2010. Westminster Hall & Chaple Mendon, 3886 Mendon Rd. pampermepinkrochester.com. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. $20-$25 door. Pugstock 2010. Boom Towne Canine Center, 1296 Beaver Creek Rd., Farmington. beanie724@yahoo.com. 1-4 p.m. $5, under 10 years free. RAIHN Snazzy Jazzy Sunday FUNdraiser. Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Rd. raihn.org, events@ raihn.org. 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50, registration required. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress.com, rochestercrf@gmail.com. 5 p.m. Free. Grassroots organization for LGBT equality. Sample Soap’s 20th Birthday Bubble Bash. R L Edwards Manor, 615 Clarissa St. 234-1729, samplesoap.org. 2 p.m. Free. Tara Reunion Part Deux. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. Noon. Free admission. Why This Dietitian Doesn’t Recommend Dairy Products. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. 234-8750, rochesterveg.org. 5:30 p.m. Vegan potluck, 7 p.m. program. $3. [ Monday, October 18 ] Candidate Forum on Disability Issues. Stardust Ballroom, 41 Backus St. 546-7510, datias@ cdrnys.org. 6-8 p.m. Free. Jewish Federation Reports on “Count Me In” Survey. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd. 4610490, jewishrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Penfield Green Initiative Third Annual Candidates Forum. Penfield Town Hall, 3100 Atlantic Ave., Penfield. suederosa@ rochester.rr.com. 7-8 p.m. Free. Reel Mind Film Series: “Mary & Max.” Cinema Theater, 957 South Clinton Ave. 325-3145, mharochester.org. 7 p.m. $8. Rochester Academy of Science Mineral Section Meeting. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. mineralvp@rasny.org, rasny.org/ mineral. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Tournees French Film Festival: Le Chant des Mariees. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. 385-8378, diversity@

30 City october 13-19, 2010

Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 6-9 p.m. $60, registration required.

SPORTS | Rochester Wheels

The Rochester Wheels, a regional competitive wheelchair basketball team, will take on Finger Lakes Community College faculty, staff, and students in an exhibition game next week. The Wheels are known for taking on staff from local schools and members of area organizations. In the wheels competitions, everyone plays the game from a wheelchair. Wheelchair basketball was originally developed by American World War II veterans around 1945, and now an estimated 100,000 people play wheelchair basketball nationally, from recreation and club play to elite national teams. The sport is played by boys and girls, men and women — although the Wheels is an adults-only team. The rules follow traditional basketball closely, and the measurements of the court and the height of the baskets are the same as in conventional basketball. The game will take place Tuesday, October 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the gym at the back of the main Finger Lakes Community College campus building (3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua). Admission is free. For more information call 489-5110 or visit flcc.edu. — BY CAITLIN SHAPIRO sjfc.edu. 7-9 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, October 20 ] Muslims and Christians in Conversation: Who is a Christian? Who is a Muslim? Exploring Our Identities. Islamic Center of Rochester, 727 Westfall Rd. mshafiq5@zimbra.naz.edu. 7 p.m. Free. Screening: “Good Morning, Vietnam.” Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required.

Sports [ Friday, October 15 ] Professional Boxing. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. 5769699, ticketmaster.com. 7:30 p.m. $30-75. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Natural New York State Bodybuilding, Figure & Bikini Championships. Irondequoit High School, 260 Cooper Rd. 2347564, trainerofnaturalchampions. com. 6:30 p.m. $18-26. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Rochester Wheels vs. FLCC Faculty Wheelchair Basketball Game. Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. 785-1623, flcc. edu, 271-1894. Doors 7 p.m., ga.m.e 7:30 p.m. Free.

Workshops [ Wednesday, October 13 ] Balancing Your Chakras. The Purple Door, 1707 Crittenden Rd.

427-8110, purpledoorsoulcource. com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $25, registration required. Basic Glass Beadmaking with Lucinda Storms. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Pl. 2420450, morefireglass.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $150, registration required. Class: Successful Sautéing & Pan to Plate Sauces. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $60, registration required. Demos for Divas to Benefit Gilda’s Club. Beyond Hardware, Wegman’s Plaza, 2155 Penfield Rd. beyondhardware.net. 6-8 p.m. Free admission. Fall Garden Talk with Michael Warren Thomas. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. cityofrochester. gov/fclg. 7-8 p.m. Free. Fusing Techniques and Slumping with Mahine Rattonsey. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Pl. 242-0450, morefireglass. com. 6-8:30 p.m. $150, registration required. Hands-On South of the Border. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-8 p.m. $25 class only, $35 with Mexican beer, register. Opera Talk/Listening Series: “Falstaff, Verdi’s Last Masterpiece” Presented by Rosalba Pisaturo. Fairport Public Library, 1 Village Landing, Fairport. 223-9091, fairportlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Stained Glass Classes with Jim Ingalls. Sonnenberg

[ Thursday, October 14 ] Baby ASL Signing Class. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.booksense.com. 6:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Clam Shack Traditions. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $60, registration required. Hands-On Apple-Umpkin. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25, registration required. How to Taste Wine Like an Expert. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40, registration required. Individualized Basic Computer Skills Classes. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 10-11 a.m. Free, appointment required. Paper Quilling. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Friday, October 15 ] Rochester Professional Consultants Network Business Forum. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. rochesterconsultants.org. 7:45-9:30 a.m. Free. [ Saturday, October 16 ] Amber Shultz talks about Essential Oils. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@ yahoo.com. 12-2 p.m. Free. Boro Basics: Beyond Beads with Sally Prasch. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Pl. 242-0450, morefireglass. com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $125 plus materials. Create Things for The Home. Kuumba Open Studio and Lab, 336 Arnett Blvd. 325-4375. 9:30-10 a.m. registration, 10-11:45 a.m. instruction, 12:30-2 p.m. open studio. Free, limited to 15 people. Ages 14+. Discovering Your Roots: Solving the Puzzle of Your Family Tree. Central Library, 115 South Ave. rgsmembership@rochester. rr.com, nyrgs.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, October 17 ] Raw Food Prep Class: Autumn Delights. Tree of Health @ A Healing Sanctuary, 1722 Mt. Hope Ave. Karen Holmes, 442-3998, karen@ massagetherapy.com. 47 p.m. $75, registration required. [ Monday, October 18 ] Adult Daytime Classes: Pitas and Slaw, with a Twist. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449,

topsmarkets.com. 11 a.m.1 p.m. $15, registration required. Hands-On Home Made Pasta and More. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25 class only, $35 with wine sampling, register. Learn about Massage with Amy Campbell, LMT. Highland Library, 971 South Ave. 428-8206. 5:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Promotion on a Shoestring for Musicians: The Musician’s Media Kit. RCTV-15, 21 Gorham St. 325-1238, CWhiteLlewellyn@msn.com, rctv15.org. 7-8:30 p.m. $2025. Protecting Yourself & Your Financial Identity. Courtyard by Marriot Brighton, 33 Corporate Woods. 2415900, info@wealthmg.com. 6:30p.m.-7:30 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Tuesday, October 19 ] Creative Journaling. Victor Yoga Studio, 23 East Main St. Melanie Martinek 742-3663. 7-9 p.m. $45, registration required by 10/15. Football Food Frenzy. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20 class only, $30 with beer sampling, register. Spirituality During Times of Change. Mental Health Association, 320 N. Goodman St. 325-3145, mharochester.org. 6:308 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Wednesday, October 20 ] An Evening with Oz Clarke: Wine Tasting Class and Book Signing. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $50, registration required. Fall Garden Talk with Michael Warren Thomas. Danforth Community Center, 200 West Ave. cityofrochester.gov/fclg. 7-8 p.m. Free. Meditation, Nonviolent Communication, and the Philosophy of Gandhi. University of RochesterInterfaith Chapel, Wilson Blvd. 276-4962, gandhiinstitute.org. 5:307:30 p.m. Free. Penmanship and Calligraphy Club. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 7 p.m. Free. Stained Glass Classes with Jim Ingalls. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 6-9 p.m. $60, registration required.


RESTAURANTS Pizza Place: Little Venice · Mark’s Pizzeria · Pontillo’s · Salvatore’s Barbecue Restaurant: Beale Street · Dinosaur · Sticky Lips · Taste of Texas Place for a Hot Dog: Bill Gray’s · Dogtown · Don’s Original · Schaller’s Hot Sauce (Rochester style): Mark’s Texas Hots · Nick Tahou Hots · Penfield Hots · Sticky Lips French Fries: Bill Gray’s · Dogtown · Gate House · Schaller’s Deli: DiBella’s · Fox’s · Park & Oxford Café & Deli · Rubino’s Place for Pancakes: Highland Park Diner · James Brown’s Place · Jines · South Wedge Diner Bagel Shop: Bagel Bin · Bagel Land · Balsam Bagels · Brownstein’s Place for Brunch: Frog Pond · James Brown’s Place · Jines · Mario’s Place for Dessert: Abbott’s · Cheesy Eddie’s · Chocolate & Vines · Phillips European · Sugar Mountain Bake Shoppe Chinese Restaurant: Chen Garden · Flavors of Asia · Golden Port · Royal Dynasty Indian Restaurant: India House · Tandoor of India · Taste of India · Thali of India Sushi Restaurant: California Rollin’ · Piranha · Plum House · Shiki Italian Restaurant: Mario’s · Mr. Dominic’s · Pasta Villa · Rocco

Mexican Restaurant: John’s Tex Mex · Maria’s · Monte Alban · Salena’s Mediterranean Restaurant: Aladdin’s · Astoria · Olives · Sinbad’s Restaurant for Vegetarian: Aladdin’s · Lento · Owl House · Sinbad’s Coffee Shop: Boulder · Equal Grounds · Java’s · Spot Cheap Eats: Aladdin’s · Dogtown · John’s Tex-Mex · Mark’s Texas Hots Upscale Restaurant: 2 Vine · Black & Blue · Good Luck · Lento New Restaurant: Hose 22 · Next Door Bar & Grill · Owl House · Shea’s Established Restaurant: 2 Vine · Hogan’s Hideaway · Jines · Mario’s · Rooney’s

SHOPPING Jewelry Store: Blueground · Cornell’s · Mann’s · The Source Gift Shop: Archimage · Craft Company No. 6 · Eleventh Hour · Parkleigh Car Dealership: Dorschel · John Holtz · Van Bortel · Vision Auto Repair Shop: East Ave Auto · Ferrel’s · Vail · Vesa Gym: Downtown Fitness Club · Midtown Athletic Club · Rochester Athletic Club · YMCA Yoga Instructor: Carrie Gaynor, Absolute Yoga · Francois Raoult, Open Sky Yoga · Mark Sandler, Absolute Yoga · Tom Somerville, Downtown Fitness Place for a Massage: AE Spa · Del Monte · Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage · Scott Miller Salon

Hair Salon: Scott Miller Salon · Shear Ego · Surface · World Hair Nail Salon: Del Monte Spa · Maxim Spa · Scott Miller Salon · Shear Ego Florist: Arena’s · Fioravanti · Kittelberger · Rockcastle Clothing Store: A Step Apart · Dado · Godiva’s · Thread Tattoo Parlor: Love Hate · Lucky Lotus · Physical Graffiti · White Tiger Piercing Parlor: Dorje Adornments · ICON · Physical Graffiti · Primitive Impressions Liquor Store: Century · Marketview · Schuber’s · Whitehouse Bakery: Baker Street · Leo’s Elite Bakery · Little Bakery · Savoia Pastry Shoppe · Sugar Mountain Bake Shoppe Regional Winery: Bully Hill · Casa Larga · Dr. Konstantin Frank · Heron Hill Winery Catering Company: Lorraine’s Food Factory · Plunkett’s Fabulous Foods · Savory Thyme · Tasteful Connections Furniture Store: Charlotte Furniture & Appliance · Metro Retro · Ruby Gordon · Viking International Place for Unusual Décor: Archimage · Metro Retro · Parkleigh · Thread Pet-Friendly Business: Bark Avenue Dog · Dogs at Play · Fido’s · Park Avenue Pets Local Psychic/ Medium: Julianne Baliva (Mystic Moon) · Kathy Smith (Dove Gift Store) · Psychic’s Thyme · Robyn DeVoist (A Healing Sanctuary)

MEDIA Radio Personality (Male): Barry Beck (WBZA) · Brother Wease (WFXF) · Scott Regan (WRUR) · Scott Spezzano (WPXY) Radio Personality (Female): Jennifer V (WBER) · Kimberly Ray (WBZA) · Sandy Waters (WPXY) · Terry Clifford (WBEE) Radio Show: “The Break Room” (WCMF) · “The Breakfast Buzz” (WBZA) · “Spezzano & Sandy” (WPXY) · “The Wease Show” (WFXF) Radio Station: WBER · WXXI · WPXY · WDVI (The Drive) TV News Station: WHAM (Ch 13) · WHEC (Ch 10) · WROC (Ch 8) · YNN/RNEWS (Ch 9) TV News Reporter (Male): Don Alhart (WHAM) · Doug Emblidge (WHAM) · Kevin Doran (WROC) �� Pat McGonigle (WHEC) TV News Reporter (Female): Ginny Ryan (WHAM) · Jennifer Johnson (WHAM) · Norma Holland (WHAM) · Rachel Barnhart (WHAM) TV Weatherperson: Glenn Johnson (WHAM) · Kevin Williams (WHEC) · Rich Caniglia (WHEC) · Scott Hetsko (WROC) Local News Story of 2010: Bob Duffy selected as Cuomo running mate · Fate of Midtown Plaza · Greece Police corruption/ Merritt Rahn trial · Mayoral control of the city schools Local News Story Ignored in 2010: City murder/crime rate · Midtown Plaza · Pandora Boxx on “Rupaul’s Drag Race” · Subway system planning

Local Blog: DragonFlyEye.net · Rochesternypizza. blogspot.com · RochesterTurning.com · Tympanogram.com Local Twitter Account: Democrat & Chronicle (@DandC) · Rachel Barnhart (@rachbarnhart) · Tap & Mallet (@ TapandMallet) · Wegmans (@wegmans)

LOCAL COLOR Politician: Bob Duffy · Joe Robach · Louise Slaughter · Maggie Brooks Activist Group: Civil Rights Front · Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley · Metro Justice · Planned Parenthood Neighborhood/Town: Chili · Fairport · South Wedge · Park Ave University/College: MCC · Nazareth · RIT · University of Rochester Sports Team: Amerks · Red Wings · Rhinos · ROC City Roller Derby Park: Cobbs Hill · Ellison · Highland · Mendon Ponds Building: City Hall · Eastman Theatre · George Eastman House · Powers Building Eyesore: Downtown Rochester · Kodak · Midtown Plaza · “Vagina” sculpture at Ridge & Lake Natural Feature: Genesee River · High Falls · Lake Ontario · Letchworth State Park Local Company: Kodak · Paychex · Wegmans · Xerox Place to Take an Outof-Towner: George Eastman House · National Museum of Play · Nick Tahou Hots · Wegmans

Place to Propose: Cobbs Hill · High Falls · Highland Park · Letchworth State Park Local Celebrity: Brother Wease · Lou Gramm · Pandora Boxx · Philip Seymour Hoffman

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Original Band: Lobster Quadrille · Silent Auction · Teagan and the Tweeds · Uncle Plum Cover Band: Big Eyed Phish · Skycoasters · Something Else · Uncle Plum Solo Musician: Greg Townson · John Akers · Teagan Ward · Ted Nicolosi Music Venue: Abilene · Bug Jar · Lovin’ Cup · Water Street Music Hall Club DJ: Darkwave · Jon Herbert · Kalifornia · Kribs Open Mic: Boulder · Colony · Flipside · Lovin’ Cup Music Concert of 2010: Black Keys/ Flaming Lips, CMAC · Dave Matthews/Tim Reynolds, CMAC · My Morning Jacket, CMAC · Phish, CMAC Local Album of 2010: Silent Auction, “H on Earth” · Sports, “Sports” · Pia Mater, “Technicolor Duck” · Walri, “Paper Cranes” Theater Production of 2010: “Legends of Dance,” Rochester City Ballet · “Lipstick Massacre,” Method Machine · “Nijinsky’s Last Dance,” Bread & Water Theatre · “Rent,” JCC CenterStage Theater Company: Blackfriars · Downstairs Cabaret · Geva · Method Machine

Art Gallery/Museum: ArtisanWorks · George Eastman House · Memorial Art Gallery · Rochester Contemporary Art Exhibit of 2010: “6x6x2010,” Rochester Contemporary · “Albert Paley in the 21st Century,” Memorial Art Gallery · “ArtAwake,” University of Rochester · “Colorama,” George Eastman House Local Artist: Albert Paley · Cordell Cordaro · Jay Lincoln · Mark Groaning · Sarah Rutherford Local Photographer: Gerry Szymanski · Mike Hanlon · Patrick J. Stefano · Walter Colley Movie Theater: Cinema · Dryden · Little · Movies 10 Festival: Clothesline · Corn Hill · Lilac · Park Ave Drag Performer: Ambrosia Salad · Darienne Lake · Kasha Davis · Pandora Boxx Improv Comedy Troupe:Broken Couch · Geva Comedy Improv · Nuts and Bolts · Village Idiots Kids Entertainment: Gary the Happy Pirate · National Museum of Play · Rochester Museum & Science Center · Seneca Park Zoo · TYKEs (Theater Young Kids Enjoy)

Cocktail Selection: Good Luck · Lola · Owl House · Tapas Bartender: Chris Guarino (140 Alex) · Herman (Bug Jar) · Phillip Rawleigh (Lux) · Patty (Vertex) Nightclub: One · Tilt · Vertex · Vinyl Strip Club: Barrel of Dolls · Klassy Cat · Rick’s Tally Ho · Foxy’s Pick-up Bar: 140 Alex · Lux · Murphy’s Law · Taylor’s Sports Bar: Acme · Distillery · Rookies · Sports Page Place to Shoot Pool: 140 Alex · Lux · Salingers · Six Pockets Place to Shoot Darts: 140 Alex · Monty’s Krown · Old Toad · Tap & Mallet Happy Hour: 140 Alex · Acme · Distillery · Lux Trivia Night: 140 Alex · Dragonfly · Lux · Old Toad

NIGHTLIFE New Bar/Club: 140 Alex · Dicky’s · Flight Wine Bar · Owl House Bar for Beer: Lux · MacGregor’s · Old Toad · Tap & Mallet Bar for Wine: Chocolate & Vines · Flight · Lovin Cup · Solera

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Film Times Fri Oct 15 – Thu Oct 21 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport JACKASS 3: 7:15, 9;15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 7:10; also SatSun 1:30, 4; SOCIAL NETWORK: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; TOWN: 9:15.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ALPHA & OMEGA: Fri 5; also SatSun 1, 2:45; CASE 39: 7:15, 9:20; Sat-Sun 1, 3:05, 5:10; EASY A: 9:25; also Sat-Sun 1:15; JACKASS 3 (3D): 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 7:10, 9:25; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:30; MY SOUL TO TAKE: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; RED: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1; SECRETARIAT: 7, 9:20; also FriSun 4; also Sat-Sun 1; SOCIAL NETWORK: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15; TOWN: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4:30; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 7, also Fri-Sun 4; YOU AGAIN: 7:15, 9:20.

Dim lights, big city [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Jack Goes Boating” (R), directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman Now playing

In keeping with his fine work in a remarkable variety of roles on both stage and screen, Philip Seymour Hoffman’s first film as a director, unsurprisingly, grows out of a play he both directed and starred in off Broadway. Appropriately for an off-Broadway play, the movie, “Jack Goes Boating,” a low-budget, low-key work, exactly suits its venues, the art houses that

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. *NOTE: NO MATINEES AND NO SHOWS ON TUESDAY* AMERICAN: 7; ANIMAL KINGDOM: 8:45.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  CASE 39: 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10:05; DEVIL: 2:25, 5:10, 7:40, 9:45; EASY A: 1:55, 4:15, 6:55, 9:40; JACKASS 3: 1:45, 2:30, 4:05, 5:05, 6:50, 7:50, 9:30, 10:20; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 2:05, 4:30, 6:55, 9:35; LET ME IN: 1:50, continues on page 34

32 City october 13-19, 2010

constitute the cinematic equivalent of small, independent theatrical productions, proudly determined to showcase art that exists and sometimes thrives out of the mainstream, in places beyond the grandly commercial megaplexes. The movie itself, a drab romance in the best indie/arty tradition, concentrates on two oddly contrasting couples who differ in many ways, including the progress and final direction of their relationships. Hoffman plays Jack, a New York City limousine driver whose friend and fellow driver Clyde (John Ortiz) wants to fix him up with a girlfriend, so he and his wife Lucy (Daphne RubinVega) invite him to dinner to meet one of her colleagues, Connie (Amy Ryan). Lucy and Connie work in the business of telemarketing for a funeral home, a dreary job complicated by a boss with a tendency to grope his female employees. The dinner sets the tone for the whole movie,

Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Ryan in “Jack Goes Boating.” PHOTO COURTESY OVERTURE FILMS

an awkward gathering where the neurotic Connie talks about her father’s recovery from a coma and his subsequent death from a fall in a nursing home; foreshadowing the sexual problems that the picture only hints at, she also mentions that the nurse attempted to fondle her while she was visiting her comatose father. Jack’s responses establish his essential kindness and passivity — he can only repeat her words and make sympathetic noises. Despite the clumsiness of the situation, the two marginally dysfunctional people begin a most tentative sort of connection with Jack’s promise to take Connie boating when summer comes. He must first, however, learn to swim, and his faithful friend Clyde resolves to teach him, which means that much of the film shows the corpulent Jack, under Clyde’s encouraging tutelage, turning from a flounderer into a genuine swimmer. When Connie suffers a violent assault on the subway — an incident the script never makes clear or convincing — Jack visits her in the hospital and makes another promise, to cook a dinner for her. Along with the swimming lessons, cooking lessons occupy much of the film’s time and also introduce a major problem in Clyde’s marriage, Lucy’s past affair with a pastry chef at the Waldorf Astoria (yes, it all gets quite bizarre in its own low-key way).


Under pressure [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“It’s Kind of a Funny Story” (R), written and directed by Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden Now playing

“A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop” (R), directed by Zhang Yimou Opens Friday

Connie’s sexual difficulties emerge comically in a couple of scenes that underline the everyday weirdness of the couple. At one point they attempt sex, but she tells him she isn’t yet ready for “penis penetration.” When she finally reaches that readiness she asks Jack to take her to “overcome” her, but without force, and in his clumsy, bumbling way, Jack happily obliges. Among his considerable abilities, Philip Seymour Hoffman plays sad underdogs and sympathetic losers with genuine conviction; as Jack, however, he exaggerates the dumb naivete of the character beyond credibility. Limo drivers in New York make good money, acquire a certain sophistication, and need to make a good appearance, while Jack lives in the basement of his uncle’s house and with his lank, greasy hair, the dorky wool hat he wears everywhere, and his general slovenliness simply looks a mostly distressing mess. Aside from some nice shots of Jack’s practice at visualizing his swimming stroke and, in a sense, the life he begins to hope for, the movie hardly exploits the opportunity to expand a pretty weak script into something excitingly cinematic. Despite the fine performances of the whole cast, especially John Ortiz, the flatness of the emotional landscape and the dullness of the people make “Jack Goes Boating” a generally inauspicious directorial debut.

“Kids these days don’t know how good they have it,” you’ve probably clucked at one time, as did your parents, their parents, and so on back to when they were etching such observations into cave walls. It’s not news that people don’t always inventory their blessings; most are too obsessed with what they can’t quite get. And that constant pursuit all but guarantees dissatisfaction, hopelessness... even worse if left unchecked. Those sorts of feelings — brought on by unrequited love, academic pressure, along with antidepressant withdrawal — are overwhelming 16year-old Craig enough for him to beg for admittance to a psychiatric ward in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” a frustratingly

Keir Gilchrist and Zach Galifianakis in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story.” PHOTO COURTESY FOCUS FEATURES

clichéd and precious coming-of-age tale about a young man ripe for perspective. Keir Gilchrist plays the quiet Craig, whose thoughts of suicide propel him to the emergency room early one Sunday morning instead of off the Brooklyn Bridge. He winds up at 3 North in the company of a stock Rainbow Coalition of troubledyet-sweet souls, most of whom appear to be dealing with benign quirks rather than honest mental-health issues. They include an Egyptian who dispenses bits of wisdom from bed, a Hasidic Jew who dropped too much acid, an African-American rendered paranoid by the Patriot Act, and Bobby (Zach Galifianakis, “The Hangover”), who becomes Craig’s closest friend in the ward. Bobby’s troubles take their time in coming to light, but his gradual reveal, like the problems plaguing the other patients, seem to serve one basic purpose: to assist Craig in extricating his head from his ass. And please forgive me for such glib phrasing, but that’s essentially what “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” boils down to, as Craig realizes that his upper-middle-class stresses are manageable and in some circles don’t even count as actual problems. While this too is hardly news and forms the basis for most coming-of-age stories, to place it against the psych-ward backdrop is borderline-insulting to those struggling with mental disorders. To be fair, the film is based on the semi-autobiographical novel by Ned Vizzini, but one has to wonder what’s fact and what isn’t. The reason Craig and his cute, scarred love interest (Emma Roberts) are even mixing with the adults is because the teen section is undergoing renovation; would this really happen outside of fiction? “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” is by Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden, who know their way around both weightier subjects (2006’s Oscar-nominated “Half-Nelson”) and growing pains (last year’s “Sugar”), but working under the shallow burdens of voiceover, flashbacks, animation, and fantasy sequences, the tone feels all wrong. It

doesn’t help that leading man Gilchrist isn’t up to the challenge of getting the audience emotionally invested in Craig’s five-day journey to self-awareness. So focus instead on the gift that is Galifianakis. His rumpled weirdo act is well established, yet he also knows how to subtly convey that Bobby’s deadpan bravado might be masking some pain. The ambiguity with which Fleck and Boden handle Bobby’s fate represents another sharp tonal shift, but it might be the only truthful thing about this movie. You’re Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou,

and you’ve just blown the planet’s collective mind with the opening ceremonies to the 2008 Beijing Olympics; what can you possibly do for an encore? The answer, apparently, is to revamp the Coen brothers’ 1984 debut “Blood Simple.” Yimou’s take, called “A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop,” unfolds in feudal China against the timeless noir triangle of the wealthy businessman, his abused young wife, and her smitten lover. The story begins as broad, operatic buffoonery then veers quickly into violent tragedy with the introduction of a double-crossing cop (calmly magnetic Sun Honglei from Sergei Bodrov’s “Mongol”), hired for murder but more concerned with the money. Yimou incorporates a few of the same telling details from the original (the smoking device, the impenetrable safe) but makes some strange changes to the cheating couple, portraying her as a screechy femme fatale and him as a nervous wimp. Where Yimou excels, unsurprisingly, is visuals; the director of “Hero” (one of my faves) and “House of Flying Daggers” clothes his players in sumptuous silks and films them against a barren but breathtaking backdrop. The most exhilarating set piece combines acrobatic choreography with a soupçon of food porn as the employees stretch the noodle dough. It’s an unnecessary scene, but a delicious one.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


4:35, 7:15, 9:55; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:20, 4, 6:40, 9:25; MY SOUL TO TAKE: 2:15, 4:45, 7:55, 10:35; N-SECURE: 1:40, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25; RED: 1:30, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15; SECRETARIAT: 1:15, 4:10, 7, 9:50; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 10; TAKERS: 2:20, 5:15, 7:45, 10:30; TOWN: 1:25, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 2, 5, 8.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for 10/13-10/20* I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE/ CURSE OF THE DEMON: Wed 10/13 7; THE MISTAKE: Thu 8; CONRACK: Fri 8; IMAGEOUT FILM FESTIVAL: Sat; THE MARK OF ZORRO: Sun 7; CHANG: A DRAMA OF THE WILDERNESS: Tue 8; SLEEPY HOLLOW: Wed 10/20 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor EASY A: 1:25, 4:40, 7:50, 10:35; I WANT YOUR MONEY: 1;55, 4:50, 7:40, 9:50; JACKASS 3: 1:30, 4:30, 7:10, 10; also in 3D 1:55, 4:50, 7:40, 9:50; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:50, 4:20, 6:55, 9:25; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:25; MY SOUL TO TAKE (3D): 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:20; RED: 1:20, 4:55,

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] CHANG: A DRAMA OF THE WILDERNESS (1927): From Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, the men who shocked the world with “King Kong,” comes this Siam-set drama about a family trying to protect itself from jungle animals. Dryden (Tue, Oct 19, 8 p.m.) CONRACK (1974): Martin Ritt (“Norma Rae”) adapts a memoir by novelist Pat Conroy, played by Jon Voight, who takes a job on a small island off the coast of South Carolina in the late 60’s teaching kids neglected by the educational system. Dryden (Fri, Oct 15, 8 p.m.) A FILM UNFINISHED (R): Filmmaker Yael Hersonski blends recollections from Holocaust survivors as well as footage of atrocities with a manipulative Nazi propaganda film detailing “the good life” Jews were living in the Warsaw ghetto. Little I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE/ CURSE OF THE DEMON (1943/1958): The first in this horror double feature from Jacques Tourneur is a riff on “Jane Eyre” going down in the West Indies, while the second stars Dana Andrews as a psychologist out to expose a cult leader as a fraud. Dryden (Wed, Oct 13, 7 p.m.)

7:20, 9:45; SECRETARIAT: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:55; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:40, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15; TOWN: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall JACKASS 3 (3D): 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 7:10, 9:25; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:30; MY SOUL TO TAKE: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; RED: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1; SECRETARIAT: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1; SOCIAL NETWORK: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. CASE 39: 2:30, 7:50; EASY A: 2:20, 4:40, 7:35, 10; JACKASS 3: 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:55; also in 3D 1:40, 2:40, 4:10, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:25, 10:25; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:50, 4:15, 6:50, 9:35; LET ME IN: 5:10. 10:30; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 10:05; MY SOUL TO TAKE (3D): 2:25, 5, 7:40, 10:20; RED: 2, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45; SECRETARIAT: 1:20, 4:20, 7:15, 10:10; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:15, 4:05, 7:05,

JACKASS 3D (R): Hey, “Avatar”! Watch and learn as Johnny Knoxville, et al., use the third on-screen dimension to its fullest, funniest, and most crotch-pummeling potential. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE MARK OF ZORRO (1940): Tyrone Power, Jr., will be on hand to introduce this swashbuckling adventure starring his late father, Tyrone Power, as a masked man who sets out to liberate peasants in early 19th-century Southern California from their oppressors. With Linda Darnell and Basil Rathbone. Dryden (Sun, Oct 17, 7 p.m.) THE MISTAKE (1991): This love story taking place in the sunset of Communism in Eastern Europe tells the story of a West German man who falls in love with an East German woman while being watched by informants. Dryden (Thu, Oct 14, 8 p.m.) RED (R): Retired and Extremely Dangerous: Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, and Bruce Willis star in this adaptation of Warren Ellis’ 2003 graphic novel about a group of oldtimers dragged back into the spy game after one of them is threatened. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

34 City october 13-19, 2010

9:50; TOWN: 1:25, 4:30, 7:25, 10:15.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. CASE 39: 1:25, 4:20, 7:20, 9:55; also Fri-Sat 12 midnight; EASY A: 12:40, 3, 5:15, 7:40, 10; also Fri-Sat 12:15 a.m.; IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY: 12:25, 3:05, 5:30, 8:05, 10:40; JACKASS 3: 2, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05; also Fri-Sat 11:20; also in 3D 12:30, 1:15, 2:50, 3:35, 5:10, 5:55, 7:30, 8:15, 9:50, 10:35; also Fri-Sat in 3D 11:55; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:20, 4, 6:55, 9:20; LET ME IN: 12:50, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15; also Fri-Sat 11:40; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1, 2:15, 4:05, 5:05, 6:50, 7:50, 9:30, 10:30; also Fri-Sat 11:50; MY SOUL TO TAKE (3D): 12:55, 3:30, 7:10, 9:45; also Fri-Sat 12:05 a.m.; N-SECURE: 2:10, 5, 7:45, 10:25; RED: 1:05, 2:20, 4:15, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:40, 10:45; also Fri-Sat 12:10 a.m.; SECRETARIAT: 12:45, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35; SOCIAL NETWORK: 12:05, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20; TOWN: 1:10, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 12:35, 3:40, 7:05, 10:05.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  A FILM UNFINISHED: 6:30, 9 (no Sun), 9:30; also Sat-Sun

[ CONTINUING ] CASE 39 (R): Renée Zellweger stars in this horror thriller as a social worker caring for a young girl (Jodelle Ferland, “Tideland”) whose troubles extend into the supernatural realm. Co-starring Bradley Cooper and Ian McShane. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster EASY A (PG-13): The sassy Emma Stone (“Zombieland”) stars in this romantic comedy as Olive, a quick-witted teen who revamps her reputation after lying about losing her virginity. Also starring Penn Badgley (“Gossip Girl”) as well as the dream team of Stanley Tucci and Patricia Clarkson as Olive’s parents. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13): From writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (“Half-Nelson”) comes this dark comedy about a depressed young man (Keir Gilchrist) who learns about life after checking himself into a mental facility. Featuring Zach Galafianakis and Emma Roberts. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG): Zack Snyder follows up “Watchmen” with this animated adaptation of Kathryn Lasky’s books about a young barn owl, kidnapped

12, 2 (no Sun); IMAGEOUT FILM FESTIVAL: Sat various; IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY: 6:50 (no Tue), 9:25; also SatSun 12:10, 2:20; JACK GOES BOATING: 7, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 2:50; NEVER LET ME GO: 6:40 (no Sun or Thu), 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:20 (no Sun), 2:30; OPERA SERIES: QUEEN OF SPADES: Tue 7; A WOMAN, A GUN, AND A NOODLE SHOP: 7:10, 9:20 (no Tue); also Sat-Sun 12:30, 2:40.

IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY: 1:50, 4:10, 6:40; also FriSat 9; I WANT YOUR MONEY: 1:10, 3:20, 5:25, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 9:45; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:30; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 2:10, 4:40, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 9:50; NEVER LET ME GO: 3:50, 6:30 (no Thu); also Fri-Sat 8:45; RED: 2, 4:30, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:40; SECRETARIAT: 1:40, 4:20, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:35; SOCIAL NETWORK: 2:15, 4:50, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:10; TOWN: 2:25, 5, 7:45; also Fri-Sat 10:15; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 1:20, 4, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9:30.

1:05, 4, 6:50, 9:40; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:10, 4:10, 7, 9:50; TOWN: 1, 2;25, 3:50, 5:15, 6:40, 8:30, 9:30; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:45.

Webster 12

383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave.

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  CASE 39: 1:40, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45; EASY A: 1:25, 3:55, 7:30, 9:50; INCEPTION: IMAX 1:40, 4:50, 8; I WANT YOUR MONEY: 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 10; JACKASS 3 (3D): 12:40, 1:50, 3, 4:10, 5:20, 6:30, 7:40, 8:50, 10; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:15, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45; LET ME IN: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 9:55; MY SOUL TO TAKE (3D): 1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40; RED: 1:20, 4:15, 7:20, 9:55; RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE: 12:55, 4:05, 6:55, 9:20; SECRETARIAT:

888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. CASE 39: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10; also Fri-SAT 9:40; also Sat 10:30 a.m.; EASY A: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50; also FriSat 10; JACKASS 3 (3D): 1:10, 3:45, 5:55, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10:45; also Sat-Sun 10:40 a.m.; LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: 1:20, 4:15, 5:15, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also Sat-Sun 11 a.m.; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 2, 4:40, 7:25; also Fri-Sat 10:05; also Sat-Sun 11:15 a.m.; MY SOUL TO TAKE (3D): 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15; also Fri-Sat 10:40; also Sat-Sun 11:20 a.m.; OTHER GUYS: 4:50, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 9:50; RED: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8; also FriSat 10:30; also Sat-Sun 10 a.m.; SECRETARIAT: 1, 4:05, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Sat-Sun 10:10 a.m.; SOCIAL NETWORK: 2:15, 5, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:20; also Sat-Sun 11:30 a.m.; TOWN: 1:45, 4:30, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:15; also Sat-Sun 10:50 a.m.; TOY STORY 3: 2:30; also Sat 11:45 a.m.; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 12, 3:30, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:55.

and brainwashed, who escapes then returns with his friends to defeat his former captors. Featuring the voices of Abbie Cornish, Helen Mirren, and Sam Neill. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LET ME IN (R): Director Matt Reeves (“Cloverfield”) transplants the Americanization of the gorgeous Swedish vampire flick “Let The Right One In” to 1983 New Mexico to tell the tale of a bullied boy (Kodi Smit-McPhee, “The Road”) befriended by a young bloodsucker (Chloë Grace Moretz, “Kick-Ass”). Co-stars Richard Jenkins. Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13): Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel topline this romantic comedy about two attractive singles who become caregivers to an orphaned girl. But they don’t like each other... OMG, what will happen? Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MY SOUL TO TAKE (R): Another horror movie from Wes Craven, this one about a serial killer who seems to have returned from the grave to make good on a threat to slaughter seven kids born on the night he died. Starring no one in particular. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo,

Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster NEVER LET ME GO (R): Keira Knightley, Carey Mulligan, and Andrew Garfield star in Mark Romanek’s (2002’s “One-Hour Photo”) adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s bleak dystopian novel about young people at a tranquil boarding school who are being prepped for something other than life. Little, Pittsford SECRETARIAT (PG): This feel-good tale stars Diane Lane as housewife Penny Chenery, who took over her ailing father’s stables and joined with eccentric trainer Lucien Laurin (John Malkovich) to race the 1973 Triple Crown winner. With Scott Glenn and James Cromwell. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE SOCIAL NETWORK (R): Director David Fincher’s adaptation of Ben Mezrich’s “The Accidental Billionaires” explores the hotly contested birth of Facebook from three different perspectives. With Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield (he’s the new SpiderMan), and Justin Timberlake. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster TAKERS (PG-13): This ensemble heist flick follows a gang of bank robbers lured into the always-problematic

“one last job,” only to be dogged by a tenacious cop. With Matt Dillon, Idris Elba, Zoe Saldana, Hayden Christensen, and Chris Brown. Culver THE TOWN (R): Ben Affleck’s second film is a gritty crimedrama in which he also stars as a robber in love with the bank employee (Rebecca Hall, “Please Give”) who might be able to identify him. With Oscar nominee Jeremy Renner and Emmy winner Jon Hamm. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster TOY STORY 3 (G): The second sequel to Pixar Animation’s cornerstone finds Woody, Buzz, and the rest of the playthings shipped off to a day care center, where they get into scrapes and teach more lessons. Featuring the voices of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen... you know the drill by now. Movies 10, Webster WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13): Michael Douglas reprises his Oscar-winning role as greed aficionado Gordon Gekko, now an ex-con trying to rebuild his life in these dicey economic times. Co-stars Shia LaBeouf as a struggling trader engaged to Carey Mulligan (“An Education”) as Gekko’s estranged daughter. And, yes, Oliver Stone directs. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. AMERICAN: 2:25, 5, 7:35, 10:10; also Sat-Mon 11:45 a.m.; DESPICABLE ME: 2:10, 4:25, 7:10, 9:30; also SatMon 11:50 a.m.; DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS: 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10; also Sat-Mon 11:40 a.m.; EAT, PRAY, LOVE: 2:35, 5:35, 8:35; also Sat-Mon 11:35 a.m.; EXPENDABLES: 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:15; also Sat-Mon 11:55 a.m.; GROWN UPS: 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05; also Sat-Mon 12:10; LOTTERY TICKET: 2:30, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55; also Sat-Mon 12:05; SALT: 2:20, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50; also Sat-Mon 12; TOY STORY 3: 2, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7:15, 8:30, 9:45.

Pittsford Cinema

Tinseltown USA / IMAX


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent CULVER/PARK AREA: One bed­room, 2nd floor, hardwoods, fire­place, kitchen, one car parking, basement storage, no pets, no smoking. $625 plus 1 month deposit+ security. Includes all util. 244-4123 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888.

EAST AVE/PARK: Studio $590. no/ pets). Avail Now. Carpets, heat, hot-water, gas. Laundry/ parking. Bus at door. Near Wegmans, Gym, bank, restaurants. 585-473-2473. GREAT LOCATION Corner Park/ Berkeley. Large 2br+den, remod­ eled kitchen, large living area, year round sun porch. Located in Park Ave, café/boutique scene. Parking Provided $850+. First and last month free to qualified renters with 14 month lease. Call 585-271-7597

LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet home. Utilities included. Bus line. Off street parking. South West. Call 328-2771 MONROE AVE AREA STUDIOS $275-$350, parking, includes all. 585-235-5562 ON PARK AVE with quiet offstreet parking, close-to boutiques & res­taurants, large 1 bedroom. First month free to qualified applicants. $815 includes heat, & 24 hour maintenance 585271-7597 ON PARK AVE. Near East Ave. Charming 1/2 home. First Floor, 1- 2bdrms, formal dining, hardwoods, enclosed porches, laundry. Quiet. No Pets. Nonsmokers. $795/ month +utilities. 585-392-7428 SOUTH WEDGE upper 2 bedroom, sleeping porch 1890 home, ex­posed brick, hardwood floors $800 includes all. Cat friendly, some dogs possible. 585-325-6554 STRONG/UofR/RIT 19th WARD 1- bedroom, lower level, kitchen w/ap­pliances, refinished bath, small liv­ing room. On busline, off-st.pkg. $675 includes everything! 585-482- 6009

Commercial/ Office Space for Rent

Houses for Rent HOUSE FOR RENT/ ROCHESTER: Nice 3bdrm home with an enclosed porch and large lot. $695/mo plus utilities & security. WOTB. Call Cornerstone 607-936-1945. See our complete listings at www. homesbycornerstone.com.

Houses for Sale

year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Hunting Land 25 Acres w/ Timber - $34,995. Free Closing Costs. Call NOW! 800-229-7843 www. LandandCamps.com ABANDONED MINI-FARM 21 acres- $59,900 Beautiful setting near Cooperstown! Rolling fields, streams, woods, farm buildings! Twn rd, EZ terms! Owner wants offers! (888)774-0307

Land for Sale IT’S HERE!! NYS FALL LAND SALE Oneida, Oswego, Madison, Chenango, & Lewis Counties. Over 150 Properties! 7 Acres Riverfront- $29,995. Cranberry Lake Woods- 42 Acres on Water. WAS: $229,995. NOW: $139,995. Adirondack River- 16 Acres on Water. WAS: $129,995. NOW: $79,995. Tug Hill-Montague-

Adoption A YOUNG, ENERGETIC couple looking to adopt newborn into

continues on page 37

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabu­lous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house &+ 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585- 383-8888 HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabu­lous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house &+ 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick mixed use building. 6,000 square feet of stores/office plus apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Home and Garden Professionals

36 City october 13-19, 2010


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 35 a safe, loving home. Legal and confi­dential. Expenses paid. Please call Kathy and Chris 877274-5156 ADOPT: A happily married couple have room in our loving hearts and home for your newborn. Expenses paid. Please call Debra & George at (877)732-0291 ADOPT: Hoping to share our hearts and home with your baby. Happily married couple. Expenses paid. Please call Bill & Nancy 1-877-647- 2766 or www. lotsoflovetogive.weebly.com HAPPY YOUNG COUPLE praying for the blessing of a baby to wel­ come into our hearts and home. Expenses paid. Please call Karen and Michael 1-877-865-7571

Automotive CA$H 4 CAR$ Free Towing of your junk cars and vans. $50-$5000 or donate to our Children’s Charities. 482-2140 WANTED OLD BRITISH and Italian Sports Cars. 74’ and older, any condition. Porsche 356/911, Mercedes SL, Austin Healy, Jaguar XK & XKE, MGA and others. Call 315-516-2682 DONATE VEHICLE: Receive $1000 grocery coupon, Noah’s Arc, Support no kill shelters, research to advance veterinary treatments. Free towing, tax deductible, non- runners accepted 1-866-912-GIVE

Financial Services IT’S YOUR MONEY! Lump sums paid for structured settlement or fixed annuity payments. Rapid, high payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1- 866-294-8771. A+ Better Business Bureau rating.

For Sale BACKHOE 1969 Case 580 CK Backhoe, Excellent Condition! 40 hp Diesel construction king. Extend -hoe, $ 7,800/BO 585727-4849. COPIER (HEWLETT PACKARD) Office Set Pro (1150C) Works very well (uses color and black ink) $49 Staples carries ink 585880-2903 DESK CHECK WRITER with ink supply $40 585-654-9480 DESK TOP formica with one draw­er, 2 steel file cabinets $50 585- 654-9480 DOG & CAT HOUSES kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

LAZY SUSAN 11” diameter silver color metal lazy susan (for spice cabinet or serving table) $5 OBO 261-1798 LOVE SEAT, SPANISH from 1970’s Pink & Purple, No rips $49 585-880-2903 RUG with pictures of Moose, large, can hang on wall Great gift. $45 585-880-2903 SELLING OUT While they last, fab­ric remnants, for slipcovers and up­holstery plain & printed, 3-5 yard pieces, $2.50, per yard 6-10 yard $5.00. freebies available. 585-654- 9480 SUPPORT VETERANS OUTREACH Purchase a $5 raffle ticket to win a Charlie Daniels Custom Signature Hat.

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Live Well in the Ward

27 Roslyn Street

Gleaming oak and pine floors, unpainted chestnut trim, and sparkling stained-glass windows are common characteristics of early twentieth century houses in the 19th Ward neighborhood. The American Foursquare at 27 Roslyn Street is a prime example. This house, built in 1908, is entered from the wide Roman-brick front porch with four Corinthian-style columns, through the vestibule to the front hall. The dining room to the right has vibrant red walls and a bay window with a window seat. A large wooden pocket door may be closed to separate the room from the hall. The adjacent spacious living room, which spans the length of the house, features a decorative brick-front fireplace with wooden mantelpiece. Stained-glass windows with a shield design decorate the wall on either side of the fireplace. This room also has a bay window and may be closed-off from the hall by pocket doors. The kitchen, recently remodeled, has ample counter and cupboard space. The floors in the kitchen, as in the adjacent breakfast area and powder room, are heated. The windows in the breakfast area offer a view of the backyard’s circular stone patio and perennial flowerbeds. The staircase to the to the second floor pauses at a spacious landing with a built-in wooden bench and a floral design stained-glass window. Upstairs are three bedrooms. The master includes an alcove that’s the perfect size for a dressing area.

The second bedroom offers access to an enclosed porch that is suitable for a children’s play area or an office. Also located here is access to the laundry room. The large upstairs bathroom features green wainscoting and a claw-foot bathtub with shower. The upstairs hall includes a builtin linen cabinet with drawers. The 19th Ward is home to a diverse group of doctors, lawyers, students, professors, and others who enjoy living close to the University of Rochester and downtown Rochester. Neighbors gather throughout the year to celebrate life in the community with festivals and events such as the Square Fair each June. The house at 27 Roslyn Street is within walking distance of Boulder Coffee on Genesee Street, and is only a short drive from a neighborhood YMCA, hardware store, pharmacy, grocery store, and many other shops. The house is also conveniently located on the RTS #4 Genesee/Melrose bus line. For more information about the 19th Ward, visit the 19th Ward Community Association website at www.19wca.org The list price for this 1,866-square foot house is $77,900. For more information, contact Ted Wood at 585-370-6901. By Padraic Michael Collins-Bohrer Mr. Collins-Bohrer grew up in the 19th Ward. He currently lives and works in Downtown Rochester, and is co-organizer of the HomeWork column.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 37 Proceeds benefit Veterans Outreach Center. Drawing 1110- 10. Tickets on sale at all Canandaigua National Bank Locations SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) $35 585-880-2903 PRIVACY HEDGES- Fall Blowout Sale 6’ Arborvitae(cedar) Reg $129 now $69 Beautiful,

Bushy & Nursery Grown. Free Installation & Free delivery. 518536-1367 www.lowcosttrees.com Limited sup­ply.

in forming a support group for Benzodiazepine with­drawal, or know of an existing group, please contact me. 330- 4410

Groups Forming

Home Services

BENZO WITHDRAWAL SUPPORT If you are interested

HAVE YOUR FAVORITE CHAIR re- upholstered or slip covered. Dining- room chairs re-covered. THE WORKSHOP Quality workmanship at affordable prices. Since 1954. 351 Empire Blvd. 654-9480

Jam Section BASS OR KEYS WANTED 3 piece original hard rock band wants bass/ keys to start gigging. Please ask to hear samples of our work and be creative! Mweek82@yahoo.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412

DREAM ENGINE seeks musicians for musical/poetry artist collabora­tion. Blues/ jazz/funk/rock influenc­es. All instruments. Talent, creativ­ity, improv skills required for noncommercial, performance art en­ semble. Practice Tuesday nights. Chris 585-472-9971 DRUMMER LOOKING FOR working blues band. Experienced and will­ing to travel. Text Bob @585-705- 3142 or leave message 585-473- 1654 JOE E. & THE JAM FACTORY in a special free concert at the Great great House of Guitars, Saturday October 23, 6pm KEYBOARD / SYNTH PLAYER needed now for local established rock cover band. No rental or utility fees. Please call 585-6215488 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS Looking for musicians & male sing­er to Jam & play out, coffee shops & private events Call 585266-6337 MOTOWN REVUE, “PROMISE”. Musicians needed for 50s/60s/ 70s Motown Show!!! Keyboards and Drums!! For more info and an audi­tion, call 585 202-8890. MUSICA SPEI Rochester’s sacred Renaissance group. is seeking ex­perienced singers for the upcoming season. Call Alexandra at 585-415- 9027

or visit www.musicaspei.org for more details.

Lost & Found

ROCK BAND NEEDS GUITARIST Bass Player and Drummer. Practice space needed. Rehearse new music and play occasional shows 585-482-5942

FOUND BLACK CAT Portland, Rochester General Hospital area, male, no collar Call 585266-4486

THE BOWTIES A 5-voice men’s a cappella group established in 1997 is seeking an experienced 1st (high) tenor. Call Tim at 585.303.6305. www.thebowties. com. THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) GUEST NIGHT, October 19th, 7pm. Has openings. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. All ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698. THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide va­riety of musical styles from barber­shop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. All ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585-385-2698. VOCALIST LOOKING FOR MUSICIANS to learn original music for studio and for performance. Equip & Trans and available even­ings. Guitar, drummer. keys, horns Contact Bobbie 585-328-4121 585-2341324 VOCALIST WANTED Experienced / Versatile / Reliable / Good Range for band (drums / bass / keyboard) Pop / Jazz / Ballads Larry Ferrante 585-426-7241

Looking For... IF YOU’RE A GAY, bi, curious, or versatile kind-of-guy, age 18-45, and HIV-negative, you may qualify to take part in an important medical research study at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org, or call 585.756.2329 to schedule an appointment.

Miscellaneous WIN CHARLIE DANIELS HAT Custom Signature Hat, Raffle to benefit Veterans Outreach Center. Drawing 11-10-10. Tickets ($5) on sale at all Canandaigua National Bank Locations ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 www. CenturaOnline.com

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and com­position for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 413-1896

Notices GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspa­pers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484 This is not a job of­fer. (AAN CAN)

Schools HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532- 6546 Ext. 97 http:// www. continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

Top Ads ELEMENTARY TUTORING: NYS K- 6 Certified Teacher looking to work with your elementary student by ac­tively engaging them in the learning process. Tutoring services available weeknights and weekends. Contact meaghanssmith@gmail.com

38 City october 13-19, 2010


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DANCERS: PT/FT, Earn BIG $$$$, 18+, no exp. necessary, Tally Ho, 1555 E. Henrietta Rd. Roch. Call 585-303-0550 EDITOR/ PUBLISHER FOR ORTHODOX WEEKLY: Oversee all aspects of publication (sales, edi­torial and online - www. TheJewishStar.com.) Must be able to manage sales staff, develop relationships w/ advertisers and community leaders. Familiar with 5 Towns/ Brooklyn Orthodox com­munities. Salary, incentives, health plan, 401K. Send resume w/ salary requirements to: JewishStarSearch@aol.com MUSICIAN, ORGANIST, KEYBOARDIST For The Pentecostal Miracle Deliverance

Church. 10 hours per week. Contact; Linda Smith 580 St. Paul Street, Rochester, NY 14605, 585325-3929, by October 30th. MYSTERY SHOPPERS Earn up to $100 per day. Undercover shop­ pers to judge retail & dining estab­ lishments. Experience not required Call 800-488-0524 PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) SALES MANAGER, DIGITAL/ SPECIALTY PRODUCTS Responsibilities Include: Overseeing advertising sales for our websites, training newspaper print sales team, cold calling, prospect­ing, qualifying, presenting, rela­tionship building. Knowledgeable online marketing concepts. Richner Communications, Inc. publishes 27 community newspapers and shop­pers. Compensation package

in­cludes salary, commission, bonus plan, health plan, 401K, more. Send resume w/ salary require­ments to ca­reers.richner@ gmail.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) ATTN: DRIVERS! Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits Latest Technology. Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. 877-258-8782 www. meltontruck.com

re­sort areas. No experience neces­sary. Paid training & Transportation. OVER 18 Start ASAP. 1-866-734-5216

Volunteers ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at

Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are provided. If you are interested, please call or email Jennifer Casatonguay at 585350-2526, jcastong@hillside.com.

COMPEER IS SEEKING volunteers to mentor adults. Form a lasting friendship through our E-Buddies, Compeer Calling, or One-to-One Mentor Programs. Vehicle needed, training/support provided (Contact: Renee Bryant, 546-8280, rbryant@compeer.org) COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor

continues on page 40

DRIVERS- CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED!! Albany, NY Area NE re­gional van freight Home weekly! Great Pay! 866-687-9784 www. drive4ats.com MOVIE EXTRAS earn up to $150/ day to stand in backgrounds of ma­jor film. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-6644621 (AAN CAN) **ABLE TO TRAVEL** Hiring 6 people, Free to travel all states,

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 39 youth experiencing parental incarcera­tion. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun

activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/Compeer lebert@compeer. org 585-546-8280 Ext-117

EBAY VOLUNTEER NEEDED to as­sist in eSales Department at Volunteers of America. Ebay expe­ rience required: photography and

writing. Antiques knowledge help­ ful. Call Mary Kay 585-698-1538 LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER has several 1 hour

preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-473-3030 MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neigh­bors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. SCHOOL #12, 999 South Ave is looking reading and math volun­ teers, English and Spanish, now through June. Training Provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 TALENTED PRINTER /GRAPHIC ARTIST needed to donate services. Volunteer time to design new bro­ chure for new fibromyalgia support group. Send samples & contact info to: jacolyn_fibrosupport@ hotmail.com THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes vol­ unteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your inter­ ests with our projects. Each volun­ teer makes a difference. Call Eileen 585-288-2910. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ cen­tered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155.

40 City october 13-19, 2010

WEBSTER - If you are interested in helping children and adults with de­velopmental disabilities during ther­apeutic horseback riding lessons contact Kim Kennedy at (585) 340- 2016 or kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org.

Business Opportunities ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE! Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines +Candy. All for $9995. 877-915- 8222

Career Training DRIVER TRAINING CDLA: Tractor Trailer Learn to Earn $35- $45,000 per NTTS grad employers, D.O.L.,A. T.A., National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool, NY www.ntts.edu EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http:// www. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310364-0665 (AAN CAN)


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PCAM, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/10. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 12/17/ 04. Princ. office of LLC: 125 E. Main St., Rochester, NY 14604. NYS fictitious name: PCA MANAGEMENT, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. CA addr. of LLC: 11101 Lakewood Blvd., Downey, CA 90241. Arts. of Org. filed with CA Secy. of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: Management services. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiquidPixels Europe, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/05/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 9 Royale Dr., Ste. 103, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CURTIS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Curtis LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 10/ 1/2010. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such pro­cess to 20 English Woods, Rochester, NY 14616. The LLC is orga­ nized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LESTER WILLIAMS ] Lester Williams Enterprises, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 2, 2010. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail

any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Lester Williams Enterprises, LLC, 108 Marlborough Road, Rochester, New York 14619. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Monarch Senior Living LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 20, 2010. New York office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 860 Hard Road, Webster, New York 14580. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 860 Hard Road, Webster, New York 14580. LLC is to be man­aged by one or more members. LLC is orga­nized to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Authorization of ROCHESTER MALLS, LLC (LLC). Application for Authority filed with NY Secy. of State (SSNY) on 8/31/10. Office location: Monroe County, NY. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 3/29/05. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY desig­nated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. DE ad­dress of LLC: The Corporation Trust Company, Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Certificate of Formation filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF VOILA PRODUCTIONS ] Voila Productions, LLC was filed with SSNY on May 13, 2010. Office:

Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. ad­dress which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Voila Productions, LLC, 455 South Goodman Street, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose is to en­gage in any lawful activity [ LEGAL NOTICE TREE IN THE SKY LLC ] Notice of Organization: Tree in the Sky LLC was filed with SSNY on 9/22/ 10. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 3 Jenna Way, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose is to engage in any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Prana Yoga, LLC has filed articles of organiza­ tion with the New York Secretary of State on August 27, 2010 with an effective date of forma­tion of August 27, 2010. Its principal place of business is located at 17 Watchet Lane, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designat­ed as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Watchet Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful ac­ tivity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Weins Family Holdings, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on September 1, 2010 with an effective date of formation of September 1, 2010. Its principal place of busi­ ness is located at 17 Watchet Lane, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designat­ed as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to135 Sylvania Road, Rochester, NY 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under

Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Beechwood Apartments, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 8, 2010. New York office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 400 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14607. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 400 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14607. LLC is to be man­aged by one or more members. LLC is orga­nized to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF MONROE - HSBC MORTGAGE CORPORATION (USA), Plaintiff, AGAINST KATHERINE C. CUSHMAN, ET AL., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a judgment of foreclo­ sure and sale duly dated 8/19/2010, I, the under­signed Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City Of Rochester in the County of Monroe, State of New York, on 11/ 3/2010 at 9:15 AM, premises known as 39 SCOTT CRESCENT, SCOTTSVILLE, NY 14546. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements there­ on erected, situate, lying and being in the Village of Scottsville, Town of WHEATLAND, County of Monroe and State of New York, Section, Block and Lot: 199.12-1-3. Approximate amount of judgment $48,757.83 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index #12139/09. John F. Speranza, Referee, Steven J. Baum PC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 1291, Buffalo, NY 14240-1291 Dated: 9/22/2010

[ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF MONROE - WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, AGAINST RICHARD D. WARD, SR., ET AL., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a judgment of foreclo­sure and sale duly dated 9/3/2010, I, the under­signed Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City Of Rochester in the County of Monroe, State of New York, on 10/ 28/2010 at 10:00 AM, premises known as 1020 ARNETT BOULEVARD, ROCHESTER, NY 14619. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improve­ments thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the City of ROCHESTER, County of Monroe and State of New York, Section, Block and Lot: 120.701-19. Approximate amount of judgment $75,174.94 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index #15260/09. William W. Moehle, Referee, Steven J. Baum PC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 1291, Buffalo, NY 14240-1291 Dated: 9/23/ 2010 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Antonelli Storage Facility, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 15, 2010. New York office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 22 Foxboro Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 22 Foxboro Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. LLC is to be man­aged by one or more members. LLC is orga­nized to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability

Company is Milaura LLC (the “Company”). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on June 7, 2010. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the Company may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any such process is 1655 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 215, Rochester, NY 14620. The business purpose of the Company is to en­gage in any lawful activity for which a limited liability company may be orga­ nized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 10-5097 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Sandra J. Becker; Monroe County Department of Human Services, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated September 8, 2010 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 3, 2010 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises di­rected by said Judgment to be sold and therein de­scribed as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situ­ate in the Town of Chili, County of Monroe and State of New York, being known and described as Lot No. 604 Park Place Subdivision, Section 5, as shown on a Subdivision Map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 324 of Maps, page 62. Said lot is of the di­mensions as shown on said map. Tax Account No. 158.01-6-4 Property Address: 1 Everton Run, Town of Chili, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­ tions, and easements of

record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­ mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $144,538.01 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2010. Anthony Cotroneo, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] SMITH AUTO SALES, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on September 13, 2010. It’s office is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State has been designat­ ed as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to: The LLC, P.O. Box 6, 899 Ballantyne Road, Scottsville, NY 14546. It’s business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of LAST CALL LIQUORS, LLC. Org. filed with SSNY 08/ 12/2010 County: Monroe. SSNY is desig­ nated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served, SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 339 Melville St. Rochester NY 14609. Purpose any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIX DOTS SOUND, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/23/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 156 Sedgley Park, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SLED DOG STUDIOS,

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/23/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 156 Sedgley Park, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: LIMEDROP EVENTS LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 8/ 13/2010. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of pro­cess to: C/O LIMEDROP EVENTS LLC, 45 Whitecliff Drive, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Pallet & Crate, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/ 3/2010. Office location, County of Monroe. The street address is: 5393 Holley Byron Road, Holley, NY 14470. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5393 Holley Byron Road, Holley, NY 14470. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Jarvit NY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/12/2010. Office loca­tion, County of Monroe. SSNY has been desig­nated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2255 Lyell Ave, Ste 201, Rochester NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/31/10. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated as agent

cont. on page 42

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> page 41 of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the prin­ cipal business address: 250 Mile Crossing Blvd., Suite One, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: MACHADO, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 2, 2010. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­ cess to: c/o Ronald A. Mittleman, Esq., Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter & Burstein, P.C., 507 Plum St., Suite 300, Syracuse, NY 13204. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which LLCs may be formed under the New York LLC Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JCK ENTERPRISE III, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DSM DESIGN, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/ 26/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 292 LAKE AVENUE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

42 City october 13-19, 2010

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] RIDGE ROAD PROPERTIES LLC a do­ mestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 8/20/10. NY Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Betty A. Joseph, 2104 County Line Rd., Holley, NY 14470. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 100 HJPK, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/29/09. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY has been desig­nated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 69-A Hillcourt Circle, Rochester, New York 14621. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Transitus LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/ 20/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is des­ignated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business loca­ tion at 732 PittsfordVictor Rd. Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: 37 Vine, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 10, 2010. Office lo­cation, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o Robert Mullin, Esq., P.O. Box 440, Fishers, NY 14453 Purpose: any law­ful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Oxford House Asset Mgmt., LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 10, 2010. Office lo­cation, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o Robert Mullin, Esq., P.O. Box 440, Fishers, NY 14453 Purpose: any law­ful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Oxford Houses of WNY, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 10, 2010. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o Robert Mullin, Esq., P.O. Box 440, Fishers, NY 14453 Purpose: any law­ful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ALLEY CAT OF ROCHESTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/10/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 169 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Code-2, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/7/10. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 1 Morgan Chase, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of M. LIPANI PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/10/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Mary Ann LiPani, 163 Empire Blvd., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Underground Media, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/9/10. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Nevada (NV) on 3/23/10. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1900 Empire Blvd., Ste. 348, Webster, NY 14580, also the ad­dress of the principal of­fice. Arts of Org. filed with NV Secy. Of State, 204 North Carson St., Ste. 4, Carson City, Nevada 89701-4502. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] 706 East Avenue, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/9/10. LLC’s of­fice is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business loca­ tion at 706 East Ave. Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EAST HOUSE STATE STREET APARTMENTS, L.P. Cert. of LP filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/15/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LP: 1136 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14264. Latest date on which the LP may dissolve is 9/14/ 2110. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LP at the addr. of its princ. office. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 4 ME THEN MY BOYS, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/10/10. NY Office location: Monroe. SSNY


Legal Ads is designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 816 Goodman St. S, Rochester, NY 14620-2524. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Pignato & Merkley DDS, PLLC (“PLLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 1/17/2007, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 1203. A Certificate of Amendment changing the PLLC’s name to Gregory A. Merkley, DDS, PLLC was filed with NYSOS on 9/22/ 2010. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for PLLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2086 Five Mile Line Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] APOTHEGM JEWELRY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/2/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 311 Melrose Street, Rochester, NY 14619. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of, HEALTH NETWORK, LLC Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7-2210. Office of Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 620 Park Ave. Ste 199, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ink Management LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/9/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 306 Affinity Lane, Rochester, NY 14616.

Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] ENERGY EFFICIENCY SPECIALISTS LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/ 22/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is des­ignated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business loca­ tion at 781 Harvard St., Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UTMOS ATMOS LLC, Art. of Org. files Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/01/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to P.O. Box 16301, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful ac­ tivities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Richmond Funding LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 8/17/10. County: Monroe. SSNY is desig­nated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 1690 Lyell Ave Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of 2755 Penfield Road LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/27/ 2010, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of pro­ cess served to: 2755 Penfield Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MONROE LAKE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/16/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2608

Route 112, Medford, NY 11763. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Tower Assets Newco III, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/ 1/10. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 4091 Viscount Ave., Memphis, TN 38118. LLC formed in DE on 12/18/08. NY Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of Mendon Properties Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/29/10. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1273 Pittsford-Mendon Rd., Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose: all lawful pur­ poses. [ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ] NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF RELIGIOUS CORPORATION Index No. 10-12282 In the Matter of the Application of OAKBROOK CHURCH Petitioner, For Approval of Dissolution and Distribution of Assets pursuant to Section 18 of the Religious Corporations Law TAKE NOTICE THAT upon the verified petition of John Armstrong, re­maining member of the Leadership Board of Oakbrook Church, a New York Religious Corporation, the peti­ tioner will apply to the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of Monroe, at the Courthouse, located at 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York, 14614 on the 9th day of November, 2010, at 9:30 a.m., for an order de­creeing the

dissolution of the Oakbrook Church and ordering and direct­ ing the transfer of all property belonging to the corporation, and ordering that, after ascertaining and paying the debts of the corporation and the necessary costs and ex­penses of the proceed­ings of the dissolution, the balance be devoted to (i) Independent Gospel Missions on behalf of Rev. Gulshanlal., 990 Calkins Road, Rochester, NY 14623, and (ii) Campus Crusade of Christ International on behalf of Nate & Emily Miller, 100 Lake Hart Dr., Orlando, FL 32832, to be devoted and applied to their respective general purposes, pursuant to Section 18 of the Religious Corporation Law, and for such other relief as the court deems proper. Rochester, New York Dated:September 28, 2010 Nixon Peabody LLP By: /s/Anita L. Pelletier Anita L. Pelletier 1300 Clinton Square Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585)- 263-1339 Attorneys for Oakbrook Church

Fun [ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1106 EAST RIDGE ROAD LLC ] 1106 East Ridge Road LLC (the “LLC”) filed an Application for Authority with the NY Dept. of State on September 14, 2010 pursuant to Section 802 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The LLC was formed in Oregon on September 10, 2010. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, NY. The NY Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and has been di­rected to forward service of process in care of Holley Y. Franklin, 1100 SW Sixth Avenue, Portland, OR 97204. The address of the office re­quired to be maintained by the LLC in Oregon is 19225 NW Tanasbourne Drive, Hillsboro, OR 97124. The certificate of formation is filed with the Oregon Secretary of State, Corporation Division, 255 Capitol Street NE, Suite 151, Salem, OR 973101327. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any real es­tate activities or any other business permitted under law.

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44 City october 13-19, 2010


October 13-19, 2010 - CITY Newspaper