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studio la primitive

arts zine issue 7 september 2014


slp

P A B

studio la primitive

L O

EDITOR

Robyn Stanton Werkhoven CONTRIBUTORS

T

A P I A Carnaval 2013, 108x92cm oil on linen, Pablo Tapia

FrontCover cover--Re-entry 60x55cm oil on panel, Pablo Tapia Front (C)2014

Pablo Tapia

Ann Sutherland

Kristen Lethem

Eric Werkhoven

Chris Byrnes

Lorraine Fildes

Brian Roberts

Carlin McLellan

Colin Lawson

Kathryn Thomas

Therese Kenyon

Robyn Werkhoven

Please do not copy articles in this magazine without written permission of the Editor. Copyright Š 2013 Studio La Primitive, All rights reserved. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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B

INDEX

R

Index…………………………………………………… 3

I

Editorial……………………….. Robyn Werkhoven 4

A N

Studio La Primitive Antics…….. E&R Werkhoven

5

Featured Artist………………… Pablo Tapia

6 - 19

Poem …………………………...Carlin McLellen

20 - 21

Featured Artist …………………Kristen Lethem

22 - 31

Poem…………………… …… Eric Werkhoven

32 - 33

Featured Artist………………….Brian Roberts

34 - 43

O

Artist Interview………………….Chris Byrnes

44 - 53

B

Special Feature……………….. Alison’s Birthday 54 - 55

R

E

Rabaul Volcano……

Lorraine Fildes

56 - 67

Poetry……………………………Kathryn Thomas 68 - 73

R

Adornment Exhibition………….Ann Sutherland

74 - 79

T

Art News………………………… ………………

80 - 90

S Leaving Newcastle Harbour (detail) oil on canvas - Brian Roberts Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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EDITORIAL Greetings to all our ARTS ZINE readers . This issue celebrates the Zine as one year old, the first Zine went online 1st October 2013. The Sept / Oct 2014 issue features interviews with nationally recognised artists Kristen Lethem, Pablo Tapia, and Brian Roberts’s latest exhibition. Don’t miss reading our new essays, poetry and art news. Special feature on band Alison’s Birthday, Monique Werkhoven and Jaspinadress are both talented musicians, song writers and artists , who took off from Australia 6 years ago, have teamed up with UK musician Isa Blood to produce their edgy , witch punk band. Front cover of 1st issue of SLP ARTS ZINE.

The ARTS ZINE features professional Hunter Valley, national and international visual artists poets and writers, glimpses into their world of art and their creative processes. Submissions welcomed, we would love to have your words and art works in future editions.

SLP would like to thank all contributors . DEADLINE FOR NEXT NOVEMBER ISSUE 8 is OCTOBER 15TH . Submit articles to email:

Regards - your editor Robyn Werkhoven

werkhovenr@bigpond.com Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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E &

R A

N T I C S STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE (C)2014 - ANTICS by E&R Werkhoven collaborative drawings . www.studiolaprimitive.com Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Pablo Tapia Opposites - Pablo Tapia (C)2014

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PABLO TAPIA BACKGROUND: “I grew up in Santiago, Chile and arrived in Australia in 1999 following my wife who I met back in my country when I was studying engineering. Here I found an animation/ traineeship job with Walt Disney Australia in Sydney. I didn't stay there for very long but the experience made clear to me that my true calling was an art related career. I enrolled at Tafe and later I finished my BF at Newcastle University. That was followed by a three year training in Renaissance Oil Painting Techniques with Charlie Sheard, a seven month period studying the Max Meldrum Method intensively at the ex-Graeme Inson school, an honours year again at Uni and

a scholarship to do a Master by Research in Fine Arts. My experience of Newcastle was so great that I had to come and live permanently here.”

When did your artistic passion begin? “Since I can remember drawing came very natural to me...drawing accurately wasn't difficult but my paintings were horrible. I would say that it became a true passion during my first year at Tafe...when I was exposed to a lot of art history and to the realities of training and attempting to become a professional artist. Today I just can't get enough of it!” Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Jocimar 52 x 56 cm Oil on linen Pablo Tapia (C)2013

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Pablo Tapia describes his work: “Observational...tonal impressionist with an inclination for the abstract qualities in all images. I try to see and describe pictorial characteristics on the things/people I am looking at. Abstract qualities like the movement of light

or

colours

playing

against

each

other.

Nevertheless

Symbolism

keeps

showing

up

in

small quantities because when you focus on technical aspects as I do the subconscious feels free to release inner forces...it is like a byproduct. Process, materials, and being present ( as in mindfulness) also are fundamental to my work.”

What inspires you Pablo? “Simple things, the drama of light and shadow, and shapes. These visual aspects can be found everywhere...you just have to look. What you paint (portraits, landscapes, etc) is an excuse to play with paint...and all at the end is a way to get to know the world and yourself.”

Name your greatest achievement, exhibitions? “Mmmmm. Semi-finalist at the Moran last year perhaps. University medal too.”

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Peste 60 x 55cm Oil on panel Pablo Tapia (C)2013

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What are you working on at present? “I have a couple of portrait commissions for the University and I am working on my solo show for the gallery that represents my work; Frances Keevil Art Gallery. This exhibition also will act as the body of work needed to complete my Master by Research in Fine Arts.”

Your future aspirations with your art? “Hopefully I will be able to get another representation in a different state and promote more the courses on Renaissance techniques and the Max Meldrum Method which I really enjoy sharing with my students. Perhaps one day to have my own art school.”

Forthcoming exhibitions? “At the end of October at the Frances Keevil Art Gallery in Double Bay, Sydney.”

Other interests? “Many! Science...specially Physics, religion, politics, philosophy, cinema. I also like sports and martial arts....and I like those stories that you normally only tell to strangers.” - Pablo Tapia (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Stain 60 x 55 cm Oil on panel Pablo Tapia (C)2013

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“Pablo Tapia's art practice reflects an increasing obsession with the traditions and history painting. Over time, his oeuvre cultivated by a thorough analysis of old Master techniques and applications has been rewarded through commercial and institutional success and recognition. Tapia paints the world that surrounds him regardless of subject matter devoutly executing visual concepts that are self-reflexive. His work navigates a trajectory that articulates his passion for paint, its material characteristics and qualities bestowing a truth to his current body of work that is often missing in contemporary visual culture.�

-Dr Annemarie Murland (C)2014 Artist and Educator, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus

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El Grito 55 x 60 cm Oil on panel Pablo Tapia (C)2013

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Early Bird 46 x 42 cm Oil on linen Pablo Tapia (C)2011

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Battle Ready 67 x 61 cm Oil on panel Pablo Tapia (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Breath 57 x 51 cm Oil on canvas Pablo Tapia (C)2013

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Red Scarf 55 x 50 cm Oil on board Pablo Tapia (C)2013 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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PABLO TAPIA Represented by Frances Keevil Gallery

www.franceskeevilgallery.com.au

Winter Self Portrait 138 x 77 cm

Doug Moran Semi Finalist 2013

Oil on canvas

Pablo Tapia (C)2013 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Untitled - Carlin McLellen Stars escape out of stars

Continuity commences divorce proceedings against the here and now. What's next? Van Gough is still missing an ear Hemingway still wants to sleep with my lover

Feeling aimless I walk into town to watch a punk and hardcore show at White's records I don't wear ear plugs because Beethoven did it deaf So why can't I? Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Usually I leave early to buy sharpies

I catch the bus home, checking myself out

from Coles Marketown

in the CCTV screens: Such a handsome, noble douchette.

I am H Foot

Back home, I turn on the radio

I am Poems

To drown out the ringing in my ears

I am CUBE

Sunday jazz saves me from several things

I am Squirtle

Such as words & getting muddled up

I am the treble clef on the park bench

& being a person

beside the pergola in King Edward Park

& people I remember the memorial overlooking the cliff & I remember not being able to breathe there.

Carlin McLellen (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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KRISTEN LETHEM

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KRISTEN LETHEM - INTERVIEW “I was born in Newcastle and spent much of my early childhood at our farm in Stroud or on the beach at Nelson Bay. I had a fairly nomadic childhood as my father liked to travel. When I was seven, we spent a whole year travelling around Europe. I spent days watching the changing countryside through the windows of our car as we drove from country to country on our European road trip. The most exotic country we lived in outside of Europe was probably Iran, then, in complete contrast we moved back to Europe, to picturesque little village in the depths of the English countryside. Here I spent most days riding my horse around the rolling hills of the South Downs. I think this immersion in nature and the ability to see long views from the

very top of the Downs, sparked my initial interest in painting the landscape. My family returned to Australia in 1981 and bought an old convict-built homestead in the Upper Hunter surrounded by, what to me, was a typically ‘Australian’ landscape. Everything was on a much larger scale, the light was harsh and the colours appeared bleached and monochromatic.

I spent the early 80’s as an art student at Sydney College of the Arts, where I studied Visual Communication and Design. Then, with my degree in hand, I moved to London, where I spent fourteen years working as an illustrator, illustrating anything from children’s books, life style magazines and brochures to packets of rice and labels on bottles of wine.” Opposite page: Summer Hill Road - mixed media on canvas - Winner Waverly Art Prize 2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Fowlers Gap 1 – mixed media on canvas - Kristen Lethem (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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“I am now in my final semester at the College of Fine Art U N S W, in Paddington, where I am studying for a Master of Art, with a major in painting. “My paintings are landscapes, mainly depicting distant views of valleys and rolling hillsides. Many of my works are views seen from an elevated perspective in order to show the ‘pattern’ of the landscape. I work in

a restricted colour palette to help emphasise this idea of shape, pattern and contrast and to create a particular mood. I am inspired by the Australian landscape. My initial observations of the Upper Hunter had a huge impact on me particularly in contrast to the more muted landscapes of the English countryside. I was struck by the harshness of light and the contrast it created between the bleached hillsides and the shadows cast by the vegetation. This contrast created patterns that shift and change according to the position of the sun. I think I have become obsessed with the idea of the landscape and pattern and now when I look at a particular view, that is predominantly what I see. My greatest achievement in relation to my career as an artist would have to be, being selected and hung in

the Paddington Art Prize four years in a row and winning the Waverley Art Prize in July this year. This is my final semester of my Masters in painting, so in the immediate future, I am going to be working towards a body of work for the end of year exhibition. I am hoping to explore the impact of man on our environment and reflect this idea in my body of work as part of my process.” Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Upper Hunter – mixed media on canvas - Kristen Lethem (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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“Every landscape has a unique pattern or language.. It’s own ‘topographical script’. My future aspirations for my work would be to travel more widely around Australia in order to experience a variety of landscapes and explore the characteristics that help inform their individuality.

I am in the process of applying for residen-

cies in Hill End and Bundanoon, which would allow me to really spend time observing and recording the particular ‘language’ of each individual area. I will be exhibiting my body of work from my Masters degree in November, at the College of Fine Arts and will have selected pieces in the Christmas show at Frances Keevil Gallery in Double Bay. Last year I travelled with the University of New South Wales, to their Arid Research Station near Broken Hill. Here, a group of us from C O F A, spent a week or so exploring and immersing ourselves in the landscape and creating work in response to our experiences. Whilst there we took part in a string making workshop and I became absolutely hooked. My entire final project was an installation piece composed of a variety of string vessels made from and inspired by various found objects, including wool, bones and grasses from the area and reflecting the colours of the arid landscape. I was so inspired by the whole process that string

making has become another part of my practice, and I now hold regular string and vessel making workshops in Sydney!”

- Kristen Lethem (C)2014

Kristen Lethem works may be viewed at: www.franceskeevilgallery.com.au

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Carrobolla Road – mixed media on canvas Kristen Lethem (C)2014

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Near Vacy - Finalist Paddington Art Prize, Winner COFA Award – mixed media on canvas, Kristen Lethem (c)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Flood - Finalist Paddington Prize 2011 - mixed medium on canvas - Kristen Lethem (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Gresford Road - Finalist Mosman Art Prize 2014 - Kristen Lethem. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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L O V E P

O E E&R WERKHOVEN - drawing STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE (c)2014

M Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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LOVE POEM I love you for all it’s worth.

After all the work is done and we are all

That’s why we are still together.

home bound.

What’s happening these days that make it

Ready to unwind, ready to embrace

special.

our loved ones.

To recount each moment seems a mam-

We are not taking a back seat, we

moth task.

need to be upfront.

A gesture of gentle repose, while the sun

To make the most of life, to make the

goes down or comes up.

most of love.

And loves sweet caresses flow into the

Moments that close in to our heart

wide open sky, like dew drops and tears of

beating.

happiness.

- ERIC WERKHOVEN (c)2014

That all is fine, and that you love me as

well. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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BRIAN ROBERTS SELECTIONS FROM

JOURNEY

SEPTEMBER 12 – 28

OPENING: SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 13 FROM 3PM ASW 40 ANNIE ST WICKHAM NSW 2293

WWW.ART-SYSTEMS-WICKHAM.COM Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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On show at ASW from September 12, 2014

SELECTIONS FROM A JOURNEY by BRIAN ROBERTS. Over the last two years I have been fortunate to have developed an association with Brian & Shirley both as a gallery owner of ASW and as a friend. Subsequent visits to their wonderful home and studio at Eccleston in the Hunter Valley, has strengthened our artistic relationship. Throughout Brian’s recent illness, he remains stoic and passionate about his art. Arriving in Newcastle in 1991, Brian and Shirley have continued to be active and prominent members of the arts community. Brian’s immense catalogue of work is testimony to his passion for art making and in particular to his love of oil painting. His early career in design, photography and advertising has ensured that his craft has been imbued with a sharp eye for all the ingredients that make an artwork successful. On entering Brian & Shirley’s studio one is struck by the enormity of their passion and commitment to art making. Along with neatly stacked canvases are drawing cabinets filled with reams of life drawings and portraits rendered with surety and beauty, significantly, Brian and Shirley first met at life drawing sessions in the 80s. Brian’s artistic career is enriched by his life experiences. Well-travelled, and having a sharp business acumen, he has been infused with the wealth of life skills and a knowledge, that only the most prodigious artists possess. His paintings tell, as does fine poetry, of deeper meanings and introspection. I am proud to have the opportunity to exhibit Brian Roberts survey of work titled Selections from a Journey at ART SYSTEMS WICKHAM. - Colin Lawson (C)2014

Opposite page:

WINTER – ECCLESTON oil on canvas 2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Selections from a Journey, Brian Roberts at ASW The power of nature and the expressiveness of pigment are brought together in Brian Roberts’ selection of paintings. The dual act of seeing what is not there but is implied with brushes and a painting knife has led to works that extend across several traditions: Abstract Expressionism, Romanticism, and Asian landscape painting. This marriage of styles leads me to think about D.T. Suzuki’s description of the painters purpose, linking it to Zen

philosophy, is to ‘create forms and sounds out of formlessness and soundlessness.’ Eastern

philosophy has pervaded Brian’s life and work, leading him to adopt a certain discipline and consistency about his art practice, and at the same time the gesture or stroke.

remain receptive to ‘the moment’ with vigour and daring in

Roberts’ journey has been a steady climb that has kept him responsive and

appreciative of nature, it’s ‘beauty and terror’. The man-made alliance with nature is expressed in his harbour series using navigation symbols, shipping and Nobby’s

Head in Newcastle as the key landmark to a safe harbour. On the other hand, the

precariousness of life expressed in painting heavy skies, storms and bush fires, are presented in an epic romantic style with their low horizons and smokey atmospherics.

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STORM APPROACHING SEAL ROCKS - Oil on canvas, Brian Roberts. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Roberts’ work is never static - it conveys movement – in fact it tracks the physical sweeping, scraping and wrist action of an artist who imagines everything in colour. In one of his most recent paintings Fire Flares, the flying fury of embers in a fire storm are implied with the ground a deep black penetrated by brilliant red to suggest burning coals – still dangerous - with trails of smoke rising. The colour handling in this painting is beautiful and confident and retains the ambiguity that keeps painting mysterious and magical. Roberts has sought the dramatic in his pictures and has used the solidity of oil paint to push and nudge his way through, with a palette knife.

The whipped up ocean threatens a coastal headland in Storm

Approaching Seal Rocks. The edges of the knife

create the detail that sits on top of the smeared and

blended backgrounds. A crisp dark is allowed to stay to indicate a silhouetted rock formation whilst white

frothy clouds are swallowed up by a turbulent sky. Flashes of pure aqua, ochre and red remind us that this is pigment and that the action is happening under the artists hand. The exhibition is a survey of Brian Robert’s work over the past decade bringing us up to date in 2 014.

Therese Kenyon

MFA

Artist/Curator August 2014

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LAST LIGHT – NOBBYS

Oil on canvas, Brian Roberts Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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BOAMBEE INLET Oil on canvas Brian Roberts

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FIRE FLARES Oil on canvas Brian Roberts

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NAVIGATING NORTH Oil on canvas Brian Roberts

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BIOGRAPHIC NOTE Brian Roberts studied painting and graphic design at the Melbourne College of Graphic Arts as part of a seven year printing apprenticeship at The Herald and Weekly Times in Melbourne. On completion

of his course he travelled to London where he worked as an illustrator, art

director, painter and film maker. From England Brian moved to the USA where he continued his career in television, film making and painting. On returning to Australia he continued for a time as a film producer/director in the advertising industry until he opened Impressions Gallery, and later Signed Editions Gallery in Melbourne.

In 1996 he was a demonstrator at Avondale College, Cooranbong and took part in the Artist-inResidence Program at Maitland City Art Gallery. From 1997 to 1999 he conducted painting workshops at Maitland City Art Gallery and Willandra Art Centre in Sydney. Brian resides and paints in Eccleston, Hunter Valley, NSW.

Enquiries: 0431853600 ASW 40 ANNIE ST WICKHAM NSW 2293

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CHRIS BYRNES

BHP Streets with curved lines positive - Chris Byrnes (C)2014

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CHRIS BYRNES - INTERVIEW BACKGROUND: “I grew up in Jesmond in a family of seven children and attended Newcastle Art School in the early 70’s.

Later I took evening classes at TAFE while working full time to raise my son Christian John. By joining Newcastle Printmakers Workshop around 1996 I was able to exhibit with a group of people which meant sharing the financial costs of being part of the art world.

An opportunity to work at the University of

Newcastle in early 2000 meant I could undertake a Bachelor of Fine Art Degree Programme part time, as the University supported staff interested in completing a first degree programme. I graduated with Honours in 2011 and currently live and work from my home studio in Waratah while family members are scattered across Newcastle, the Hunter Valley, NSW and WA.”

Chris Byrnes - work and inspirations: “I would describe myself as one happily ensconced in a Modernist world and living in the upside down visual world of the camera obscura at present. My work explores the magic of photography as I react as a human being within the scientific, philosophical and joyous world of photographic alchemy. My work must pay homage to the hand-made and I find my work more and more, exists as unique state photographs.” Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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BHP soft landscape - Chris Byrnes (C)2014

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“All I need is the power of light as it exists in the physical world, an aperture to let the light inside and a light sensitive emulsion into which the image can be embedded. When I walk out into the world with my primitive cameras I measure the experience in heartbeats, pulses and in the breath that I take, a breath of pleasure, wonder, joy and anticipation of what may be unfolding

inside the camera at that point in space and time. I find inspiration from the scientists, historians, mathematicians, philosophers and artists who first explained [and continue to explain] the world to the masses. Inspiration also comes from environmental activists such as Green Peace and human activists such as Amnesty International. These are the people desperately trying to make positive changes across all humanity. Amongst the art movements and styles that interest are Surrealism, the rich visual world of the Pictorialists and the tonal and soft painted mark of painters such as Max Meldrum and Clarice Beckett. Inspiration comes more from painting and paper media works more than directly from photography. I approach photography as a painter or print-maker, interested in process, materiality and surface. While the surface image must be interesting, it is only ever as good as the hand-made, individual process that lies underneath that surface. It must come from a place of skill, training, practice and of course individual imagination and purpose.�

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Platform all Stations - Chris Byrnes (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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‘At the time of writing, I have just finalised work for a group exhibition for a Pop-Up Gallery event at Nobbys Light House in July. Other current projects include working on a book of images – Newcastle through a Pinhole and waiting replies for some possible funding opportunities to undertake a camera obscura based project in Sydney. I remain forever hopeful.

I remember my first venture into art. I coloured in an illustration in the Newcastle Morning Herald which won me a prize of 1 shilling and 3 pence I think it was. I was about five years old. My mother being the vigilant person that she was recognised that I could draw or at least colour and arranged for my kindergarten teacher to allocate a small section of the blackboard for me to draw on at school. I also won an Enid Blyton book in a sand-building sculpture competition at Newcastle Beach when I was about seven years old. -experiencing the joy of discovery as a child without any need to market, commit to social media, compete in a global market, pay gallery and meet exhibition costs and sign performance contracts. All I had to do was have fun making images and objects. Some aspects haven’t changed while others - , well that is another story........”

Chris Byrnes (C)2014

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Sunday Morning , bench pinhole - Chris Byrnes (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Nobby’s 4, pinhole view - Chris Byrnes (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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2 Hours 8 Minutes - Chris Byrnes (C)2014 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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All Washed Up or Turning Tide Chris Byrnes (C)2014

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ALISON’S BIRTHDAY

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“ALISON’S BIRTHDAY are a sour trio of amateur dramatics from Brighton UK, conjured via seance to soundtrack your VHS-horror nightscapes. Writing spooked hypnotics of songs, Alison's birthday haunt the crossroads between womb gloom and witch punk.” Alison’s Birthday Jaspin Inadress

Monique Werkhoven Isa Blood

“Further Than the Moon” - Alison’s Birthday

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RABAUL - VOLCANO LORRAINE FILDES

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RABAUL - VOLCANO LORRAINE FILDES My most adventurous holiday was to Rabaul in Papua New Guinea. On the tip of the Gazelle Peninsula is the Rabaul caldera. This caldera has many sub-vents, Tavurvur and Vulcan being two of the most wellknown. Mount Tavurvur is by far the most active. In 1937 Tavurvur and Vulcan, erupted simultaneously, killing 507 people and destroying most of the buildings and infrastructure. It was debatable whether a regional centre would be re-established there. This eruption however did lead to the founding of the Rabaul Volcano

Observatory which watches over the many active volcanoes on Papua New Guinea and educates and prepares the population for evacuation if an eruption is thought imminent.

Rabaul was re-established by the Japanese during their occupation in World War II. This rebuilding was be-

cause Rabaul has one of the finest harbours in the region and was perfect as a naval base. At the end of the war Papua New Guinea was given to Australia to administrate. The capital was moved to Port Moresby, but Rabaul remained the main city of the Gazelle Peninsula. By 1990 Rabaul's population was 17,044. Opposite page: View of Rabaul Harbour from the Rabaul Volcano Observatory. Smoking Tavurvur can be seen in the distance and two cruise ships are in the harbour. My cruise ship was the Dawn Princess (furthest away). Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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In 1983 and 1984 the town was readied for evacuation when the volcanoes started to heat up. Nothing happened until 19 September 1994, when again Tavurvur and Vulcan erupted simultaneously, destroying the airport and covering most of the town with heavy ash fall. Even with only 19 hours of warning most of the city's inhabitants were safely evacuated before the eruption. Five people were killed — one death was caused by lightning, a feature of volcanic ash clouds. The planning and evacuation drills helped keep the death toll low. Most of the buildings in Rabaul collapsed due to the weight of ash on their roofs. The 1994 eruption prompted the relocation of the provincial capital to Kokopo. Nonetheless, Rabaul is slowly rebuilding in the danger zone. Vulcan has remained dormant since the eruption, while small-scale eruptions from Tavurvur occur intermittently. Of course, personal interpretation matters. I couldn’t believe what was

happening in Rabaul when I visited in 2009. Tavurur was continually “erupting” throwing up rocks, ash and smoke into the air. The rocks apparently went back into the vent and only the smoke and ash carried out to the nearby villages and harbour. The people of Rabaul were undisturbed with these small “eruptions”.

Opposite page photograph: Four wheel drive vehicles took us from the Port to Matupit village which was just across a small harbour inlet from the Tavurvur vent. On the way we saw ash filled creeks, ash covered mountains and burnt greenery struggling up through the ash.

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My photographs will give you some idea of the state of Rabaul in 2009. I have read that Tavurvur exploded again in 2013. As far as I was concerned it was exploding in 2009. One has to ask whether the people who were living in the local Matupit village moved or are they still living under the ash? After the 1994 eruption they were moved and resettled in Kokopo, but as soon as Tavurvur settled sufficiently they insisted on returning to their land. I feel sorry for the children who are living there and breathing in this volcanic ash every day, but who knows what kind of resettlement conditions they were given in Kokopo – obviously not good enough to keep them there. I was totally covered in ash within a short time of being in the volcanos’ vicinity. Our cruise ship – just on a daylight visit - was covered in fine grey ash. I find it hard to realize that people can live under such incredible conditions. It was an overwhelming experience. It was just the most extreme

experience in life that I have ever had.

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In Matupit village everything is covered in fine grey ash. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Children play football in the ash, dogs roll in the ash and when it rains ash and water fall upon you. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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We left the village of Matupit and drove as close as possible to Tavurvur. We left the vehicles and

walked through thick ash to the waters edge, looking straight across the

water to Tavurvur.

Up close to Tavurvur was frightening. It is an active smoke belching, rock throwing and rumbling volcano. Ash continually falls on you, while hot water dissolves sulphur from the rocks, causing an orange froth to

wash up on the grey ash sands. - Lorraine Fildes (C)2014

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Frangipani tree (and tourists) struggling with the ash.

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Kathryn Thomas POETRY Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Kathryn Thomas - Poet Kathryn Thomas was a prolific poet, writer and philosopher, who lived on the South Coast near Wollongong, NSW. As a tribute to Kathryn, Arts Zine will be featuring a selection of poems from her book “Phoenix,... Free” published in 1990, in forthcoming issues.

direction we are moving in.

You may

not agree with all that is contained within these poems, but then, that is not the purpose of my work; there is no wish to convert you to a way of thinking, but rather a challenge to you to find a

more

appropriate solution to what consti

tutes “suffering” in our community, and hopefully relieve it.”

Kathryn says about her work “In every way, my poetry attempts to reflect on part of what is essential to humanness, and is, therefore, a celebration of that reality: an attempt to challenge the concepts of an Age perceived to be in crisis, and to offer a personal re-examination on those attitudes which have, (arguably), bought us collectively to the brink of disaster. It is only when we are able to peer into the abyss, from the vantage of the edge of the

Illustrations from Phoenix,…Free!

precipice, can we draw back from, then rethink the

by Robyn Stanton Werkhoven (C)2014. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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MY LOVE IS‌‌. As a blossom: not expecting the joy of its spring, that moment it attains its fullness of being as a mediator from the Source; one brief blooming, to atrophy, then crumble into eternity. Not to consider it may or may not become fertile and bear fruit; it opens and reveals its self to the nourishment of its author, not attending to the joy it gives the hearts identifying with its beauty. Delivering its perfume to its environment freely,

not caring, uncaring of the imbibing; and those reveling in the odour it gives them, casually accept the blossom’s unknowing generosity as the order of things. For that is its nature, and mine.

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I AM NOT THIS BODY Kathryn Thomas Everyday bludgeons my senses; the urban disease. My eyesight diverted from seeing the truth.

Endless colours and forms, arranged and ordered manipulating my attitude: “Buy this,….. Eat this,…. Wear this,…. Smell this,…. A parade of idols, Prostituted to Form, A template I will never fit. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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This constant distraction, this subversion of personal sovereignty, reduces me to less than what I could be.

I know I heard the plop of the penny drop.

I must smell only of nice things, smell only of nice things’ smell only nice.

I must clothe and hide away, distract from what is obvious:

Else I may smell the decay’ “That something’s rotten in the State,..” and the rat’s getting harder to find!

the day I was born I began to die.

I must hear, only what I want to hear.

Soon, this sheep will be shorn, to reveal the carcass underneath.

Block off that which disturbs like the ripples on a pond.

And knowing all these things, the child within cries out, “Let’s sing.”

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O Mammon, you least erected spirit,

Dwellings built larger for fewer people,

Speculating in gilt, creating human suffering,

while the usurped and scrupulous

The Ideal eludes you.

shelter, hide in cardboard boxes.

The streets are filled with garbage

The accumulated wisdom of the past

Thrown-up by consumerism,

twiddles its thumbs, neglected and discarded,

And the poor live off the vomit.

a burden to those who refuse to listen.

The young fill their veins with pain-killers,

And so the humane

Their humanness dismissed as worthless,

take a backrow seat

And they die, wasted in toilet blocks.

to blood, and bombs, and bullets.

Men perpetuate the myth

- Kathryn Thomas (C)2014

Of the powerlessness of women, And wonder why they’re losing hope. And the landowner’s lie! Whose was it first to sell? And what was the price?

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ADORNMENT Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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ADORNMENT EXHIBITION 23 OCT - 9 NOV 2014 NEWCASTLE ART SPACE Official OPENING SAT 25 Oct. 5 –7 pm Adornment 2014 will feature artists Varelle Hardy Laraine Palmer Ann Sutherland Eric & Robyn Werkhoven Andrew Finnie Carolyn McKay Misha Moon Jennifer Obrien Dawn Thompson Maree Nichols Lis Mertens Suzanne Schroder

What is Wearable Art? Wearable art may be created from many art genres and techniques. It may include an original designed article of clothing, jewellery or body decoration such as tattooing, by an artist to adorn the human body. Wearable and Body art themes can range from the absurd, playful, quirky to the more serious-minded, regal or

social political. The artist enters into the world of fantasy, the surreal where wonderful art works are conjured and created, an escape from the mundane. Throughout history humans have been captivated and engrossed with the beautifying and decorating of

their bodies.� Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Wearable Art Exhibition 2013 - Newcastle Art Space. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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The exhibition Adornment 2013 was held at Newcastle Art Space and the curator Ann Sutherland, then Director of NAS, was inspired by events such as WOW in New Zealand and The Beanie Festival in Northern Territory, to endeavour to establish an ongoing similar annual event in Newcastle to showcase the art of body decoration so entrenched in the human psyche.

Sutherland organised a body painting demonstration at the 2013 Adornment opening in memory of Emilee Ades, known to many as Faerie Emilee. ‘Ades won national awards for her body art and travelled overseas to teach and compete. She was recognised as one of the world’s top 50 body artists and painted models for the premiere of the Sex and the City movie in Milan.’ Quote article for Newcastle Herald 2013 by Alison Branley “Body art like any other art form ranges from the frivolous to the serious” quote from The Decorated Body by Anthropologist Robert Brain inspired her to encourage artists to explore the idea of adornment in the form of wearable art, photography, drawing and sculptural works and for artists to create art works based on expressions made by the tattooed body, the scarred body, the plastic body, the symbolic body, the sexual

body, the animal body, the social body, the religious body, the dressed body and the decorated body.

- Ann Sutherland, Curator (C)2014 Title page photo features Donna Cavanough, Adornment Exhibition 2013 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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For the 2013 Adornment exhibition, Hunter Valley textile and installation artists Dawn Thompson, created an amazing dress that could be folded up into a book.

Dance Dress, a collaborative work by Eric & Robyn Werkhoven. The dress comprised of a hand painted skirt panel featuring wild dancing women & beasts, and a silk screened bodice, it was suspended from the gallery ceiling. Artist and singer Donna Cavanough created an environmental friendly, fanciful bodice from banana fronds. After wearing it can be returned to the earth for composting. 2014 ADORNMENT will no doubt exhibit many wonderful and bizarre creations! An exhibition not to be missed! Article by Robyn Werkhoven and Ann Sutherland Š2014

Dawn Thompson beside her Book Dress (C)2013. Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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Further information contact Ann Sutherland Email: elizann53@hotmail.com

DANCE DRESS - collaborative work Eric & Robyn Werkhoven (C)2013 Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE ARTS ZINE Celebrates 1 year old on 1st October 2014. All issues may be viewed & downloaded free from

www.issuu.com

Further information contact Editor Robyn Werkhoven: Email: werkhovenr@bigpond.com Issue 7 - Sept / Oct

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A R T N E W S

STUDIO 48 Looking for expressions of interest for gallery next year 2015. Re: rent periods.

three

week

Contact details: Visit gallery on a Friday between 11am - 4 pm or a/h Phone number

49574714 Director Sandra Baker

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MAX MELDRUM PAINTING METHOD FOR PORTRAITURE

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An intensive weekend workshop where students will learn the Australian Tonal Impressionist system applied to portraiture. This unique painting method teaches the student to see visual phenomena objectively and as an arrangement of coloured shapes; thus eliminating mental preconceptions about the subject. There is no need for linear drawing skills, knowledge of anatomy or geometric perspective. The course is comprised of practical exercises, demonstrations and the presentation of tonalist principles and theory designed to build a strong foundation and give actual hands on experience in the impressionist tradition.

Instructor Pablo Tapia is a professional artist, specialised in Renaissance Techniques and the Max Meldrum Method. Currently he is represented by the Frances Keevil Gallery in Double Bay, Sydney. Course will run on the 18th and 19th of October at the Newcastle Community Arts Centre: 246 Parry St, Newcastle West NSW. Phone: (02) 4961 1696 Cost: $350. Six students max. Further information and material list Please contact Pablo Tapia: Email: pablomtt@gmail.com

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ART NEWS

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A R T N E W S

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M View from Mount Canobolas – mixed media on board Kristen Lethem(C)2014

Profile for Robyn Werkhoven

Slp arts zine september 2014  

Arts and Literary magazine featuring artists' interviews and exhibitions. Poetry, essays and Art News.

Slp arts zine september 2014  

Arts and Literary magazine featuring artists' interviews and exhibitions. Poetry, essays and Art News.