{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

L A

s t u d i o arts zine issue 33 sept 2019

P R I M I T I V E


N

N

A

A

T

T

A

A

L

L

I

I

E

E

D

D

U

U

N

N

C

C

A

A

N

N https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/


AMELIA VIVASH

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/


K E N

K E N

O’ R E G A N

O’ R E G A N

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/


Jo Katsiaris

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/


LORI CICCHINI http://www.loriana.com.au/


Reimagining the Canon

EXHIBITION October 25 - 17 November 2019

Newcastle Art Space 91 Chinchen Street, Islington, NSW.


slp

S

T U

D

studio la primitive

I

O CONTRIBUTORS L A

Lori Cicchini

Annemarie Murland

Pearl Moon

Robyn Werkhoven

R

Gina Ermer

Art Systems Wickham

I

James Drinkwater

Dungog Contemporary

Maggie Hall

Sculpture on the Farm

I

Lorraine Fildes

Dungog by Design

T

Brad Evans

Newcastle Potters Inc.

I

Eric Werkhoven

P

M

V

E Woman, Red Dog & Flowers, acrylic on canvas, H76 X 51cm. E&R Werkhoven Š 2019.


INDEX Editorial …………

Robyn Werkhoven

10

SLP Antics………... …

E & R Werkhoven

11

Feature Artist ………..

Lori Cicchini

Essay …………………

Maggie Hall

…………………

12 - 33

James Drinkwater

34 - 45

Feature Artist …………

Pearl Moon

46 - 65

Sogetsu Ikebana ………

Lorraine Fildes

66 - 75

Feature Artist ………...

Gina Ermer

76 - 89

Poetry ………………….

Eric Werkhoven

90 - 91

Poetry ………………….

Eric Werkhoven

92 - 93

Poetry ………………….

Brad Evans

94 - 95

Poetry …………………

Robyn Werkhoven

96 - 97

Gaol to Art School ……..

Lorraine Fildes

ART NEWS……………….

98 - 113 114 - 145

Front Cover: Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019, Model Tanisha. Aussie Icon 2 , mixed media on canvas, H61 x W45cm. - Pearl Moon © 2019.


EDITORIAL

Maggie Hall, artist, writer and photographer, presents an essay on her response to the recent exhibition of contemporary artist James Drinkwater’s

Greetings to our ARTS ZINE readers, this is our Spring edition.

The September ARTS ZINE 2019 includes interviews and features on photographers, artists and fashion designers.

The stunning work of fine art and fashion photographer Lori Cicchini,

work at the

Newcastle Art Gallery. The feature includes a selection of Drinkwater’s paintings. Don’t miss out reading new poems by Brad Evans and Eric Werkhoven.

including her creative portraits and emotive, narrative photography. ART NEWS and information on forthcoming art exhibitions.

The extraordinary artist and fashion designer Pearl Moon.

In the

interview Moon writes about the difficulty with protecting her designs being copied by foreign companies.

The ARTS ZINE features articles and interviews with

national and international visual artists, poets and writers, Our other artist /fashion designer is Gina Ermer based in Newcastle

exploring their world of art and creative processes.

NSW. Ermer writes about her life and establishing Fringe Dweller, the her fashion label.

Submissions welcomed, we would love to have your words and art works in future editions in 2019.

Lorraine Fildes, our resident travel photographer and writer, has of flower arrangement and the history behind Sydney’s National Art

Deadline for articles 15th October for November issue 34, 2019. Email: werkhovenr@bigpond.com

School…… from Gaol to Art School.

Regards - your editor Robyn Werkhoven

two interesting articles this month, one on Ikebana , the Japanese art

The publisher will not accept responsibility or any liability for the correctness of information or opinions expressed in the publication. Copyright © 2018 Studio La Primitive.

All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced , in whole or in part, without the prior permission of the publisher.

Issue 33 - September 2019

10


Man, Dog & Skull,

aqua graphite

Pencil & oil pastel on paper, H40 x W30 cm.

P R I M I T I V E

www.studiolaprimitive.net

S T U D I O

L A

E&R Werkhoven Š 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

11


L O

R I C

I C C H

I N

I N T E R V I E W

I Issue 33 - September 2019

12


LORI CICCHINI Lori Cicchini is an award winning Fashion and Fine Art photographer based in Canberra, Australia. Cicchini's photography work has been described as "emotive" and "narrative", some of which can be "dark and provoking" yet at the same time "peaceful

and beautiful". Her work has received numerous industry awards and accolades, and has been published in various art and fashion magazines both

nationally and

internationally.

In 2019 and 2018 Cicchini was awarded the AIPP ACT Illustrative Photographer of the Year, and in 2017 AIPP ACT Portrait Photographer of the Year, previously also awarded in 2015.

Page 12: Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019, Model - Ellie. Right: Portrait study of Lori Cicchini. Photograph curtesy of artist.

Issue 33 - September 2019

13


Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Ruby. Issue 33 - September 2019

14


LORI CICCHINI - INTERVIEW My journey into photography started quite late into my working life, I have had a number of different careers from office admin to sales, none of which filled the gap I knew I was craving. I did however learn some important lessons in these years, marketing and client service come to mind. Looking back however, I think

the thing that stands out the most is an overwhelming satisfaction in creating something unique and spontaneous, transferring feelings from within to an image. Sometimes I find it a little confronting to look

back over my work, I can see a visual diary of my year recorded in the images I create, the images are no longer a capture of a moment as you might expect in a typical reading of a photograph, it also records how

I felt at the time.

What do you believe is the secret to success?

I think the ingredient to any successful outcome include time, persistence, overlooking obstacles by trying new things, making mistakes and learning from them, being inspired by things that genuinely interest me and incorporating it in my work, and the biggest one is to make work that satisfies me and only me and continue to make it for myself.

Issue 33 - September 2019

15


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019. Model - Akari. Issue 33 - September 2019

16


What is a typical day for you? Each day can change at the drop of a hat depending on my mood, but generally I would say at the moment I’m trying to start my day early, 5am rise which has been a bit challenging as it’s winter at the moment and I live in the coldest city of the country. I’m a creature of habit and sometimes they aren’t great but hey I’m only human. I’m trying to be diligent with my exercising and get that in before the day starts being hectic. My working day starts with emails and such like correspondence, I generally travel to location and straight into scheduled shoots. Some days can be a little less scheduled where I can spend the day processing, and once in a while I allow myself the luxury of creating my own art. My day generally ends late in the evening if I haven’t already fallen asleep on the sofa with the television watching me.

Tell us about the fashion arm of your work, and how it differs from the fine art photography you do. The fashion work I produce generally speaks of my fine art, I work very hard to be genuine to my own

aesthetic and create with my style in mind. As with all commercial work, this isn’t always the case, sometimes I just need to stick to the brief set by the art director, but in saying that, if I have the time I like shoot and process in addition to the brief and present them both to the client. The best jobs are often the ones where I have full creative control, then one can expect the unexpected because I usually don’t know myself where it might all go.

Issue 33 - September 2019

17


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š2019

Model - Olivia. Issue 33 - September 2019

18


Lori Cicchini

received the Australian

Professional Photography Award for

2019, a gold medal for Illustrative in recognition of photographic excellence. “Let my home be my gallows was

inspired by Dante’s Inferno, the gold leafing was an extra layer of depicting

the

mending

of

story broken

things.” -Lori Cicchini. Model - Courtney.

Issue 33 - September 2019

19


Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Fleur. Issue 33 - September 2019

20


How do you find inspiration and capture that perfect moment to suspend in time? Inspiration for me comes on many forms, it can be music, lyrics, poetry, an historical time or event, something that works with the story I’m telling, the mood I’m setting. I also like to experiment with things outside of the set norm for a typical theme, for example a take on French Rococo with a dark twist, yep usually has a dark twist. If it’s dark but still beautiful it’s guaranteed to be my thing.

What camera(s) and other equipment are your favourite? My go to work horse is my Canon 5D with various lens, I also like to use my Fuji XT2 on location mostly for

the fact it’s, light and compact, I don’t like being bogged down with too much equipment when shooting outside a studio, although I’m also known to be that photographer that brings everything, just in case! So I can’t really win the war there. Which artists or photographers do you admire, or have influenced your work of late? Tim Walker springs to mind as a photographer who I have always admired and continue to be inspired by,

I love his diversity and quirkiness. I also enjoy Nick Knight’s work, his work can be quite elegant and simplistic yet also complex.

Issue 33 - September 2019

21


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019. Model - Ellie Blyton.

Issue 33 - September 2019

22


What is your favourite photograph to date? (And if this is too difficult to answer, your favourite image of 2019 so far?) That’s a really hard one, I made an image last night, it’s not quite finished but it pulls at my heart strings at

the moment. The next image I make might change that .

What are some of the challenges you face as a photographer in today's visually-focussed world? How do you rise above these and create something unique and extraordinary? If you take away the word ‘challenge’ and focus on creating, anything is possible, just get in there and make work and not get bogged down into the vortex of endless images out there, who cares what anyone is doing

unless it inspires you to create yourself.

How has the digital 'age' and advances in technology informed or changed the way you operate - if at all? Haven’t affected me at all I don’t think, I came into this world of photography in my 40s, it was already a digital world, the only thing that challenges me is that I’m not a technical minded person, so I need to think about those sorts of things a little harder than most people.

Issue 33 - September 2019

23


Tell us about your nude photography and what excites you about the beauty of the female form?

I’m not sure what it is about nude photography that interests me, all I know is that I find it quite raw and quite pure, unobstructed in a way. It’s almost like the connection is in the serenity of movement or a

moment, it’s just beautiful.

What are you currently working on? (recent or upcoming exhibitions, editorial shoots, etc.) I’m working on a theme I’ve being wanting to shoot for some time now, I’m just waiting for the weather to warm up.

Any words of wisdom you would impart to young photographers eager to follow in your footsteps?

Let go of expectations, learn the rules and learn when to flex them, move outside of your comfort zone, you won’t learn anything there. Follow your interests and explore and experiment within it at your every

opportunity. And the biggest advice I’d give for anyone reading this and wanting to jump in the deep end, if you’re in it to be rich and famous, don’t do it.

Art must come from the heart not from a purse. Issue 33 - September 2019

24


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019. Model - Marie.

Issue 33 - September 2019

25


Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019.

Model - Sylph Sia. Issue 33 - September 2019

26


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019.

Model - Lauren. Issue 33 - September 2019

27


Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019,

Model - Sylph Sia.

Issue 33 - September 2019

28


Photograph by Lori Cicchini Š 2019.

Model - Stephania.

Issue 33 - September 2019

29


Photograph by

Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Anne Duffy. Issue 33 - September 2019

30


Photograph by

Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Sylph Sia. Issue 33 - September 2019

31


What are the challenges in becoming an exhibiting artist? I think the challenges vary, initially it’s finding the right Gallery to represent the work with enthusiasm. Curating

work is crucially important and quite difficult to do yourself, the vision of an experienced curator can ensure

the work is not only cohesive but also presents in the best way.

Marketing is skill in itself and can be quite time

consuming, as many artists can attest, administrative skills may not be our strongest attribute, well it’s certainly not mine.

What do you hope viewers of your art works will feel and take with them?

I would hope that it takes them on a journey, an experience of reminiscing or exploring the imagination.

I would also hope that the work provokes thought and discussion, sometimes a simple feeling of belonging or

understanding is enough too. - Lori Cicchini Š 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

32


http://www.loriana.com.au/

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs Lori Cicchini © 2019.

Page 32: Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Ilana Davies.

Left: Photograph by Lori Cicchini © 2019. Model - Krystal. Issue 33 - September 2019

33


M

A G G

I E H

A L L

By the Opening: a series of letters Issue 33 - September 2019

34


J A M E S D R I N K W A T

E R Page 34: Surrender- a Self portrait, mixed media assemblage, Artist Collection, James Drinkwater Š 2019. Above: A Series of Letters I, oil on canvas, Artist Collection, James Drinkwater Š 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

35


The Hunter’s Writers Centre is excited to announce Ekphrastic Live Reading at Newcastle Art Gallery. Developed during ancient Greece, Ekphrastic writing is a literary piece that responds to and reflects the ‘action’ of an art work. In the first Live Reading local writers were inspired by Newcastle artist James Drinkwater’s exhibition, of paintings and sculptures in a major survey exhibition - The sea calls me by name in collaboration with Newcastle Regional Art Gallery, 2019.

The following poem is by Newcastle artist and writer Maggie Hall. Maggie says -

“I arrived a bit early for the opening of the James Drinkwater exhibition with my paper and pen ready to begin documenting the arrival of gallery visitors milling downstairs before the official opening began in the upstairs gallery space. My intention was to write a response to the exhibition as a whole, incorporating the arrival and anticipation of the crowd, (before the officials made their announcements upstairs) with a poetic response to the exhibition as a whole experience.”

Page 37: A Series of Letters I, oil on canvas, Artist Collection, James Drinkwater © 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

36


Issue 33 - September 2019

37


By the Opening: a series of letters The woman from French Polynesia stands sculpted, Corten by steel and enamel lace. A decade of painted rich yellows, red and green. Pleasantries’ surrounding the striped blue sculpted lake. Riches of gold reflect off willowed wood. Passing forms gather hope in multiple luscious wooden frame.

An ocean face search for hidden urchins. Along the East End, pink blue green coats, worn woolen threads in color dyed pattern. Men stand tailored by orange velvet jackets. One moustache, three beards. They all wear glasses. Draped scarfs dancing beneath the animated light. Spotted harlots in tangerine plastic; shoes laced in white leather. Crossing time. The entrance before receptions desk. They walk in with silence, passing initiate entry lines to be greeted by a desk with no name. Looks of feared silence in slight hope of recognition or place.

The poor boy, Saint Germain des Pris seeks future patron from Pont Marie. The Second Sunday, an Artist walks through the Market place searching for a Beggar who haunts the cobblestones by St Paul Chertier. African Quarters near the presidential suite, Paris, twenty fifteen. Patrons sommelier merchant beside the Boy with a painted arm, arrives in Nice. Issue 33 - September 2019

38


There, fire engine monuments Henri Matisse.

Curiosities form the Dusty red school, aside a producer’s house. Beneath, the two red suns set over Nice.

Vincenzo bathes with mother and child. Venice rush hour. The bulker wades past the here and now as white gulls James into black.

We fell asleep on that ocean face. Searching for a sea monster with no fins to play, three notes inside the garden room. I love you - Le jardin, Je’taime Lou.

Surrender, by this heavenly night’s swim, this sea bath. Tight bushes collage the Berlin table, towering within harbors framed night.

It is there the girl and boy stand. A Port de bras of brushstrokes towards a peninsula sea. The ballet to Chin Chin street, where each journey is left to be.

RESPECT

- Maggie Hall © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

39


J A M E

S D R I N K

W A

T E

Avenue Henri Matisse 2

R

Oil on hardboard James Drinkwater Š 2016. Issue 33 - September 2019

40


JAMES DRINKWATER James Drinkwater is a Newcastle-based artist whose practice traverses painting, sculpture, assemblage and collage. Drinkwater makes work about place, intimacy and memory, using abstraction, colour and mark making for transmission of these preoccupations. Drinkwater studied at the National Art School, Sydney, before moving to Melbourne and then Germany. His work is held in

major public and private collections both nationally and internationally, including the Macquarie Group Collection, Artbank, Allens law firm, the Newcastle Art Gallery, and private collections in New York, Singapore, Germany and the UK.

https://nandahobbs.com/artist/james-drinkwater

Right: The Producers House, near the Presidential suite Oil on linen James Drinkwater Š 2015. Issue 33 - September 2019

41


Poor Boy Oil on canvas, 2009

James Drinkwater © 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

42


The Bulker Wades past the Peninsula and so we Jubilate. Oil on canvas H240 x W180cm. James Drinkwater Š 2018.

Issue 33 - September 2019

43


J A M E

S D R I N K

W A

T

VMI 5

E

Oil & collage on hardboard

R

James Drinkwater Š 2017

Issue 33 - September 2019

44


All Rights Reserved on article Maggie Hall © 2019.

All Rights Reserved on images James Drinkwater © 2019.

https://nandahobbs.com/

artist/james-drinkwater

Looking for Urchins and Louise Ferrari Oil on canvas H240 x W180cm. James Drinkwater © 2018. Issue 33 - September 2019

45


PEARL MOON Issue 33 - September 2019

46


PEARL MOON Textile designer and artist Pearl Moon and independent

clothing designer is based in Murrurundi, in the Upper Hunter Valley NSW.

Pearl has been a multi media and textile artist for 20 years, as a younger woman she trained to be a fashion

industry pattern maker in New Zealand. In 2000-01 Pearl completed 2 years of a Bachelor of Visu-

al Art degree at The University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.

She established the business Boho Banjo - art to wear, based on her desire to offer a style of clothing that is

loose, relatively unstructured and that moves on the body when worn.

Page 46: Detail: Bridget with Bright Flowers, mixed media on canvas, 2012. Left: Aussie Infanta, mixed media on canvas, H66 x W43cm. - Pearl Moon Š 2012. Issue 33 - September 2019

47


Out of the Violet and Blue 2010,

Mixed media on canvas H80 x W58cm . © Pearl Moon.

Issue 33 - September 2019

48


The Journey from I am Pearl Moon

At school my favourite subjects were English and Art. But it was no surprise when completing my HSC in 1976 to fail Art. Despite being more than a decade into the second wave of feminism the high school art

syllabus of that era wasn’t geared to support or inspire women, that being an artist was an attainable way of life. We learned the old fashioned 20Cth theory propagated by male academics such as Ernst Gombrich in

his “The Story of Art” how visual “art” was a continuum of male practitioners who guided and perfected the skill in a direct line from the unknown caveman to Picasso. The Gombrich theory of evolution could encompass the contribution of women and primitive cultures in a few disdainful paragraphs.

We went on some school excursions to art museums where students walked around whispering in the gloom and peered at the “old masters” in their ornate frames displayed tastefully on the off white walls. I was often more mesmerised by the beauty of the patina and peeling gilding on the elaborately carved frames. I understood without words or reference to Gombrichs art history that the images inside those frames were nothing to do with anything I had ever seen.

Issue 33 - September 2019

49


Sitting in the student cafeteria of Auckland University in 1978 I saw a Colin McCahon painting on the wall that opened my mind. I’m pretty sure it was one of his “I am” series. It was stark and emotional, almost

monochromatic and had text in it. I had

never seen anything like it and it didn’t have a gilt frame to distract from the content. The impact was

so visceral it made me shiver to the core of my being. I came back every day for a couple of weeks

just to look at it and absorb the awesomeness.

Left: Aussie Icon, 2011, mixed media on canvas, H65 x W48cm.

© Pearl Moon.

Issue 33 - September 2019

50


More than another 20 years elapsed after Colin McCahons permission before I got to the University of Newcastle to start a Bachelor of Visual Art. This was another miserable experience not much more empowering than my high school art syllabus of the 1970s. But I learned one really important thing about

myself that did facilitate becoming more comfortable in the world... that I was on the autistic spectrum. Realising I am

Aspergers freed me from the enormous amount of energy and anxiety I devoted to

studying normal and how to best present myself in that way. I had always thought my great failure in life was the intense discomfort of being around people and negotiating interactions. I did not communicate well.

Sometimes I had a reaction like catatonia when I felt so disorientated trying to talk to somebody I would actually have to fight the desire to fall asleep. My brain would just go into a sort of paralytic shut down. Knowing I was Aspergers made that dissonance a predictable reaction arising from my non typical brain functioning. This freed me to re-focus all that energy wasted on emulating normal to create a constructive universe suited for me. I stopped worrying that I didn’t make art like a man, that I couldn’t train my brain to make art from my

intellectual neurons. My Aspergers brain always functions best in solitary doing a sexy

and playful happy dance with the muses of spontaneity and intuition.

Issue 33 - September 2019

51


Still Life, 2014 Mixed media - acrylic paint, thread, resin hardened textile. Š Pearl Moon. Issue 33 - September 2019

52


Detail of Still Life The hair is stitched with thread on an electric sewing machine in a

technique called free motion embroidery.

Issue 33 - September 2019

53


Cloth and drawing with thread and fibre is my favourite medium. My first serious works of art were cloth figures. Working sculpturally with flat material like cloth is a very different approach from working with

malleable soft or hard materials as most traditional sculptors do. I liked the challenge of working sculpturally with a medium that had not been much explored or taken seriously by the contemporary art world. It was

freeing to have few predecessors and virtually no academic theory expostulating the paradigms for using the medium.

I made cloth figures for about 10 years. It was all about the surface and the figures were a great vehicle for

displaying the embellished textile. Between 2010 -13 I went through a period of working 2 dimensionally. My preferred scale for the sculptures

had been around 25-50cm. I wanted to work larger but found upscaling them didn’t work for me so I started experimenting with canvas, combining painting with my stitching techniques.

Page 39: Left: Columbine 2004, mixed media, H38cm.

Middle: Binta 2006, mixed media, H44cm.

Right: My Best Hat 2007, mixed media, H50cm.

Pearl Moon Š 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

54


Issue 33 - September 2019

55


From 2013 onwards until now I have made wearable art clothes. After a couple of decades of embellishing the female figurative with lavish textile I decided to wrap the surfaces around real people. Though in truth it was more a return to what I had been making after leaving school. Having attained a mark of only 40/100 for my achievement in art I was unable to get into Elam Art Institute in Auckland so I drifted around alternative lifestyle communities, hoping the people that lived in communes were more easy to understand than the conventional world. I ended up living at Centrepoint Community in Albany for 3 years where I was

fortunate to meet and be mentored by one of New Zealand’s most fabulous textile artists, Susan Holmes. I went to TAFE and got a certificate in patternmaking, garment assembly and sample sewing. Using these

skills I started a small sewing business and sold through a market stall and all around New Zealand through an agent.

All the clothes I made were designed by me and many hand stencilled with my prints.

Sadly, I don’t have any pictures of the clothes made in that time up until 1986 when I came to live in Australia.

Issue 33 - September 2019

56


It can be hard to convince people that such an apparently utilitarian thing as a garment might be a work of art. It

was much easier selling media sewed to or painted on canvas because people understand if it is in a frame or

has a hanging hook on the back it is obviously “art” and hangs on the wall. They are often

surprised when I

suggest you don’t have to wear the garment. Put a pole through the armholes and hang it on the wall of your house. It will look amazing and you have 2 surfaces that can be interchanged - the front and the back! A wearable garment will last just as long as any artwork on canvas and preserved in good condition it will accumulate value over time and be re-sellable.

Left: Try Angles 2015, women’s fabric dress, © Pearl Moon.

Issue 33 - September 2019

57


Geisha Stare Dress made from used textiles with large and small patches of digitally printed images created by the artist from vintage Japanese postcards. Š Pearl Moon 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

58


Another Angle Tunic made from used textiles. Š Pearl Moon 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

59


Untitled 2018, heavily stitched fabric jacket made from used fabric. Š Pearl Moon.

Page 61: Untitled 2018, upcycled denim jacket. Š Pearl Moon. Issue 33 - September 2019

60


Issue 33 - September 2019

61


Samurai Jacket, 2018 Back of upcycled jacket, cloth. © Pearl Moon.

Issue 33 - September 2019

62


Coat for the Recalcitrant

Bohemian Princess Fabric. On display at Muswellbrook

Regional Arts Centre during Pearl Red Moon exhibition “Finery” 2019. © Pearl Moon 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

63


The “fashion” industry is a disgustingly wasteful industry, using up and wasting the Earths resources along

with the worst of the worst. It is also a notorious exploiter of third world labour, mostly poor and working class women. For the garments I make I collect all used, second hand clothing, yarns/fibres/buttons and

unused vintage remnants of cloth from local charity shops. The only new resource I need to buy is thread. The industrial model of mass manufactured clothing is so pervasive I often have a hard time convincing

people I only make one garment at a time and that item is never replicated. Its not an exaggeration or a fantasy that the clothes are “art to wear”. Just like an artist who makes a single painting every piece is designed and cut by me, printed, painted, patched, appliqued, sewed by hand and machine by only me.

A month ago Chinese clothing manufacturing companies began appropriating photos of the work I publish on my blog and Etsy shop. They are using photographs taken by me in their internet shops on social media and pretending it is their product they are selling and that the buyer will receive what is in the picture. This is a complete fraud on several levels - it is an infringement of copyright to take my pictures and they are misrepresenting the garments that the hapless buyers will receive. The fakes they manufacture are cheap, poorly made clothes with a photographic reproduction of the surface. It is intensely distressing to me because I don’t make a living income from sales of my art to wear. If not for the generosity of my husband in supporting me the amount of art made would be considerably less. These morally deficit muggers are enriching themselves from the fashion industry model that I despise and work to subvert.

Issue 33 - September 2019

64


P E A R L

I have been powerless to stop this so far and they have

appropriated 6 garments to date. China doesn’t recognise international copyright law that would protect me if the

frauds were in any other country. Complaints to Instagram and Facebook only result in getting automated requests

for me to send my “authorised version”. Whatever the fuck that is....?

So I’m thinking it may be time for a re-invention and a new imagining of “I am”.

- Pearl Moon © 2019.

M O O N

http://www.pearlredmoon.com/

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs Pearl Moon © 2019.20 Right: Ava 2012, mixed media on canvas H95 x W42cm. © Pearl Moon. Issue 33 - September 2019

65


Sogetsu Ikebana Lorraine Fildes

Issue 33 - September 2019

66


Exhibition of Sogetsu Ikebana At the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney 2019. Flower arrangement entered Japan from China with Buddhism, it was imbued with Chinese and Buddhist philosophy. More than simply putting flowers in a container, a disciplined art form called ikebana, was developed. Ikebana emphasized the shape, line, and form of the arrangement. Ikebana required the floral

artist to follow a set of rigid regulations. The floral arrangement had to highlight colour combinations, natural shapes, graceful lines, and the implied meaning of the arrangement. Originally Ikebana could only be done by the elite population of Japan and rigid rules had to be followed.

Gradually, change was brought to bear on Ikebana rules. Sofu Teshigahara founded the Sogetsu School in 1927. She is credited with elevating ikebana from a technical practice to an art at the level of sculpture, which is how it is has been viewed ever since.

Page 66: Artist: Paula Gothelf Title: Autumn Burst, Inspiration: The vibrant season, Chroma of amber and rust

Nature’s masterpiece by Robyn Noble Materials: Washingtonia robusta (Palm frond), Philodenronsp., Chrysanthemum sp. Issue 33 - September 2019

67


A U

T U

M N I

S C A

L L

I N

G Issue 33 - September 2019

68


A common but not exclusive aspect of Ikebana is its employment of minimalism. Some arrangements may

consist of only a minimal number of blooms interspersed among stalks and leaves. The container can be a key element of the composition, and various styles of pottery may be used in their construction. The

Ikebana artist also aims to give an expression of the season in their artistic arrangements. The exhibition in the Botanic gardens was held in autumn so all the participating artists wrote statements of what had

inspired them to produce their autumnal arrangement. Ikebana arrangements are not unlike sculpture. Considerations of colour, line, form, and function guide the construction of a work. In ikebana, the beautiful materials must be used to create something even more beautiful. A skilled artist can place a single flower and make it a powerful artistic expression.

Page 68: Artist: Sylvie Collins Title: Autumn is Calling Inspiration: As we head into the golden days of Autumn with its beautiful colours of the Croton leaves and of seed pods of Gourds developing into amazing shapes and sizes like the strange creatures of the Underworlds. Materials: Hakea and Gourd

Issue 33 - September 2019

69


E M B

R A

Artist:

C

May Chiu

E

Embrace

Title: Inspiration: A celebration of the season’s beauty

in a joyful embrace. Materials: Palm fronds, Nandina berries, Chrysanthemum,

Lilies, Flax Issue 33 - September 2019

70


Artist: Kathy Morris Title:

Catch the Wind Inspiration: The curved horizontal symmetry of the

bold orange ceramic container gives the arrangement a strong base, and complements the riotous upward movement of

stem, leaf and flower. Materials: Ravenala madagascariensis (Travellers’ palm) Chrysanthemum indica. Issue 33 - September 2019

71


Artist: Yumiko Soo Title:

Prunus? Inspiration: Is it Prunus?

Hi, hi, hi….. It’s Sasanqua! Autumn’s here!

Materials: Palm husk, Sasanqua and Chrysanthemum

Issue 33 - September 2019

72


R

E F

L E C T I

O N S

Artist: Sandy Jumikis

O F

Title:

Reflections of Autumn Inspiration: Ikebana opens doors for me. I celebrate

A

reflecting

U

texture, plant material, the hand-made

T

vessel and finally the design. Enjoy.

U

on

seasonal

light,

colour,

Materials: Helianthus (sunflower) Combretum rotun-

M

difolium (monkey vine) and Plantus (Plane

N

tree). Issue 33 - September 2019

73


Artist: Alexander Evans Title: Reconstructing renewal (full view to the left and a close up to the right so that one can see the beauty of the hand made papers) Inspiration: Trees once deceased, cut up and resigned to the firewood pile have been rescued and reconfigured to show the

natural beauty of this material even in its sawn state. It forms the sculptural basis for other flowering and foliage materials.

Reconstructed and renewed with autumn feeling. Materials:

Acer

negundo

with

natural

lichen,

Doryanthes excelsa (Gymea lily leaf), Statice,

Craspedia

(Billy

buttons),

Ruscus, handmade papers, Tasmanian oak, fishing line.

Issue 33 - September 2019

74


Artist:

Linda Sheldon Title: Ode to Autumn

Inspiration: …. The vines that round the thatched eaves run; …. And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;

by John Keats Materials: Chrysanthemum sp. Trachelospermum jasminoides

(star jasmine), Zea mays convar. Saccharata var. rugose.

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Lorraine Fildes © 2019.2019

Issue 33 - September 2019

75


GINA ERMER F

R I

N G

E D W

E L

L E

R Issue 33 - September 2019

76


GINA ERMER Fringe Dweller by Gi n a Erm er is an all Australian fashion label and store based in Newcastle NSW. The design ethos is based on issues surrounding

sustainability and ethics in design and business. Ermer is the designer of the garments which are

designed for comfort, quality and fit. She is influenced by a Japanese aesthetic in it's simplicity and attention to detail.

Page 76: Interior view of Fringe Dweller shop. Right: Dress, Shibori dyed fabric. Issue 33 - September 2019

77


Portrait study of Gina Ermer, Photograph curtesy of Gina Ermer © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

78


GINA ERMER - INTERVIEW I grew up and went to school in West Wallsend, and outer suburb of Newcastle but left for Sydney to study Art when I finished school. I then decided I wanted to be a Fashion Designer and went to East Sydney Tech for three years study. I thought that Fashion Design was more likely to provide me with an income whilst still being creative and practical. I really

enjoyed this period and when I finished my course I worked as a Design Assistant for a designer called Jonathan Ward back in the eighties. These were really creative times in the fashion industry and I loved it. When I had my first child, I didn’t want to work full time and so I managed to get a job as a part time textile designer in a design studio in Sydney. This role meant that I was painting up designs in paint on paper. Another fabulous opportunity. I couldn’t believe that I was actually being paid a wage to draw and paint all day. This became a career that I enjoyed for

around ten years and worked for a number of textile design studios in Sydney in that time.

However, there was a big change in the way textiles were designed with the introduction of computers. I wasn’t a fan of designing on computers. So, I looked around at other career options. That came in the form of teaching Textiles and

Fashion Design at East Sydney Tech. I taught subjects such as colour theory, fashion illustration, fashion design and textile design. During this time, I went back to study a Masters of Art and Design Education at the College of Fine Arts, UNSW. Once I obtained the Masters Degree, I was offered work at the University and also at The University of Technology in Sydney, teaching in the textile design departments. All of these positions were casual so I kept my hand in at designing textiles at the same time.

Issue 33 - September 2019

79


Whist I was teaching, I became a bit obsessed with natural dying and shibori techniques for fabric. Together with another

textile artist, Kristen Vournelis, we held an exhibition of our combined work at Timeless Textiles in Newcastle. We then went on to start a studio/store in Leichhardt, Sydney, under the Renew banner. It was so successful according to the Renew program, that our store was bought out by another store in four months. Not so good for us though. Big change was around the corner when my husband had to retire early on medical grounds. We needed to sell our Sydney property and move. Newcastle was the obvious choice for us. We had both grown up here and had family and

friends living in Newcastle. It is also still close enough for us to visit friends in Sydney. I had the opportunity of looking at my life, reflect and work out what I was going to do next. I found that there weren’t many

career options for a Fashion and Textile Designer/Teacher in Newcastle. Though I did do a little teaching at Newcastle Tafe and University. I was fortunate enough to have a friend and work collegue, Natalie Engdahl, who had a studio at the Newcastle Community Art Centre and she was prepared to share her space with me. For a couple of years, I explored painting still lives and enjoyed the creative community around me. At the same time, I needed to have an income. So, I started making and selling my garments at the Olive Tree Markets. The Olive Tree Markets were a great opportunity to explore the potential of having my own label and testing the market.

Issue 33 - September 2019

80


Apples in Steel Bowl. Painting by Gina Ermer © 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

81


Two years ago, I established my store and label, Fringe Dweller by

Gina Ermer, in Newcastle city. I wanted the name of the label to reflect my design philosophy. Fringe Dweller, means someone who lives outside of the mainstream. My work is

influenced by sustainability,

and this factor determines many of my business decisions. It effects the type of fabrics I use, the way I use waste, the number of garments I

produce and how they are produced. I choose to keep my business relatively small and local and am not interested in the fashion mass market. My garments are designed with quality in mind to last for many seasons and are not subject to the whims of fashion, rather, they are about personal style. I only use natural fabrics, to ensure biodegrada-

bility and not to contribute to the micro plastic problem we have with our oceans. My garments are all either made in my studio or by a maker in Sydney to reduce carbon footprint. I feel very lucky to have my passion fulfilled in the form of my studio/ store in Newcastle. There are many creative aspects to running this business. I not only design and make garments, but I need to source fabrics, build websites, attend to

marketing and social media, design

marketing tools, plan ranges, organize workload, put on fashion parades, run a business and speak to people. My daily contact with my customers provides feedback that is also really important to the way I work.

Models Billie and Maddie wearing Fringe Dweller fashion designs. Issue 33 - September 2019

82


F

R I

N G

E D W E L L E R

Issue 33 - September 2019

83


Logwood, Shibori dyed fabric. Gina Ermer © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

84


Model Carolyn wearing a Fringe Dweller dress. Gina Ermer Š 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

85


INTERVIEW - GINA ERMER When did your artistic passion begin?

I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t creative. All children are creative but my passion has lasted throughout my life. My father was an artist and was obsessed with his passion, so it was always around me. He took me to art exhibitions and our family holidays were always spent going to places that inspired him to paint. I grew up thinking that that was what people did. I wasn’t interested in dolls as child, I wanted bags of clay or coloured pencils, that was until I thought I could use a doll to

make clothes for. My grandmother was a seamstress in Italy and she taught me to sew on her treadle machine when I was around six years old. I also tried to make myself a pair of paper mâché shoes when I was around ten. Art was my favourite subject in high school. I wanted to do it all, screen printing, ceramics, jewellery making, painting, drawing, crotchet and sewing. I was lucky enough to be accepted into art school in Sydney when I finished school where I attended a year at Alexander

Mackie College. In those days there was an emphasis on conceptual art rather than skill-based knowledge and I was overwhelmed and subsequently took a year off from study. I didn’t go back to that study, rather I decided that studying fashion design was more suited to my interests. And I thrived at East Sydney Tech. I learnt patternmaking, professional sewing, illustration, colour theory, screen printing and design. I was in my element.

Issue 33 - September 2019

86


Oranges and Pears, painting by Gina Ermer Š 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

87


How important is drawing as an element to your artwork?

Drawing is a very important part of my work. It helps me to visualize and realize my ideas. I worked as a textile designer in studios for around ten years, which I loved. The process involved researching imagery,

drawing up motifs, then rendering the design in repeat for printing purposes. I also enjoyed creating colour palettes by mixing colours with gouache paints which were used to paint up the design on paper. Then the world went digital. I wasn’t so keen on looking at a screen all day for work and it was at this stage I started my teaching career. I taught many subjects at East Sydney Tech in the Fashion Design Department. One of them being drawing. I believe that it

is the basis for exploring and communicating visual ideas. These days I draw my designs first and explore proportion and variations before I start making patterns, which I also draw up manually. I also use my drawings for specification sheets for my cutter as a communication tool. My sketches are also an important part of analysing a range.

What are you working on at present? I am currently working on my spring/summer ranges for my store. I love how the seasons change and there is always something new to explore. I am also introducing a little girl’s range of hand knits and clothing that is a mini version of my women’s wear. As well as that I am collaborating with Mulberry and Flax on their range of sustainably produced all Australian wool/alpaca label, Great Southern Yarn. I have helped develop a colour palette of wools, which are hand dyed, for the range and am now working on developing a range of hand knitting patterns and kits which will be sold world-wide. - Gina Ermer © 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

88


F

R I

N

https://www.fringedweller -byginaermer.com/

G

E D W

FRINGE DWELLER SHOP 170 King Street, Newcastle, NSW.

E L L E R All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Gina Ermer © 2019.2019

Issue 33 - September 2019

89


OBSERVATIONS 13 AUGUST 2019 I had my two coffees for this morning,

watched both SBS and ABC news updates. To breathe the air that smells faintly of smoke, curling up out of the chimneys.

Early commuters, no voices clambering to make sense of the world, start quietly, re-assess what’s next. Even so it is already going full bore.

Busier the closer you get to towns and cities, like an exodus, a stream of cars and other vehicles pass by like ghostly shimmering’s.

By the seat of our pants and our sexual preferences the moist combustion of food passing through. Absorbing particles through the multi various channels, and what not else that makes us who we are.

Issue 33 - September 2019

90


It is pretty icy cold that makes a man feel hungry, cosy and warm which he can barely afford.

For all the poor buggers, and children whose hopes have been marginalised, wear these limbs with pride. Just to be born into a human rather than an animal. A leaf, a stone’s throw, a repeat on previous errors and other incarnate passions, from within the combustion practises of swallowing the world whole.

It’s pains it’s flavours, wash it down into these sweeping changes.

- ERIC WERKHOVEN © 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

91


TRUTH, ONLY BUT………. Deep rich colours, laden greys and white clouds, Creating this longing to grow, to feel the water absorb the stream, in their tree like bodies.

The rocks unconscious of any fuss, become the curves and lines, an artist draws. Why do I write, when I know I will not like half of it, but feel appalled. Only when I write I will feel some relief, feel the strangeness become normal.

I will and should not pick up the clarinet to blow a tune, conspicuously absent,

and yet what a relief. Did I not taste blood in my mouth after blowing the trumpet, metallic essence of red fluid. But when I looked I could not see any stains.

Obviously it adds up to a huge amount of pressure. Part of my oblivious attitude. But so strangely invigorating, utterly confounding what I thought about, what is and isn’t music. Issue 33 - September 2019

92


It has been a long time, a sort of reckless behaviour, it may have cost me dearly as if I can’t gauge the difference, the effects, and thus the truth laid waste.

But music shone like a diamond, causing so much pain and bedazzlement, twisted forms of desire.

I am patting it down, trying to appease this inner craziness. Trying to finally come to terms with, what I will write about, how long will it last?

Eligible for some punishment, the debris of floating thoughts, serve as flotsam to hide under and try to get away.

- ERIC WERKHOVEN Š August 2019.

Issue 33 - September 2019

93


B R A D

the blackout I remembered that stormy night

reminded me of a vampire

in my childhood

from one of those old, German Expressionist B&W’s.

my father fumbling for candles and matches from the cupboard

E V A N S

Without saying a word I climbed into bed

and after he lit them walking me to my bedroom

and knew,

without saying a word

even then,

the shadows of him,

how difficult he found it

elasticising down the hallway,

being a father. - Brad Evans Š 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

94


B R A D E V A N S

A lone portrait for a youth of yearning Lit bright by fire both wanting & searching,

Bill & mortgage-bound, their low paid earning

I'm proud of you and that old, Newy crowd; 1

Spent on bare survival just for the now,

A lone portrait from a youth of yearning.

A lone portrait for a youth of yearning.

Infinite sands of summer all burning

Creative urge now subtle and spurning

Our fly-like joys caught in a cobweb shroud,

An old man's eyes, wondering why and how,

Lit bright by fire both wanting & searching.

Lit bright by fire both wanting & searching,

A lone portrait for a youth of yearning. Jobs all taken at their parents' urging, Many throwing down their unworn towels,

- Brad Evans Š 2019

A lone portrait from a youth of yearning. Those chilled, narrow-minded wakes all churning Over dreams savaged by a half-sunk prow,

Lit bright by fire both wanting & searching.

1 'Newy' - Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Issue 33 - September 2019

95


WOMEN WITH WORDS Women with words of great joy Halcyon day dreams I will give you my heart Deep emerald eyes Curvaceous goddess of life Focused female form Do you hear my smile?

Adorned by layers of words Poetry of love The music plays on

Lost in lyrical day dreams Dressed in black writing - Robyn Werkhoven © 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

96


WOMEN WITH WORDS Woman of steel Pink skin and rosy red lips Strong arms and strong will. Crazy eyes and mind Grinning smiles and dancing feet Scream your song of life Contorted bodies

Symbols of old mystery Love found and lost Ephemeral dreams

Lost in lettering of life Layers of feelings - Robyn Werkhoven Š 2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

97


Recycling in Sydney FROM GAOL TO ART SCHOOL

Issue 33 - September 2019

98


L O

R R

A I N

E F

I L

D E S Issue 33 - September 2019

99


Page 98: The grand main entrance to the National Art School is on Forbes Street, Darlinghurst. Page 99: The tradesmen entrance to the National Art School is on Burton Street. At this time an Arthur Boyd exhibition was showing. Issue 33 - September 2019

100


Recycling in Sydney - From Gaol to Art School Lorraine Fildes

The National Art School stands on land used by the Gadigal people, which is why I’d like to acknowledge the traditional

owners of the land, and pay my respects to elders both past and present at the start of my article about this School. Hard to believe but the home of our National Art School was originally a Gaol! But actually we are very lucky - as the old Darlinghurst Gaol is one of the architectural gems of 19th century Sydney buildings. The plans for the Darlinghurst Gaol included a tall circular chapel in the middle of the site, around which are sited six rectangular cellblocks in a radial fashion.

The main material used for construction was Sydney sandstone, quarried from nearby and cut into large blocks by the convicts. Construction of the Darlinghurst Gaol wall began in 1822 and was finished in 1824 using convict labour, but due to a lack of funds, the site sat empty for 12 years. Construction of the rest of the complex did not begin until 1836, with completion of some of the cell blocks in 1840. On the 7 June 1841 the first prisoners were moved from Sydney Gaol on the corner of George and Essex Streets in The Rocks, across to the Darlinghurst Gaol. New buildings were added to accommodate the increasing population over the following decades. Cells originally designed to house one inmate were holding three. Both male and female prisoners were held at Darlinghurst Gaol. The women were transferred to the Women's Penitentiary at Long Bay when it opened in August 1909. The men were transferred to the Male State Penitentiary at Long Bay when it opened on 2 June 1914. Darlinghurst Gaol was then closed, ceasing to be a

prison on 14 July 1914. Issue 33 - September 2019

101


Australian poet Henry Lawson is one of Darlinghurst Gaol’s most famous inmates who served time for failing to pay

his wife alimony and child support. He described the gaol as Starvinghurst Gaol due to meagre rations given to the inmates. It was during his incarceration that he wrote the poem “One Hundred and Three” which was published in 1908 and titled after his prison number.

They shut a man in the four-by-eight, with a six-inch slit for air, Twenty-three hours of the twenty-four, to brood on his virtues there. And the dead stone walls and the iron door close in as an iron band

On eyes that followed the distant haze far out on the level land. Bread and water and hominy, and a scrag of meat and a spud,

A Bible and thin flat book of rules, to cool a strong man’s blood; They take the spoon from the cell at night-and a stranger might think it odd; But a man might sharpen it on the floor, and go to his own Great God.

(partial extract from “One Hundred and Three” by Henry Lawson)

Issue 33 - September 2019

102


This watercolour of Darlinghurst Gaol was done by H. Bertrand. Bertrand was convicted of the murder of Henry Kinder,

who died on 2 October 1865, in one of Sydney's most notorious homicide cases of the time. Bertrand served a 28 year prison sentence, most of which was spent at Darlinghurst Gaol. This watercolour 32.5 x 43 cm was accompanied by plans of Darlinghurst Gaol and titled 'watercolour drawings by H. Bertrand, Darlinghurst 7-12-91’. It is from the collection of the State Library of New South Wales.

Issue 33 - September 2019

103


T H E C H A P E L Issue 33 - September 2019

104


The Chapel The Chapel was designed as a surveillance tower by colonial architect Mortimer Lewis, and built between 1847 and 1872. This central tower concept changed

after realising that the guards would be vulnerable. So it became the gaol chapel, with men’s bathhouse below: “cleanliness next to godliness”. The chapel is a beautiful example of colonial architec-

ture – when measured it was found to be a perfect circle – the inside diameter is 14.25 metres (39 feet), and the height to the cupola is 15.25 metres. The chapel is now used for painting classes on the

top floor – excellent lighting for this purpose – also with inspiring stained glass windows designed by colonial architect James Barnett and made in 1873 at Falconers glass works in Sydney.

Issue 33 - September 2019

105


Cell Block D – the Cell Block Theatre The following information was provided by a plaque on

the building: D Block was the second wing to be built as part of Darlinghurst Gaol. It was the women’s wing from 1841 to 1909. It was three-storeys high, with 36 double cells and six single cells. There was also a padded cell on the

ground floor. In 1922, a branch of the Sydney Technical College was established in the former gaol buildings. But D Block did not form part of this educational campus. The building

was left to decay. In 1955, when the East Sydney Technical College became an independently administered entity, it was decided to convert the neglected D Block into a theatre space. And thus the Cell Block Theatre was born. The

floors and cells were removed, leaving a cavernous internal space with superb acoustics that is great for a range of performances, from opera, pop bands and dance to theatre and art exhibitions. Issue 33 - September 2019

106


C

E L L

B L O C

K

T H E A T R E

Issue 33 - September 2019

107


Prison Cell Block A - Now the National Art School Art Gallery

A-Wing was the first building constructed at Darlinghurst Gaol. In its early days it housed all types of prisoners, but it eventually became used as the “trial wing” for men on remand or

those awaiting trial. A-Wing also held the condemned cells until 1872. The A-Wing contained 48 cells of varying size. When the gaol was given to the Technical

College the cells were removed and the interior of A-Wing was rebuilt, including the insertion of new, larger windows. However, the early stone cantilevered staircase arrangement survives.

The exterior of the building – with the exception of the larger windows – looks essentially the same today as it did when the first group of prisoners arrived in 1841. Issue 33 - September 2019

108


A-Wing and the cantilevered staircase Built by master tradesmen, the staircase was

constructed as each course of wall was added. One end of each tread was laid into and supported by the wall, with the other end sitting on the back of the edge of the stair below.

Issue 33 - September 2019

109


Two other cell blocks that radiate from the chapel – note the impressive clerestory roof windows on the left.

Issue 33 - September 2019

110


A third story has been attached to this

original

This cell block building is now the NAS library.

sandstone cell block radiating from the chapel. Issue 33 - September 2019

111


This photo shows the weather vane on top of the hip roof cupola on the chapel, the roof and chimney of building 26 and the two chimneys and the clerestory windows in the roof of building 25. This band of windows allows natural light to illuminate a large interior space.

Issue 33 - September 2019

112


This was the original Governor’s residence of Darlinghurst Gaol.

This was the morgue for the Darlinghurst Gaol. The skull and crossbones over the entrance certainly indicate that the building was constructed to hold something toxic.

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Lorraine Fildes Š 2019.2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

113


Issue 33 - September 2019

114


Issue 33 - September 2019

115


R E I M A G

I N

I N

G T H E C A N O N

Issue 33 - September 2019

116


Reimagining the Canon There is more than one way to be a feminist, or as Caroline McHugh would say ‘a womanist’, in

contemporary society. This analogy and a fierce belief in making ‘good art’ was the shared common thread that brought nineteen women artists together for the Reimagining the Canon exhibition. A gender inspired

lens provides the framework for a show that consists of mainly mid-career and established artists from major and regional cities around Australia, England, Ireland, and Scotland.

Participating artists are: Patricia Wilson - Adams, Dr Alison Bell (Scotland), Chris Byrnes,

Dr Penny Dunstan, Sarah Edmondson, Helen Hopcroft, Dr Annemarie Murland, Dan Nelson, Dr Lucy O’Donnell (England), Marika Osmotherly, Alessia Sakoff, Belinda Street, Kiera O'Toole

(Ireland), Rachel Thomas, Lezlie Tilley, Clare Weeks, Eila Vinwynn, Vera Zulumovski, and Lee Zaunders.

Issue 33 - September 2019

117


Good art and how it is produced, perceived and received within the wider community – both at home and abroad - and an

individual approach to making, provided the benchmark for participation in the exhibition. An interdisciplinary and cross border approach to practice meant that the group’s identity was inclusive of professional practicing artists – the artist as performer, historian, writer and academic. As a cohort, the group offers a range of subject matter in their various acts of doing that illustrates self-expression, and at the same time, contributes to the creation of a heterogeneous cultural life. Although well known within their respective zones of demarcation - studio space, home space, marketplace, institutional space – these artists are largely anonymous in the greater art world. Under looked, overlooked, from the margins, and living in the shadows might be common analogies used to locate the ‘other’, in art and life, but this group firmly rejects this

notion. Instead, the thematic conditions that surround the purpose and function of the group are simple: everyone’s story matters and needs to be told. The personal, as such, is political and, in this instance is communicated through a process-material interdependence which results in a variety of visual outcomes. As a collective, the group brings ‘the everyday’ into the identity politics that surround the Canon of Western Art and its nemesis: feminist art today. Indeed, these women artists celebrate their ‘Queendom’ not because of their engendered body, but in spite of it. A rich variety of praxis, technique, process and a range of visual strategies expose their gaze, touch and individual ways of expressing their being in the world.

- Dr Annemarie Murland, Curator, Reimagining the Canon,© 2019.

The exhibition, titled, Reimagining the Canon is supported by the arts festival, Crack Open the Canon that runs between, October 25- 17 November 2019,

Newcastle, Art Space, 91 Chinchen Street, Islington 2296, NSW Australia. The official opening is on Saturday 26 October at 4 pm and the address will be delivered by artist, Virginia Cuppaidge. Issue 33 - September 2019

118


R E I M A G I N I N

G T H

E C A N O N

Issue 33 - September 2019

119


SUSAN RYMAN R

R

A

A

V

V

E

E

N

N

D

D

A

A

N

N

C

C

E

E

S

S Raven Shadows, Coloured pencil on rag paper, Susan Ryman © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

120


RAVEN DANCES SUSAN RYMAN

30 AUGUST - 15 SEPTEMBER ART SYSTEMS WICKHAM GALLERY

40 ANNIE ST. WICKHAM, NEWCASTLE NSW.

www.art-systems-wickham.com/ Cornucopia - suite one, Coloured pencil on rag paper, Susan Ryman © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

121


Raven Dances suite one. Coloured pencil on rag paper. Susan Ryman Š 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

122


SUSAN RYMAN ‘Standing on a jetty looking towards land on a brilliant sunny spring morning, I noticed two ravens swooping and flying in a breathtaking dance all along the shoreline. Suddenly one completely disappeared, revealing itself to be an elusive shadow. The works in Raven Dances all respond to my immediate surroundings, inviting contemplation about the fragile nature of

existence. Refuse becomes beautiful dancing ghosts, harbingers of our cultural disregard for so many precious things, including our fellow humans.

Seemingly insignificant minutiae, moments, people and things hiding in the shadows, and conversely blaringly banal objects are flooded with colour-saturated light in strange and sumptuous new worlds using layers of contour-conscious texture. These unlikely things all dance out of context with each other often under brooding skies and the watchful eye of strangely dislocated people.’

- Susan Ryman 2019.

Susan Ryman was born in late 1955 in Marrickville, she completed a Diploma in Art Education at the National Art School and Alexander Mackie CAE in Sydney from 1971 – 1975 and a decade later, successfully completed the Graduate

Diploma in Art at Newcastle College of Advanced Education. In 2015 Susan was awarded a PhD in Natural History Illustration by the University of Newcastle.

www.art-systems-wickham.com/ All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Susan Ryman © 2019.2019 Issue 33 - September 2019

123


ART SYSTEMS WICKHAM

40 ANNIE ST. WICKHAM, NEWCASTLE NSW.

Phone: 0431 853 600

www.art-systems-wickham.com/

Director: Colin Lawson Issue 33 - September 2019

124


ART SYSTEMS WICKHAM CALENDAR 2019

AUG 30 – SEP 15

RAVEN DANCES - SUSAN RYMAN

SEP 20 – SEP 29 THERE IS ANOTHER WORLD BUT IT IS THIS ONE - JOHN HEANEY

OCT 11 – OCT 27 APPARENT SPACES - JOHN BARNES

40 ANNIE ST. WICKHAM, NEWCASTLE NSW.

Phone: 0431 853 600

www.art-systems-wickham.com/

Director: Colin Lawson Issue 33 - September 2019

125


N

N

A

A

T

T

A

A

L

L

I

I

E

E

D

D

U

U

N

N

C

C

A

A

N

N

DUNGOG CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Issue 33 - September 2019

126


Natalie Duncan Natalie Duncan is known for her ceramic sculptures, examples of which are held in the permanent collection of The Australian War Memorial and the Muswellbrook Arts Centre. Natalie was the winner of the 2017 Newcastle Emerging Artist Prize for her sculpture “Princess Kimmy K Artamide.” A multi-talented artist, Natalie is a qualified Australian army combat photographer who saw service in Afghanistan. Finishing her time in the army, Natalie went on to study ceramics and SPI (sculpture, performance & installation) at the UNSW, formerly COFA.

Natalie lives here in Dungog with her husband, children, two sheep and chooks, where she has a ceramics and painting practice.

Page 56: Bending Over Backwards, Oil on board , H88 x W123 cm.

146 - 150 Dowling Street, Dungog, NSW.

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/

Natalie Duncan © 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

127


N A

T A L

I E

D U N

Fuck It 2019 Hand built ceramic vessel, twice fired,

under-

C

glaze, oxides glazed with embedded rock crys-

A

H120 x W58 x D40 cm.

N

tals.

Natalie Duncan Š 2019.

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/ Issue 33 - September 2019

128


N A

T A L

I E

D U N

C

Pink Pussy Hat, Lantana and Coffee Oil on board H91 x W62 cm.

Natalie Duncan Š 2019.

A N

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/ Issue 33 - September 2019

129


STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE ARTS ZINE Since October 2013 Robyn Werkhoven has published the Online Art and Literary magazine STUDIO

LA PRIMITIVE ARTS ZINE. Featuring artist’s interviews, exhibitions, art news, poetry and essays. Arts Zine in 2017 was selected by the NSW State Library to be preserved as a digital publication of lasting

cultural value for long-term access by the Australian community.

www.studiolaprimitive.net

To view previous issues click on image of cover.

Issue 33 - September 2019

130


Click on cover to view the issue.

Issue 33 - September 2019

131


Click on cover to view the issue.

Issue 33 - September 2019

132


Click on cover to view the issue.

Issue 33 - September 2019

133


Issue 33 - September 2019

134


POETRY & SCULPTURE

The publication includes a collection of poems written over recent years, penetrating and profound observations on life. And a selection of Eric’s dynamic and prolific sculptures.

Enquiries contact: E: werkhovenr@bigpond.com

Page 134: Left - Front cover, The Fall, Autoclaved aerated cement / cement / lacquer, H32 x W46 x B38cm. Eric Werkhoven 2013. Page 134: Right - Goddess, Autoclaved aerated cement / adhesive cement / lacquer, H82 x W25 x B20cm. Eric Werkhoven 2010. Right: Eric Werkhoven, Photograph by Robyn Werkhoven.

Issue 33 - September 2019

135


studio la primitive

jewellery Dungog By Design

224 Dowling St, Dungog NSW. Issue 33 - September 2019

136


DUNGOG BY DESIGN handmade & Inspiring

224 Dowling St Dungog NSW Issue 33 - September 2019

137


23 AUGUST - 8 SEPTEMBER

4 - 20 OCTOBER

THE SPACE BETWEEN

PATTERNS IN TIME

The Athena Group

Julie Ackery, Susie Lochhead & Amanda Lawry

13 - 29 SEPTEMBER

ORBIT

25 OCTOBER - 10 NOVEMBER

Barbara Greentree & Anne Marie Hall

TELLING TALES Tracie Bertram & Michelle Brodie

57 Bull Street Cooks Hill NSW Hours: Fri Sat Sun 11am - 5pm www.newcastlepotters.org.au Issue 33 - September 2019

138


THE SPACE BETWEEN The Athena Group

23 AUGUST - 8 SEPTEMBER

Ceramic plate - Sue Stewart 2019.

57 Bull Street Cooks Hill NSW Hours: Fri Sat Sun 11am - 5pm www.newcastlepotters.org.au Issue 33 - September 2019

139


O r b i t ANNE-MARIE HALL

BARBARA GREENTREE Issue 33 - September 2019

140


Orbit An exciting exhibition of pottery and paintings by Cooks Hill artists

Barbara Greentree and Anne-Marie Hall. September 13 – September 29 Official Opening Fri September 13th, 6-8pm

Potter Barbara Greentree and painter Anne-Marie Hall share a passion for the natural environment in which they orbit. The patterns, intricacies and colours of nature are a source of wonder and delight. Their

individual experiences are expressed uniquely. Barbara through her skills as a potter, shapes, decorates, and glazes her pots as functional vessels, which can stand alone as objects of art. Anne-Marie expresses her art through the medium of acrylic paints, which she boldly applies on canvas.

57 Bull Street Cooks Hill NSW Hours: Fri Sat Sun 11am - 5pm www.newcastlepotters.org.au Issue 33 - September 2019

141


SCULPTURE

ON THE FARM 2019 www.sculptureonthefarm.com

Left: Nothin’ but sky, Braddon Snape, winner 2018. Issue 33 - September 2019

142


SCULPTURE ON THE FARM

Sculpture on the Farm October Long Weekend 4 -7 October, 2019 www.sculptureonthefarm.com or by contacting

SCULPTURE ON THE FARM

Philippa Graham by email on

pdgraham@graers.com Issue 33 - September 2019

143


Issue 33 - September 2019

144


Rhino Images - Art and the Rhinoceros Lorraine Fildes and Robert Fildes. Art and the Rhinoceros - There are over three hundred Rhino images in this book. Whether in the ancient past or in the present the rhinos are always represented as huge, powerful and solitary animals. The book includes paintings, drawings, woodcuts, etchings, rock carvings and sculptures of the rhino all depicting the power of the animal. These images of the rhino range from early civilisations such as in China, Roman Empire, Indus civilisation in Pakistan/ India area and from Southern Africa down to current day images of paintings and sculptures produced by modern day

artists. The text indicates where you may find these wonderful images as well as the websites of the artists concerned, the caves where the rhino images have been found and the places where posters use the rhino image. There are very few of these magnificent wild animals left in the world, so unless they are protected and managed, artistic images will soon be the only viewing option.

Rhino Images – Art and the Rhinoceros, First Edition, 2017, is available for download at The Rhino Resource Centre web site. Direct Link :

http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/index.php?s=1&act=refs&CODE=ref_detail&id=1518479271

Page 144 : White rhino crash at Whipsnade Zoo, England. Image: Robert Fildes Š 2019. Issue 33 - September 2019

145


P E A R L

P E A R L

M O O N

M O O N

Bridget with Bright Flowers, 2012,

mixed media on canvas, H82 x W67cm. © Pearl Moon.

Profile for Robyn Werkhoven

ARTS ZINE September 2019  

Art & Literary online magazine, featuring artist's interviews, exhibitions, poetry, essays & art news.

ARTS ZINE September 2019  

Art & Literary online magazine, featuring artist's interviews, exhibitions, poetry, essays & art news.