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studio la primitive

arts zine issue 32

july 2019


GEORGE GITTOES www.gittoes.com

Lil Dave, Ink on paper, 124 x 94 cm. George Gittoes © 2019.


S T U D I O

L A P R I M I T I V E www.studiolaprimitive.net


ANDREW SUTHERLAND

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Bound to the Body, 49 × 51 × 23 cm , corten steel, steel, resin, Peter Tilley, Sculpture on the Farm 2018.

www.sculptureonthefarm.com

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www.thommenart.com.au

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'Yellow chain with match' Unique Photograph on metal 60x90cm. Edmond Thomen Š 2019.


KATHRIN LONGHURST https://nandahobbs.com/

http://kathrinlonghurst.com/

This is Not a Love Song, Oil on linen,H120 x W90cm. Kathrin Longhurst © 2019.


slp studio la primitive CONTRIBUTORS

Map LC 55, Hand coloured Lithograph, H58 x W36cm. detail-1,Anne-Maree Hunter.

Nigel Milsom

Eric Werkhoven

Anne-Maree Hunter

Robyn Werkhoven

Andrew Sutherland

Monique Werkhoven

Terry Fogarty

Art Systems Wickham

Bernadette Meyers

Dungog Contemporary

Lorraine Fildes

Sculpture on the Farm

Maggie Hall

Dungog by Design

Brad Evans

Newcastle Potters Inc.


INDEX Editorial …………

Robyn Werkhoven

10

SLP Antics………... …

E & R Werkhoven

11

Feature Artist ………..

Nigel Milsom

12 - 27

Poetry …………………

Brad Evans

28 - 29

Feature Artist …………

Anne-Maree Hunter

30 - 49

Poetry …………………

Eric Werkhoven

50 - 51

Feature Artist ………...

Andrew Sutherland

52 - 67

Poetry ………………….

Maggie Hall

68 - 69

SOLO ART …………

Terry Fogarty

70 - 87

Poetry ……………….

Terry Fogarty

88 - 93

Wind Song …………….

Bernadette Meyers

Cairns Art Gallery ……

Lorraine Fildes

ART NEWS……………….

94 - 105 106 - 125 126 - 155

Front Cover: Judo-House Part 6 (The White Bird) oil on linen, H170 x W380cm. Nigel Milsom 2014-16. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.

.Judo-House Part 8 (a perfect light), oil and enamel spray paint on linen, H150 x W110cm. Nigel Milsom, Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.


EDITORIAL Greetings to all our ARTS ZINE readers, this is our Winter edition, full of colourful articles to warm up the mind and body. The July ARTS ZINE 2019 includes interviews and features on three Hunter Valley artists Nigel Milsom, one of Australia’s leading award winning, contemporary artists, presently living in Newcastle NSW. A Finalist in this year’s Archibald and Sulman Art Prizes.

Maggie Hall, artist, writer and photographer, presents Red Soldier, a poem inspired by a painting by artist Gregory Gamage. Sydney based artist, writer and photographer Bernadette Meyers returns this month with a sensitive and ethereal feature Wind Song. Don’t miss out reading new poems by Brad Evans and Eric Werkhoven. Art news and information on forthcoming art exhibitions.

We explore the world of Anne-Maree Hunter a contemporary printmaker specialising in lithography, etching and artists' books. Figurative painter Andrew Sutherland writes about his work. Based in Sydney Terry Fogarty a Geographer/Historian and poet writes about SILO ART in Australia and a tribute to poet Les Murray.

The ARTS ZINE features articles and interviews with national and international visual artists, poets and writers, exploring their world of art and creative processes.

Submissions welcomed, we would love to have your words Lorraine Fildes, our resident travel photographer and writer, visits Cairns Art Gallery to see an inspiring ceramic exhibition.

and art works in future editions in 2019. Deadline for articles 15th August for September issue 33, 2019. Email: werkhovenr@bigpond.com Regards - your editor Robyn Werkhoven

The publisher will not accept responsibility or any liability for the correctness of information or opinions expressed in the publication. Copyright © 2018 Studio La Primitive.

All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced , in whole or in part, without the prior permission of the publisher.

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Interior Sound, graphite pencil / oilpastel on paper, H50 x W40cm ( framed).

P R I M I T I V E

www.studiolaprimitive.net

S T U D I O

L A

E&R Werkhoven Š 2019.

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NIGEL MILSOM

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NIGEL MILSOM Nigel Milsom is one of Australia’s stellar contemporary artists and a recipient of major art awards. Born in 1975 Albury, his home and studio is currently based in Newcastle NSW.

His painting Judo house pt 6 (the white bird), a portrait of barrister Charles Waterstreet, won the 2015 Archibald Prize. In 2014 Milsom won the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize for his painting, Uncle Paddy and in 2012 he won the Sulman Prize for his painting

Judo House pt 4 (Golden mud). “The art appears as an enchanted world surrounded

by; intrigue, expectation, suspense, and focal impact. The power and energy emitting from Milsom’s art is energized by an intense focus on the subject, typically highlighted by a black backdrop”. – Mark Widdup.

Page 12: Judo-House Part 5 (Faith, Hope and Luck), oil on linen 110cm x 110cm. 2012. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Right: Judo-House Part 7 (The White Light), watercolour on cotton paper,

H29.7 x W21cm. 2017-18. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.

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Judo-House Part 5 (Faith, Hope and Luck) Oil on linen H212 x W170cm. Nigel Milsom 2012.

Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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NIGEL MILSOM - INTERVIEW When did your artistic passion begin? I can’t really pin-point an exact day or age because I’ve been making drawings and painting all sorts of things ever since I can remember, so I guess my passion to create things has always been with me. In saying that, I remember being five or six years old when I made a conscious decision to become an artist. I didn’t know how making that commitment would unfold, all I knew was that’s what I wanted to pursue from a young age. Have you always wanted to be an artist? Yes, although I did flirt with other ideas throughout my life. At one stage I wanted to be a sign writer and at another, a horse vet and even a professional sportsman. During my primary and high school years I was a pretty passionate rugby league, rugby union and boxing fanatic. Describe your work? It’s an amalgamation of many things, but primarily it’s a marriage between hard-edge geometric painting and a type figurative expressionism.

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What is the philosophy behind your work? To paint with second or third hand material with first hand emotion. To operate within a Zen zone where the moment means everything, is everything. Do you have a set method / routine of working?

Yeah of course. I wake in the morning and work until I can’t stand up. Then I go to sleep and wake up and try do it all over again until what ever painting I’m working on tells me to stop and move on to the next

interesting thing. Why do you choose this material / medium to work with? Mainly because it is unrelenting and unforgiving and all encompassing.

It pushes me beyond anything else I experience in life. How important is drawing as an element to your artwork? Initially drawing is a very important component before I undertake the painting side of things, however, once I start painting, drawing becomes less important, it becomes useless. I say that because I’m not in the business of painting an illustration of an idea or image. My goal is to allow the paint to form the idea or image through the movement of paint. For me, drawing and painting are two different processes. One is static and precise, where the other is fluid and less specific. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Judo-House Part7 (The White Light) Texta on cotton paper.

H 29.7 x W21cm. Nigel Milsom 2017-2018. Courtesy of Yuill /Crowley,

Sydney.

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What inspires your work / creations? Everyday experiences that slice through the ordinary. Whether it’s a particular light illuminating an object, or a piece of nature that has a particular energy field that animates my senses. Essentially I’m inspired by life,

particularly my family, birds and friends. Not necessarily in that order.

What have been the major influences on your work? My family, my mother, my sisters and brothers. and my son Jack. Artistically I’d have to say the artists Katsushika Hokusai, Alice Neel, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Robert Ryman, Aimee Crouch and Robert MacPherson.

What are some of your favourite artworks and artists? I really get a lot out of looking at the work Paula Rego, Luc Tuymans, Agnes Martin, Vincent van Gogh, Tracy Emin and Andy Warhol. I love Van Gogh’s the potato eaters series and his portraits, actually I love

everything Van Gogh painted. Even his shitty work is great. To be honest with the artists I’ve just mentioned I pretty much enjoy everything they’ve made.

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Judo-House Part 7 (The White Light). Ink on cotton paper H29.7 x W21cm. Nigel Milsom 2017-18. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Any particular style or period that appeals?

There are certain aspects of all periods in art that generally appeal to me. It’s difficult for me go past oriental scroll painting whether it be Chinese or Japanese in origin. The Ukiyo or floating world period in Japanese

art has always had quite an impact on me. There’s an obvious link to Western art through the likes of Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Matisse etc. to this period in Asian art that I find very inspiring. I enjoy a lot of

Western contemporary artists as well, be it the work of Philip Guston or Marlene Dumas. The photography of Aimee Crouch has always had a huge impression on me. I’ve always responded to her photographic imagery as though they are paintings, she seems to use the camera as though it’s a paint brush and find that very exciting, from a painting perspective. What are the challenges in becoming an exhibiting artist? I guess it depends on the individual. Personally, I haven’t really found exhibiting work over the years that

difficult, or even a challenge. For me the challenge has always been doing the work. That’s not to say there aren’t any hiccups when it comes to showing work. The main hiccup for me has always been dealing with

the social side of things, mainly the social anxiety that comes with exhibition openings, talks etc. but over the years you kind of get used to it. My family’s support seems to iron out any of my neurosis.

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Judo-House Part 5 (Faith, Hope and Luck), oil on linen, H230 x W360cm. Nigel Milsom 2012. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Name your greatest achievement, exhibitions?

That’s a hard one. On paper it looks as though I’ve achieved a lot, from winning art prizes etc. but my finest achievements have to be the long lasting friendships I’ve made over the years with other creative people.

Whether it be my relationship with my art dealer Kerry Crowley to people I’ve either studied with at art school or have met through exhibiting work. . . the list is long and varied and I’ve tended to appreciate

and respected every one of them. For good or ill. What are you working on at present? At the moment I’m recycling some old canvases. . .basically re-stretching new linen over old stretcher bars because the original paintings were absolutely terrible so I cut them off with a Stanley knife and threw them in the bin.

What do you hope viewers of your art works will feel and take with them? I guess I’d like to think my work stirs up some kind of emotional response from the viewer, whether it be

positive or negative. I try to make work that is open to the viewers interpretation and to whatever associations they would like to set up with their own experience. Painting isn’t a platform for me to preach to

the viewer, there is no moral story in my work. The work is a visual dialogue between the painting and the viewer… and although I’m the maker of the work I try to remain as absent from that experience as I possibly can.

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Judo-House Part 8 (A Perfect Light)

Oil on linen. H60 x W50cm. Nigel Milsom 2019.

Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Judo-House Part 8 (A Perfect Light), ink on cotton paper, H29.7 x W21cm.

Judo-House Part 6 (The White Bird), graphite on cotton paper,

Nigel Milsom 2019. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.

H 29.7 x W21cm. Nigel Milsom . Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Judo-House Part 8 (A Perfect Light), graphite on cotton paper, H29.7 x

Judo-House Part 7 (The White Light), ink on cotton paper, H 21 x W29.7cm.

W21cm. Nigel Milsom 2019. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.

Nigel Milsom 2017-18. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Your future aspirations with your art? To keep pushing seamlessly into new visual territory, whether I can or not is up for grabs - that is life. Where do you see your art practice in five years time? I honestly don’t know. It’s hard for me to see where it will be tomorrow let alone in five years. Forthcoming exhibitions? I’m meant to be having one in September at Yuill / Crowley in Sydney. I’m also in the process of organising one with the Newcastle Art Gallery for August 2020 and there are a few other things in progress.

Other interests, music? I love music, reading, playing chess, bird sighting as opposed to bird watching, the company of friends,

family especially hanging with my son jack and going on road trips.

- Nigel Milsom © 2019.

Page 27: Judo-House Part 8 (A Perfect Light), oil and enamel spray paint on linen, H150 x W110cm. Nigel Milsom. Courtesy of Yuill / Crowley, Sydney.

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http://www.yuillcrowley.com/

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs -

Nigel Milsom © 2019

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E V A N S

The Plumber I pulled away at the lower skirt of insulation and watched the tired, young plumber measure his tape through opening provided by my outstretched arms. Winter had not yet let go her grip as he talked of pipes bursting throughout these sub-zero nights.

Brad Evans Š 2019

B R A D

I peered at the damp joint in the old cylinder and through the blue-green rot of copper two vessels stood in sepulchral silence: while we both paused and looked up to the ceiling, our hopes rose to greet that mournful honking of spring geese arriving overhead

their powerful, snowy wings dismissed the chill air as they began their angelic descent towards the eastern lakes. Winter was finally letting go. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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E V A N S

He heard the song once more And knew what was coming And whenever he heard it A disaster would loom Just over the thin, bare horizon Or else some horrible death - personal & stark! And he sang in the arms of Bacchus As a rule - not loudly Just a bare, near-imperceptible whisper Enough to still the shaking of fists

Brad Evans Š 2019

B R A D

And he sang in the arms of Bacchus

And to halt the talk of war And the song sounded old, but with no dust apparent I left soon after and tried to look it up Online and even searched in libraries But there was no sign of it anywhere Not even in the collections of old scores. He died soon after and took it with him: He took the song, that voice, those words And a heart so pure. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ANNE-MAREE HUNTER

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ANNE-MAREE HUNTER Contemporary

printmaker

specialising

in

lithography,

etching and artists' books that range in form, including

altered books, book objects, installations and sculptures. She completed a Ph.D titled “Constructing the Eclectic

Bibliothèque” at The University of Newcastle, Australia concerned with creating a library of artists’ books in all their diversity. Anne-Maree has been exhibiting since 1989 and has had 13 solo

exhibitions chiefly of her prints which have been

collected by a number of workshops and special collections internationally such as the Chicago Printmaking Collective

Workshop, London Print Studios and the Chang Mai Contemporary Art Museum, Thailand. In Australia, her books have been collected by The Monash University Rare Books Collection, The Baillieu Library at The University of Melbourne and The State Libraries in both Victoria

and Queensland. Page30: Yawanashi Kusumoto, Handcoloured Lithograph with Chine Colle, H 58 x W36cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Right: Saving Place, Intaglio with Chine colle, H56 x W38cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Life on a High Wire, Artists Book, H15 x W8 x B1cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ANNE-MAREE HUNTER - INTERVIEW When did your artistic passion begin? As I can’t remember, I would have to say it has always been with me. My earliest memories involve making something and imaginative, creative play.

Have you always wanted to be an artist? Yes, I have always pursued making and doing even when life means time has to be directed

elsewhere like earning a living and raising children.

Describe your work? There are some consistencies when I am working within certain mediums; my Lithographs

tend to be

stylistically similar to each other, as are my Intaglios. However, I have an

eclectic touch and work across mediums and themes, which often means that there is a

variability of imagery and kinds of works I make. The work is largely paper-based – Prints, Altered Books, Artists’ Books & Objects as the overarching connection.

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What is the philosophy behind your work? My philosophy is possibly that “work begets work�; one thing leads to the next. Initial ideas spark a theme or motif, and I develop these. Having a background in printmaking, I am used to working in series which means

that an idea can be explored, developed and expanded into a succession of work that

revolve around it. Very often, this creates a body of work that forms an Exhibition.

"Fjord" from the "Precious" series of miniature painted paper-pulp sculptures

housed in jewellery boxes. Artist's Object, H12 x W12 x B7cm . Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Do you have a set method / routine of working? It is not a rigid routine but when I’m working on finishing an artwork or a series of works, my

studio calls to me, and I can’t stay away. At times I get very excited to see how something is

drying and find

myself out there in the middle

of the night. They are like babies that must be

tended to, day or night. Occasionally, I have to fit life in and around time

spent in the studio physically, but I find myself thinking about ideas and the work.

"Mesa" from the "Precious" series of miniature painted paper-pulp

sculptures housed in jewellery boxes. Artist's Object, H16 x W19 x B7cm.. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Cloud Atlas, Artists Object, H45 x W45 x B60cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Un-Zip The World Paper Object H50 x W50 x B50cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Why do you choose this material / medium to work with? Specialising in Printmaking initially and mainly Lithographs (which is printing from a heavy, flat slab of stone), and Etchings (from a metal plate) leads to working with lots of paper. It is fair to say I am obsessed with paper and have a quite a collection of decorative, Japanese

papers and other papers to use in both my prints and artists books. I intend to use them up before gathering more, but that hasn’t worked so far…I also print onto and collage with

‘found papers’ such as from books and old maps.

All printmaking processes allow artists to produce editions and multiples. Stone Lithography is possibly an endangered process as it is specialised and a little ‘tricky’, but it produces the

most delightful images of inky washes which are my preference. Intaglio or Etchings are also a laborious process but there is something about the acid biting into a metal plate to produce

wonderfully velvety images and even texture; it keeps me coming back for more. Perhaps I’m a glutton for punishment.

I also spend time with Letterpress printing as part of producing text as an element for some

of my Artists’ Books. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Printing Zoomanity pages, Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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How important is drawing as an element to your artwork? Drawing is so much the basis for all image making even if it is a thumbnail sketch used to jog my memory. The medium of Lithography most closely resembles sketches and drawings; and I do draw directly onto the stone, however, I now find I create images in

other ways such as with inky washes, scratching and

scrapping back, layering and

collaging.

What inspires your work / creations? Recently I have been working with themes around landscape, atlas’, maps and travel. Usually I will work around an area I am interested in and explore that area as thoroughly

as I can. These themes and ideas come from both my inner life, but I am also intensely interested in the natural and metaphysical worlds.

What have been the major influences on your work? Life; other artists and artworks: the environment; reading, radio and moving pictures.

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Sweet Sukura Girl Etching H38 x W28cm.

Anne-Maree Hunter.

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What are some of your favourite artworks and artists? Fiona Hall – the detail, ideas, materials and technique. For printmaking – George Baldessin; such large, impressive etchings and Paul Wunderlich for Lithographs. I have always loved “Suspended Stone Circle II” by Ken Unsworth; a meditation. Dale Chihuly – magnificent Glass.

And while it is very cliched and the most reproduced image in the world, I am completely drawn to “The Great Wave” by Hokusai, who also has an amazing body work beyond this one famous Wood Block print. My first memories are of dreams about such waves, it’s in my psyche.

Any particular style or period that appeals?

At heart, I am probably a Surrealist as I like the unusual, the quirky and often make a sharp point with a twist of humour or irony, something that may not be immediately obvious; something that works on your subconscious. But truly, I can find the cream in every style or period of artwork. And there is nothing wrong with the purely beautiful and the really horrifying. Page 43: Normanton, Hand stamping on Map, H70 x W95cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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What are the challenges in becoming an exhibiting

artist? You need to have belief in yourself to be able to

bare your raw self to the world. The other barriers are the usual: - expense, exhibition spaces institu-

tional resistance, lack of reward both financially and recognition. There is also something of the ‘in

group’ that seems to exclude or are blind to those beyond the current favourite flavour.

Name your greatest achievement, exhibitions?

Completing a PhD on Artists Books. Having work (mainly Artists’ Books) collected by

State Libraries and Regional Galleries Continuously exhibiting since 1995. “Atlas”- my last solo major exhibition at Maitland Regional Gallery in 2017. Suburban Democracy, Artist’s Book 22, Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Hann River, Hand stamping on Map, H70 x W95cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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What are you working on at present? I have recently packed up my studio and moved house, so I am lacking a space to spread out and work easily in, but I am tinkering and creating smaller works for some group exhibitions I am involved with. This year celebrates the 40th anniversary for the Newcastle Printmakers Workshop, so past and present members are producing an edition based on one of the years since 1979. This will

produce an archive, but the members also exchange their prints with each other – it’s like Christmas.

And I am currently working on a couple of Artists’ Books presently.

What do you hope viewers of your art works will feel and take with them? I hope they will look more deeply in and consider what I may be saying but I also hope that it invokes their own musings. I hope that my works invites 2nd and 3rd looks, something that keeps them coming back, something more than a pretty picture, something of substance but I am also very happy if they are amused and find something humorous within.

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Waterbody, Artists Book, H32 x W46 x B3cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Your future aspirations with your art? I want to keep working. I hope that on my last day on earth, I still have a ‘paint brush’ in my hand.

I am trying to become more widely known, recognised and collected.

Where do you see your art practice in five years’ time? Mmm, tricky: hopefully in a more secure artistic place.

Forthcoming exhibitions? I will be in various Group and Selective Printmaking, Works on Paper and Artists’ Books exhibitions around Australia. I am in the initial stages of planning another solo exhibition – must get a new studio space organised!

Melon Geisha, Papercut, H10 x W10cm. Anne-Maree Hunter 2015.

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4 Lime Kimino, paper cut, H30 x W30cm. Anne-Maree Hunter. Instagram: psyclonicstudios

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Anne-Maree Hunter. Š 2019 Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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SOMETHING OF EVERY DAY LIFE. Yep, our local girls laid these eggs we are eating. They are looking a lot better with the fresh diet of cut up grass and garlic chives, good for keeping the intestine worms at bay. And of cause the two Muscovy ducks are not there to foul up the water. I was really worried, the two hens were looking pretty sickly, a month has passed, if not three months. Still the two healthy chickens keep us in eggs, and their droppings are good fertiliser for the plants. So maintaining a clean cage is also on my agenda.

The ducks are happy in their new abode, the swimming pool converted into a pond, since in all truth they are getting quite old and crotchety. Now believe it or not they can finally swim in the water. It is a huge improvement, that I may not have seen coming.

Alas it shows me up to be ignorant of these creature’s wellbeing, damn it, that is quite true. No use showing my regret to beast and man alike, unfortunately these incidents, do frequently happen. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Actually it is quite warm today, and a cooler place must be found.

Is it time for a cup of tea? Is the garden beckoning me to do some more work? Planting seedlings, shifting composted material, or is some house work in order, like vacuuming

the floor with our newly acquired appliance. The old one has already been disposed of, it barely picked up any dirt. So look out Daddy Long Leg spider and other creatures who inhabit the dust motes, and of

cause the Ants. Sorry , you are sucked up in this vortex and killed in the maelstrom of debris.

- Eric Werkhoven Š 2019.

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ANDREW SUTHERLAND

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INTERVIEW

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Inner City Living– Ghosts of Citizens Past

Mixed media on canvas H100 x W100cm.

Andrew Sutherland © 2017. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ANDREW SUTHERLAND Hunter Valley, contemporary figurative artist.

Sutherland’s paintings express his love of fantasy, cinema and still photos, all influences in his work. ‘I have been working on paintings with figurative subject matter. I am exploring the depiction of the human form and the contrasts between an academic approach and an expressive one. Thematically I am

interested in the human condition. I see my figures as characters and try to put them into environments that give them a context or story that the viewer can elaborate on in their own mind.’ - The exhibition FIGURATION REDUX @ ASW 2019

Pages 52/53: The Moon and the Sun, mixed media on canvas, H60 x W200cm. Andrew Sutherland. Right: Circle, Mixed media on canvas, H90 x W70cm, Andrew Sutherland © 2004. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Howl Mixed media on board H125 x W125cm. Andrew Sutherland ©

2019

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ANDREW SUTHERLAND - INTERVIEW “I grew up in Stockton and left school in 1981 after getting my School Certificate. I worked as a banker for 5 years then travelled around Australia for about six months. When I got back I was broke and enrolled in the Associate Diploma of Fine Arts course at Newcastle TAFE and loved it from day one.�

What attracted you to the world of art? I had always enjoyed art at school and drew and painted at home too usually humourous pictures involving naked people

and drug paraphernalia. I experimented with media like using boot polish when I didn't have any brown paint. I liked being creative and making something. When did your artistic passion begin?

During the first few months of TAFE I suddenly became really aware of colour and tone as I looked at the world around me. It was so enriching. Also the

moment when I realised that realism was not the be all and end all of art. It really blew my mind because I am not a naturally talented

realist artist. I struggled with realism and when I realised you don't have to be confined to that one style it was liberating- thrilling to me really.

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Have you always wanted to be an artist?

No, not really, I've never known what I wanted to be, still don't I just enjoy making art. I still feel kind of embarrassed or phony when people say "oh, you're an artist!". Am I?

Describe your work? Varied, experimental, messy. I seem to work in series and

explore. What is the philosophy behind your work? I try to make artwork that is interesting, that arrests the viewer for some reason, whether it be the image being

depicted or the technique. I don't think there's such a thing as right or wrong in art,

but for me the artwork needs to 'work'- firstly in a formal way- as an arrangement of shapes, line, colour, tone etc. and secondly (and less importantly to me) thematically. Ideally both! Right: Where Have all the Flowers Gone , H120 x W40cm, mixed media on canvas, Andrew Sutherland Š 2013. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Do you have a set method/routine of working? When I was using a lot of collage I did. I would get the frame, glue down the collage material and then paint. The collage became part of the surface on which the paint is laid. When I'm just painting I usually

start with washes and gradually build up the image using thicker paint then finish with glazes. However, I also love the element of chance and have had many a happy accident- spilt paint, ripped materials the wrong

way etc. and at first you think, "oh shit", then you go, "actually that looks kind of cool". And you leave it.

Why do you choose this material/medium to work with?

A variety of factors- beginning with "what can I afford"! I started using collage and found objects in TAFE because I was a poor art student and one day had no money for red paint. The TAFE had pulled up it's old red carpet so I decided that wherever I needed red in the painting I was working on I would stick a piece of carpet. It turned out to be an interesting work, the teachers liked it and I thought, hey, this could be beneficial. At that time we had just had the 1989 earthquake so there were hundreds of demolition sites that had all sorts of wonderful objects that could be stuck onto a painting. One of my TAFE teachers introduced me to Robert Rauschenberg and some other mixed media masters and I was hooked. I ended up working that way for the six years I studied Art (3 at TAFE 3 at the University of Newcastle) and did well from it. It's been my way of working until recently really. I'll probably always use collage to a degree. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Diptych, Mixed media on canvas, H120 x W200cm, Andrew Sutherland © 2016. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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What inspires your work/creations? I don't know really. The desire to master something, to produce something that I think is interesting or beautiful (or both). And hopefully someone else will too. At the moment I am grappling with the human figure because I know in the past I

have consciously avoided it due to my finding it most difficult to render satisfactorily. It's kind of a challenge I have set myself. I think though, that what I love about making art is that when I'm doing it, it takes me out of myself, out of this world and into 'the zone' where everything else is superfluous, nothing really matters except what you're doing with the materials. It's a lovely place to be and, if when you come back, there's a decent painting looking back at you, it's so satisfying. It makes you feel unbelievably good.

What have been the major influences on your work? My friend Bondy and I copied about 20 Monet's and Van Gogh's each when I was in first year at TAFE. Most were terrible but I learnt a lot from that. My art student colleagues influenced me more than I can say- my friend Glen Basedo - his work still comes to my mind. My work tended to be very 'tight' when I started and seeing the work of Michael Bell, Ed Rush and the Pakhunters broadened my horizons and really helped me loosen up. I was fortunate to have them as my teachers at

TAFE. John Montifiore and Gary Jones were very kind and encouraging to me at University. Aldona O'Brien gave tough love! The acceptance of appropriation as a legitimate art practice was really big for me, because as someone not naturally gifted towards realism it enabled me to use realistic images with a modicum of skill. Being given a photocopier by my boss right when I started to use collaged images of cinema photo's was a Godsend and allowed me almost free range with copying at no expense. That was awesome! Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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What are some of your favourite artworks and artists? I'm really old fashioned -sorry! Anything by Monet amazes me, his colour. And other Impressionists such as Van Gogh. I love Chagall, Picasso, Pollock, De Kooning, Rauschenberg, and Basquiat. (You can tell how old I must be!)

Any particular style or period that appeals? Not really, I see individual works from all periods that I love, from cave paintings to digital art. It's that arresting image that captures me, whether it be modern or ancient, painting, print, photography or sculpture. There's always something isn't

there? And nothing new under the sun!

What are the challenges in becoming an exhibiting artist? Firstly, for me anyway, its the financial cost. I work as a Case Manager for a company that helps people with acquired brain injuries. I don't make my living from my art. I'm lucky I show through Art Systems Wickham and they are really reasonable. I also show with a sculptor, Peter Ronne, so we can split the cost.

Secondly putting yourself out there for critical examination of your work. I don't mind objective opinion- you can learn from it. Subjective opinion sucks. And yet that is what will be offered the most.

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Inner City Living- the Crowd, Acrylic on board, H60 x W40cm, Andrew Sutherland © 2016. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Ghost dog of Mayfield Mixed media on board. H150 x W150cm. Andrew Sutherland © 2017.

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Name your greatest achievement, exhibitions? I won the Maitland Art prize two years in a row way back in 1992 and 1993. I know that just makes me a small fish in a

small pond, but I am inordinately proud of having done so. It gave me confidence that my work must be OK. The first year I won, I was not expecting to and I was ecstatic until one of my University lecturers said to me, "congratulations, I can't believe you won with THAT painting!" It knocked my confidence right out. So when I won again the next year, I thought, well surely the judges can't be wrong two years running and they're different judges to last year, so my work must have some appeal. I must have some talent. It really helped me. People don't realise how vulnerable we are to self doubt and how crippling it can be.

What are you working on at present? Figurative works. I've moved away from collage and feel naked without it!

What do you hope viewers of your artworks will feel and take with them? I hope they feel like stopping and looking, really looking at the work. Not just walking round the gallery in 5 minutes and leaving. I hope they enjoy some aspect of the work- colour, humour, paint- something, enough to linger over it. I hope they buy the painting and take it with them!

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Your future aspirations with your art? I just want to keep making it. If I can also keep exhibiting and cover the costs that would be good. It's very humbling when

someone will part with hard earned money for your work.

Where do you see your art practice in five years time? My eldest son Zac has built me a studio in our back yard. It's

so well done and wonderful. I used to have to paint in the kitchen now I can go down to my studio. I remember talking with my friends at TAFE 30 years ago and we all dreamt of one day having our own studio. It is a dream come true. I see myself continuing to explore the use of materials.

- Andrew Sutherland Š 2019.

Right: Coco Chanel Bumbag no.5, H130cm x W100cm, mixed media on board, Andrew Sutherland 2017.

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Left: Inner City Living- Naked Boogie on the Foreshore Mixed media on canvas

H100 x W100cm. Andrew Sutherland 2017.

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Andrew

Sutherland Š 2019.

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RED SOLDIER White principles steer the wombing boat Holding strong his black oar, encumbered bellowing West, man’s sin screams into the face of another’s tomb

Caught beneath shallows of purple rain, cocks side a gentle grey carpet. There lays an open writ passage Foretelling destinies left to vessel a substitute escape Death always be, two birds familiar by another. Family innocent by the silent boat. Footsteps of dried ice form a glassy barrier The fore warning, screaming West wind Line divides, South land to desired North, it is there the gatekeeper waits Ball in mouth and mask of shame Sheathing fear beneath this weary face The key to unlocking the duel worlds safely hidden between the milky breast of a half-moon shadow Yellow headstones point to North heavens, dark and divided, four scuttled lines. Black temples fall into Tomorrowland

Marching beats lose time. The mother house lays the pointing past, a beacon of each future The rimming mouth ushers porcelain blue-disc dreams into Never lands breath of always Sing another tune, play another song Bright as the Omega Sun, following the Orange Moon

Lithic by Nature . Visionary in Mind S tu d fhag mo chroi craite Rhyme.

- Maggie Hall © 2019. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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R E D S O L D I E R

Gregory Gamage’s contemporary painting inspired artist and writer Maggie Hall to create the intense vividly imaged poem Red Soldier. All Rights Reserved on article and

photographs - Maggie Hall Š 2019.

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Quintessentially Australian Silo Art Trails?

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Quintessentially Australian Silo Art Trails? Terry Fogarty Silo art is the practice of local Australian communities commissioning public mural artworks primarily on large cylindrical structures. The murals were initially painted on abandoned grain silos or in recent times on

large water tower storage tanks. Now ubiquitous mural townscape art has emerged. According to the folk at the ‘Australian Silo Art’ website: The ‘Silo Art Trend’ is infusing Australian’s with new found energy and enthusiasm. It’s encouraging people from cities and country towns alike to get into their cars, caravans, motorhomes and even tour busses to journey along Australia’s now number one must do road trip. The Australian Silo Art Trail Collection all began in Northam, Western Australia (in 2015)”

Page 70: Northam WA 2015, whimsical characters in fantastical transportation devices by Phlegm

(TFogarty/Avon Advocate) Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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The ‘Farmer Quartet’

West Victoria Silo Art Trail

The first artwork on the most well-known silo art trail was commissioned by the town of Brim (in 2016) in the Mallee

region (Grampians) of Victoria. Brisbane artist Guido Van Helten created the now famous ‘Farmer Quartet’

The ‘Farmer Quartet’, soaring 27 metres, celebrates Australia’s iconic farmers, stoic in the face of adversity. It was commissioned with a view to creating tourist interest that would attract visitors to the then drought-stricken region.

It was a monumental success. Building on the success of the Brim initiative, Yarriambiack

Shire Council, Joddy Roller of the International Street Art Agency, the Victorian and Australian Governments and the publicly-listed company GrainCorp collaborated to create the ‘Silo Art Trail’. The trail consists of six ‘way stations’ centered

Each silo provides an experience unique to

on Brim. It stretches from Rupanyup in the Wimmera region

its particular location such as at Sheep Hills

to the south to Patchewallock in the Mallee of the north.

where Melbourne artist Adnate celebrates the areas indigenous culture.

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Sheep Hills – Adnate – indigenous culture. Photograph TFogarty. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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In the footsteps of an ancient art. As we know, the practice of painting artistic pieces in public spaces is not new. It has been

with us since the dawn of mankind and has evolved into ever more intricate and subtle nuance. Right top: Aboriginal rock art Mt Grenfell, NSW, c.2,000 BP by Ngiyampaa Wangaaypuwan people. (TFogarty)

Mid L: Bison, Altamira cave, Cantabria, Spain, c.20,000 BP by Paleolithic people TFogarty/Archeology Travel). Bottom L: The History of Mexico, National Palace, MexicoCity c.1930s by Diego Rivera. (TFogarty)

Right: Expulsion from Paradise (panel, Sistine Chapel, Rome,c.1500s by Michaelangelo. (TFogarty) Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Wheat takes hold across Australia The original

‘Silo Art Trail’ has

spawned a wide variety of similar

projects across Australia with at least 30 silo art sites established (or planned) including 6 in Western Australia, 7 in South Australia, 11 in Victoria, 4 in New South Wales and 2 in Queensland. What started in Northam has become an Australia-

wide phenomena. Map Legend: Brown – silo art; Purple –

water tank art; Black: townscape art.

In addition to classic silo art, the

genre has morphed to include water storage tank art and more Australian Silo Art (TFogarty/australiansiloarttrail)

recently Townscape art towns. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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S I L O A R T

SILO ART

Sheep in Red Socks by Dan Miller Merriwa, NSW.

(TFogarty)

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Multi genre silo art trail A good example of a contemporary silo art trail encompassing all three genres is in the Hunter region of NSW comprising the

Merriwa Grain Silo, Kurri Kurri Street Art town and the Coal Point water tank in

Newcastle.

Top left: STREET ART People, places & events, by various artists. Kurri Kurri Kurri Kurri, NSW. ((TFogarty) Bottom Left: WATER TANK ART - indigenous wildlife by Dan Miller. Coal Point, Newcastle, NSW. (TFogarty)

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Quintessentially Australian? The majority of silo art in Australia is expressed in a colloquial vernacular – iconic Australiana reminiscent of work on Arnott’s biscuit tins, Rosella sauce bottles and historical literary magazines.

Top Left: Rosella (TFogarty/Rosella) Top Right: Windmill (TFogarty) Bottom Left: Bulletin man (TFogarty/Bulletin) Bottom right: Echidna (TFOGARTY/Etsy)

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Internationalistion Whilst other countries have embraced

similar

artworks the concept of a silo art trail does not

seem to have been embraced. To their loss. However, Guido van Helten the artist

respon-

sible for painting the Brim silo has also been commissioned to create various ’silo’ artworks internationally including: Art (re) Public in Jacksonville, Florida; ATO zone in Avdiivka, Ukraine; UPEA16 in Helsinki, Finland;

Unexpected Fort Smith, Arkansas and Fort Worth in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. Guido’s grain elevator art work has also inspired artists in South Dakota, Tennessee, Arkansas and Florida.

Left: Fort Worth, Iowa, USA, 360 degree wrap-around of all local residents by Guido van Helten. (Fogarty/Iowa Adventurer)

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A new vernacular? International creative photographer

Harry Verschelden is often inspired by architecture in creating some of his silo art fantasies which one day may transform silo art world-wide.

Left: Silo art after creative international photographer Harry Verschelden (TFogarty)

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Australia’s first silo artwork at Northam WA also has an abstract flip side. The rear panel of this ‘two-faced’ work is a customary abstract in explosive blocks of fluoro colour by HENSE.

Front of Northam, WA whimsical characters by Phlegm (TFogarty/ABC).

Rear of Northam, WA, HENSE, abstract patterns in explosive blocks of fluoro colour by HENSE (TFogarty/ABC).

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Another work that breaks away from

the vernacular is the Merridin, WA mural.

Left: Merridin, unique figurative and abstract-based work by Kyle Hughes-Odgers ((TFogarty)/ABC).

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Silo art now immortalized Some of Australia’s best examples of silo art have now been immortalized by Australia Post as stamps. Left: Ravensthorpe, WA, indigenous flora by Amok Island. (Fogarty/Australia Post).

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The future for silo art? With a mere 4 years since the first silo art project and even less time since the trails were established, Australian

travelers are only now becoming aware of the opportunity for enjoyment that the trails present. With a limited number of grain silos, it is easy to understand why the ubiquitous water storage tanks were chosen for delivering a second wave of art works. Currently there are a limited number of townscape

works. It is likely that townscape art trails will emerge and blossom nationwide.

The opportunity exists in urban areas for industrial cylinders such as us petrol storage tanks, cement towers and the like to become artistic backdrops. Perhaps we will see ‘totem’ trails emerge utilising the humble telegraph pole.

Top left: Mount Maunganui NZ, youth and the idea of energy by Cut

Collective((TFogarty)/weburbanist). Bottom left: Sublime Sid & Ned by Joseph Johns, aka Moondyne Joe

Lower Chittering, WA, (TFogarty/Seesaw).

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Even electricity transmission towers (after the decommissioning of fossil fuel sources perhaps) may become artistic canvasses.

Above: Leuchtturm by Ail Hwang, Hae-Ryaan Jeon and Ghung Ki Park, MĂźnster, Germany, (TFogarty)/BoredPanda).

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Further reading: Australian Silo Art Trail https://australiansiloarttrail.com/ Silo Art Trail through the Wimmera and Mallee region of Victoria

T

T

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R

R

R

Y

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F

F

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G

A

A

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Y

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http://siloarttrail.com The Ultimate Guide to South Australia’s Silo Art https://glamadelaide.com.au/the-ultimate-guide-to-south-australias-

regional-silo-art-more/

Queensland Silo Art http://queenslandweekender.com.au/queenslands-silo-art-trail/

Silo Art images from around Australia https://www.escape.com.au/

Long journeyman Terry Fogarty a Geographer/Historian is also a

destinations/australia/incredible-silo-art-around-australia/image-

consummate chaser of thematic trails to follow across the world. In his

gallery/1280107fe7cee4ab8f3c1c3595348e67

over 2,000,000 kilometers travelled he has sought and conquered thematic trails in Australia, Europe, Scandinavia, Africa, Asia, the Pacific and North & South America. These have ranged from the mud

Western Australian Silo Art https://www.publicsilotrail.com/

pools of New Zealand, huts of the Australian high country, Norwegian coastal towns, the towns at the farthest reaches of the world, the

Australian Silo Art interactive map https://australiansiloarttrail.com/map-page/

Aztec ruins of Mexico city, life along the Irrawaddy and many many more. “Following a thematic trail can give meaning and purpose to

journeying. The research required, travel, encounters and reminisces shared stay with us for life”. Terry Fogarty 2019. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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LES MURRAY TRIBUTE Terry Fogarty Les Murray (b.1938) died in April 2019 at Taree, not far from his family home at Bunyah on the mid-north coast of NSW, Australia. Les was a colossus of Australian and world poetry. Along with collaborator Geoffrey Lehmann, he published

his first poetry in The Ibex Tree in 1965. Over the next fifty-five years Les published thirty-five works of poetry along with collecting and editing six works and penning ten verse and prose collections. Les is remembered not only as a Poet Laureate but also as:

- an autodidact with some ‘terrible politics” John Kinsella, The Guardian. - having an anti-establishment streak (that) helped reinforce the idea that his poetry had a larrikin quality to it. Deakin University literature professor Lyn McCredden. - a sub-human redneck, Les Murray. In the 1990s, a proposal to name a park in Chatswood in honour of Les was squashed by Councilors of Willoughby City Council on the basis that ‘he is not dead’ and concern that ‘he might say something embarrassing’ Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Jolly

Life throws curved balls

Yet fanciful so

Roger, the Pilot

To be caught and treasured

Running potpourri

Teasing letters

Softly playing in the park

Gathering chiropterms

From behind the skenes

Calming, a turbulent mind

Into blossoms of gold

Painting in words

Accepting the cloak of the buffalo

Leafing wings

Phrases and insights

Sublimating form for flowers

To they glisten

Reassembling

Awakening

Shining

Sitting on a farm

Who dare, save

Olympus of peotic topography

Is a far cry

Australia’s greatest

Towering mind, body and spirit

From days behind a desk

Laid down in time

Shunning relativist fame

Sifting the rest, from

Only the omnipotent

One mind, condensing time

What Sydney and Melbourne

Time traveler

To highlights of achievement

Offer

Smelting alphabets

Of lesser intellect

Reassigning

Casting

Overshadowing

Ken would be proud

Does coal smoke and bats

Born and bread

Represent a conspectus

Where Valerie

So much to choose

Adorned and fed

So much to chew

Lustre lights, shining

Over, seeking perfection

Around the table

Layering meaning within style

Carousing

Extracting Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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FRETTING FOR LES Les Murray married Valerie Morelli from Chatswood. They lived in Chatswood for a number of years with

their children. During their time in Chatswood local residents recall that Les would often play with his son, who suffered from Autism, in the local park. Evidently Les had put barb-wire fencing atop the fences of their

property to contain his son who tended to wander. Whilst living in Chatswood, Valerie and Les revived a tradition started by another world-class poet, Kenneth Slessor (Five Bells), also from Chatswood. They would host dinner parties for poets, mainly from Sydney and Melbourne. These included Slessor and other recognised poets and literary figures such as Douglas Stewart (Fire on the Snow), Geoffrey Lehmann (his co-conspirator on Murray's first book of poetry), Christopher Koch, Mark O'Connor, Peter Porter, Peter Goldsworthy, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Alan Gould, Robert Gray, Jamie Grant and his wife Margaret Connolly. Les penned many poems that resonate with imagery of Chatswood and the North Shore: work's turned its back on sweet brilliance but when they start to loom, these towers disappear. Dusk's lightswitchers reveal yellow business branching kilotail and haloed with stellar geometry Mirror-glass skyscrapers Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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In addition to Les and Kenneth Slessor, Chatswood and Willoughby has produced an extraordinary number

of highly renowned poets, writers and literary figures who either lived in or wrote about the area. This includes Louise Mack, Mona Alexis Brand (Children of the Sun), Tad Orwell (Kangaroo Flat), Lennie Lower

(Here's Luck), Francis Webb (A drum for Ben Boyd), Kenneth Cook (Wake in Fright), Jennifer Rankin (Night ride), Barcroft Boake (Where dead men lie), Kate Grenville (Lillians story), Matthew Reilly (Scarecrow),

Henry Lawson, Burnum Burnum (Wildthings),Nancy Wake (The White Mouse), Betty Roland (The touch of silk) and Gwen Meredith (Blue Hills), A move is in train to appropriately commemorate Les’ contribution to Chatswood. Some years ago, a park on the Pacific Highway was re-named Kenneth Slessor Park. Les, along with the ‘co-conspirator’ of his first book of poems (Geoffrey Lehmann) were invited to the opening. Whilst Lehmann attended, Les sent his apologies as he was travelling overseas. In the Foreword of Les’ conspectus of Australian poetry. After

describing his rationale for not including many classic poems of many of his selected poets he recounts that ‘you cannot easily leave Slessor’s Five Bells out of an Australian anthology and retain credibility.’ . In his anthology (see above) he selected poets and poems based on poetic experience. This included a

swag of poets from the Northern Shore of Sydney where Chatswood is located. 1. Murray, L (1986/96), The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse, Oxford University Press Australia.

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Henry Lawson lived in Naremburn on the Northern Shore. It is reported that Lawson, known to have liked a tipple or two would often depart the tram and instead of going home would weave his way down into the

bush where he would soend the night in a large cave overhang. Of particular interest is Lawson’s poem ‘Chatswood’ (Lone Pine 1919) purported by some as recounting the way Chatswood got its name. Other’s contest this assertion as a figment of Lawson’s fermented imagination. Kenneth Slessor who grew up on the corner of Fullers Road and the Pacific Highway, Chatswood whose ‘Second-Class Ballad of the North Shore First’ resonates with the clatter of iron tyres of the NSWGR. Francis Webb lived in Johnson Street, Chatswood. Francis had attended school in North Sydney and Chatswood. His personal library and collection of 18th and 19th century oil paintings were bequeathed to

Chatswood Library. He penned a poecm about the Middle Harbour of the Northern Shore. Of the various poets that used to attend Les and Valerie’s dinner parties in Chatswood, Les selected to include Mark O’Conner, Peter Goldsworthy, Christopher Koch, Peter Porter, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Alan

Gould, Robert Gray, Jamie Grant, Bruce Beaver and Jennifer Rankin.

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Other local poets Northern Shore selected by Les as being ‘lively and readable’ include Harley Matthews, Barcroft Boake, Douglas Stewart, Christopher Brennan, Henry Kenndall, Mary Gilmore, RD Fitzgerald,

James Devaney, AD Hope, Victor Daley, Robert Adamson, Vivian Smith, James McAuley, Robin Gurr and John Le Gay Brereton and Hugh McCrea. Les was a Patron of The Concourse at Chatswood, one of Sydney’s pre-eminent entertainment venues and the cultural home of the Northern Shore arts scene. Terry Fogarty Chatswood May 2019

Terry Fogarty is the author of ‘Voices of the Northern Shore’ a literary gazetteer of the authors and poets of the northern shore of Sydney. His own poetry is both philosophically eclectic yet seamless. Grounded in place, personality and time he braids literary tapestries that can be both confronting yet calming. Recurrent

themes from theatres of the absurd are seasoned with the frailties of written expression where he often subpoenas truth. 4. Fogarty, T (2008), Voices of the Northern Shore – a literary gazetter, Boake Press, Chatswood. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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WIND SONG

Bernadette Meyers Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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These stunning sand dunes are only a couple of hours north of Sydney at Anna Bay. They are easily

accessible by foot, yet they are practically deserted. There is a 4WD bus which takes tourists out to a spot where they can slide down the dunes, however, few people seem to appreciate the incredible beauty right

within reach. Since we don’t have a 4WD we weren’t able to access the main sand dune area, however, we still managed to get to a wonderful spot not far from a beach carpark. I’m still processing the whole experience of being in that special place. Nature has so much to teach us and the perspective up there on top of the dunes is quite different from our normal view of life. It is clean, simple, focused and distraction-free, perfectly situated for listening to the wisdom of the sand.

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You feel elevated and able to view your life from afar. The entire dune experience is like a metaphor for our

life. You can see the big picture and how beautifully formed the horizon is. There are no mistakes, it is all in perfect harmony.

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I started to ponder light and shadow. The sand itself is only beautiful because of how the light falls on it and

how it has allowed the wind to shape it. It’s all about the light and shadows, the ripples and patterns. It would be dull and lifeless if there were no shadows to describe the patterns. Perhaps that is how our life

is - it is both the bright and dark days that define the picture of our life.

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The dunes are ever-changing and the patterns are more magnificently designed than any artist could dream

up. In one way it’s a fragile place, yet in another way it is resilient and able to re-form after each storm or battering. The wind is a vital element in that environment. It struck me as a metaphor for the Spirit of God

and the idea that if we simply allow the Spirit to shape us as souls, we will be formed into something artistic...

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Then there are the imprints of those who have traveled there. I walked the dunes early in the morning and

noticed that it’s a very busy place at night with all sorts of animal, bird and insect tracks. It was amazing how many different types of creatures tracks show above and below the surface of the sand. Another metaphor

for the way that people and events imprint on our life - for better or worse.

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I came away from the two sessions of photographing the dunes with a full heart. Feeling a sense of

completeness and security. A deep knowing that our lives are carefully designed and that there is a big picture. It was my intention to capture this and express it through this Windsong series.

All Rights Reserved on article and photographs - Bernadette Meyers Š 2019. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ART GALLERY CAIRNS

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CAIRNS ART GALLERY Lorraine Fildes This year I have been travelling in Australia and New Zealand, uncovering some wonderful art and architec-

ture as I moved around. One of my stops was Cairns, one of the main tropical tourist destinations for those visiting the Great Barrier Reef and the associated coastal tropical islands. Cairns Art Gallery was the one of the highlights of this city. I have included two of the exhibitions they had on display. One of the exhibitions was organized to exhibit the work of ceramicists from the Far North Queensland Region. “Cairns Potters Club Melting Pot 2018 National Ceramics Exhibition” - held from the 30 November 2018 to 6 January 2019. It showcased both functional and abstract works, formed by using a

range of techniques and materials. I have selected my favourite pieces from the exhibition and luckily the award winning ceramic is amongst my favourites. The other exhibition “Cartonography: Fruit Cartons of Far North Queensland” was provided by a Sydney

artist Sean Rafferty. This exhibition involved the collection, mapping and cataloguing of Australian fruit and vegetable cartons. I have included a photo of his collection. For more information about Cartonography and the artist’s collection visit www.cartongraphy.com Page 106: Felicity Bury “Bianca” Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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CAIRNS POTTERS CLUB - MELTING POT 2018 NATIONAL CERAMICS EXHIBITION

Joan Cleland Infinite Variations

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K E N I S O N Ken Ison, Left - Elements, Right - Symbols (Raku) Winner of “The Australian Ceramics Assoc. Award of the “Melting Pot 2018” competition. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Brigitte Baumeister, Horsehair with lid, set of 2, Raku. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Jennie Scott, Indian Treasure. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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L

O N E

W H I T

E Lone White Rainforest Form.

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Jeananne Orfanos Field of Remembrance.

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Mollie Bosworth Dragon Flies Dream.

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Valmai Lord Casting Shadows 1

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Sam Matthews The Dust Collector.

Lyndel Turpin, Dusk Dancer, Raku Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Craig Hoy, Make an impact, Raku.

Ian Whittaker, Sugar Mill. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Christina George, The Nest. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Victoria Park, Leech Henge, 15 pieces, Raku. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Christina George, Where’s the Genie? Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Y U K I O’ C

O N N

O Yuki O’Conno, Perception 1. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Jeananne Orfanos, Nature Winner of the Clay Shed Award.

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Ian Whittaker Queenslander.

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CARTONOGRAPHY Fruit Cartons of Far North Queensland by Sydney artist Sean Rafferty

The adjacent photo shows fruit and vegetable cartons collected by

Rafferty

Queensland.

from He

Far

North

sees

these

objects as place markers that

convey stories about the people who grow, harvest, store and transport produce, from the farm or orchard to the consumer. His installations

are

designed

to

encourage audiences to think about the many stories, histories and experiences that are integral to their creation and purpose. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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All Rights Reserved on article and photographs Lorraine Fildes © 2019

Left: Danielle Piat, The Owl, Raku.

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ART NEWS Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ART NEWS Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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MYTHICAL BEASTS 12- 28 JULY 2019 ASW GALLERY www.art-systems-wickham.com/

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V E Barking Up the Right Tree, Acrylic on Fabriano paper, 90 x 120cm.- E&R Werkhoven © 2019

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MYTHICAL BEASTS 12- 28 JULY 2019 ERIC & ROBYN WERKHOVEN

MONIQUE WERKHOVEN Official Opening: SATURDAY 13 JULY 3pm. onwards. Art Systems Wickham Gallery

40 Annie St Wickham, Newcastle NSW. www.art-systems-wickham.com/ Left: Psychopomps, oil pastel / aqua graphite pencil on paper H125 x W80 cm. Robyn Werkhoven © 2019.

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Studio La Primitive - Mythical Beasts Eric & Robyn Werkhoven

Monique Werkhoven

12 – 28 July 2019. Eric and Robyn Werkhoven celebrate a forty year artistic relationship with this year’s exhibition at Art Systems Wickham Gallery, 40 Annie St, Wickham, Newcastle NSW. Launch of book – POETRY & SCULPTURE by Eric Werkhoven Monique Werkhoven presents paintings - Eyeball Art.

Official Opening: Saturday 13th July 3pm. Onwards. Opened by: John O’Brien, award winning film & TV script writer.

Performance by The De Factos (John O’Brien & Donna Cavanough) inspired by the Werkhovens’ work. www.art-systems-wickham.com/ Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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A Wild Africa, acrylic on canvas, H90 x W60cm.

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E&R Werkhoven © 2019.

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The exhibition features a unique series of collaborative drawings and paintings of mythical beasts and bizarre

characters that inhabit the artists’ imagination. The stylised, graphic contorted creatures are part of life’s parade, witnessing the daily drama of life and an indeterminate future. Some appear to be in a hurry to be elsewhere, while others meditate on what’s it all about? “The works explore the world of human folly observing the irrationalities of existence, with sheer delight and a touch of irony.” Eric Werkhoven will launch the book Poetry & Sculpture. The publication includes a collection of poems written over recent years, penetrating and profound observations on life. And a selection of Eric’s dynamic and prolific sculptures.

Eric & Robyn live and work as professional contemporary artists in the Hunter Valley NSW. Together they exhibit under the title of Studio La Primitive. Both are award winning artists and have been Finalists in major Australian art

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prizes. Their work has been selected for exhibitions nationally and internationally. In 2013 they established the successful Arts and Literary online magazine – Studio La Primitive Arts Zine.

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In 2017 it was selected by the NSW State Library to be preserved as a digital publication of lasting cultural value

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for long-term access by the Australian community.

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At present the artists are the subject of a documentary film being made on their art and life – ‘Eric & Robyn and the

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Mythical Beasts’ by film makers Nicky Elliott and Pete Delahunty and producer Tom Zubrycki.

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Monique Werkhoven, artist and musician. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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E Monique describes her paintings as lowbrow,

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Pop Surrealist, inspired by the underground visual art movement, that originated in Los Angeles, California, area in the late 1970s and the more recent Japanese toy and video gaming culture. Monique alias MATA MON, presents a series of paintings - Eyeball Art, based on her

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fascination with the eye, being the opening to

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the soul.

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Left: Detail Slime Time, acrylic on board, Monique Werkhoven Š 2019. Above: The Mask, acrylic on canvas, Monique Werkhoven Š 2019. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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POETRY & SCULPTURE

The publication includes a collection of poems written over recent years, penetrating and

profound observations on life. And a selection of Eric’s dynamic and prolific sculptures.

Enquiries contact:

E:

werkhovenr@bigpond.com

Page 134: Left - Front cover, The Fall, Autoclaved aerated cement / cement / lacquer, H32 x W46 x B38cm. Eric Werkhoven 2013. Page 134: Right - Goddess, Autoclaved aerated cement / adhesive cement / lacquer, H82 x W25 x B20cm. Eric Werkhoven 2010.

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ERIC & ROBYN and the MYTHICAL BEASTS D O C

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Y Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Nicky Elliott & Pete Delahunty - “We're thrilled to

our toes to introduce you to Eric & Robyn and the Mythical Beasts. This film is a passionate

love story, shot over two years, featuring two of the most extraordinary, funny and creative artists

in Australia.” Film by Nicky Elliott and Pete Delahunty

Film Coming soon in 2019 / 20. Link to trailer Eric & Robyn and the Mythical Beasts:

https://vimeo.com/314422036

Right: Eric & Robyn Werkhoven, by Maggie Hall © 2019.

Producer: Tom Zubrycki.

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ARTSYSTEMSWICKHAM

40 ANNIE ST. WICKHAM, NEWCASTLE NSW.

Phone: 0431 853 600

www.art-systems-wickham.com/

Director: Colin Lawson Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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ART SYSTEMS WICKHAM CALENDAR 2019 JUNE 28 – JULY 7 ……….

LIAM POWER

JULY 12 – JULY 28 ………..

MYTHICAL BEASTS -

ROBYN & ERIC WERKHOVEN, MONIQUE WERKHOVEN AUG 2 – AUG 11 …………

NEW WORK - PAUL MUNRO

AUG 16 – AUG 25 ………………. OUT OF THE SHADOWS -

VARELLE HARDY, MARGARET McBRIDE, ANNE LEES, VANESSA TURTON , FELICITY HOWARD. AUG 30 – SEP 15

RAVEN SHADOWS - SUSAN RYMAN

SEP 20 – SEP 29 …… THERE IS ANOTHER WORLD BUT IT IS THIS ONE - JOHN HEANEY

www.art-systems-wickham.com/

Woman & Red Dog, acrylic on canvas, E&R Werkhoven © 2019.

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SURFACES AND LAYERS EXHIBITION DUNGOG by DESIGN 2019

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Dungog By Design Artisan Collective Annual Art Exhibition. 2019

Surfaces and Layers 27 July – 4 September. Venue: Dungog by Design Gallery 224 Dowling St. Dungog, NSW.

Official Opening: Saturday 27th July starts at 2pm Opened by Sue Smith,

TV & Australian film

scriptwriter. All welcome to attend the opening and meet the

artists. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE ARTS ZINE Since October 2013 Robyn Werkhoven has published

the Online Art and Literary magazine STUDIO LA PRIMITIVE ARTS ZINE. Featuring artist’s interviews, exhibitions, art news, poetry and essays. Arts Zine in 2017 was

selected by the NSW State

Library to be preserved as a digital publication of lasting cultural value for long-term access by the Australian community.

www.studiolaprimitive.net To view previous issues click on image of cover.

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Click on cover to view the issue.

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Click on cover to view the issue.

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studio la primitive jewellery

Dungog By Design

224 Dowling St, Dungog NSW. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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DUNGOG BY DESIGN SUSANNE HODGINS

handmade & Inspiring 224 Dowling St Dungog NSW ROBYN WERKHOVEN Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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DUNGOG CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Dungog Contemporary Presents Mowanjum To Maningrida June 1 - July 14, 2019. An exhibition of paintings, silkscreen and woodblock prints from Mowanjum Arts, Derby, The Kimberley, and fibre works from Maningrida Arts and Culture, NT.

146 - 150 Dowling Street, Dungog, NSW. Page 148: Edna Dale (1983) “Djalala & Wandjinas� (wandjinas with boundary stones on their body). Painting acrylic on canvas, 90 x 120 cm .

https://dungogcontemporary.com.au/ Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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SCULPTURE

ON THE FARM 2019 www.sculptureonthefarm.com Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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SCULPTURE ON THE FARM

Expressions of Interest Open March 1

Sculpture on the Farm October Long Weekend 4 -7 October, 2019

www.sculptureonthefarm.com or by contacting

SCULPTURE ON THE FARM

Philippa Graham by email on

pdgraham@graers.com Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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21 JUNE - 7 JULY

2 - 18 AUGUST

FORMED & FIRED

THE TASTE OF TEA

Newcastle Studio Potters & Glass Artists

Newcastle Potters Inc.

12 - 28 JULY

23 AUGUST - 8 SEPTEMBER

LARGER THAN LIFE

THE SPACE BETWEEN

Janet Graham &

The Athena Group

Catherine Kavanagh Di Gravio

57 Bull Street Cooks Hill NSW Hours: Fri Sat Sun 11am - 5pm www.newcastlepotters.org.au Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Rhino Images - Art and the Rhinoceros Lorraine Fildes and Robert Fildes. Art and the Rhinoceros - There are over three hundred Rhino images in this book. Whether in the ancient past or in the present the rhinos are always represented as huge, powerful and solitary animals. The book includes paintings, drawings, woodcuts, etchings, rock carvings and sculptures of the rhino all depicting the power of the animal. These images of the rhino range from early civilisations such as in China, Roman Empire, Indus civilisation in Pakistan/ India area and from Southern Africa down to current day images of paintings and sculptures produced by modern day

artists. The text indicates where you may find these wonderful images as well as the websites of the artists concerned, the caves where the rhino images have been found and the places where posters use the rhino image. There are very few of these magnificent wild animals left in the world, so unless they are protected and managed, artistic images will soon be the only viewing option.

Rhino Images – Art and the Rhinoceros, First Edition, 2017, is available for download at The Rhino Resource Centre web site. Direct Link :

http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/index.php?s=1&act=refs&CODE=ref_detail&id=1518479271

Page 154 : White rhino crash at Whipsnade Zoo, England. Image: Robert Fildes Š 2019. Issue 32 - JULY 2019

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Profile for Robyn Werkhoven

ARTS ZINE JULY 2019  

Art & Literary online magazine, featuring artists' interviews, exhibitions, art news, poetry and essays.

ARTS ZINE JULY 2019  

Art & Literary online magazine, featuring artists' interviews, exhibitions, art news, poetry and essays.