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MARCH / APRIL 2021 $4.95

THE COSTS OF UNCERTAINTY (PAGE 12)

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PANDEMIC

ROAD BLOCKS HOW THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY IS ADAPTING TO ENSURE ESSENTIAL SERVICES ARE MET IN THE MIDST OF COVID

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atlantic VOLUME TWENTY ONE • ISSUE 2 • MARCH / APRIL • 2021

Call us: 1-902-452-0345 E-mail us: rob@autoatlantic.com Mail us: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane Bedford, NS B3M 0H5 Canada

Page 6

PANDEMIC ROAD BLOCKS – From classic family-owned parts shops to mammoth manufacturing plants, COVID has caused disruption across the automotive industry. How are businesses surviving? Kristen Lipscombe investigates.

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 44

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PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers (902) 452-0345 rob@autoatlantic.com

THE COSTS OF UNCERTAINTY – Dave Elniski tackles another road block hampering the trucking industry: communication.

Page 16

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – Nova Scotia releases its five-year highway plan • Much more!

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KNOW BEFORE YOU GO! Dana Smith explores how becoming a qualified truck driver has changed over the years and what’s required now.

Page 20

STEADY IS THE BETTER WAY OVER BEING BUSY – Bob Greenwood on how your shop is a “knowledge business” and not a “commodity/volume business.”

Page 21

VALVOLINE HONOURING MECHANICS WORLDWIDE – the venerable brand launches a month-long global campaign that honours the best of the best.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – But does the bear have the koala-fications to drive that thing? This and more tomfoolery ensue.

Page 28

MANAGING TRUCK DRIVER BURNOUT – Truckers already have a disproportionately higher level of mental health issues than the general population,

Page 32

VIRTUAL EVENTS…THE NEW NORM – The third annual Women in Carwash conference drives online and towards another successful event.

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THE IMPACT OF COVID 19 ON CANADIAN WOMEN TRUCK DRIVERS – Whether trying to access a washroom, etc. female truckers have a lot on their plates.

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SUNRISE SALVAGE INTERVIEW – Larry Rushton has seen a lot of garbage during a salvage career that spans three decades.

Page 38

HOW SAFETY INSIGHTS CAN HELP Cities Like Windsor ON Improve Their Streets – Ford launches its Safety Insights web-based tool.

Page 42

FIX AUTO ADDS 60 LOCATIONS IN 2020 – The aftermarket leader targets 2021 as a year of sustainable growth across the Atlantic region.

Page 45 Page 46

WIN BIG! A Rust Check free one-time rustproofing treatment, or a Stanley 123-Piece socket set from NAPA in our contests!!

EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com SALES MANAGER Dan Hillier (902) 999-1027 dan@autoatlantic.com Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, Nova Scotia B3M 0H5. Tel: 902.452.0345. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

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Letter from the Editor

IN PRAISE OF EVERYTHING EV

L

By Carter Hammett

ET’S START THIS COLUMN OFF WITH A PIECE OF TRIVIA SHALL WE? THE SKILL-TESTING QUESTION IS: WHEN WAS CANADA’S FIRST ELECTRIC VEHICLE BUILT?

If you said 1893(!), you’d be correct. As you can probably guess the concept came and went and then eventually disappeared as American designs dominated the landscape. Oddly, Canada, with its robust automotive sector, has no domestically-designed electric vehicle (EV). With any luck that’s about to change, especially if Project Arrow can really fly. The new arrow concept was created by a design team based out of Ottawa’s Carleton University in a national competition and is currently being whipped into shape in Windsor ON. The completed “virtual vehicle” is expected to debut later this year with a concept vehicle due in 2022. The vehicle’s handle is inspired by the famous 1950s jet interceptor Avro Arrow, another Canadian milestone. That brought Canada to the edge of world leadership in

aerospace technology but for reasons still unknown the plane got mired and politics and disappeared without a trace. As of this writing, 93 Canadian suppliers and tech firms have signed on, but rumour has it that the project may never actually get off the ground. That’s because the idea was to demonstrate to investors that our fine country actually has the technology to produce an entirely new and original vehicle with all parts coming from Canada. The hope is to possibly inspire someone to become an OEM and build the vehicle on a commercial level. Let’s hope this Arrow flies. In January, Ontario’s auto sector received a huge boost after GM, Ford and Fiat Chrysler announced plans to invest as

much as $1billion each in EV investments. The announcements enthusiastically welcomed by Unifor, which represents over 20,000 autoworkers among the three companies. Not to be outdone, the provincial and federal governments are kicking in around $600 million in funding for the Ford plant. In a country that produced close to 20 GHG per person in 2018—fifth in the world—where people are addicted to gasoline vampires, and it’s not unusual to drive hours to get to a weekend cottage, this is a country that’s ready for EVs. To date, EVs only account for about three percent of all new vehicles sold in this country, and drivers still prefer big vehicles as witnessed by escalating sales even during the pandemic. And yet, and yet, the big three companies have goals to change that market penetration to at least 30 percent by the end of 2025. That’s good news, especially on the jobs front.

AND NEXT TO FINALLY… Nova Scotians woke up to good news February 24 as the province announced it was incentivizing provincially registered drivers to turn electric with the aid of a new rebate program worth up to $3,000. The rebate can be added to the $5,000 currently being offered by the feds, and applies to used vehicles as well. At present, only vehicles under $55,000 will qualify. The program will divert about half of $19 million in funding to help make energy efficient upgrades more easily available to lower-income residents.

AND FINALLY, FINALLY…. In 2020 more than 54 per cent of all new vehicle purchases in Norway were electric, making the northern country the world champion in adopting all things electric. With consumer incentives that include everything from tax emptions to reductions on everything from licensing to free toll-road access, free charging and parking, Norway’s doing something right. It’s something we can all aspire to. 4

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PANDEMIC

ROAD BLOCKS HOW THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY IS ADAPTING TO ENSURE ESSENTIAL SERVICES ARE MET IN THE MIDST OF COVID

T

By Kristen Lipscombe

HE ONGOING PANDEMIC HAS CREATED ROAD BLOCKS FOR BUSINESSES BIG AND SMALL ALIKE. So just how is the auto and trucking industry, which includes everything from mom-and-pop parts shops to massive manufacturing plants, weathering this COVID-19 economic fallout? As a finely tuned system from top to bottom that provides essential services across provincial and international borders, our industry, so far at least, seems to be faring better than most. “I think we’re lucky enough in our business – the after-market parts business – that we’re a little bit recession free,” John O’Dowd, vice-president of NAPA Canada, recently told Auto and Trucking Atlantic. “Although we saw drops in business in our parts stores and our networks of shops across Canada during the months of (last) March and April, we then picked everything back up again – we made up for that in the following months.” Adds O’Dowd, “overall, in terms of business, it did not affect us as much as other industries.” In fact, he explained, the pandemic has actually “created a lot of opportunities for us to change, and to change fast.” What that means is that NAPA Auto Parts, or UAP Inc., sped up business plans meant for several years down the road to instead make those same

improvements in a matter of months. “We did probably in the past sixto-eight months what we would have done in the next three years in our plans,” O’Dowd said. For example, “we accelerated our digital transformation because we knew people were going to be shopping in different ways going forward.” “We decided to accelerate it so now you can buy a part online, now you can get it delivered, you can go curbside pick-up – which we initiated within weeks of the pandemic starting,” O’Dowd said. “That was unique for us because we are a big ship; sometimes it’s tough to turn it around; but we saw with the pandemic that everybody worked a little faster and we got projects going easier.” Stores and delivery drivers have also been equipped with remote terminals, something “unheard of in the industry a year ago,” so that payments can be made online as much as possible. That doesn’t mean there aren’t challenges to be addressed, especially with auto parts coming from literally the other side of the globe. “With the disruption in logistics across the world, and still today we’re suffering from it – lack of containers out of China – and most parts are sourced out of there.” Fortunately for NAPA, the Canadian company has had an office in Shanghai for the past 25 years, one of the only manufacturers to have a second home in China. “We saw a little bit of it coming,” O’Dowd explained, “so the inventories were beefed up in February and March of last year, and with that we ended up having a healthy inventory and we were able to put together a COVID plan together for our stores.” autoatlantic.com

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Dealing with Covid-19

“We have been very strict,” O’Dowd said of how the company has approached Public Health and safety of customers and staff alike. “Whatever the government was asking, we would take the harshest province in the country, and double down on that as being the norm for our stores, and also strongly recommended for our members.”

Ensuring proper physical distancing, protective personal equipment (PPE) and diligent health and safety standards to avoid infection spread at NAPA’s nine large distribution centres across the country has also been of upmost concern. “We did have two cases that forced us to shut down a distribution centre, because we wanted to be a step ahead of what the

WE’RE BIG ON

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores 8

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government was asking us.” “We shut down for 24 hours; we got other distribution centres to back us up,” O’Dowd said, emphasizing that shutting down is difficult as an essential service as parts get delivered to garages repairing vehicles ranging from trucks delivering food supplies to emergency vehicles. “All of this put a lot of pressure on


our distribution centres to make sure that COVID restrictions and rules were in place and we made sure that we controlled everybody going in and out of those facilities.” With 1,800 NAPA AutoCares Centres, 600 NAPA AUTOPRO Centres and 600 NAPA Auto Parts stores across the country, O’Dowd feels that putting NAPA’s high pandemic protocol standards in place quickly and efficiently “helped maintain morale across our networks” and immediately created a sense consistency in all locations across the country. “I think they felt that they were supported by us quite a bit during this venture,” O’Dowd said. “Many of these are independent businesses in most cases; we have some corporate stores that we own, but the vast majority are Canadian families that own these small businesses, and they needed support from us from a logistics point of view, from a parts and business support point of view and from a financial point of view. We also helped them out with government programs that were offered; a lot of them didn’t know how to start.” O’Dowd said keeping the lines of

communication open with locations across the country, including right here in Atlantic Canada, has also been key to reassuring and supporting individual NAPA locations. “We want to make sure that they understand that the chain of logistics is not going to be broken because of COVID,” he said. “We’re going to be there to supply them no matter what and if we don’t have it in the Moncton distribution centre, we’ll find different ways of fulfilling their parts needs.” For the most part, however, Atlantic Canada has done well to keep the flow of information and parts fairly steady throughout the pandemic, particularly when compared to Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. But what about when vehicles are all fixed up and ready to hit the road, in order to deliver essential goods and services across towns and provinces to keep our economy going through this pandemic? It’s the service stations along those vital routes that keep those vehicles in motion, including the Edmundston Truck Stop+, a state-of-the-art service station geared towards offering professional driv-


Dealing with Covid-19

ers and tourists the highest quality services available on any highway out there. Spokeswoman Marie-Josee Michaud said Edmundston TruckStop+ “experienced quite a challenge, like everybody else,” in adapting its goods and services in this new COVID-19 world. “Add to that, we are right at the border of Maine and Quebec,” Michaud explained, “so we went from probably millions of tourists driving by our door to zero, because  the borders are closed all around… we went from being the gateway to Atlantic Canada to the backdoor!  Tourists don’t  move east to west as far up as Edmundston, so we have no more drive-by tourists, so we’ve had to deal with that.” The TruckStop+ team immediately jumped into action to make up for that lost clientele, by ensuring “our priority will be to make sure that the trucking industry gets their fuel, gets their food, gets showered – because some of them have been going across Canada without services – so our main priority will be to keep that part of the business operating and making sure that the trucking industry has all the services they need.” Although restaurants on site have been shut down  on and off  through the pandemic, the service station ensures “the food carousel” is always full for truckers so they can grab their grub and go. “We also made sure that we were able to offer the lounge to rest, but it’s only one at a time, so there  are  strict  rules.” While most truck stops closed down showers, the Edmundston stop set up an even more rigorous  cleaning protocol,  and rearranged staff shifts and work routines to reduce contacts between staff and traffic  “to ensure they would  remain  open for the industry ”— safely, of course. “We don’t close the doors at Ed-

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mundston Truck Stop+,” Michaud said of how important it has been for the service station to go above and beyond, “being rigorous,” when it comes to Public Health protocol while also adapting its products and services. “It’ 24 hours, 365 days a year.” All novelty items and souvenirs, “even though we were losing sales,” were taken out of the store to allow for physical distancing and limit customer time inside. More groceries and pharmacy items were brought in to increase the convenience factor for those on the road. “We’re the only convenience store with a drive-thru,” Michaud said, which staff encourage customers to use because it allows for “less contact” among clients and em-

ployees, along with paying at the pump as opposed to coming inside the store. “I’m pretty sure that service will be used more and more by locals  after the pandemic,” Michaud said. “They get to the window, they tap, they don’t have to take the kids out of the car,  it’s convenient.” The service station also offers “steering wheel trays” to make it easier for drivers to eat in their cars.  “We had to brain storm on … how do we cater during this new normal?” Michaud said. “So far, we’ve been blessed that we’ve kept COVID out of all of our operations.” “The trucking industry, they’re so respectful, because they know they’re going from province to province, from region to region, and they know they’re an essential service,” Michaud said. “We’re in this together; they know they have to respect the rules and  from our end,  we’re trying to be  extra  cautious to ensure we continue to provide the services they need.” It’s been all about being quick to adapt and continuing to  do so  as rules and regulations around this pandemic constantly change and progress, Michaud said. Communication has also been vital to ensuring drivers know what the rules and regulations are coming into the truck stop and what services are available at any specific time.  “After a year, we’re getting used to  being prepared for any scenario,” she said. “We try to keep on top of what’s next.”   “It’s been a trying year for sure,” O’Dowd of NAPA agreed, “but I think we’ve adapted for sure.” For NAPA’s part, O’Dowd (photo at left) is confident the company has adapted so well to the pandemic that “there’s no going back.” “We’re staying on the path that we’re on and it’s only going to help in the future.”


Truckers Corner

THE COSTS OF UNCERTAINTY:

ADDRESSING COMMUNICATION DURING THE PANDEMIC By Dave Elniski

T

HE OPERATIVE WORD IS “ PIVOT.” C O V I D -19 H A S MEANT TRUCKING COMPANIES HAVE HAD TO DO AN ABOUT-FACE IN COMMUNICATING MEANINGFUL INFORMATION TO THEIR STAFF AT ALL LEVELS. EFFECTIVE - NOT EFFICIENT - COMMUNICATION IS KEY. Many trucking companies struggle to recruit and retain drivers in quantities sufficient enough to put management at ease. Office and maintenance staff turnover also pose challenges. A company owner may dream of the

are wondering how to get through another year of similar challenges.

A BUSINESS NEEDS MORE THAN CUSTOMERS All businesses need customers and trucking companies put considerable effort into finding the work necessary to keep their fleet moving. But if there isn’t enough labour to move the freight then more work isn’t a blessing. Trucking companies are also often unable to influence their load rates; for many, rates are determined by shippers and brokers. And even if rates rise in response to fewer available trucks, no one is giving anything away and such changes can take more time than many carriers have to survive in their current state. There is profit in efficiency, and addressing worker concerns mid-pandemic may be the key to greater efficiency for many companies as worker anxiety rises.

ness which, on a good day, struggles with communication and retention, increased uncertainty will only exacerbate these issues. Unfortunately, many trucking companies struggle to communicate effectively with their drivers. Drivers, whose skills are in high demand, may respond to uncertainty by leaving their employer to drive for a different company where they feel more likely to survive and advance. Trucking companies can’t do anything to reduce the wide-spread anxiety surrounding the pandemic at the national and international levels. However, they can adopt improved communication strategies to reduce the uncertainty that exists within their own operations.

CROSS-CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS COVID-19 challenges even the most homogeneous workforce. However, most Canadian workplaces include significant levels of cultual diversity and this diversity needs to be central in communication planning. The delays and poor reception sometimes seen when video conferencing are distracting. Additionally, written communication like newsletters and emails don’t provide a way of conveying the messages coded in body language and facial expressions. People who struggle with your organization’s primary language will have a harder time comprehending electronic messages. Workers with extra communication barriers will require special attention during the pandemic. They experience all the stress and uncertainty of their coworkers while having to contend with communication challenges that naturally occur in a diverse workplace.

A PANDEMIC COMMUNICATION TUNE-UP profits possible if their workforce were to remain steady. Orientations cost money, and the loss of each competent worker represents further financial loss as all their experience follows them to their next job. COVID-19 has not eased any of these organizational burdens. Canadians are on the threshold of their second pandemic year, and many trucking businesses that survived 2020 with decreased revenues 12

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EFFECTS OF ELEVATED UNCERTAINTY If there is a lot of uncertainty, there is also a lot of anxiety, stress, and panicked decision-making. At the same time, lots of uncertainty means there is less trust, long-term planning, and felt security. Simply put, high levels of uncertainty make workplaces unpleasant. Uncertainty prevents workers from focusing on the problems at hand. If a busi-

Communication is something every organization can improve, however, during the COVID-19 world of increased uncertainty and stress, communication strategies deserve extra attention. Many carriers have excellent communication practices, but even these companies should re-evaluate their practices now that the pandemic has changed the day-to-day world of many workers. The subsections below will examine


Truckers Corner

some aspects of organizational communication that carriers can reflect on in their operations.

REMOTE COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES What types of communication have diminished due to remote work that were previously taken for granted? Many workers are working from home due to COVID-19 restrictions. While this does not typically apply to drivers, having office staff working from a different

location will create challenges for many companies. A lot of communication is done informally in settings like offices. While there may be a shared calendar and workplace email system, a lot of messages may be passed verbally depending on the layout of the facility. If remote work is presenting communication challenges for your company, reflect on how much information typically gets passed through hallway conversations and the poking of heads into offices.

The communication strategy being used for remote work must make up for the loss of these informal types of conversations. This is directly aimed at offices, but if there are communication deficiencies between office workers there will be problems in the information being conveyed to drivers. The renewed importance of meetings Love them or hate them, meetings are essential to a healthy business culture. Does the carrier have a way of regularly gathering thoughts and ideas to improve operations and dispel rumours? COVID-19 has altered many types of gatherings including the traditional conference room meeting. Despite these restrictions, companies need to find a way to ensure that key goals are being communicated to the right people and that information is being shared from the right sources. Rumours will grow and thrive when communication is poor. The pandemic has caused increased levels of uncertainty for many as well, so rumours related to changes in the business need to be confronted and controlled. Whether social distancing or virtual platforms are used, meetings should be maintained as much as possible so that information can be passed down and feedback passed up.

COMMUNICATION TIME Many workers and owners are spending extra time on planning and managing the challenges arising from the pandemic Where is this time coming from? A business leader or owner may simply have to put in extra time to manage the operation. However, these individuals should not assume that all of their workers are willing to do the same. If there are logistical challenges due to remote work or increased delays in operations due to enhanced health and safety protocols, this time cannot be taken for granted. Business leaders need to communicate that they understand the challenges their workers are facing due to the pandemic. They must also acknowledge these increased efforts through fair compensation or through the lessening of individual workloads so workers avoid burn out. In order for successful communication to take place, time must be spent on investigating, using, and tweaking communication systems. And finally, leaders and workers alike can help the company thrive by checking in on their co-workers and direct reports to get a sense of how people are feeling. 14

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VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION PLATFORMS At this point in the pandemic, most people are familiar with video conferencing programs like Zoom, Google Chat, Apple’s FaceTime, and Microsoft Teams. Adequately research different programs to determine what is best for your organisation.A business doesn’t need to cho ose a single platform. Remote office workers who meet regularly for a committee may elect to use a certain platform that suits committee members. But when a virtual meeting is scheduled with a driver, see if that individual has a preference for a program. People’s expertise with and access to technology differs dramatically, so giving options will help gain greater acceptance of these changes during the pandemic. There are also other internet-based communication apps that may work for specific business needs. Programs like WhatsApp allow for the sharing of text, video, and audio messages without access to a cell signal as long as there is internet, so WIFI and Ethernet-based devices can participate in group discussions. Each type of communication program or app offers specific advantages and disadvantages, but there is something important to remember: many workers dislike all of them and never wanted to work like we are forced to during the pandemic. Managers and leaders need to recognize the annoyance many people feel when asked to participate in virtual meetings. They must also recognize that people are being asked to become proficient in different forms of technology which they may have never used pre-pandemic, so patience and understanding are critical to a collaborative work culture.

services. The key takeaway from this article is that the pandemic represents a time of change and change needs to be handled carefully. Effective - not efficient - communication can reduce uncertainty in the workplace, address negative rumours, and help workers feel more involved and appreciated. The key word here is effective: effective communication will take more effort and time than using the most ef-

ficient means available. Workers are people and people thrive when they feel like they are cared for and part of a community. If a company can create this type of culture, the resulting cohesion will more than make up for the time spent practicing proper communication. Dave Elniski is a trucking safety professional from southern Alberta who writes on a variety of transportation-related topics.

KEEPING IT POSITIVE AND REAL Finally, all managers and business leaders should strive to remain positive and genuine. Bad news will need to be delivered when appropriate, but if the company is still operating then there are people doing good work that needs to be recognized. Now is a great time for businesses to create programs of recognition for the dedication of their staff. Drivers away from home, office staff working from their bedrooms, and all other workers doing what is required to get the job done deserve pats on the back.

SUMMARY The COVID-19 pandemic has tested the resiliency of many carriers despite some segments of the industry seeing alltime highs in terms of demand for their autoatlantic.com

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East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT NEWS AND VIEWS COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION. NOVA SCOTIA Province releases 2021-22 Five-Year Highway Plan Nova Scotia will invest almost $500 million to improve and upgrade roads, highways and bridges across the province this year. The Five-Year Highway Improvement Plan includes more than 150 major construction and improvement projects for the coming year that will make Nova Scotia’s roads, highways and bridges safer. “Our highway system is the backbone of our province. Investing in our highways, roads and bridges is an investment in public safety,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “This year and last year represent more than a billion dollars invested in our road and highway infrastructure.” Eleven major construction projects are planned for 2021-22, with the focus on ongoing twinning of Highways 101, 103, 104 and Highway 107 (the Sackville-BedfordBurnside Connector). The department will continue to spend on safety improvements for high-

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ways not being twinned. That work involves improving intersections, adding passing lanes, climbing lanes and turning lanes, interchanges and roundabouts. THE PLAN INCLUDES: n improvements for the Port Hastings Rotary n the new Highway 102 Aerotech Connector n construction of the new Bridgewater Interchange n 19 bridges to be replaced or rehabilitated n more than 500 kilometres of asphalt and gravel road work Investment in the Gravel Road Program to rebuild existing gravel roads in rural Nova Scotia, improving safety and reducing maintenance costs, continues to be a priority. The plan can be found at: https://novascotia.ca/tran/highways/fiveyearplan. asp

New Licence Plate Honours Retired Volunteers Government is introducing new recognition for retired volunteer firefighters and ground search and rescue members. A special licence plate will be available to retired volunteer firefighters and ground search and rescue workers with at least 15 years experience. The plate comes at no cost and those groups will also be exempt from paying vehicle permit fees. “Volunteer firefighters and search and rescue workers have generously given their time and risked their lives to help others,” said Lloyd Hines, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. “This new plate recognizes the invaluable contribution and service these brave volunteers have made to their communities.”

NEW BRUNSWICK Road safety study to be conducted in collaboration with Oromocto First Nation The provincial government is taking part in a road safety study in Oromocto, near the Oromocto First Nation.


VISIT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE FOR PRICING & INFO


East Coast Road Report

The study will be conducted by Dillon Consultants Engineering and will include a review of the safety of the following intersections: n Route 102 (Waasis Road) and Hiawatha Avenue; n Route 102 and Ganong Street; and n Route 102 and MacDonald Avenue. “We are pleased with the opportunity to collaborate with our partners to evaluate how to enhance safety for all road users at these intersections,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Jill Green. “Working together on this project broadens everyone’s understanding of all the essential considerations and will allow us to find the best results.” “This safety study is very important to the Oromocto First Nation’s members, the residents of New Brunswick and the soldiers who travel through this area on a daily basis,” said Oromocto First Nation Chief Shelley Sabattis. “I would like to personally thank Mayor Powell, Minister Green, Colonel Parsons and Indigenous Services Canada for their partnership and making this safety study possible.”

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This study will compile information and data on physical and operational conditions; traffic and pedestrian flow; and intersection configuration within the area. The goal will be to identify and address safety concerns. “The town is pleased to be a financial and participating partner in this road safety review,” said Oromocto Mayor Bob Powell. “I believe by working together with our stakeholders we will collectively be able to find a solution that improves the safety for the residents in that area and for the community.” In addition to the provincial government, Oromocto First Nation and the Town of Oromocto, others who have partnered in this study include the Department of National Defence – Base Gagetown and Indigenous Services Canada. “Community safety is everyone’s responsibility and the Oromocto First Nation road safety review is an example of how multiple partners can come together for common good,” said Colonel Dwayne Parsons, commander of the 5th Canadian Division Support Group. “Safer roads benefit everyone,” said federal Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller. “The Oromocto First Nation Inter-

section Safety Committee is a great example of leadership and partnership between multiple governments working together collaboratively to better address a priority safety concern affecting community members and nearby residents.”

NEWFOUNDLAND Rennies River Flood Mitigation Portugal Cove Road to King’s Bridge Road Proponent: City of St. John’s The City of St. John’s is proposing to construct two earthen berms and erosion control measures along the Rennies River, to reduce flooding and associated effects between Portugal Cove Road to King’s Bridge Road. Construction of the berms would include clearing of vegetation, grubbing organic matter, and earthworks. Construction of the bank stabilization would include vegetation clearing and placement of the new materials required to stabilize the bank. This undertaking is expected to occur over a six month period during spring/summer 2021. The undertaking was registered on February 2, 2021; the deadline for public comments is March 10, 2021; and, the minister’s decision is due by March 19, 2021.

   


Truckers Corner

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO!

S

By Dana Smith

O YOU’VE DECIDED TO BECOME A COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVER. HOW IS THAT DONE THESE DAYS?

be driving a truck. Trucking is a lifestyle. It can be an exciting one for many people. Using a checklist to figure out if trucking is right

for you is a great way to determine if you should jump in with both feet or not. Doing it for the love of it, is always the best way for a rewarding, fulfilling career.

No matter what industry you work in, training and skill level play a key role in your success. Back in the day a person could take a driving test, get their commercial license, and start driving immediately. Over the years trucking has evolved with new rules, training, technology, and equipment. Customers have evolved as well with different needs and wants, some having very specific requirements. We have also seen the shift to more home deliveries from increased online sales and faster shipping times, as people were staying more at home and shopping online due to the pandemic rules of selfisolation. Some have said that being a professional driver is not a skill, that anyone can do it. Not only is it a skill, not everyone can and wants to do it. There are many challenges that come with being a professional driver such as driving for long periods of time, being away from family, and unhealthy habits on the road. There are also many rewards too, such as getting paid to see the country and travelling; operating heavy equipment, meeting lots of new people, job security, freedom and flexibility, and steady pay. Is there a need for truck drivers? Most would say “yes”. According to reports by Trucking HR Canada, Canada will have a shortage of 25,000 truck drivers by 2023. T0hat being said, it appears there’s a substantial need for new professional drivers. Now that we’ve identified the need for professional drivers, what’s the next step? Figuring out what you need to get started in the industry. Trucking is like most careers, with a few things to consider before getting behind the wheel of an 80,000 pound rig. You have all heard the saying, “Pay me now or pay me later.” Jumping into a career before you do your research can lead to many problems, including stress, shortterm careers, unhappiness, relationship issues, financial hardships, job jumping, and many more. We are all gifted at something, and that something may-or-may not autoatlantic.com

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Bob’s Business Development

STEADY IS THE BETTER WAY OVER BEING BUSY

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By Bob Greenwood

NE OF THE CRITICAL ELEMENTS THAT INDEPENDENT SHOP OWNERS MUST REALIZE IS THAT THERE ARE TIMES WHEN THE SHOP CAN BE TOO BUSY TO MAKE NET INCOME. It becomes dangerous when this is a constant. Management seems to concentrate more on getting more customers (car count) rather than concentrating on making a “profit” from the customers it already has. Shop staff are running around trying to please everyone that comes through the door, to insure the needed cash flow hits the bank account “today”. This is a sure signal that the business is heading for trouble. The most important profit on a

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sale comes from the billed labour component which ensures the correct number of labour hours billed per vehicle service, based on the manufacturer’s recommendations. This is critical to the shop’s bottom line. Your service is in the “knowledge” business, not the “commodity/volume” business, therefore your professional responsibilities to your clients go a lot further than just “selling them a job.” Consider that the average client is unenlightened regarding proper service and maintenance of their current vehicle based on how they use it. Consider that to properly advise and educate the client, the front counter should know how many kilometers (km) are driven each year; how the vehicle is used (highway, city, off-road driving; whether the client owns or leases

the vehicle; what the client’s expectations are regarding the vehicle, and its service history. Consider how many labour hours billed a year the vehicle requires to insure it is in safe, reliable condition, and efficient for the client. It’s a professional responsibility to slow down and clearly educate the client about services required for the vehicle based on the manufacturer’s recommendations. Your shop is the messenger of the news, not the maker of the news. When the shop is “too busy,” everyone says there’s no time for this. That is absolutely right. It sounds like the shop is working “hard,” not necessarily smart

DO THIS TEST TO SEE HOW YOU ARE FARING. 1.

Take a random fiveto-10 survey count of the clients you have had for at least three years, where they still have the same vehicle, and examine the pa st


One Stop. One Source. COMPLETE BATTERY LINE


Bob’s Business Development

two years’ work done on each vehicle. Add up the total number of labour hours from the work orders/invoices that were billed on each vehicle during those two years.

2. Calculate the total kilometers driven by each client over that service period (ie. 35,000 km which works out to 17,500 per year) and record what interval was the vehicle at when it came into the shop.(ie 60,000 km, or 130,000 km). 3. For the same time period, look up all the service requirements that were recommended by the manufacturer for the same kilometers driven and service interval, and calculate the total minimum labour hours the manufacturer recommended that should have been spent to ensure that vehicle is safe, reliable and efficient. How did you make out? If you’re in the ball park, (five percent difference) well done. It looks like your system is working and you have a great relationship with your clients. But if you are severely short in billed time (you did not get all the work), it may be time to slow down and examine your internal customer service system. Do you educate and counsel them, or do you sell them? Do you have a trustworthy relationship with them? Is there room for improvement?

NOW MOVE ON TO THE SECOND PHASE OF THE TEST. Take the same vehicles and examine what the manufacturer recommends for the next two years coming up based on the distance the client is most likely to drive. (Use the history here). Calculate the available labour hours to be billed. Now, be aware of your progress with these clients when they come in. Slow down. Take the time to educate the client. Show them what the manufacturer recommends by printing out the appropriate service intervals. You are the messenger here, that’s all. Based on your expertise, and understanding of the client, are these service recommendations a good investment for him to make? If so, point out how the relatively small investment makes sound financial sense, rather than spending a substantial amount of money to buy a new vehicle. If it isn’t a good investment, counsel the client on replacing the vehicle, and be happy to advise them based on their needs. Your clients are usually too busy to look after their own vehicle. Set up the system to manage these high-tech machines for them. Many vehicles are unknowingly abused by the client because of the vehicle maintenance requirements the manufacturer recommends. Take the responsibility to insure your client base gets an excellent return on their investment. When you do, I’m confident you will also see the shop’s bottom line grow. When you accomplish the right level of service with these clients, carry on and make it a system of doing business with the rest of your client base. It’s up to management to make things happen. It’s up to management to make sure the right systems are in place. Take your time, and be patient with yourself to see this through. Give yourself a year of thorough dedication to making this happen. If it was easy everyone would do it, but the best thing is that your clients will notice the personal attention you are giving them, and that makes you distinctly different in this industry. Being distinctly different has people talking positively about your business. Now you are growing your business out of your marketplace. Some people dream of success, while others wake up and work at it each day. 22

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VALVOLINE HONOURING MECHANICS WORLDWIDE

GLOBAL BRAND TO AGAIN CELEBRATE ESSENTIAL INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS WHO HAVE KEPT THE WORLD MOVING

V

ALVOLINE CANADA CORP. — AN INTERNATIONAL SUBSIDIARY OF VALVOLINE INC. (NYSE: VVV), A U.S.-BASED, LEADING WORLDWIDE SUPPLIER OF PREMIUM BRANDED LUBRICANTS AND AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES – TODAY ANNOUNCED THE UPCOMING MARCH LAUNCH OF THE BRAND’S 2ND ANNUAL MECHANICS’ MONTH. This 31-day campaign will honor mechanics throughout multiple countries where the 150-year- old motor oil brand operates, including Canada, by giving special thanks to mechanics’ ongoing, everyday service, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, service centers and auto-repair shops across the globe have remained open and operational as essential services,” said Jamal Muashsher, Valvoline Senior Vice President, International. “It is especially important given the hardships of this past year to recognize these unsung heroes who not only keep each of us safe and on the road, but also keep other essential service workers moving to help those in need.” During Mechanics’ Month, Valvoline Canada will celebrate industry professionals through social media, giveaways and unique partner collaborations to heighten appreciation for mechanics and how they have continued to deliver services through an unprecedented moment in history. While essential, mechanics have had to change their normal routines to account for COVID-19. Business hours have fluctuated, extra sanitation measures inside vehicles have been implemented and onsite human interaction has been minimized greatly as many shops have offered drop-off and pick-up services, no matter the location. “We’ve proudly supported mechanics with a variety of programs throughout our brand history,” added Muashsher. “And due to the many changes, hardships, safety measures and overall alterations in how they’ve done their business in light of COVID-19, we want to pledge a more robust alignment of partnership and support — and encourage people across the globe to do the same.” To learn more, visit www.valvoline.com.


Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF THE BIZARRE, THE HORRIFIC AND THE PUZZLING

COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE INFORMATION HIGHWAY SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. YER WELCOME. LITHUANIAN COUPLE DREAMS BIG WITH SNOW-MADE FERRARI If local lockdown has you bored stiff, you can always follow this Lithuanian couple’s lead A video by Storyful  shows a snowmade  Ferrari LaFerrari  in the couple’s backyard. The footage was shot by Donata Bugiene and shows her husband working on the project, which took him approximately two days to finish before the final touches and the paint were applied. The replica has accurate dimensions and even a striking red exterior finish made of “environmentally friendly paint,” as Fox6Now reports. The snow sculpture was made in the last days of January but given the country’s cold weather, it’s most likely still alive.

Advertising doesn’t cost, it pays. A person will ride in an advertised car. Sit at an advertised desk, work on an advertised computer, and write with an advertised pen. Yet this person hesitates to advertise, saying that advertising does not pay Finally, when the person’s unadvertised business goes under, he or she will advertise it for sale. We can help. Call us: 1-866-423-3939.

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most 24 years to afford the supercar. And, of course, that’s true if they spend their full income to buy a Ferrari. With only 500 examples built, the LaFerrari is one of the rarest and most expensive modern-day supercars. It’s probably safe to say the production run now amounts to 501 units thanks to this snowmade LaFerrari from Lithuania. Source: The Best You Can Do In Face Of This Much Cold Is Make A Snow Ferrari (motor1.com)

UN-KOALA-FIED TO DRIVE?

“The Ferrari is a real size, made to the dimensions of the original Ferrari LaFerrari,” Donata Bugiene explained. “We decided that if you can’t buy it - you can build it yourself! Now no one can deny that a Ferrari is standing in our yard.” According to TradingEconomics, the

average monthly wage in Lithuania currently is around €1,454 per month or approximately $1,750 at the current exchange rates. If we assume the couple from Panevezys County earns the average for the country and that you can buy a LaFerrari for $1 million, it’ll take them al-

A koala has been rescued after causing a five-car pileup while trying to cross a six-lane freeway in southern Australia. Police said the crash in heavy Monday morning traffic in the city of Adelaide caused some injuries, but no one required an ambulance. The animal’s rescuer said she got out of her car to investigate what had caused the pileup. Nadia Tugwell, with her coat in hand, teamed up with a stranger clutching a blanket in a bid to capture the marsupial. A concrete highway divider had blocked the koala’s crossing. “The koala was absolutely not dam-

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360 Route 10, Fredericton, NB E3A 7E1 idealequipment@outlook.com www.idealequipmentltd.com Still have Cleanburn parts and service for our customers! autoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

aged in any way,” Tugwell said. “It was very active, but very calm.” Once the koala was in her trunk, Tugwell drove to a gas station to turn the animal over to wildlife rescuers. In the interim, the koala was able to climb from the trunk into her SUV›s cabin. “It decided to come to the front toward me, so I said, ‘OK, you stay here. I’ll get out,’” she said. “It started sitting for a while on the steering wheel: (as if ) saying: ‘let’s go for a drive,’ and that’s when I started taking photos,” she added. The koala later was released in a forest — well away from the freeway. Source: Koala causes 5-car pileup in Australia, hitches a ride as it’s rescued | Autoblog

After a base coat of plastidip was applied, the team sprayed on eight coats of the special paint to produce the desired effect. Right from the moment it left the spray booth, the car began to transform into a kaleidoscope of color. Just as you’d expect, the finish produces a pseudo thermal camera effect and changes right before your eyes when you interact with it. As cool as the end result looks, Fonzie was quick to mention that this is simply a fun test to see what is possible; for longterm use, he said it would be advisable to put down another layer of sealer to protect the finish from regular wear and tear. Semantics aside, it was certainly impressive to see the mood ring effect on a car. Source: Temperature-Sensitive Paint Makes Audi A4 Look Wild (motor1.com)

THE CAR AS MOOD RING

BITCOIN CAR BUYERS? SOME OF THOSE YOUNGINS’ WERE OUTTA OF THE STARTING GATE LONG BEFORE YOU WERE

What does temperature-sensitive paint look like? Fonzie of DipYourCar knows his stuff, especially when applied to an Audi A4. We’d be remiss not to mention that these crazy paint jobs aren’t everyone’s cup of tea – yeah, big surprise. However, before you click away in distaste, the science involved in such a complex paint job is actually really interesting. It’s probably been a while since you’ve seen a mood ring, but the paint featured in the video here functions using the same principle. Just like the ring, the automotive application involves the use of thermotropic liquid crystals which produce different colors at various temperatures. Unlike most of the heat-sensitive paint jobs you’ve seen before which use thermochromic pigments, this variant is much more sensitive – producing a greater range of color. 26

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Georgia car dealer Christopher Basha was way ahead of Elon Musk in embracing bitcoin as a currency for selling vehicles. Basha said he learned about cryptocurrency from a roommate who mined bitcoin. “Someone bought a pizza with bitcoin,” he said. “Buying a car with bitcoin didn’t seem that crazy.” He began accepting bitcoin payments in 2015, but no customers were interested. “I almost forgot about it,” he said. In 2017, bitcoin prices surged, and one customer used the cryptocurrency to buy four Kias for a total of more than $150,000, Basha said. Bitcoin payments have been picking up since late last year, with prices rallying.

Basha is one of a small group of auto dealers who have been accepting bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies from customers well ahead of  Tesla  Inc›s revelation that it had bought $1.5 billion of the cryptocurrency and would soon accept it as a form of payment for cars. Dealers said accepting cryptocurrency is a good marketing and branding tool. But it is still a niche business. Price volatility and the absence of trusted banks and other financial intermediaries make bitcoin payments a risk for  dealers  who are not tech savvy. Basha, the Kia dealer, said he converts bitcoin into cash immediately upon receipt because he believes it risky for a company the size of his to hold such a volatile asset. But it does take several minutes to turn bitcoin into U.S. dollars on a payment platform, which occasionally leads to losses averaging $300 to $400 on each transaction due to price movements. Once, he forgot his password to send bitcoin from one account to another to make the dollar conversion after receiving payments from a customer. “I was freaked out. … There is no middleman who’s going to come save you.” Pietro Frigerio, a Lamborghini dealer in Irvine, California, said when bitcoin prices surged in 2017, his store sold 20 cars in a month. But during the latest rally, he has not seen much increase in bitcoin payments. “People are waiting for exchange rates to go up further,” said Frigerio, who also sells other premium luxury  sports cars like Bugatti and McLaren. He said customers who bought cars with bitcoin have something in common:

They are young people who have a strong belief in virtual currency. Source: Buy a car with bitcoin? Some car dealers have been years ahead of Tesla | Autoblog


Truckers Corner

MANAGING TRUCK DRIVER BURNOUT COVID-19 ASIDE, TRUCKING WAS ALREADY STRESSFUL BEFORE THE

PANDEMIC STARTED. BUT NOW WITH MENTAL HEALTH NO LONGER A “DIRTY LITTLE SECRET” AND A WIDE VARIETY OF SUPPORTS AVAILABLE, BURNOUT CAN BE AVOIDED, IF NOT MANAGED A LOT BETTER THESE DAYS.

S

By Carter Hammett

OMETIMES IT JUST HAPPENS TO THE BEST OF US. WE REACH THAT TIPPING POINT IN OUR PSYCHE WHERE EVERYTHING SHUTS DOWN AFTER WORKING SO HARD JUST TO KEEP THINGS AFLOAT. That friends, is called “burnout.” In any given week, 500,000 employed Canadians are unable to work due to a mental health issue, and the cost of a disability leave is about twice the cost of a leave due to physical illness. A recent U.S. study showed that truck drivers are more prone to depression and anxiety than oth-

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er occupations due to the volume of time spent alone and away from home. These were among other risk factors that include obesity, diabetes, increased drug and alcohol use and sleep apnea. At a time when driver recruitment and retention is top-of-mind for many employers, mental health supports can assist employers with better managing their driver workforce. Recent surveys indicate that 75% of those in trucking feel their work is too stressful, and 71% say the same thing about their lives in general. And it’s been well documented that that psychological disorders and mental health issues are disproportionately higher in the trucking industry than in the general public. According to Trucking HR Canada, drivers are at risk of numerous occupational-health-induced conditions. These include, not limited to, loneliness (27.9 per cent), depression (26.9 per cent), chronic

sleep disturbances (20.6 per cent) and anxiety (14.5 per cent.) Dispatchers, driver managers, HR, and safety and compliance staff are also at risk for occupationalhealth-induced conditions. Getting help for mental illness shouldn’t be any more different or difficult than any other health concern, but there’s always been a huge roadblock that prevents people from seeking help: stigma. People need to realize that when 25% of the population will experience some form of mental health issue at some point in their lives, you are not alone. Fortunately, over the past two decades, employers, health care providers and others have been working to remove this stigma and to change attitudes about mental health — in the community and in workplaces. Lately, COVID-19 has just added another layer of stress of an already stressful


Truckers Corner

job. Drivers are key players in the logistics chain and since the majority of supplies depend on truckers to keep things moving, the pressure only becomes exacerbated . According to verywellmind.com, “burnout” is a fairly new term, attributed to Herbert Freudenberger in his book, Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement. He stated that burnout was “the extinction of motivation or incentive espe-

cially when one’s devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired results.” Furthermore, burnout is “a reaction to prolonged or chronic job stress and is characterized by three main dimensions: exhaustion, cynicism (less identification with the job) and feelings of reduced professional availability.” The stress that comes from burnout is largely attributable to your job, but vari-

ables ranging from negative thought patterns and belief systems to perfectionism and lifestyle can all be contributing factors as well.

DOES ANY OF THAT RING A BELL? Oddly enough burnout doesn’t appear in the edition of that bible of psychiatric disorders, The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the latest edition of which was produced in 2013. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take it seriously or go without recognizing the signs, which include: Alientation from work-related activities: drivers may become cynical about their working conditions and the infrastructure their job offers them. They may begin to numb out or start feeling emotionally-distanced from the work they’re doing. The cumulative result of this can have a significant impact on how tasks are carried out. Emotional Exhaustion – burnout causes drivers to become unable to cope, fatigued and drained. The job itself becomes an energy vampire leaving drivers facing great difficulty when it comes to completing the simplest of tasks. Physical Symptoms can include stomach aches, intestinal issues, headaches and migraines. OTHER SIGNS CAN INCLUDE: n Exhaustion n Lower immunity n Muscle pain n Loss of motivation n Change in appetite n Change in sleep pattern n Self-doubt While burnout shares overlapping characteristics with depression, people living with the latter often feel negative about all aspects of life, not just their occupation. Depression’s characteristics can include feelings of hopelessness, thoughts of suicide as well as cognitive and physical symptoms. Much can be done to combat burnout. For one thing, employers can start to recognize that good mental health is essential for one’s well-being as well as that of a solid workforce. They can provide awareness to their staff, including phone numbers and resources for drivers to reach out when they feel help is needed. Drivers also need to recognize that they are not alone. About one-in-five people will someday experience some form of mental health crisis its essential to embrace the fact that the crisis is real and there’s no shame in asking for help. Campaigns like Bell Let’s Talk Day and

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the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Not Suicide, Not Today commercials, just emphasize this over and over again. There’s also, some practical, common sense drivers can take to monitor their own self-care, especially if feeling like they have any of these symptoms. These include: Take Your Vacation – the downtime truckers receive is precious since time on the road means time away from friends and family. Developing a healthy work-life balance becomes essential in order rest, regroup and recharge. Keep a Regular Schedule – Easier said than done in some cases, but try to follow a regular schedule if at all possible. When this infrastructure is applied to your own schedule you not only have time to perform all the tasks required of you, but you’ll be able to recover lost sleep and maintain a consistency and productivity that might otherwise lose on the road. Take Advantage of Technology – With videoconferencing platforms like Zoom, WhatsApp and MS Teams, truckers have no excuse for not keeping in touch with friends and family on the road. While not overly popular, E-logs can also help drivers from overworking as they exist so drivers can enjoy a peaceful break. For people who prefer more structured approaches consider some modalities that have been gaining in popularity in recent years. Two of these are Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Mindfulness. Buoyed by the book Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat Zin, Mindfulness is a “mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings thoughts and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique,” says the Oxford Dictionary. Techniques like meditation, body scans and visualization are key components of this application, and they work. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) has been proven to have some success in treating road rage while a 2008 study in India—where death is as a high 14 per 1000 vehicles—has seen some success as well. CBT is based on the premise that thoughts and emotions influence behaviours, and offers a wide variety of interventions that correct a wide range of issues including distorted thinking, negative beliefs and destructive thoughts about driving and replace these with healthier and constructive thoughts. This form of therapy is effective in treating issues across a number of domains and is be-

coming both increasingly popular and accessible. It’s short-term and practical as well. For drivers living in Ontario and Manitoba (so far) a new app called AbilitiCBT can be accessed for free. The app includes 12 modules, each one complemented by free access to coaching from a social worker. There’s a host of apps that drivers can access from most places and some of

these include: Allstays - The developers of Allstays know how difficult the trucking lifestyle can be, so, they created this app to ensure that truckers can get some much-needed rest at clean, affordable stops. Truckers can use Allstays to search for a stop where they can get showers, gaming activities, laundry, foods and other services that they need while taking a rest from the open road. Remember the stresses truck-

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At The Car Wash

ers initially faced right after COVID broke out? This app would have been a mighty useful at that time! Headspace is a ridiculously popular app that’s been downloaded millions of times. Free to join until you’ve completed the entry level module, there’s a multitude of themes ranging from sleep Another free app is Calm. It offers meditations, soundscapes, sleep stories and a host of other methodologies to keep your brain happy and calm. These are just a handful of solutions that truckers can tap into. They emphasize personal responsibility and self-care, which are essential ingredients for avoiding burnout and maintaining a sense of balance and wellness. There’s also no shame, repeat, no shame, in admitting that you have a problem, reaching out and asking for help. The reality is, burnout is an avoidable condition for all truckers. It’s time to stand up and turn stigma on its head by starting the dialogue. After a while you just might start loving your job again.

WHY WORKSPACE? MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES n Bell Let’s Talk– Bell Canada n Big White Wall n Canadian Centre for Occupa- tional Health and Safety n Canadian Mental Health Association n Centre for Addiction and Mental Health n Gearing up for Workplace Men- tal Health - Trucking HR Canada n Government of Canada: Mental Health in the Workplace n Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health n Guarding Minds at Work The Healthy Trucker n Healthy Minds at Work n Mental Health Commission of Canada n Mental Health First Aid Canada n Mental Health Works n Mindful Employer Canada n Mood Disorders Society Canada n Truck Driver Burnout Guide: Driver Burnout: The Guide - WorkHound/Content Hub 32

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VIRTUAL EVENTS . . . THE NEW NORM

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A N UA RY 18 – 20, THE TEAM AT WOMEN IN CARWASH™ WAS ANTICIPATING AN EXCITING GATHERING OF WOMEN (AND MEN) AT A BEAUTIFUL RESORT IN FORT LAUDERDALE.

We’d meet up, hug, share a few drinks and laughs at the opening cocktail reception, and then all settle in for two days of engaging, thoughtprovoking, educational sessions. Change of plans. In-

stead, the 3rd Women in Carwash™ conference was held virtually from every climate across the continent. We made a few changes to the starting times to accommodate attendees from as far away as Alaska, California, Florida, and Newfoundland. Everyone could sign on to all aspects of the conference without having to get up too early or stay up too late. All in all, the Women in Carwash™ conference was outstanding. Iin-person cocktail receptions often come with the awkwardness of walking into a room full of people you don’t know and stand-

ing by yourself, watching everyone to see if anyone catches your eye. The virtual cocktail reception didn’t’ come with any of that. We sent all registrants a Welcome Box in advance that included a Women in Carwash™ tshirt, a lovely brushed silver stemless wine cup, and a mousepad. Many wore their t-shirt and drank a toast with their wineglass. We introduced each attendee as they “entered the room.” Hence, although handshakes weren’t possible and hug a distant memory, the cocktail reception was the introduction to everyone


from the comfort of their homes leading into the rest of the conference. Paul Krismer delivered an inspiring keynote, “The Serious Business of Positive Emotions,” to set everyone up for the next few days. All the speakers were great! It’s not easy to present a topic to a room full of eager faces waiting for that one brilliant piece of information that will transform their careers. Standing before a background image of a beautiful sandy beach and palm trees in front of the ocean, our speakers engaged us through their computer cameras, ready to engage with questions and discussion. It is a whole new world for sure. We are so grateful to all of our sponsors and all of the women (and men) who took time out of their busy workday to gather around their computers to share, learn, laugh, and meet new friends with whom to grow this fabulous Women in Carwash™ industry. The 4th Women in Carwash™ conference will be held virtually June 21 – 23, and for more information and to register, please visit www.womenincarwash.com, email bjj@womenincarwash, or call Brenda at 204-489-4215.

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Truckers Corner

THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON CANADIAN WOMEN TRUCK DRIVERS

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By Isabella Akaliza

OVID-19 HAS D I S R U P TE D THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE. TRUCKERS DELIVERING ESSENTIAL GOODS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ARE FACING AN INCREASING STRUGGLE TO FIND OPEN WASHROOMS. Although trucking was identified as an essential service and exempt from many restrictions, drivers continue to face difficult working conditions: limited washrooms, food stations, and additional quarantine measures on their return home.

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Shelley Uvanile-Hesch, CEO of the Women’s Trucking Federation of Canada, is now pushing businesses to open their facilities and for carriers to stand up for their drivers. In an interview with CBC News, Uvanile-Hesch called it “dehumanizing” that divers were being denied access to restrooms. “Drivers are human beings, we’re not dogs,” Uvanile-Hesch said. “We don’t go outside. We deserve to be able to go into a washroom like everybody else.” Finding food is also an issue, because many restaurants are closed and trucks aren’t able to fit in drive-throughs. Caroline Carter, a truck driver, has been driving a transport truck for 34 years. Though truck drivers are encouraged to maintain healthy lifestyles, it has become incredibly difficult for her due to the fact that options are limited to fast

food restaurants. “How are you supposed to eat healthy on the road when you’re eating fast food?” Carter said.

TRUCKERS FACE ANOTHER MORE SILENT CHALLENGE, ISOLATION. The second wave of the pandemic has intensified feelings of stress and anxiety for some truckers, causing alarming levels of despair, suicidal thoughts and hopelessness. In the Canadian population, our truck drivers are not immune. Carter asks that the general public be more understanding; that despite the fact that they do go into high-risk areas, truck drivers self-isolate, as that is the nature of the job. Carter is one of many truckers who asks the general public not to treat them as social pariahs especially when they take every precaution to be safe when travelling outside of their com-


munities. Her request comes amidst reports of grocery stores that won’t allow drivers inside if they admit to being out of the country within the past 14 days, as well as reports of limited access to basic facilities like washrooms and showers. “We’ve kind of learned to adapt as drivers but we shouldn’t have to. We shouldn’t have to fight for the opportunity to say ‘hi,” and see a person or use a bathroom” she says. For Allie Fanjoy, a truck driver on medical leave, when COVID-19 first hit she found it difficult. She recognizes that a lot of measures were taken in order to mitigate the spreading of COVID-19 in truck stops. Also taken? Moments of casual contact. Moments where she would socialise with other truck drivers as they waited for a shower, as they stood in line to order food, or when she would pay for her coffee in a drive-through window. These were quick yet meaningful moments that became brief interactions she would soon miss. Ten months into the pandemic, with interactions few-and-far between, Fanjoy couldn’t take the isolation anymore and attempted suicide. “What people don’t understand when it comes to the mental health of people, you have to have that human contact,” Fanjoy said. “And in effect, what is going on is that COVID-19 has taken that away from a lot of us, especially truck drivers who tend to be isolated to begin with.” A recent poll conducted by the Mental Health Commission of Canada found that 50% of Canadians reported worsening mental health since the pandemic began with 44% feeling worried and 41% feeling anxious. Jordan Friesen, the national director of workplace mental health at the Canadian Mental Health Association, told CTV News Channel that front-line workers are among the groups that the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is most concerned about right now. “We see front-line workers experiencing higher levels of fear, worry, uncertainty… feelings of anxiety and anxiousness that of course are related to them being in an elevated risk for contracting COVID-19,” he said in an interview with CTV News. According to CAMH, people are struggling with fear and uncertainty about their own health and their loved ones’ health, concerns about employment and finances, and the social isolation that comes from

public health measures such as quarantining and physical distancing. One-in-10 Canadians polled, said that their mental health had worsened ‘a lot’ as a result of COVID-19. Similar results were found in a survey of Canadian workers, where 81% reported that the pandemic is negatively impacting their mental health. Fanjoy who has been very public about her story, says that she has had

many drivers reach out to her and share feelings of loneliness and isolation. When they ask her for advice on what to do, she encourages them to seek out professional help. Fanjoy joins Carter in asking that the public be more compassionate to travelling essential workers. “They forget that we’re people and because we’re people we need [compassion].”

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At the Recycler’s Yard

SUNRISE SALVAGE INTERVIEW

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ARRY RUSHTON FROM SUNRISE TOWING & SALVAGE IN PORT HOWE NS, HAS BEEN IN THE AUTO SALVAGE BUSINESS FOR JUST OVER 33 YEARS. He has seen a lot of change over the decades and reflected on those changes and how his business and approach to auto recycling has changed over time in our recent discussion. Tell me about the early days in the auto wrecking business. I bought the yard from a guy that had a salvage yard license who ran a traditional, oldstyle junkyard back in 1988. He was more of a junk collector, trading in metals where he could. He had some old wrecks on site, but a lot of other junk too. It was hard to see a business in there, but we did. He did have an old wrecker towing vehicle, and that was new to me, but that helped me see a potential business in amongst the junk. That’s when I started the business as Sunrise Towing & Salvage. What kind of changes did you make early on? Organization. Understanding what we had in the place, what could be salvaged, what was just junk and needed to be disposed of – just trying to make sense of the place. We definitely operated on a shoestring back then, although I guess we still do, but we were determined to plow back any small profits we made in to continual improvements. That’s been my goal from day one – make small changes every day in the right direction to keep your business on track. What helped you the most in making the transition from a junkyard to a more progressive operation? I joined the Automotive Recyclers Association of Atlantic Canada (ARAAC) back in 2012. Originally I thought I was too small to join that group. Those are the big auto recyclers across the four Atlantic provinces and they are part of a national association – the Automotive Recyclers of Canada (ARC). But I screwed up my courage and submitted my application. Back in those days you had to attend a meeting and tell them about your business, why you wanted to join, etc. Then they voted on whether to accept your application. I got in the first time, and I think it was my stated reason for joining that got me in – I wanted to learn from the best. Since then, I’ve attended virtually every meeting and learn something every time. Many of the meetings have yard tours of other members, and that is a great way to learn. I’ve always been impressed that other members open their doors and share so 36

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much great information. They really believe that if we individually grow and get better, we all get better. You’ve now even joined the Board of ARAAC – what’s that like? When I was first asked to join the Board, the same thought crossed my mind about joining the association – I’m too small to do that. But I quickly realized that the issues I was seeing were affecting the industry regardless of the size of the operation. It was also interesting to see and hear about the development of the Canadian Auto Recyclers Environmental Code (CAREC). We are audited to this Code every two-three years, and it not only helps my business but it has been great at separating the ARAAC members from the backyarders and scrappers that are unfortunately still out there. What would you like to change about the industry? Unfortunately we still need to compete with backyarders that are out there who can pay more money for a wreck or end-of-life vehicle - as they don’t have the overhead we have. In Nova Scotia, there are regulations but the government has


left in an exemption from the rules if you operate on less than a quarter hectare. This exemption allows for an unlevel playing field we are trying to change.

What would you like to change about your business? Nothing specific – just continual improvement and challenging the way we

do things. I work in the business every day, and it’s the small things done every day that help build a strong business.

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HOW SAFETY INSIGHTS CAN HELP CITIES LIKE WINDSOR, ONTARIO IMPROVE THEIR STREETS

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By Callahan Coplai, Safety Insights Lead, Ford Motor

HE FORD CONNECTION TO THE CITY OF WINDSOR STRETCHES BACK MORE THAN A CENTURY, EVER SINCE HENRY FORD OPENED HIS FIRST CANADIAN OPERATION IN 1904 AND STARTED PRODUCTION OF THE MODEL C. That cross-border collaboration has never ceased – and now we’re taking that relationship to the next level in an attempt to help reduce car crashes and improve the safety of city streets. Last October, we officially launched the Safety Insights platform, an innovative software tool that can help governments with their mission to build smarter, safe transportation systems. Now, we’re proud to announce that Windsor has become our first Canadian customer. What is Safety Insights? Safety Insights is an award-winning, web-based tool that provides transportation engineers and planners with a comprehensive view of traffic safety in their communities, equipped with features that help them plan in a more proactive way to help save time, money, and most importantly, lives. Safety Insights identifies hotspots where crashes occur often to help cities determine how to make those areas safe. For more information, please visit www.ford.ca. 38

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Around the Atlantic

‘A HAPPIER CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE’: NEW NAPA YARMOUTH COMMITTED TO BUILDING COMMUNITY TRUST BY PROVIDING TOP NOTCH SERVICE

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By Kristen Lipscombe

APA YAR MOUTH’S NE W STORE MANAGER SCOTT WILSON IS COMMITTED TO FORMING DEEP-ROOTED CONNECTIONS WITH HIS COMMUNITY.

He plans to accomplish that by ensuring his team provides the highest quality service possible, including the best auto parts around of course, and by building

gether and never give up on providing the service that every customer deserves,” Wilson said. “We hope that our connection to customers continues to grow and that we continue to grow closer as a group so that we can be here for any need that our community members may have for a long time to come.” As for as how business is going under the new NAPA Yarmouth brand, Wilson said “it’s going quite well,” especially as an essential service still operating through the ongoing pandemic, with all public

THE NAPA YARMOUTH TEAM OF SCOTT WILSON, MICHELLE CROCKETT & JORDAN BRUSH

the type of trust with his customers that will last for decades to come. “Our plan is to focus on the customers, and try to make things as easy as possible for them,” said Wilson, who took the helm of the local auto parts shop nestled in southwestern Nova Scotia’s friendly port town just three months ago, turning Yarmouth Auto Supplies into a corporate NAPA store. “At the end of the day, they are what this is all about,” Wilson said of his new shop’s clientele. “We want to create an environment that makes the customer feel comfortable and confident that they are getting the best service possible. As we build those connections and build that trust, the rest of the business will grow as well. “It all relies on happy customers.” The best way to create happy customers, of course, is to ensure your staff members are happy doing their jobs, as well. “We have an amazing group here that has had an instant connection since day one,” Wilson said of the NAPA Yarmouth team. “We have a group that will work to40

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health protocol top of mind each and every day. “As it is with any large change of ownership, it takes time to get to know the customers, and grow those connections, but so far things are going great and we are moving in the right direction,” said Wilson, who is originally from Digby but has been living and working in Yarmouth for more than two decades. Wilson’s work experiences range from serving as an automotive service technician and managing an automotive repair shop to working in the trucking industry as a mechanic. He’s licensed in automotive, as well as truck and transport, repair trades and brings this wide array of experiences to the new NAPA shop. Wilson sees running the newly rebranded shop as an exciting “new challenge” in his career that perfectly aligns with his passion for automotive work and his appreciation for NAPA itself, which he describes as “a great company with great products and great people.” “The NAPA brand is one that I feel comfortable standing behind, because they stand behind their products and em-

ployees,” Wilson explained. “The company provides many different lines of parts to try to help fit any customer’s needs.” Although he notes every repair and project is unique, NAPA will always do its best to come up with the best possible solution to meet each customer’s individual requirements. “Another big focus for NAPA is educating their employees and providing every possible resource for (them) to grow their knowledge,” Wilson said. “In the end, this knowledge leads to better customer service and a happier customer experience.” Already since taking the reins last November, Wilson said the biggest change in the shop thus far is “our increased inventory.” “We continue to offer the same trusted products and great customer service that people have come to expect of NAPA,” Wilson said, “but we now have the advantage of having much more inventory on hand at all times. This helps us go above and beyond in providing fast and efficient service.” Wilson hopes the high standards NAPA Yarmouth has set for itself will get more people talking about just what the shop has to offer to the small but loyal Yarmouth community. “My hope is that through our hard work and focus on customer service, our community members will embrace and trust us for whatever services they are looking for,” Wilson said. “NAPA is a trusted brand and we hope to grow that feeling within our community.” In fact, Wilson said his NAPA team has already received a “warm reception” from the Yarmouth community. “We are eager to return the favour and try to help as many people as we can,” Wilson said. “To our customers and potential customers, we just want to emphasize how much we appreciate any opportunity we get to show how hard we work to make you as happy as possible. Our customers are our focus and we will do everything in our power to provide the service you deserve.” For more info on NAPA Yarmouth, please visit: https://www.napacanada. com/en/ns/yarmouth/store/1000251.


Industry News

FIX ADDS 60 LOCATIONS IN 2020 AFTERMARKET LEADER TARGETS 2021 AS “YEAR OF SUSTAINABLE

GROWTH”, PLANS TO ACCELERATE FRANCHISE DEVELOPMENT ACROSS ATLANTIC REGION

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A LIFA X (NOVA SCOTI A) FEBRUARY 12, 2021: FIX NETWORK, THE GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET LEADER, IS FORGING AHEAD WITH ITS GLOBAL EXPANSION PLANS, WITH A STRONG FOCUS ON DEVELOPING FRANCHISES IN NEW MARKETS AND INCREASING PENETRATION IN EXISTING TERRITORIES.

Despite the pandemic, Fix Network has steadily grown the footprint of its collision, glass and mechanical business which includes Fix Auto, ProColor Collision, NOVUS Glass, Speedy Auto Service

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and SRP. In 2020, the network added 60 new locations around the world. It also expanded the ProColor Collision brand to the United States, with three new ProColor Collision shops opening in California recently. “Our franchise development strategy is aimed at independent body shop owners who are keen to protect their businesses from the surrounding uncertainty,” said Steve Leal, President and CEO of Fix Network World. “We will continue to support such passionate business owners by equipping them with the latest tools and knowledge so they can maintain a robust operation.” According to the latest report from The Romans Group, there was a drastic decrease in miles driven during the pandemic as well as in the number of accidents

and claims processed compared to 2019. However, consolidation has continued as collision repairers face lagging sales but need to invest in structural changes and training as vehicle repair complexity increases. In fact, most of Fix Network’s growth took place in the second half of 2020, with many independent owner-operators recognizing the value of joining a network for this reason. From boosting its regional support teams to training franchisees in the latest automotive technologies, Fix Network is leaving no stone unturned in its franchise development strategy. The network is continuously redefining the body shop experience by providing independent collision repairers the support and tools that help drive sales, manage operations, and


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 15

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

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ARC

1-519-858-8761

autorecyclers.ca

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

Bastarache

1-888-288-6621

bastaracheauto.com

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Bradford Exchange

1-877-595-9507

bradfordexchange.ca

IN

Communications NS

1-902-424-2975

novascotia.ca

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Covey’s

1-866-737-8911

coveys.com

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Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

fixauto.com

Fleet Brake Atlantic

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fleetbrake.com

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Hope For Wildlife

1-902-407-9453

hopeforwildlife.net

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

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John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

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Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

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Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

INTERNET

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maritimeauto.com

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Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

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Maritime Pro Stock

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1-800-263-2111

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NLS Products

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NLS Products

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NLS Products

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

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Stark Automotive

1- 416-654-7222

starkautosales.com

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SPCA NS

1-844-835-47980

Spectra Premium

1-800-641-3090

novascotiaspca.ca

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spectrapremium.com

9

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

worldpac.com

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Valvoline 1-800-TEAM-VAL

valvoline.ca

23

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enhance the client experience. Calling 2021 as “the year of sustainable growth”, Leal says that the extraordinary challenges in the “post COVID normal” have made the network even more determined to push ahead with franchise development, in order to create the largest global network of independent collision repair facilities. The aftermarket industry is changing quickly and one of Fix Network’s priorities is to ensure that its franchise partners are always supported with the most advanced automotive technology and training, along with the collaborative support structure of the network. “As future automotive trends become a reality, we are committed to help our franchisees prepare for and benefit from what’s ahead,” he adds. “From virtual classrooms training technicians in the latest auto repair processes, to teaching office staff in customer service and marketing processes – we are doing everything to ensure that our franchisees can operate at full potential.” In the Atlantic region, Fix Network remains committed to accelerating its franchise development for 2021. “Our growth really speaks to the successful business model we’ve developed and the commitment of our franchisees,” says Mark Weeks, Regional Vice President – Atlantic. “Through proactive engagement and increased focus on training, we have been able to quickly pivot and mobilize our resources to support our strategic partners. For more information, visit fixnetwork.com.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Carolyn Novak of Antigonish, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is April 26th, 2021

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: info@autoatlantic.com NAME:

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

JANUARY 2021 WINNER!

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ADDRESS:

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1. ‘60s Volvo production city 5. Classic car collectors’ collectives 8. “Harold & ____,”Jag XKE hearse movie 9. In transit, in other words (2,5) 10. Paddle, sometimes 11. Roof covering, once 12. Crash pad, you might say 14. GPS unit placement, perhaps (2,4) 17. WWII icon, ____ the Riveter 19. First word, right mirror message 22. Austin Powers XKE name 23. Auto tech’s investment 24. Lenders’ car claims 25. Gran Torino-driving ‘70s TV cop

1. Certain Chrysler V-8s 2. Canada’s seventh PM 3. Trucking company’s vehicles 4. ‘00-’15 Nissan compact SUV 5. ‘84-’07 Dodge minivan 6. Automotive about-face (1,4) 7. Sporty ‘91-’96 Dodge import 12. DIY auto paint container 13. Beaufort and Connaught, in 1-Across 15. Sailors’ tattoos, often 16. PEI town with mouse mascot 18. Model car’s size ratio 20. VW showroom selection 21. Chopper backrest, a.k.a. ____ bar

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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v fans (or automotive technology fans for that matter), we need to know the name of this revolutiony car, and you can you tell us more about it. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at info@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is April 26th, 2021.

Best wishes to Rod Gosse of Corner Brook, NL, who correctly answered: “Invented by Frank Joseph Zamboni The four th one made sits in the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame . . .” Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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