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FILLING UP FOR SUCCESS AT THE TRACK (STORY ON PAGE 22)

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SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021 $4.95

CALLING ALL CARS TO RECYCLE (PAGE 12)

ACCOUNTABILTY OF STAFF & MANAGEMENT (PAGE 16)

WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN . . .

TRUST IN TRUCKING (SEE PAGE 40)

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A RUST CHECK ONE TIME TREATMENT OR A STANLEY 123-PIECE SOCKET SET FROM NAPA!

CROSSWORD GUESS & WIN DETAILS ON PAGES 53 AND 54!

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atlantic VOLUME TWENTY ONE • ISSUE 5 • SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER • 2021

Call us: 1-902-452-0345 E-mail us: rob@autoatlantic.com Mail us: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane Bedford, NS B3M 0H5 Canada

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 52 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers (902) 452-0345 rob@autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com SALES MANAGER Dan Hillier (902) 999-1027 dan@autoatlantic.com

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WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN – the semiconductor shortage is a global problem that’s had tremendous consequences for the automotive industry. One solution say pundits is to keep the next evolution of chips close to home. By Carter Hammett.

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ATLANTIC TRUCK SHOW plans to return to Moncton June 22 – Organized by the APTA, Atlantic Canada’s only trucking show returns in the new year.

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WHERE ARE ALL THE CARS TO RECYCLE? An unexpected swing towards higher prices for used cars finds dealers competing with fleet businesses for inventory.

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UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC 2021 AWARDS – The best of the best step up to collect their milestone awards.

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ACCOUNTABILITY OF STAFF AND MANAGEMENT: Do the real math. Bob Greenwood waxes on the hidden costs many biz owners never pause to consider.

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FIX AUTO ADDS CAPE BRETON to its Atlantic footprint – The “newest” addition to the network is in the River Bourgeois area and operated by the second generation.

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FILLING UP FOR SUCCESS – Whoever thought a key ingredient for success at the races would be ketchup and mustard? Tim Terry explains.

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HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? – With a plethora of innovative new training programs up for grabs, the Automotive Sector Council is here to support you.

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DRIVERLESS CARS MAY BE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK – The truth is out there writes Adrian Giorgio.

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ALL EV EXPANDS across Atlantic Canada with four new dealerships. In just under a year, the little business that could, has.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – The kids are alright? Better check your trunk first, just to be sure.

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – NS to introduce bilingual stop signs in Acadian communities.

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TRUST IN TRUCKING – this goes a long way on multiple levels. Here’s why.

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“A WELL-OILED MACHINE.” Rhino Truck Lube’s tag line just happens to be: ‘we’re not just changing oil; we’re changing the industry.” It’s the rallying cry heard across Atlantic Canada and beyond, writes Kristen Lipscombe.

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“JUST UNTIL FOREVER.” St. John NB NAPA shop owner Danny Joyce sings…and with good reason.

Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, Nova Scotia B3M 0H5. Tel: 902.452.0345. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

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WIN BIG! A Rust Check free one-time rustproofing treatment, or a Stanley 123-Piece socket set from NAPA in our contests!! autoatlantic.com

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Letter from the Editor

IT’S A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

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By Carter Hammett

S THE WORLD SLOWLY ADJUSTS TO COVID-19 AND LURCHES FORWARD TAKING STEP, AFTER CAUTIOUS STEP, THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY HAS BEEN IRREVOCABLY CHANGED ALONG WITH PEOPLE’S BEHAVIOURS.

Some interesting data emerges in terms of how people’s driving and spending habits have changed since the pandemic first raised its ugly head. A recent Angus Reid survey asked a sample of 1509 Canadians about their working preferences in a post-COVID world. It appears the majority of Canadians aren’t really that interested in returning to their offices five days a week, unless the commute takes less than 15 minutes. Two thirds of respondents said they prefer a hybrid work model--split between office and home—by about 39 per cent COVID has had a huge impact on the way many companies conduct business, with many employers having the epiphany that a workforce can be trusted enough to remain highly engaged with their jobs

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while being productive, especially if a hybrid model becomes the norm. Not surprisingly, 29 per cent of all Canadians said they would look for another job if they were expected to return to the office five days a week. This attitude was most clearly reflected among workers in the 25-to-44 age group. When it comes to commuting, 68 per cent of all respondents indicated that their preferred commute be no more than 30 minutes. About one quarter suggested that their commute should be no more than 15 minutes. These figures come about because Canadians have realized the impact long commutes have on their quality of life. Indeed, there’s a lot of perks with less commuting including more time with families, greater emphasis on health and exercise or trying local businesses for the first time. But it’s not only driving trends that have shifted. Purchasing trends have as

well. Earlier this year the results of a Canadian Black Book survey indicated that three quarters of all Canadians were driving less. This figure was highest in Alberta where 84 per cent of all drivers said that they spent less time behind the wheel. On average, Canadians have cut their driving overall by about 50 per cent, the survey found. One outcome of this behavioural change is that there is now less urgency to purchase a new vehicle. Atlantic Canada topped the list at 80 per cent of regions who say that they won’t be purchasing a new car anytime in the near future. When asked if they intended to buy a new vehicle within the next two years, drivers in the 18-to-34 range clocked in at 51 per cent as most likely to cough up some of their hard-earned dollars for a new set of wheels. Many Canadians however, aren’t rushing to purchase vehicles, and this includes EVs and PHEVs with only 30 per cent considering an alternative energy vehicle in the next five years. However, the next car 47 per cent intend to purchase would fall into this group. Breaking things down further by gender, men (36%) are more likely than women (24%) to buy an EV, while university grads are another demographic that show strong interest in EVs, clocking in at 41 per cent. Interestingly, about 15% of all respondents have reported actually buying a car to avoid coming into contact with other riders on public transit. Another interesting factoid to emerge from these surveys is that 26% of all Canadians are more open to buying a car online (although 74% still prefer in person purchases.) Another piece of data that emerges is that Atlantic Canadians (30%) are the most likely demographic to purchase vehicles entirely online. These are but a few of the indicators of change emerging out of the pandemic, but there can be no denying the impact that COVID has had on the attitudes of drivers or the cultural shift in attitudes towards driving, commuting and purchasing vehicles. It’ll be interesting to see where we actually go from here.


WHEN THE CHIPS A THE CARE AND FEEDING OF CANADA’S SEM

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ARE DOWN: MICONDUCTOR CRISIS

THE WORLD IS CURRENTLY IN THE THROES OF A GLOBAL SEMICONDUCTOR SHORTAGE. AND CANADA AS A PLAYER IN THE INNOVATION MARKETPLACE, FALLS WOEFULLY BEHIND A LONG LINE OF COMPARATIVE ECONOMIES. KEEPING THINGS CLOSE TO HOME COULD BE THE DIRECTION OF THE FUTURE, SAY PUNDITS.

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By Carter Hammett

HETHER IT’S YOUR HEARING AID, SMART PHONE OR DISHWASHER, THOSE LITTLE GUYS ARE EVERYWHERE AND THE WORLD CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF THEM. We’re talking semiconductors - also known as chips - of course, and the world is experiencing a serious crisis in their absence. Indeed, in addition to impacting everything from border crossings, influencing video conferencing and remote employment while sending masks and sanitizer sales through the roof, COVID19 has had an unprecedented effect on the global supply chains we rely on so heavily for chips. For the uninitiated, semiconductors are tiny ubiquitous chips that fortify virtually every electronic product on the market, including ventilators, video games and just about any other electronic gadget you can think of. The chips are powered by miniscule transistors that are thousands of times smaller than a strand of hair. Globally-speaking, industry is worth a resounding $7 trillion U.S. Our dependency on them is so great, it’s created a kind of technological welfare. During the initial stages of the pandemic, ventilators were in short supply, so much so that we couldn’t accelerate imports of them autoatlantic.com

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Semiconductors

fast enough, let alone produce any here at home. And if you think that’s all that’s been affected think again. This year has seen the autotech industry shaken like it’s never been shaken before. The average new car contains over 1000 chips. With a jump in demand for home electronics, the lack of available chips has hindered production at several big auto players including Honda, Chrysler and GM. The outcome has included massive layoffs and substantial dips in revenue. Auto parts suppliers state that the chip shortage is even worse than initially anticipated. Magna International Inc. released a statement outlining a projected 1.6 million less vehicles this year. And that figure could be much higher than expected. Automakers have been forced to redirect their energies from cars to more profitable SUVs and trucks, while some manufacturers have reduced features like HD radio, smart mirrors and other features. Ford has been hit hard, no thanks to a fire at one of its major chip suppliers. Other casualties include the closure of an assembly plant in Malaysia which has recently been sent reeling due to recent COVID outbreaks. Meanwhile, GM has suspended some truck production, including shutting down a CAMI plant in Ontario and giving over a 1000 employees their layoff notices. Complicating things further, in a bid to cut costs, most microelectronics and

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semiconductor production has moved offshore within the last decade. In 1990 The United States manufactured 37% of all chips. By last year that figure had shrunk to a measly 12% with the lion’s share of production distributed between China, Taiwan and South Korea. And with border closures, longer lead times, and sudden plant closures supply chains have been left wanting. Another variable that needs to be taken into account is that chip manufacturing simply isn’t designed to adapt to massive shifts in demand. A single chip can take up to six months to produce, meaning supply cannot keep up with the demand.

NO EASY SOLUTIONS All of these elements have overlapped and forced business leaders to consider the question of how to build more durable supply chains. Some of these include having a diverse number of suppliers in different parts of the world, so if one part suffers, other suppliers can pick up the slack. Another solution proposed could include integrating business planning to include a multi-pronged approach to changes in supply and demand. This includes an agile response with business partners in response to sudden shifts in market demand. Some pundits have dared whisper about another idea so crazy it just might work: keep it close to home.

HOMEGROWN It’s almost unfathomable to believe that your cellphone has more computing power than the computers that were used by NASA to land a person on the moon back in 1969. According to the US-based Semiconductor Industry Association, the United States is the world leader with 47% global market share and sales last year of $208 billion. The American semiconductor industry employs more than 250,000 people and supports about 1.6 million additional jobs. Semiconductors are a Top 5 U.S. export and 80% of all sales are to overseas buyers. In comparison, Canada’s role in the semiconductor marketplace is only the tiniest of slices of the global pie. Canada’s revenue from semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing is estimated to reach US$3.8 billion dollars by 2024, according to Statistica. com. Compare this to the world’s largest chipmaker, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which generated US$47.78 billion in 2020. Co-existing alongside a global pandemic has forced industry leaders to step back and take stock of the national potential that Canada has, if not to be a global leader, than certainly, a more independent player within the semiconductor sector. In May of this year, “a select group of globally recognized Canadian founders, business leaders, chip manufacturers, and investors announced Canada’s Semiconductor Council. With a mandate to build


and lead Canada’s national semiconductor strategy and action plan, the coalition will work towards advancing Canadian competitiveness, strengthening trade partnerships, bolstering supply chain resilience, and propelling Canada to the forefront of the US$7 trillion global semiconductor industry.” “The coalition recognizes the importance of positioning Canada as a global leader from research to design to manufacturing in the $7 trillion global industry that is critical to our national technological security, supply chain resiliency, a green economic recovery and global competitiveness. Chips and semiconductor products are embedded in everything from EVs to medical devices, consumer electronics, and precision agriculture,” says the Council’s chair, Sarah Prevette via email. Prevette, who is also the founder of Future Design School, was named by Inc Magazine as one of the top entrepreneurs in North America. She’s also an active technology investor and renowned thought leader in human-centred design. Prevette founded Future Design School which works with academic institutions around the world to cultivate critical competencies that align with growing industries. “As Chair of council, my role is to

bring awareness of our message and ensure that we meet our mandate to lead and build Canada’s national semiconductor strategy and action plan.” Part of that strategy includes a mixture of corporate and government investment to keep things not only embedded in the Canadian landscape but also to be able to envision a future that includes a place at the table for our own subject matter experts. “We’re competing against major chipproducing countries like South Korea and Taiwan. In order for Canada to become a more competitive global player, we need to forge a shared vision among industry leaders, chip manufacturers, policymakers, and investors. In order for our homegrown hardware startups to grow and scale here in Canada — and to not exit too early at low valuations —  they need access to very expensive technologies, and they need to see a future for themselves in Canada. Right now, we’re seeing too many of our best and brightest minds in the semiconductor sector leaving for better opportunities abroad.”   Which hampers Canada’s overall strategy when it comes to innovation. In June of this year, The Conference Board of Canada released its Innovation Report Card 2021.

“Innovation is the process through which economic or social value is extracted from knowledge—by creating, diffusing, and transforming ideas—to produce new or improved products, services, and processes,” states the report. In this regard Canada scores a solid “C”—up two notches from a year ago--compared to 16 peer countries. Canada took the 13th spot, just behind Japan. The countries with the top scores were Switzerland, the United States and Sweden. Somewhat surprisingly, countries ranking lower than Canada included France, Australia and The United Kingdom. Provincially, Ontario received the highest grade with a solid “C.” New Brunswick and P.E.I. scored dead last with “D” scores. The Atlantic province with highest score was Nova Scotia in 19th place. “Canada continues to exhibit relatively weak innovation performance. Volatile resource prices, changing demographics, and increasing economic protectionism are exposing Canada’s business innovation weakness and generating pressure to become more innovative in the coming years,” states the report. “In Canada, we’ve long been known for our abundance of natural resources, and while exporting raw materials will probably always play a role in our autoatlantic.com

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economy, we can no longer rely on it if we hope to build an advanced, modern economy. Innovation starts with thinking bigger about what our role can be in the global economy. We need to transition to a producer of advanced technologies; not just an importer and a consumer of them. We have some of the most highly educated graduates and most highly skilled professionals in the world, but if we don’t provide them with opportunities to build scalable companies and transformative careers, we risk losing them to more innovative countries,” says Prevette. So one of the more obvious solutions to the innovation problem is realizing that Canada has the potential to bring its tired, dated overreliance on traditional forms of economic generativity solidly into the 21century. Old school reliance on imports have sometimes proven to be unreliable— witness the recent Suez Canal debacle— when we can start looking towards the future and the capacity to produce our own semiconductors and the rewards that accompany that.

WAKE UP CALL When Canada’s Semiconductor Council announced its launch in May of this 10

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year, a press release said, in part: “As the global chip shortage continues to threaten major industries in Canada and around the world, there’s an urgent need for Canada to establish itself as a developer and manufacturer of semiconductor products — both for domestic use and global export. A rejuvenated semiconductor sector will also help Canada to build small business capacity, drive economic recovery, reach our decarbonization goals, and strengthen technological security.” The question becomes how to accomplish this exactly? There appears to be little or no consensus as to what approach to take in a post-pandemic economy. Some pundits believe that Canada, with the proper buy-in and investment, has the power to become a key player in the innovation economy, chiefly by prioritizing R & D as well as manufacturing chips. Whether tapping into our top talent of tomorrow and planning for the next cycle of thought leaders in STEM, or pulling talent in from around the world as we welcome the next wave of economic New Canadians, a thriving semiconductor sector means substantial job creation. “For every semiconductor job that is created; nearly five highly-skilled tech

jobs are created. Semiconductors need to be viewed as a powerful tool to help us not only forge a vital new industry, but to create meaningful careers and to power our economic recovery. We have a rare opportunity to create new exciting career paths and opportunities for our Canadian youth; where Canadians can envision themselves as hardware design engineers or advanced manufacturing experts. It is also a fantastic opportunity to attract global talent, including students, world-class researchers and global founders who choose Canada to start, build and scale global businesses in semiconductor design, innovation and manufacturing,” says Prevette. Not so fast say some naysayers. Canada has little-to-no chance of going up against the world’s heavy hitters competitively. In that regard Canada would do well to consider carving out a corner for itself by becoming a key player in the development and manufacturing of specialty products. One example of this is photonics, which use light to perform actions exercised by electronics, including mechanical sensors and quantum devices. Perhaps instead of focusing on a vehicle’s main com-


Semiconductors

puter within the car, consider applications which can be used across multiple industries instead. Whatever the outcome, there can be little doubt that Canada’s need to ramp up its manufacturing of semiconductors in some form is a priority that can no longer be ignored. The feds have recognized emerging technologies like 5G, cybersecurity and

quantum computing as priorities but seem to have over looked that all of these rely on semiconductors to power them. “Chips are the brains behind the technologies, and even though we can’t really see them, they power virtually everything we rely on,” says Prevette. “So yes, the challenge for the council is to help the government and other stakeholders understand the

critical role that chips play in all corners of our economy. If a thriving and reliable semiconductor industry is not a priority, it will be difficult to grow these other technologies in a sustainable way. The time for action is now and we need to think boldly to really leapfrog to the forefront and be a credible leader in a sector that impacts all Canadians.”

ATLANTIC TRUCK SHOW PLANS RETURN TO MONCTON FOR JUNE 2022

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NE OF ATLANTIC CANADA’S ONLY EVENTS FOR THE TRUCKING & TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY HAS ANNOUNCED IT WILL RETURN TO THE MONCTON COLISEUM NEXT JUNE.

Presented by the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association (APTA), the Atlantic Truck Show will take place June 3-4, 2022. This key event serves as a venue to showcase all the latest trucks and truck-related products on today’s market, and the 2022 edition will offer a renewed focus on trucks for all trades – focusing on vehicles for construction and building supply, dump trucks,

and forestry. As the largest national truck show east of Montreal, the Atlantic Truck Show draws visitors from throughout New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and beyond. More than 12,000 attendees took part in the most recent edition in 2019. In partnership with the APTA, the show will offer educational and networking opportunities, paving the way for exceptional business prospects to generate new leads. “APTA is delighted to continue our strong working relationship with Master Promotions to produce the Atlantic Truck Show,” said Jean Marc Picard, Executive Director, APTA. “The show is important to our members and is used to advocate the advancement and improvements to the commercial trucking industry in Atlantic Canada. The pandemic has held us from hosting any events over the last 18 months therefore this show is going to be an big event for everyone in the industry.” “The Atlantic Truck show is an important trade event within the Atlantic provinces,” said Mark Cusack, National Show Manager. “Industry leaders from across the trucking and transportation sectors trust this show for lead generation, relationship building and – of course – making sales!” Exhibitors interested in the Atlantic Truck Show can stay tuned to www.AtlanticTruckShow.com and will be contacted via email when sales information becomes available. Visitors interested in attending the show are encouraged to stay tuned to the show website for additional information and show features, as well as the show’s Facebook and Twitter pages, which will share current details on the event.

WE’RE BIG ON

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores

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At the Recycler’s Yard

WHERE ARE ALL THE CARS TO RECYCLE?

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By Steve Fletcher

SED VEHICLE PRICES CONTINUE TO CLIMB, WHICH IS PROVING BOTH A BLESSING AND A CURSE FOR RECYCLERS.

One of the most significant disruptions to the automotive industry in recent months has been the shortage of global semiconductors. The impact has been a decline in new vehicle sales because OEMs are simply not able to build enough functioning vehicles to meet demand. With less new vehicle inventory available, many new car dealers have been turning their attention to used vehicles. For us, as auto recyclers, this presents an interesting scenario. For some time now, data has shown that the overall age of the vehicle fleet continues to increase. In the U.S., data from IHS Markit, puts the average age of a vehicle at 12.1 years, while in Canada, it is just shy of 10 years old. As the vehicle fleet ages, there’s also been a very significant (and growing) demand for used vehicles. We’ve seen this reach a fever pitch recently as the shortage of new vehicles has put pressure on the used market. And, it’s not only dealers who are competing at the auctions for used vehicles but so are fleet businesses, particularly rental car companies who disposed

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of a lot of their inventories in Q2 last year as travel ground to a halt. Rental vehicles are in such short supply today that those companies are now buying older vehicles, just to have something on offer. In fact, the pressure on used vehicles has become so great that even recyclers and associations like ours are getting calls, asking if we have vehicles, including ones earmarked for our end-of-life (ELV) programs - Retire Your Ride and Car Heaven. For us as recyclers, the ageing of the vehicle fleet and demand for older cars is in many ways, music to our ears, since that is “the sweet spot” our businesses tend to operate in. After all we are in the used parts industry - and those parts help keep older vehicles on the road longer. Demand for used parts is up, partially because there is a shortage of new parts, with collision repairers and mechanical shops looking to get their hands on every component they can, whether it is new or used. Additionally, with the increase in scrap metal prices and also hot demand for items such as catalytic converters, the current economic climate offers some very good opportunities for recyclers. There is, however, a flipside to all this. If, as a recycler, you have a good supply of vehicle inventory, you’re currently in a very favourable position. If you don’t however, it is becoming increasingly harder to compete against

dealers and other recyclers that are looking for vehicles as the price for cars, salvage or otherwise continues to climb. Ultimately to be successful you have to be able to read the market and see where things are headed. External influencers, like COVID, rarely last but one thing is clear, the importance of understanding the supply chain has never been more important. Now is the perfect time for recyclers to be talking to collision repairers and mechanical shops since many of them currently have a bit more time, and by focusing on those relationships, recyclers can solve their problems relating to parts supply. At the association end of things, we at ARC continue to look at ways to help our members optimize their operations and help those who are not only selling all the part types they can to see the broader trends. Ultimately, no matter what happens in the economy, it’s the strength of the relationships and networks we have as part of the overall auto repair economy that ensure our survival and future growth. And in these unprecedented times, that is something we should all recognize and work towards. Steve Fletcher is the Managing Director of the Automotive Recyclers of Canada. You can reach him at steve@autorecyclers.ca


Around the Atlantic

UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC 2021 AWARDS

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Uni-Select Atlantic is very proud to announce the following milestone awards: CONGRATULATIONS TO M & A AUTOMOTIVE (ABOVE) FOR YOUR 35 YEARS OF SERVICE AND DEVOTION TO UNI-SELECT. CONGRATULATIONS TO MARTIN R. ALBERT / BUMPER TO BUMPER EDMUNDSTON (MIDDLE LEFT) FOR YOUR 30 YEARS OF SERVICE AND DEVOTION TO UNI-SELECT. CONGRATULATIONS TO SANGSTER’S AUTOMOTIVE / BUMPER TO BUMPER ELMSDALE (FAR LEFT) FOR YOUR 25 YEARS OF SERVICE AND DEVOTION TO UNI-SELECT. CONGRATULATIONS TO HOOD HARDWARE (NEAR LEFT) FOR YOUR 30 YEARS OF SERVICE AND DEVOTION TO UNI-SELECT.

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Bob’s Business Development

ACCOUNTABILITY OF STAFF & MANAGEMENT – DO THE REAL MATH

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By Bob Greenwood AMAM

N THE PAST, BY THE AFTERNOON OF OUR 1-DAY BUSINESS DEVELOPM E NT C L ASS, THE STUDENTS WERE REALLY GETTING THEIR HEADS INTO THE NUMBERS OF THEIR BUSINESS. It was great to see the participation and interest, so I thought I would go another step further and look at some real costs in a shop that most owners never consider or have calculated. Many shop owners have a tendency to look at the business operating expenses

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and consume their time with that topic as a main cost reduction plan to increase their bottom line. The fact is most business expenses today in operating a professional service shop are either noncontrollable or common-sense expenses. We go through this in detail in our longer Management courses. We fail to acknowledge that Management must also be ac-

countable to the business and make better use of his/her time. It is Management’s responsibility to go after the real problems in the business instead of nickel diming the business to death with expenses thinking it will save the business and bottom line in the long run. Nothing could be further from the truth. That been said, I think it is time to actually look at the most serious problem in every service shop business, namely, what unproductive staff really cost the business and calculate that cost as a true bottom-line loss. For example: If a technician is averaging 5.5 billed hours per day but is being paid for 8 then that means 2.5 hours per day are a real cost to the business. If you are paying the person $25 per hour, then $25 times 2.5 = $62.50 per day times 20 days per month = $1,250 per month plus average shop payroll burden = $1,500.00


Bob’s Business Development

PER MONTH off the bottom line. ($18,000 per year from ONE person). Add to that, if you were charging $110.00 per hour labor rate on that individual, then $110.00 - $25 basic wage cost = $85.00 per hour lost in gross profit contribution from the lost labor billings that should have been achieved times 2.5 hours = another $212.50 loss per day times 20 days per month = $4,250.00 lost additional gross profit per month which would also drop down to net profit. Total cost to the business from ONE person being unproductive and unaccountable = $5,750.00 per month ($1500 + $4,250) or $69,000.00 per year. So, from this one calculation we can see the actual cost to the business of only having one person not being held accountable for their time and productivity in the shop. Now let’s look at the entire shop as an average and keep it simple. If the entire team were averaging 5.5 billed hours per day as a group average leaving 2.5 hours unaccounted for and you have 4 techs on the team at an average wage cost of $25 per hour per tech then that works out to a monthly cost of $1,250 times 4 = $5,000.00 per month plus payroll burden = $6,200.00 PER MONTH off the bottom line ($74,400.00 per year). Now add in the lost billed labor hours that should have been achieved just for the basic 8 hours in time they were at the shop. $110 labour rate - $25 average wage cost = $85 X 2.5 unbilled hours = $212.50 X 20 days per month average = $4,250 X 4 technicians = $17,000 X 12 months = $204,000.00 per year net profit lost from the tech team when the lost unbilled labor contribution to gross profit is factored in

for a total net profit loss of $290,400.00 to the company that is not obtained because the people within the shop are not held to be accountable for their time and productivity. This is serious money!!! and THIS is where management should be spending their time………fix the accountability issue in the business. Management must be accountable to the business by spending time wisely where it has a real effect on the bottom line. Fixing shop accountability is time very well spent. Remember a competent technician should be billing 10 to 12 hours per day and an apprentice should be billing at least 5 to 6 hours per day; if they are not achieving those numbers then investigate fully “why not?” Do not guess, don’t listen to rhetoric, find out the facts. That is management responsibility to the company. It is time and absolutely necessary today to focus on accountability in business by embracing all the processes and management education you have been shown/ taught/exposed to. If you “cherry pick” the processes or what you were taught, then it won’t work. If you “assume” the processes are being followed in the shop, then it won’t work. Every owner/manager must “Inspect what you Expect” from your team and determine why something happened or did not happen or why that particular member of the team is not performing his/her position properly and focus on fixing it. This will be the quickest way to turn any business around. Educate every staff member as to why accountability is necessary and as Professionals in this industry, we must take it

seriously. If the business is not profitable then everyone’s income is affected and ultimately the commercial client is affected because the shop does not have the cash to invest in training and keeping on top of latest shop technology and equipment. Stand your ground on this issue and stop babysitting the staff because you are afraid they might quit. That means they are holding you hostage. Professional people want accountability in the business because that will show everyone where they shine. The others are scared of accountability because they know it would show where they cut corners, prove that they are lazy, show how self-centered they are, as they only think about themselves and are only looking for a paycheck at the end of the week. They really do not care about the business or the commercial clients the business looks after and these people must be cut loose from the company. Many of us in the industry wish that these people would leave the industry all together. Make every single person in the company accountable. I will guarantee you one thing; when you improve the accountability throughout your company it will have 5 to 10 times the effect on your bottom line than trying to save money picking away at individual operating expenses. Do the math and insert your own numbers into the equation I have provided in this article. Follow the math in your business, not your emotions, as the math does not lie and then you will truly be working smarter instead of harder. Bob Greenwood AMAM – 1-800-2675497

FEDS ANNOUNCE PUBLIC SERVICE MANDATORY VACCINATIONS

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NTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS MINISTER D. LEBLANC AND TRANSPORT MINISTER O. ALGHABRA ANNOUNCED AUGUST 12 THE GOVERNMENT INTENT TO REQUIRE VACCINATION FOR THE FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVICE AS EARLY AS THE END OF SEPTEMBER. The government also announced it will require employ18

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ees in the federally regulated transportation sectors of air, rail, and marine to be vaccinated by no later than the end of October. The vaccination requirement will also extend to certain travellers, including all commercial air travellers, passengers on interprovincial trains, and passengers on large marine vessels with overnight accommodations, such as cruise ships. The federally regulated trucking sector will not be included in this regulatory change. For all other federally regulated sectors, including trucking, both ministers are “strongly encouraging” employers to continuously  urge vaccination within their workforce.


At The Bodyshop

FIX AUTO ADDS CAPE BRETON TO ITS ATLANTIC FOOTPRINT

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WNER BRENT SAMPSON ELEVATES HIS FAMILY’S 57-YEAR COLLISION REPAIR BUSINESS TO A NEW LEVEL

Halifax, July 27, 2021: Fix Auto, a leading international name in quality collision repair services, has reinforced its presence across the Atlantic region, welcoming a new location in the picturesque island of Cape Breton, in Nova Scotia. Fix Auto Cape Breton, located in the River Bourgeois area of Cape Breton, builds on an existing collision repair business, previously called CSN Brent’s Auto Body, which has been operating in the area for the past 57 years. The shop is well reputed among customers and insurance providers in River Bourgeois and surrounding areas for offering quality collision repair and customer services. Second generation owner Brent Sampson points out that the shop was estab-

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lished by his father and he got involved in the business very early in life. His interest in the repair business remains undiminished since. “Working alongside my father, I came to know the intricacies of running and operating a successful body shop business,” Brent explains. “I have worked in all possible roles at the shop and am always exploring ways to improve my shop’s operational efficiencies. That mission led Brent to join Fix Network and take up the Fix Auto franchise for his area. He explains that the idea is incorporate some of the most advanced collision repair equipment in his shop and training his team in restoring vehicles of all makes and models to their original condition. “Over the past few months, I have explored opportunities to expand the business from where my father started off,” Brent explains. “My wife and I visited Fix Network’s Milton training centre a few months back and met up with Fix Network’s President and CEO Steve Leal.

Speaking to the team, we were impressed by their vision and direction and immediately decided that we wanted to be a part of this forward-thinking organization.” Brent and his team soon aligned their business with Fix Auto to keep pace with the changing trends in the collision repair industry. “Joining a respected banner such as Fix Network ensures that our team can benefit from their ongoing training, operations and marketing support. Our onboarding has been relatively easier, and we look forward to profitable growth in the coming months,” he added. Welcoming Fix Auto Cape Breton into the network, Mark Weeks, Regional VicePresident – Atlantic, says, “Cape Breton is a thriving and growing community where Brent Sampson and his team enjoy a solid reputation for quality repairs and customer service. We are confident that Fix Auto Cape Breton will further enhance Fix Auto’s reputation as a global aftermarket leader in this region.”


Atlantic Racing News

FILLING UP FOR SUCCESS By Tim Terry

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E’VE SPOKEN IN T H I S SPACE BE FOR E ABOUT THE FULL EXPERIENCE YOU GET AT A RACE TRACK. The experience that a race fan has at a track varies based on what they feel like they should get out of it. For some, they want to go to a track, spend some time enjoying some great racing and return home until the next time. Some make a weekend out of it, bringing campers, motorhomes or tents and camp at the track to make an event out of the racing card. A race team or driver experience will differ from a race fan as they are a part of the show, scratching their need for speed in different ways than sitting themselves in the grandstands.

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Plenty of these emotions and experiences are shared, regardless what side of the fence you are on. The common thread is that everyone enjoys the sport we love. Whether you are there to watch the rising stars in Late Models, working on your sibling’s Mini Stock or just there to see some great short track racing, the common bond is the sport. Outside of that, there are some other things that are shared, one of those things that I am famous for checking out at every track I go to. That’s right, I’m talking about the refreshment stand! Think about it though, besides one race track in the region, folks go to the track to see the competition, spend time with their friends and go to their “happy place.” A majority of folks do not go to the track to eat at the refreshment stand. Though, speaking from experience, a good eat at a track can stick in the mind of a race fan and they’ll return with that in mind when they visit the track the next time. We’ve chatted about it in these pages

before but the best refreshment stand experience in the Maritimes, bar none, has been Valley Raceway. Chef Will Macintosh has redefined what it means to eat at a track and is the exception to the rule above. Several folks have been known to drive to the Melvern Square, Nova Scotia track, out in the middle of the woods, to pay admission and the bill at the food window to eat Will’s food. For those folks, the racing comes second. Macintosh’s specialty is the Valley Raceway Burger. A double cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato and his special Thousand Island-esque sauce. The beef is lightly seasoned and is sourced locally from Meadowbrook Meat Market in nearby Berwick. They also have different offerings on the menu, including fresh hand cut French Fries and even Deep Fried Mars Bars to satisfy your sweet tooth. Now, most race tracks will play the cost card. They want to keep their margins high. A Valley Raceway Burger or something to that effect, is non-existent at any other track in the region. Simply


Atlantic Racing News

put, the attention to detail is not there. No other track will you find lettuce and tomato as options on your burger or any sauce. That does not go to say that burgers at other tracks are not delicious but they, as the kids say these days, “hit different” at Valley Raceway. With COVID-19, the track has yet to run a race in 2021 after sitting dormant last season but the dirt track crew is hopeful to get back on

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the clay surface later this fall. Simply put, quality keeps people coming back. As much as it is the case with the racing product on track, the same can be said with the off-track experience as well. Scotia Speedworld, led by concession manager JC Fortes, has also set up their game when it comes to their burgers, dumping the frozen patties and getting their beef from Withrow’s Farm Market. A

new bun, similar to those that fast food chain Wendy’s uses, puts the burger over the top as one of the best in Nova Scotia. The track even offers Kismit Kettle Corn as a sweet treat to go along with the biggest Weekly Racing Series in the Province. COVID has cut the Speedworld offering down and while you cannot find Onion Rings, poutines or Chicken Fingers on the menu yet, they have focused their attention on the limited offerings. Not to be outdone, Lake Doucette Motor Speedway has a great barbeque burger that is a wonderful accompaniment to some great racing the Clare area track has to offer. Across the Northumberland Strait, Oyster Bed Speedway prides themselves on quality eats at their canteen. Like Scotia Speedworld though, public health has chopped the grandstands into zones and it ultimately has changed how they operate their refreshment stand. In New Brunswick, all four paved ovals offer their own concession offerings. Speedway 660 stands apart as the track with the best French Fries in the region, winning “Fan Favorite Food” from Tim’s Corner Motorsports several times over. Speedway Miramchi continues to bring the heat with fresh burgers, poutines and even pizza! Petty International Raceway has Peggy’s Trailer in the pits with several different offering, depending on the day, from spiral fries to mozza sticks along with your favorite race track foods. Shediac’s CENTRE For Speed continues to offer excellent canteen fair, including their famous bologna burgers, at an affordable price to their fans and teams alike. Some race tracks, whether due to COVID-19 or other operation hurdles, outsource their refreshment operations. Riverside International Speedway has tapped Cabana’s to take care of keeping race fans fed over the past two seasons and their offerings have been some of the best around. With bringing outside operations into a race track, it opens up for different offerings and with Cabana’s comes Fish and Chips. One of the only tracks to offer it on a regular basis, it is an affordable, delicious and different option than the typical burgers and sausages - and yes, they offer those too! Like Riverside, the CENTRE For Speed has been known to bring in a food truck or two over the Summer to accompany their own in-house concession stands. KC and Sons Fish and Chips have stopped in a couple times over the 2021 season and it isn’t odd to see a truck offering sweets like Mini Donuts at the track - something that isn’t usually seen at racing venues


While COVD has changed the way these tracks operate in every facet, the return to normal or “living with COVID” we hope to get to in 2022 is sure to see changes. From basic operations to something that might seem trivial to most like refreshment stands, there is a lot that goes into planning a show. With COVID provincial guidelines, the restrictions in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland are all different. At press time, New Brunswick does not have any restrictions on events or mass gatherings while the other three Provinces have mandated major venues like race tracks to group their fans into separate bubbles or pods. This creates a situation where each pod needs washroom facilities, its own entrance and exit gate along with access to concession stands. As the racing season winds to a close, get out and enjoy a race at your local short track. Before you know it, the snow will be flying and we’ll be dreaming about the smell of race fuel, burnt rubber, the sight of door-to-door racing and, of course, the taste of race track food. I’m already thinking about my next Scotia Speedworld cheeseburger as I type this. Until next time, keep the hammer down and we’ll see you at the track!

around the region. The question is - what track will stick their neck out and give us something completely different? There are tracks around North America serving different eats but who will be the first to bend that fine line between profit margins and quality to give the fans something unique. Sure, you’re likely not going to find a salad at a track in the Maritimes anytime soon but we’re awaiting that next breakthrough innovation that will give us something new to talk about in these pages. Of course, several fans like myself have favourite stops to and from the track in the region. If I’m going to a race at Scotia Speedworld, I usually hit up the Wooden Door Bistro at the Quality Inn Halifax Airport behind the track. They even have a chicken parmesan type dish named after multi-time track champion Dave Matthews. Moncton race fans have been known to visit St. Louis Bar & Grill after the race to support longtime motorsport fan Keith Mackintosh. A Lake Doucette run wouldn’t be complete for me without a stop at Rudder’s Brewpub on the waterfront in Yarmouth. This sport is all about creating lifelong memories and some of those finest bench racing moments are crafted around a supper table after a good hard day of racing. autoatlantic.com

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Future Technologies

BLACKBERRY IVY TO PROVIDE SECURE VEHICLE-BASED PAYMENTS

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LACKBERRY WILL UNLOCK THE LARGE MARKET FOR VEHICLE-BASED PAYMENTS AND E-COMMERCE

On August 11, BlackBerry Limited announced  a new solution to deliver highlysecure vehicle-based payment capability to unlock a connected car payments market that is  projected  to reach over €530 billion by 2030. This vehicle-based payment solution will create new opportunities for automakers to offer a vast array of payment services and develop previously untapped revenue streams. The solution will create a “digital fingerprint” for the vehicle, allowing it to securely connect to a bank’s payment network, validate, and autonomously pay for a wide range of frequently used services, including fuel, tolls, parking, insurance, maintenance, and other “wallet” capabilities. Historically, vehicle-based payment processes have been complex and leverage legacy banking primitives such as physical credit cards or multiple smartphone apps to communicate with each

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individual merchant and service provider. BlackBerry is delivering this solution through a partnership with Californiabased financial technology solution provider Car IQ which leverages BlackBerry IVY’s in-vehicle edge computing and direct access to vehicle sensors. “We are delighted to demonstrate the value of BlackBerry IVY’s end-to-end offering for this market through our partnership with Car IQ,” said Peter Virk, Vice President of IVY Product and Ecosystem, BlackBerry. “Access to sensor data and edge computing will allow for an incredibly secure in-vehicle payments solution.”

“We are excited to accelerate the timeto-market of our latest in-vehicle payment solution and to capture share of the connected car payments market by leveraging the BlackBerry IVY platform,” said Sterling Pratz, CEO and founder of Car IQ. “With BlackBerry IVY we can now fully embed our solution on a common platform in the vehicle, allowing us to not only provide the highest level of security, but also greatly reduce complexity for banks and merchants.” “Fleet managers, shared vehicle operators and individual vehicle owners will benefit from greater convenience and secure management of transactions as the next wave of connected vehicle technology integrates more closely with merchant platforms for cashless and cardless payments,” said Lee Colman, Chief Production Officer of global automotive technology analyst firm SBD Automotive. He added, “Undisputable identification of the vehicle and/or driver leveraging seamless vehicle sensor technology at the point of sale underpinned by security creates further efficiencies for the entire fleet value chain.”


Human Resources

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? GETTING TO KNOW YOUR NOVA SCOTIA AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR COUNCIL

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By Nikki Barnett, Operations Manager

HE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR COUNCIL (ASC) HAS BEEN E X C E P T I O N A L LY BUSY THIS YEAR, LAUNCHING MULTIPLE PROJECTS TO HELP ADDRESS LABOUR MARKET CHALLENGES IN A WAY THAT WILL MAKE A LONG-TERM POSITIVE IMPACT IN INDUSTRY. Activities cut across human resource planning, attraction & retention and Training. Are you looking for training? A brandnew training portal, Marketplace, was launched in June 2021. This platform is for motive power industry employers and employees in NS to access online training. The ASC has leveraged their partnership with developer Bluedrop Training & Simulation to build this platform to offer courses that are responsive to the motive power industry’s critical needs. Courses will range from business management, human resources, and safety to technical and certification, currently under development. Worker Passports will allow employers and employees to view, download and share certificates of course completion. Feedback and testimonials from training participants and site visitors will help steer ASC for future course material on this dynamic Marketplace platform. Please visit automotivens.skillspass.com to register. Are you looking for employees? The Automotive Sector Council Motive Power Career Portal launches in the fall of 2021. The portal is not just a job board and resume builder but also a personality assessment tool. Job-seekers, apprentices and students who sign up learn about their attitudes and aptitudes, learn about career paths in the motive power Industry and are matched with open career opportunities that closely match their strengths and interests. Once signed up, there is information on training pathways and careers in industry incorporating expanding services 30

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and new technology. For employers who post jobs on the portal, they don’t just receive applications and resumes, they will receive an applicant’s job fit score and likelihood of success in the role. Applicants with a higher fit score are likely to onboard faster and stay longer, reducing the time and cost employers spend on recruitment. For more information and to sign up, visit Autotrades.jobtimize.com/ landing/ Would you hire a summer student? TestDrive 2021 is wrapping up for another year. The ASC’s TestDrive program began in 2012 and offers grade 10-and-11 high school students the opportunity to experience motive power trades in Nova Scotia. Students can earn three co-op credits, 300 apprenticeship hours towards trade certification, training experience at Nova Scotia Community College and a paid summer work placement with an employer. The experience creates career awareness for students and starts them on a path to apprenticeship.

The program is currently offered in four regional school districts where, in the fall, high school teachers may arrange class presentations. Student applications are accepted in the winter. Employers in the motive power industry are financially incentivized to employ students. Grant applications for employers will be available this winter. For more details, please visit AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca/TestDrive. The Tire and Maintenance Technician (TMT) is a brand-new certification created by industry for industry. The Automotive Sector Council in partnership with industry representatives and employers from Nova Scotia’s motive power industry identified the core skills required to work as a certified TMT. Job seekers with an interest in the motive power industry, with or without formal training, can be assessed for re-

quired competencies and fit with the new industry position, trained and certified within a few months for this entry-level position. The applicant’s assessment process, Recognizing Prior Learning, is a new approach to assessing and earning credits for individuals with what they may have already learned at work, through study, in community, through personal activities and at home. It identifies any gaps in knowledge and skill and recommends any necessary additional training. Training components are delivered online and hands-on. If individuals complete the assessment and any recommended training, they may be certified by an Industry assessor. The Tire and Maintenance Technician pilot program intends to assess 8-10 diverse candidates beginning April 1, 2022, and every subsequent tire season moving forward. Soon, the program will be recruiting keen experienced individuals in the sector to train as assessors. Details will be published in the next issue of the Auto & Trucking Atlantic. For more information and to inquire about hiring graduates, please visit AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca under Get Started. Are you looking for employees this tire season? The ASC’s Pathways to Success is about to begin its first pilot. Pathways to Success is a preparation training program, in partnership with equity-seeking groups, for diverse jobseekers to enter the motive power industry workplace. Jobseekers with interest in the industry, with or without formal training, can be assessed for fit, trained and certified within a few months for this entry-level position. If individuals complete the assessment and recommended online and in-person training, they may be certified as Tire and Maintenance Technicians. The program was designed to increase recruitment and retention in the Motive Power Industry while reducing barriers to entry. The pilot program has a goal to assess 8-10 candidates by September 13, 2021 and ready for employment by October 11, 2021. For more information, application and to inquire about hiring graduates, please visit AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca. Not sure who the Automotive Sector Council are? Check us out at AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca


Future Technologies

DRIVERLESS CARS ON THE ROADS MAY BE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK

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By Adrian Giorgio

HILE IT MAY SEEM LIKE SOMETHING OUT OF THE JETSONS, DRIVERLESS VEHICLES ARE BY NO MEANS SOMETHING OUT OF A HANNA-BARBERA PRODUCTION FANTASY. Although the concept has created controversy and debate over utility, convenience and ethics, the implementation and sale of these advanced automobiles is within grasp. This means no human involvement would be necessary for a safe and efficient experience, with multiple companies vying for the earliest release to the general public. In early May of 2021, GM’s CEO Mary Barra said that it could be achieved within the decade. By rapidly developing and funding Cruise, a self-driving start-up, GM hopes to best Tesla in achieving Level 5 transport. GM even has the upper hand

with regards to current features, possessing a hands-free option known as “Super Cruise” that Barra declared “could enable hands-free transportation in 95% of driving scenarios.” The ultimate goal is to take Cruise’s current work, which is designed for robotaxis, and make it available for mass distribution. A tall task, given the notoriety and success of some of their biggest competitors. While Tesla is known for churning out software updates at a rapid pace, Elon Musk’s reputation for productivity and efficiency may be at risk in the near future. BBC quoted IHS market analyst Tim Urquhart with regards to Elon’s audacity “It’s a typically bold claim by Mr. Musk…even if Tesla can reliably roll out the technology in a production environment, the regulatory environment in all the major markets is way behind allowing completely autonomous vehicles on the road.” While that may sound skeptical and perhaps rather bleak, Mr. Urquhart’s

assessment does seem to coincide better with Barra’s timeline of the project. Perhaps Tesla’s eagerness will be its downfall here, yielding to alternative forms of conveyance. Extant non-traditional transportation services already offer convoys of autonomous cabs. Forbes enthusiastically revealed the progress of organizations like Waymo, who are neither testing nor in a beta phase. The suburbs outside of Phoenix (Chandler, Gilbert, Mesa and Tempe) have had access to robotaxis since October 2020, after having already experienced Waymo Via, a self-driving strategy for trucking and last-mile delivery. That’s quite the speedy development, making them a more than formidable opponent for conventional auto manufacturers and delivery services. We may not yet be propelling our sedans and mini-vans through the air to get to soccer practice, but the concept no longer resembles a futuristic caricature of reality as much as it once did.

ALL EV EXPANDS ACROSS ATLANTIC CANADA WITH FOUR NEW DEALERSHIPS

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LECTRIC CAR DEALERSHIP ALL EV CANADA HAS ANNOUNCED FOUR NEW STORES ACROSS ATLANTIC CANADA, TWO OF WHICH WILL BE IN NEWFOUNDLAND, ONE IN NEW BRUNSWICK, AND ONE IN NOVA SCOTIA.

The news follows the recent sale of All EV Canada to Steele Auto Group. Steele Auto Group announced it had acquired the Halifax-based electric vehicle dealership on July 26, 2021. Peter Porteus, a vice president with Steele Auto Group, told news outlet Huddle that Steele Auto Group invested in All EV Canada because of its expertise in the EV field and its efforts to promote EV adoption in Atlantic Canada.  He added that Steele Auto Group is aligned with All EV Canada founders David Giles, Jérémie Bernardin, and Jeff Farwell in their vision for the EV market. “The change that our industry is going through towards electrification probably hasn’t been seen since the invention of the Model T,” Porteus told Huddle on August 3rd.  Porteus added that the government’s investment in charging infrastructure combined with timelines by OEMs to transition 32

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their production to electric vehicles will “revolutionize the automotive industry.” Although EV adoption across the Atlantic provinces has been relatively slow compared to other parts of the country, new provincial cash rebates, like those recently introduced in Prince Edward Island are sparking sales. “The moment that incentive program was introduced in Prince Edward Island, retail happened,” Porteus said. “People who had been thinking about it for a year or two years, the day it was announced, were coming in and buying vehicles.” Those rebates, which have also been introduced across other Atlantic provinces, are “‘directly responsible’ for Steele’s decision to invest in All EV Canada and its expansion,” he added.  All four of All EV Canada’s new expansions - in Corner Brook and St.John’s Newfoundland, Fredericton New Brunswick, and a new location in Halifax - will open in September of this year and will add to All EV Canada’s current location in Prince Edward Island, giving the company more complete representation across the Atlantic Provinces.


Carters Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD . . . BITS AND PIECES OF THE BIZARRE, THE HORRIFIC AND THE DOWNRIGHT PUZZLING, SCOOPED UP FROM VARIOUS PARTS OF THE WEB SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. YER WELCOME.

BIG BANG THEORY? Autoblog recently reported a story about a semi truck  carrying 13 tons of Degree deodorant in aerosol cans that exploded at an Oklahoma truck stop (photo above). The spray cans fired off as projectiles in all directions - even bouncing off the fire truck that responded to the blaze. The explosion occurred early morning at a Love’s truck stop off I-44 near the town of Big Cabin, northeast of Tulsa, where the driver had stopped with brake problems. The hot brakes caught the tires on fire, and the blaze spread to the trailer and its explosive contents.  “It looks like Roman candles going off,” Big Cabin Fire Chief Kevin Oakley told  local media “And you’re walking through everything, it looks like a war zone. Especially at 5 o’clock in the morning.” The most interesting thing about the whole event wasn’t the fire but rather the aftermath — thousands of incinerated spray cans scattered like spent shell casings , as the chief said, a war zone. On the bright side, a reporter tweeted, “To certain degree, the scene smelled lovely.”

now become a police matter. The cars belonged to a collector who basically kept a private museum there. In addition to the cars, there was a technical library, various parts for the machines, a collection of gas pumps, and even a  reconstruction of an old coffee shop. The vehicles included cars built between the 1920s to the 1970s, including a Ford Model T and Citroën DS. The first

to collapse. The machines included an Austin A90 Atlantic coupe and convertible, Chrysler Airflow, 1938 and 1940 Ford coupes. Until the 1990s or 2000s, it was visited only by collectors and friends of the owner and was never open to the public. Time passed, and the owner locked the building. Among the heirs who were twins, one wanted to keep the collection together, and the other preferred to sell everything. Over time, the place essentially became abandoned. That is, until a group of 10 teenagers, who were around 15 years old, decided that it was time to find out what was inside that “castle” and invaded the private property. They broke into the collection and got into the cars without the slightest ceremony. They screamed with excitement at their magnificent “discovery.” Instead of keeping it a secret, they preferred to film everything and spread the images through WhatsApp. The next day, the police were already on the scene, and the cops were in contact with the kids’ parents.

KIDS FIND THE DARNDEST THINGS Motor 1 had a recent story about teenagers in Brazil who broke into an old building only to discover a huge collection of classic cars that looked like they’d been gathering dust for decades (right). The kids filmed their escapades and posted the video on WhatsApp. It has 34

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floor alone included a Chevrolet Corvair, 1952 Chevrolet Styleline, , and Hudson Hornet.The license plates indicated they hadn’t been on the road in decades. On a second floor, rare vehicles were on wooden planks that appeared ready

BIOGAS REDUCES CO2 EMISSIONS BY 95% Scotch whisky giant Glenfiddich has begun the process of converting its delivery trucks to run on low-emission biogas made from waste products from its whis-


Carters Corner

ky distilling process as part of a “closed loop” sustainability initiative. Glenfiddich said it has installed fueling stations at a distillery in northeastern Scotland that uses technology devel-

to be used for a high-protein cattle feed. But through anaerobic digestion — where bacteria break down organic matter producing biogas — the distillery can also use liquid waste from the process to

from production at Dufftown through to bottling and packaging, covering four William Grant & Sons sites in central and western Scotland. The distiller said the biogas cuts CO2 emissions by over 95% compared to diesel and other fossil fuels, and reduces other harmful particulates and greenhouse gas emissions by up to 99%. Glenfiddich currently has a fleet of around 20 trucks. Each truck will displace up to 250 tons of CO2 annually, Glenfiddich said. The trucks Glenfiddich is using are converted vehicles from truckmaker Iveco that normally run on liquefied natural gas. The Scottish whisky industry hopes to hit carbon net zero targets by 2040

AND FINALLY… THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT?

oped by William Grant & Sons to convert its production waste and residues into an Ultra-Low Carbon Fuel (ULCF) gas Stuart Watts, distillery director at family-owned William Grant & Sons, said traditionally Glenfiddich has sold off spent grains left over from the malting process

WE’RE BIG ON

make fuel and eventually recycle all of its waste products this way. The distiller, which sells more than 14 million bottles of single-malt whisky a year, said its waste-based biogas is already powering three specially-converted trucks that transport Glenfiddich spirit

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores

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Spotted on a highway in Catalunya, Spain, the Audi RS6 Avant was being driven with two kids in the trunk. Taking into consideration they were unable to close the tailgate, chances are those were a couple of teens riding in the trunk area. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the RS4 Avant was being driven at highway speeds, so it’s fairly easy to imagine a worst-case scenario, be it a rear-end collision or hard braking. With no seatbelts for those teenagers to hold them tightly in place, things could go horribly wrong in a matter of seconds. Local reports say a French tourist was behind the wheel of the RS4 Avant and was heading to the Costa Brava, a coastal region of Catalonia in northeastern Spain. He was pulled over by the police and handed an €840 (nearly $1,000) fine for breaking no fewer than six driving laws: two violations for carrying two kids under the age of three in the back seats without proper child restraints, one for reckless driving, one for carrying more people than seats, and two more for putting two teenagers in the trunk.


East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT NEWS AND VIEWS COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO…YER WELCOME! NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR New Accessible Vehicles for Reliable GoBus Paratransit Services in St. John’s On August 6, the Honourable Elvis Loveless, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure; the Honourable Bernard Davis, Newfoundland and Labrador Minister of Environment and Climate Change; the Honourable Seamus O’Regan Jr., Minister of Natural Resources and Member of Parliament for St. John’s South – Mount Pearl, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; and Danny Breen, Mayor of St. John’s, announced joint funding to replace St. John’s paratransit vehicles. Through this investment, the paratransit fleet of buses used in the GoBus service in St. John’s and Mount Pearl will be replaced with Metrobus purchasing up to 18 new accessible paratransit vehicles. The new buses will ensure paratransit users continue to have access to the reliable transportation services they need. The Government of Canada is investing more than $1.1 million in this project through the Public Transit Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is providing over $755,000, while the City of St. John’s is contributing more than $377,000. “Our government works with municipalities in all areas of the province so that we can provide better infrastructure and services for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians. By replacing the accessible paratransit fleet with newer vehicles, we are proactively ensuring the GoBus service can continue without disruption for everyone who depends on it.” Honourable Elvis Loveless, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure

NEW BRUNSWICK Eleven communities receive provincial and federal funding for infrastructure projects The provincial and federal governments announced $8.3 million in funding August 5 for 11 infrastructure projects across the province that are intended to provide residents with safe and reliable infrastructure and better position their communities for growth. “Investments of this type help equip 38

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communities with the infrastructure they need for both population and economic growth and help ensure they will continue to flourish for generations to come,” said Environment and Climate Change Minister Gary Crossman, who is also minister responsible for the Regional Development Corporation. Projects include road improvements in Oromocto and Gagetown as well as a wellfield expansion in McAdam. In addition, maintenance depots in Debec, Centreville, Petitcodiac, Woodman’s Point, Gagetown, Hampton, and Hanwell will receive structural upgrades. These upgrades include removing hazardous material, new roofing and windows, and

improved heating and plumbing. A sand dome in Grand Manan will also be upgraded. “These investments will extend the life of important department facilities,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Jill Green. “The upgraded facilities will help us to effectively manage our large network of roadways, bridges and infrastructure.” The federal government is investing more than $6.6 million in these projects through the COVID-19 Resilience Stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. The provincial government is contributing $980,000 while municipalities and other funding partners are contributing more than $686,000. “The Government of Canada is taking strong and quick action to protect the health and safety of all Canadians, to stabilize our economy, and support communities across Canada. These projects will extend the lifespan of important community infrastructure across New Brunswick and create energy efficient cost saving benefits,” said Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin. “Canada’s infrastructure plan invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across the country, and builds cleaner, more inclusive communities.”

NOVA SCOTIA Province to Introduce Bilingual Stop Signs in Acadian Communities The province will begin installing bilingual stop signs on provincial roads in some Acadian communities this summer. “This is an historic moment for our province that strengthens our commitment to French language and culture in Acadian communities,” said Acadian Affairs and Francophonie Minister Lena Metlege Diab. “As part of the province’s Culture Action Plan, we continue to work with communities to find new ways to acknowledge and celebrate our diverse, inclusive province.” In 2019, a group of young Acadian students from Clare met with government representatives including Clare-Digby MLA Gordon Wilson, as part of their project to introduce bilingual stop signs in the Municipality of Clare. This regulation change mirrors other francophone communities in Canada


where bilingual stop signs have been introduced to support, reflect and celebrate francophone language and culture. “We applaud the initiative of these young students, their teachers and La Société acadienne de Clare. They have demonstrated commitment to citizenship and making meaningful change, not just in their community, but across the province, said .Lloyd Hines, Transportation and Active Transit Minister “I am very proud of the work the students have done. It was a very enriching experience for them. Not only have they learned how different levels of government work, they have learned how to be agents of change. I hope that they will continue to participate in civic engagement as they become adults and continue to be active members of their communities,” said Natalie Robichaud, executive director, la Société acadienne de Clare

ing more than $2.3 million in this project through the Rural and Northern Communities Infrastructure stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. “Investments in road upgrades for rural communities like the project we are announcing today will not only help Islanders stay connected but it will also support our various industries. As we build back better, Canada’s infrastructure plan

invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across the country, and builds stronger, safer, and more resilient communities,” said The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence and Member of Parliament for Cardigan, on behalf of the Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND Canada and PEI invest in road upgrades across the province The health and safety of Canadians are top priorities for the governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island. Investments in Prince Edward Island’s infrastructure during this extraordinary time provide an opportunity to create jobs, economic growth, and make our communities more sustainable and resilient. On August 12, the Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence and Member of Parliament for Cardigan; the Honourable Wayne Easter, Member of the Joint Interparliamentary Council and Member of Parliament for Malpeque; Robert Morrissey, Member of Parliament for Egmont, on behalf of the Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development, and the Honourable James Aylward, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, announced funding for road upgrades across the province. The project will see approximately five kilometres of construction and 36 kilometres of rehabilitation on local roads across Prince Edward Island. New construction will include placing borrows, granular materials and asphalt, and the rehabilitation work will include asphalt resurfacing. The project aims to improve connections between communities through increased road quality and durability that will extend their life expectancy for many years to come. The governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island are each investautoatlantic.com

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39


Truckers Corner

TRUST IN TRUCKING By Dana Smith

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HAT IS TRUST? IT’S A F I R M B E LI E F I N THE RELIABILITY, TRUTH, ABILIT Y, OR STRENGTH OF SOMEONE OR SOMETHING. Trust is something that has to be earned, not given. There are many different ideas of what trust is. Why is it important? In trucking, trust is a very powerful thing. It starts with a good company culture, good leadership, corporate image, and follows right down through to the front lines of your business, which includes all levels of management. You may think to yourself, why do I care about this?

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I sell a product or service to my customers that they need and I am the solution. You should care, because your product or service isn’t important without the trust factor behind it. Imagine that you go into a grocery store and want to purchase a product off the shelf. Let’s say it is a carton of milk. There are many different brands and types of milk there. What makes you want to buy a certain one? Is it the pretty colours of the packaging? The price? Because you have always bought that brand? Whatever the case is, you trust that the milk you buy will taste like it always has, look like it always does, and has the quality that you have come to expect from that brand. Your purchase is actually built on the trust that the company will provide what they say they will provide. If the milk doesn’t do all of these things or there is something wrong with it, chances are you will not buy it the next time. The trust has now been broken and you will most likely

move on to another brand. When this happens, it is very hard to regain that trust back. In trucking, it works the same way. Recruitment of new drivers is one such area of your business that requires that very same trust factor. There is an old saying, “say what you mean, mean what you say”. As we look harder and harder to find new drivers, it becomes more and more important to be honest and upfront with new hires. This will build that trust and retain your drivers longer. Imagine answering an ad for a driving job, talk to the recruiter and he/she tells you that you can run as many miles as you want, you can be home whenever you like, and pick from the lanes you want. You can make “X” amount of money, of which is usually inflated to look better, and they will give you a brand new truck to drive. Sounds like a pretty good job doesn’t it. You get to the interview only to find


Truckers Corner

out that the job isn’t what they told you. A big disappointment for sure. Not only will that driver go and tell 10 other people about the experience, maybe even tell their buddies not to go to your company, but it will erode the trust they may have had with your company. Also, the positive feelings they have, or had about recruiters being up front, are gone. This will carry forward to the next

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company. There is nothing worse than someone telling you what you want to hear or something that isn’t true. In the trucking industry, everyone talks to each other. People from different companies know each other, and are often great friends throughout their career. Some even move around to different companies over the years. It doesn’t take very long for a companies reputation and culture to be tainted by non-trust issues with drivers or other employees. Recruiting is just one area, but you can see how things can take a turn for the worst very quickly. Corporate image with the public is another example of building trust in general. It’s your name on the side of every truck and trailer you own. Every time your equipment leaves the yard, there is a potential for negative or positive trust issues depending on how your team operates the equipment. Professional operators will have a positive impact on how the public views your company. If they are non-professional operators, the potential for something unsafe too happen is a lot higher. Therefor the general public looses trust in the safety

around your company. You never know who is in the car beside you. They could be a present or potential customer. How do you build trust with potential new hires and people outside your company? • • • • • • •

Be consistent Be upfront & honest from the start. Keep your word Communicate effectively Be professional Value your team Live your culture

Doing these few things will help you build trust with all your potential employees. When a driver has trust in you, to lead and value them, they will go above and beyond and be your companies best advocate. They will promote your company to their friends, family, and total strangers. This includes other drivers. Whether you’re a large or small transportation business, and are looking for help connecting to your driving force to build trust, contact us today at info@ themindfultrucker.com to see how we can help you.


Industry News

‘A WELL-OILED MACHINE’ RHINO TRUCK LUBE CENTRES PROMISE QUALITY, CONVENIENCE AND CARE AS THEY EXPAND ACROSS ATLANTIC CANADA AND BEYOND

By Kristen Lipscombe

WE’RE NOT JUST CHANGING OIL. WE’RE CHANGING THE INDUSTRY.”

That’s the bright yellow tagline that pops up on the website for brand new company Rhino Truck Lube Centres, which just opened up its first location in Moncton, N.B.; and is in the midst of expanding its second site to Dartmouth, N.S.; and next up to Woodstock, Ont.; and eventually, across the entire country. But what exactly is Rhino doing differently within an oil change industry that has been around for decades? Well, the company’s logo hints at its big picture purpose. “We really wanted something that was big and robust,” explained John O’Donnell, vice-president of operations and marketing for Just Lubes, Ltd., which oversees Jiffy Lube locations across Ontario and Atlantic Canada, and is now leading the charge on growing the Rhino brand. “The logo and the name came out of the shape of a truck, so you kind of see the trailer and the cab,” O’Donnell described of what inspired the unique design. You see, Rhino Truck Lube Centres is about to fill a large gap in the transportation industry, because its locations are meant to serve, well, large vehicles. It’s the brain child of O’Donnell and his entrepreneur partners in the Jiffy Lube business. “There really isn’t, especially in Atlantic Canada, anything that is quick or convenient for the heavy-duty big rig trucks – for their oil changes,” O’Donnell said.

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“It’s a concept that we’ve seen done in the United States, but really no one here has done it. There are a few shops in Ontario and Alberta, but that’s about it, so we really want to give the drivers a true convenient oil change option.” Rhino is like Jiffy Lube, but for vehicles ranging from long-haul transport trucks, to dump trucks and snow plows, to school buses and motor homes, with the goal of saving drivers as much time as possible in the most convenient way possible. “Time is money,” O’Donnell said of the professional truck drivers who often have no choice but to stop by dealerships dedicated to large vehicles for both regular maintenance and emergency services, which can take them hours away from their intended routes. “With our concept, they literally drive the truck and trailer into the bay and they don’t have to unhook,” O’Donnell explained. “Rhino Truck Lube Centres; we save you time.” “We can change the oil, we can do all the grease that’s required on the truck and trailer, we can change their fuel filters, and any other kind of quick service fluid exchange, like anti-freeze, so really all of their maintenance items that really need to be looked at, at least once a month, with the amount of driving that they do,” he said. “And they can be in and out in 45 minutes.” Rhino Truck Lube Centres are also an excellent option for recreational vehicle (RV) owners who are starting to get back on the road to discover new adventures as COVID-19 restrictions are slowly lifted across the country. “Canadians are travelling again and (many of us have) been vaccinated, so it’s really fit for everything from RVs to big

18-wheeler trucks that are hauling all the goods to major retailers like Costco and Walmart, and for the local fleets as well. There is so much road and infrastructure work going on, so there are more construction vehicles on the road.” Rhino opened its first location this summer in Moncton. It’s conveniently located on Venture Drive off Exit 462 in New Brunswick, conveniently located next to the impressive and modern Truck Stop Plus Moncton, which offers a wide range of amenities for small and big rigs alike. Those services now include lubrication, filtration, inspection and more with the addition of business partner Rhino on site. “The location is right off the highway where there are a 100 trucks parked every night,” O’Donnell said. “It was really a nobrainer for us.” “Moncton is really the hub for warehousing, so that’s why we started there,” he added. The company hopes to work with the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association to host a trucker appreciation day site in early September, featuring a barbecue, prizes and giveaways as “just a great way to introduce professional drivers to the site.” The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA), along with all provincial trucking associations, hold National Trucking Week starting the first Sunday every September. Rhino’s second site is set to open for business this November in Dartmouth’s Burnside Industrial Park, with a similar opening ceremony to take place, of course following any COVID restrictions in place. “That site is large,” O’Donnell said. “It will have two truck lube bays and two truck car wash bays, so we’ll have quite a bit of capacity there.” Burnside Industrial Park is chalk full


Industry News

of warehouses and truck traffic, he said, “so we feel that location will be really convenient for the drivers.” “There’s no truck wash in Nova Scotia,” O’Donnell added. “They were having to go all the way to Moncton, except for one mobile unit (that is available in the area).” At all of Rhino’s shops, including the

soon-to-be Dartmouth location, there is an important focus on environmentally sustainable practices, O’Donnell emphasized. “So with our truck wash, the way the system works is, it’s a massive catch basin and then it recycles the water, cleans it, purifies it and we reuse that in the wash, so it’s very environmentally friendly.” “All of our waste oil that comes out of the trucks, and fluids, that’s all picked up and recycled as well, so everything is selfcontained,” O’Donnell said, adding, Shell is a key partner. “Care for the environment is key for us.” Along with thinking green, quality service and complete convenience, O’Donnell said safety is also a significant consideration in how Rhino is constructing its centres. “There are so many more women drivers now, and I think that is a really important part; that they feel that they are in a safe environment,” he said. “It’s very professional; it’s not some shop in an industrial park way off the highway that they have to go to. It’s on the highway; it’s clean; it’s convenient; it’s professional.” A convenience many truckers will appreciate is being able to get a drive-thru oil change and a quick Tim Hortons stop in at the same time. “You don’t even have to get out of the truck if you don’t want to. There’s WIFI in the centre so the truck driver can update his (or her) electronic log book while we preform the service and that’s really our key differentiator – time.” As the Rhino website, www.rhinotrucklubecentre.com, states, “after 30plus years in the business of quick lube and care, our management team knows one thing for sure – exactly what it takes to become a well-oiled machine.” “We can envision having 10 to 12 centres across Canada within the next three to five years,” O’Donnell said, pointing to American company Speedco, the largest similar company south of the border, as an ideal business model for Rhino. “You picture the Trans-Canada Highway with all of those locations,” he said. “Whether they’re taking fresh fruit from B.C. to Winnipeg, or goods and services from Toronto to Newfoundland, those large fleets exist coast to coast throughout North America.” And those solid and dotted highway lines you picture travelling down the centre of the entire Trans-Canada? Well, they’re reflected in the Rhino logo, too. “The yellow represents the yellow lines of the highway,” O’Donnell said, “so you’ve got the black pavement and the yellow line. It has been a really fun process.”

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Around the Atlantic

“JUST UNTIL FOREVER”: CANCER, COVID CAN’T STOP SAINT JOHN NAPA SHOP FROM SERVING, SMILING – AND SINGING

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By Kristen Lipscombe

HEN DANNY JOYCE W A S 18 Y E A R S O L D, H E ASKED THE OWNERS OF A CLOSED DOWN TEXACO SERVICE STATION IN HIS HOMETOWN OF SAINT JOHN, N.B., IF HE COULD BUY THE SHOP. They refused to entertain the enthusiastic young teen’s offer. A year later, the persistent then 19-year-old made his ambitious proposal again, pointing out that “it’s still closed, so why don’t you give me a shot?” So they did. “I had a nice little Corvette car, and I sold that, and I took that money and I bought myself a load of gas, and a load

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of oil and a new tire balancer, and a new changer, and still had a few dollars left over, and we went to work – and we’ve been here ever since.” “Ever since” is 44 years, to be exact. Co-owners Danny and wife Sharon work as a team both at home and in the workplace, which had its name changed appropriately to Joyce’s Corner, Ltd. With four and a half decades of family dedication behind it, the NAPA AUTOPRO shop located on Wellesley Avenue has a loyal following of local customers that now span generations. “I’ve had a lot of my customers for 44 years,” Danny said, “and then I have their children, and now I have their children’s children coming in!” At the end of the day, “it doesn’t matter who walks through the door,” Danny said. “You do the best you can for each customer.” He also emphasized that he refers to his four staff members working the bays

as mechanics, not technicians. He admits to being old school with the terminology. “We don’t just put stuff on; we try to fix it and then see if we can make it work.” Danny also likes to stay “in the bay and fix cars and talk to people.” He’s a great talker, and very friendly, a trait that comes across clearly speaking to him over the phone. That sparkling personality has surely helped him retain all of those loyal customers. “My wife does everything else,” the now 64-year-old Danny said of his younger business partner (she’s 63) that also happens to be his “high school sweetheart.” “She orders the parts, makes up the bills, pays the bills, makes sure the boys gets paid, looks after the boys in the bay, and basically takes care of everything else.” One of the Joyce’s three children works in the shop, 27-year-old Brad, who is learning the ropes to see if he likes the


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business. “I don’t push anything ever, I just let them go with the flow and if it feels good, fine,” Danny said. Meanwhile, 30-year-old Dan is a sales representative and 26-year-old Christina is a licensed practical nurse (LPN). Danny and Sharon are proud of all of their chosen career paths. Finding passion and positivity in life – no matter the circumstances – is important to the Joyce family, and that includes activities outside of work. For Danny, one such hobby is singing. And not just singing in the shower, but singing national anthems at both small town and big-time hockey games. “I do a little singing here and there,” Danny admitted. In fact, he’s sang his heart out at countless local minor hockey games, for the former Saint John Flames of the American Hockey League (AHL), for the current Saint John Sea Dogs of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) – and most recently, for his favourite team of all-time. After Danny was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, his son Dan reached out to the Calgary Flames and got him a gig singing the Canadian national anthem virtually before a game against the Montreal Canadians. It was for a National Hockey League (NHL) cancer awareness campaign. “I got into a health issue there back in February,” Danny described. “I was diagnosed with cancer; a tumor on my esophagus, so I had to go for the radiation and the chemotherapy… So I missed a few months of work and then I had a pretty big surgery done and that put me back.” Sharon kept the shop running while Danny battled. “My wife came to work every morning at quarter-to-eight and the guys were so good with her. They made sure everything got done. All my customers knew what was going on… they were really good about it.” But getting to step onto a fresh sheet of ice at TD Station, formerly known as Harbour Station, the major Saint John arena, as the spotlight shone down as he belted it out for his Flames live on Hockey Night in Canada – now that’s a cure that can’t be beat. “I got a call from George Canyon, the country singer,” Danny recalled. “He’s the one who does the anthem for the Calgary Flames and he’s the one who had to ‘okay’ it to let me step in and do it that night. And as soon as it aired, about 10 minutes later, he called me at home to tell me what a great job I did. He talked to me for a half an hour about everything under the sun… and he invited me to go out next year to Calgary and do it again right at the Saddledome!” Currently, Danny can only work half-days, coming into Joyce’s Corner to help where he can every morning, but he loses weight throughout the day due to stomach complications, although he is slowly gaining his health and strength back. “It just goes to show you how loyal the customers are and how loyal the employers are, when they can pick up the slack because I’m not here. They still get everything done.” And Sharon, “she manages to get it done and keeps smiling the whole time.” Despite his health struggles, Danny’s own energy radiates while speaking with Auto and Trucking Atlantic. You can almost hear him smiling, too. That positivity also radiated through television screens across the continent, as he ended his epic performance by giving a “thumbs up” to his captive audience. “All over town, wherever I go now,” Danny chuckles, “people give me the thumbs up all the time.” As for how much longer Danny plans to keep running Joyce’s Corner? “Just until forever.”


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Bill Hamilton of Middle Sackville, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is October 26th, 2021

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME:

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

JULY 2021 WINNER!

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bike brand

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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Best wishes go to Corrina McPhee of Lower Sackville, NS, who correctly answered: “A new syle Mini Cooper . . .” Thank you to all who entered our contest, keep trying, you could be next!

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Profile for Auto & Trucking Atlantic

ATA September / October 2021  

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