ATA Nov / Dec 2023

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auto CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS

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NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2022 $5.95

WHAT HAPPENED TO CIVILITY? (PAGE 14)

THE WAIT IS OVER! ARAAC 2022 CONFERENCE (PAGE 28)

CRIME IN TRUCKING (SEE PAGE 39)

WIN PRIZES!!!

A RUST CHECK ONE TIME TREATMENT OR A STANLEY 123-PIECE SOCKET SET FROM NAPA!

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atlantic VOLUME TWENTY TWO • ISSUE 6 • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER • 2022

DEPARTMENTS Page 4

EDITOR’S LETTER – The more things change . . .

E-mail us: rob@autoatlantic.com

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Mail us: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane Bedford, NS B3M 0H5 Canada

WOMEN AND WHEELS – Ellen Voie asks a very simple question: What happened to civility?

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – New Brunswick unveils its three-year Road Ahead plan.• More!

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ELECTRIC AVENUE – Volvo Study Finds Test Driving Electric Cars Increases Adoption and Purchase Consideration: Wouldja believe 77% of all Canadian drivers have never touched an EV? This and other tidbits revealed here.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – A new world record for the fastest car…driven in reverse!

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 44 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers (902) 452-0345 rob@autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com SALES MANAGER Dan Hillier (902) 999-1027 dan@autoatlantic.com

SPOTLIGHT: THE RUDE REALITIES OF CANADIAN CAR THEFT Page 6

GRAND THEFT AUTO – Think your car is theft-proof? Think again! As automotive technology has evolved, so has the means to steal it, writes Carter Hammett.

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TALK OF THE TOWN – Sean Maddox finds that getting information out of the authorities regarding car theft is like…milking mice. He does however, find a nice bunch of resources to share with readers.

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CRIME IN TRUCKING – Our very own Mindful Trucker Dana Smith offers tips and solutions to keep your truck running smoothly and that much safer…

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FEATURES

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TELL ME, TEACH ME INVOLVE ME - It’s no secret that current values put a lot of emphasis on lifelong learning. Paul D’Adamo on how this benefits the automotive industry.

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FIX WELCOMES FIRST GRADUATES OF ITS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM – The leaders of tomorrow are celebrated today in new training program.

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ARAAC’S FIRST CONFERENCE IN THREE YEARS A WINNER – The Automotive Recyclers Association of Atlantic Canada welcomes its members back to the land of the living.

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TIRE AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN PROGRAM’S PATHWAY TO SUCCESS – A free eight-week program is proving to be a game changer for learners. By Kastin Bradley.

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PROTECTING YOUR LEGACY – Sylvain Seguin on the practical choices involved in passing the torch to the next generation of shop owners.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Marty Seto

Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, Nova Scotia B3M 0H5. Tel: 902.452.0345. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40062985 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5.

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Letter from the Editor

THE STAGES OF CHANGE

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By Carter Hammett

HEY SAY “CHANGE BEGINS AT THE END OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE” AND REALLY, THAT’S WHERE GROWTH BEGINS. At ATA, we are reinventing ourselves and growing our digital presence during this period of change. A scant few months ago Postmedia announced that nine urban dailies across the country would stop printing Monday editions beginning October 17. The cuts to the nine-- ranging from the The Vancouver Sun to The Montreal Gazette-reflect a number of rude realities experienced by the Canadian publishing industry for decades now. In a statement, Postmedia spokesperson Phyllise Gelfand said that the cuts “reflect the rapidly changing news consumption habits of our readers, the needs of our advertisers and the escalating costs of printing and delivering a printed product.” This move means that The Toronto Star, Toronto Sun, Winnipeg Sun, Journal de Montreal and Journal de Quebec will be the last remaining dailies to publish seven days a week. Not even The Globe

and Mail publishes that frequently. Heritage Canada states that over 450 news outlets have shut down since 2008 — including 60 during the last two years alone. Part of the reason for this sea of change is the fact that the majority of ad revenues have moved away from print and moved on to digital platforms and other social media. Shockingly, but not surprisingly, is the fact that in 2020, 80 per cent of all online advertising was gobbled up by only two tech giants: Facebook and Google. As of this writing, Bill C-18 is being developed — and if passed — would require tech corporations to dish out fair compensation to media outlets for news that is shared on their platforms. Furthermore, journalistic independence, investment in a range of news outlets, and fair pay are just some of the criteria currently being reviewed. So what does all this information have to do with your favourite automotive magazine you ask? Your friends at Auto and Trucking Atlantic (ATA) are not immune to what’s been going on across Canada for many years now. We’ve had to look at the facts and weigh these against some harsh realities while considering options.

Happily, a plan is in place and we think you’ll like where we’re going. Our post-pandemic publishing strategy will see us evolve into a more digital centric publisher — to serve the needs of our readers better and to lower our carbon footprint. Beginning in 2023, ATA we’ll be morphing into a largely digital presence. We’ll continue to publish a bi-monthly bi-monthly magazine but digitally. We’ll also be supplementing our content with 12 digital newsletters per year. Two magazine format issues, Spring and Fall, will remain paper-based. To help with this digital strategy (and adhere to current spam laws in Canada) we need you to sign up for a digital subscription of the magazine so you can continue getting the latest and greatest from us to help grow your business. We are offering the “Score Big with ATA” contest with prizes to digital subscribers that includes two tickets to a CHL game plus accommodation. Other prizes include gift certificates from NAPA and Rust Check.

SCORE BIG WITH OUR DIGITAL ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE!! Please go to our subscription page at this link to enter . . . autoatlantic.com/ subscription We are also refreshing our website so you can get all your content on your smartphone or computer anytime you need it. You can access two years of back issues of the magazine on the website, as well! We believe this is a step in the right direction, and one that reflects the times we’re living in. Hopefully you will too, as we climb aboard this new and strange future that moves us forward. With that, we thank you for all your support, feedback, and look forward to the places we hope these changes leads us to. Cheers to new beginnings!

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GRAND TH ON AVERAGE, A CAR IS STOLEN ONCE EVERY SIX MINUTES IN CANADA; ONCE EVERY HOUR IF YOU LIVE IN TORONTO. AND WHILE SPAIN REMAINS THE WORLD LEADER IN VEHICLE THEFTS, THIS TYPE OF CRIMINAL ACTIVITY IS ON THE UPSWING IN OUR COUNTRY. WHY DO CARS GET STOLEN AND WHAT IS BEING DONE ABOUT IT?

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HEFT AUTO! “W

By Carter Hammett

HERE T H E

HELL’S MY CAR?” BY ALL ACCOUNTS IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN A FAIRLY TYPICAL EVENING FOR JOANNE CAMERON. THAT IS, UNTIL SHE ARRIVED AT HER TORONTO HOME LATE ONE NIGHT ONLY TO DISCOVER SOMETHING MISSING. Her 1991 Honda Civic had been stolen. At the time Cameron was working in a bar owned by her family when she came home around 3:30 am. She wondered why anyone would want to steal it. After phoning the police who reportedly said “good luck finding it,” they did. The very next day. The car was located about an hour away near the town of Hamilton sitting in the middle of a field. It was covered in food wrappers all over the interior, “and it looked like they drove into a few things,” says Cameron. She figures some kids took the car joy riding before abandoning it. That didn’t remove the feelings of violation, followed by the anger that followed. That anger was intensified after calling her insurance company only to be told by an adjuster that the vehicle was a write-off.

ON AVERAGE, A CAR IS STOLEN EVERY SIX MINUTES IN CANADA. According to data from the Ontario Provincial Police 60% are considered “transportation crimes” (stolen and abandoned) with the remainder absorbed into organized auto theft. The cost of auto theft to the public is an estimated $1.2 billion per year, which works out to about $48 per insurance policy holder.

Worse is the 40-to-65 deaths directly resulting from auto theft on an annual basis. “Because of supply chain issues and the increased cost of vehicles, both new and used are more valuable to thieves. As a result, consumers are more prone to having their vehicle stolen and should take extra steps to ensure they don’t fall victim to theft,” says licensed insurance broker Steven Harris. There’s several reasons why car theft is prevalent, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada (ibc.ca). This includes joy riding such as Joanne Cameron may have experienced. This tends to be a motive for younger thieves who sometimes steal for the simple thrill of “getting away with it.” Another common motive for stealing cars is that they will be used as a getaway vehicle for further crime. These cars can be utilized and then dumped with only the slimmest chance of locating the thief who took it. The most common reason for car theft is to make money from spare parts. These can be rapidly sold for a fair chunk of change, again with little chance of it being traced back to either thief or the chop shop that bought them. And in case you’re wondering, yes, the pandemic has played a role in the recent and national upswing in car thefts. “There are two outcomes of the pandemic that played into the increase in car theft,” says Steven Harris. “The first outcome is the financial climate in Canada. In times when there is financial strain, the insurance industry sees an uptick in fraud activity. The second outcome was the shortage of chips required for vehicle production. The shortage led to reduced vehicle inventory, which caused a material increase in vehicle pricing for new and used vehicles. In summary, we have a climate where fraud is more prevalent and increased vehicle values are globally higher. Vehicle theft is an attractive pursuit for organized crime.”

ONTARIO IS CANADA’S “CAR THEFT

CAPITAL” Ontario leads the way for most car thefts says Emily Vu, Director, Communications with Équité Association (equiteassociation.com) , a national organization with a vision of preventing insurance fraud .. In 2020--the most recent year available for this data, which includes cars, trucks, SUVs, motorcycles and trailers—almost 25,000 vehicles were stolen in Ontario alone. This was followed by Alberta (19,215 vehicles stolen), Quebec (11,505) and British Columbia (10,359). In the Atlantic provinces New Brunswick clocks in at numero uno with 1501 vehicles reported stolen in 2020. This is followed by Nova Scotia in second place (930), Newfoundland (488) and PEI (108). Incidentally, the Maritime area reported the fewest number of car thefts in the country. Overall, car theft declined by a full 10 per cent compared to 2019, but when we look at the number of stolen vehicles relative to the overall population we can determine that vehicle theft affected the central provinces most. Interestingly Alberta takes the number one spot with an index of 54.84 stolen cars per 10,000 residents, followed by Saskatchewan (45.01) and Manitoba (40.51). Compare this to Ontario (17.07 cars stolen per 10,000 population) and the Atlantic provinces combined (12.22) and we can see the areas least affected by car theft. But what vehicles appear to be most attractive to car thieves? In 2020 the most commonly-stolen car was the 2018 Honda CR-V 4DR AWD. Runner-up was the 2017 Lexus RX350/RX450h, with the 2017 Honda CR-V 4DR AWD taking third place. Honda and Lexus are the two brands that appeared to be most favoured by thieves. Toyota has two models in the Top 10 with Ford and Dodge making appearances as well. “The types of vehicles being stolen will vary from province to province”, says Harris. “In Alberta for example, a top 10 autoatlantic.com

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Crime Prevention

vehicle theft list will have more pickup trucks vs. Ontario which would typically have more luxury SUVs. Province-to-province, the rate of theft will vary as well, even when compared relative to population.” Trucks aren’t exempt from the rude realities of theft either. According to Otip. com, Ford trucks—including both the F250 and F350 models--have been the most frequently stolen vehicles in Canada. In 2019 Ford “scored” eight of the top ten most commonly stolen vehicles in Canada during 2019. Why is this? Part of the reason stems from the fact that many older Ford vehicles lack sufficient anti-theft technology that new vehicles have. Since 2007 when immobilizer systems, which prevent hot-wiring was mandated, vehicles have been far more difficult to steal. Ford trucks are also in high demand since they tend to be unavailable for purchase in several countries around the world therefore they tend to have a high resale value. “When we look at auto theft increase we see in numbers the volume being

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shipped overseas,” says Michael Slack, Director of Case Management in Ontario and Atlantic Canada. “Theft in Alberta versus New Brunswick is going to be very different in Quebec or Ontario” he says. “The opportunities are being driven by a foreign demand for vehicles with a high resale value. When broken down by region, the Chevy GMC Silverado series tends to be the most in-demand vehicle of choice in the Atlantic Region. “Theft of Opportunity” Interestingly, Slack says that there’s an almost 80 percent recovery rate of car theft in Alberta. Within Atlantic Canada theft recovery figure sits at about 70 percent. In Ontario the recovery rate is less than 50 per cent. “There’s a very sophisticated network of criminal groups who are stealing cars, cooling them off and then eventually shipping them overseas to places like Ghana and Nigeria.” Slack says that part of the the challenge for law enforcement is the fact that there are differing laws that tend to vary by country. Sometimes cars are easy to repatriate if the vehicle’s still in a container,

then the insurance company becomes the actual owner of the vehicle. In some cases, vehicles are shipped back and sold at auction. “It really depends on where the vehicle has been recovered from,” says Slack. Even when police do make an arrest, it’s usually just the actual thief who gets caught. Sometimes police are tasked with working their way up the theft hierarchy, which requires a much longer investigation. In other cases the issue rests on resource allocation. “The priority in the G.T.A. (Greater Toronto Area) is violence, opioids and other competing priorities,” says Slack. “There’s limitations as to what the police can do, which limits the resources that can be devoted to vehicle theft. “There used to be provincial divisions dedicated to auto theft, but now only York and Peel have these. Toronto Police has just started a Unit that will include auto thefts as part of its mandate.” While there have not been any significant auto theft increases in Atlantic Canada in the last few years, Slack suggests that one group can have a signifi-


cant impact in some jurisdictions where spikes in theft are identified. For example back in 2012 Nova Scotia reported a 300 unit increase in auto thefts. However, with steady increases in both Ontario and Quebec, trends suggest the presence of more sophisticated theft networks at play. So what’s the solution to the problem? Slack says that with sophisticated criminal activity, a multi-level approach needs to be taken. “Vehicle owners need to be aware of their community. When people are warming up their cars, they leave the vehicle unattended and this provides an opportunity for thieves, says Slack. Other prevention strategies include keeping your vehicle in the garage, putting up physical barriers and implementing technological solutions such as motion sensors. But thieves are keeping up with technology as well, says Slack. In August of this year, a phenomenon called relay technology resulted in the theft of three Dodge Ram Pickups in the city of Kitchener, an hour west of Toronto. A lot of consumers don’t want to use keys anymore, so in response manufacturers have incorporated push button start technology and keyless entry in high-end vehicles. Relay technology enables a potential thief to detect a key fob signal from inside a residence which gets transferred back outside to unlock, start and make off with a car. There’s storage boxes known as Faraday cages that prevent certain types of electromagnetic radiation from entering or exiting the unit. These have a fairly common presence in hospitals and even in your kitchen, and some are better than others. However, reprogramming technology can be used to solve that particular problem. Once thieves have forced their way into a vehicle, they can use an electronic device to access the vehicle’s diagnostics. The thief can then reprogram a blank key so the vehicle can be activated. Another process gaining in popularity among thieves is something called “revinning,” which involves fraudulent registration of a vehicle. In this case, criminals obtain a VIN number from another car and sell it as a legitimate vehicle. Drivers can then purchase a vehicle with a completely fictitious number and have no idea that they are purchasing stolen property. There’s no question that manufacturers need to do more to engineer more solutions to vulnerabilities” says Slack. Likewise, local law enforcement and Canada



Crime Prevention

Customs need to do more at the local, provincial, national and international levels. “There needs to be a concerted effort at all levels,” he says

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE INSURANCE LEVEL? Another question remains: what’s the impact of vehicle theft on insurance? If you have the right insurance in place auto theft should be covered, says Gloria Haydock, Manager of Consumer and Industry Relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC). Theft generally isn’t included in basic car insurance quotes, however there are usually several choices of optional packages that can be purchased including comprehensive insurance and specified perils coverage that will contribute to the cost of replacing a stolen vehicle, stolen or damaged parts and/or repairing damages resulting from vehicle theft or break-in. On average, according to thinkinsure.ca, it takes about 11 days to recover a stolen vehicle and about 30 percent are recovered with damage done. If the car isn’t recovered, this is considered a total loss. Your insurance company will determine the actual cash value which is the

basis of settlement of your claim, but you typically won’t be reimbursed for the car’s original value. Another option is something called “all perils” which,” on top of theft protection, protects against loss if the vehicle is stolen by someone residing in the same household,” says Haydock. Other packages include “specified perils” which enables a purchasers to add a specific peril. Haydock states first to confirm that your car has actually been stolen. If it has, to “call the police as soon as possible and then call in a claim to your insurance company. “You’ll be speaking with an adjuster who gets details of the vehicle itself, including mileage, condition of the vehicles, marks or any additions to the car, maintenance and invoices,” she says. The Adjuster will request a police report and make an assessment on the value in the event a vehicle hasn’t been recovered.” She says. Some of the more interesting details of insurance, include the fact that personal items left in the car—such as tools or golf clubs - are generally not covered by your auto insurance policy. These personal

items may be eligible for coverage under your home or tenant insurance policy, subject to your deductible. With baby seats, some insurers will cover these under your auto policy, but speak with your insurance representative to confirm. Haydock says that insurance policies around trucks are the same as with most cars. Regardless of whether it’s a car or truck that’s been stolen, it’s still difficult not to feel some level of violation says Joanne Cameron. And yet, her biggest frustration from dealing with the theft remained with her insurance company. “The adjuster said the car was a write-off,” and they initially declined to pay me,” she says. “So I went back to my mechanic and got a print out that proved to the insurance company that I had regular maintenance on it and they agreed to pay me. “The biggest lesson I learned from this is that it’s easiest to stick with one mechanic and that you need to ask for specifics. This makes it easier to get paperwork to prove the car is worth more than they say, They’ll try to lowball you and you need to prove the car’s worth it.”



Crime Prevention

REDUCING CAR THEFT: HOW TO REDUCE THE RISK OF VEHICLE THEFT: When parking your vehicle: • Turn ignition off and TAKE the keys with you • Park in a well-lighted, attended area if possible • Lock all valuables in your trunk • Completely close and lock doors and windows • Turn your wheels to the side to make it harder to tow When at home: • If you have a garage, use it and lock it • If you have a rear-wheel drive car, back into driveway • If you have a front-wheel drive car, park front end first • Always set the emergency brake • Don’t leave the ownership or insurance cards in the vehicle when unattended • Drop business cards or address labels inside doors to assist with vehicle identification Other important tips • Never hide a spare key in the vehicle, thieves know where to find it • Be aware of your surroundings while driving and drive with your doors locked • Be aware when purchasing a vehicle. If the deal sounds too good to be true-It probably is! If your vehicle is stolen... • Report the theft to the police immediately

If your car or accessories are stolen, the police will need specific information to identify the car, parts and accessories.

You should record the following: • Year and Make, Model, Colour(s) • Licence Number • Vehicle Identification Number • Serial numbers of all special equipment • Special markings - dents, scratches, other damage etc. Invest in vehicle protection whenever possible Ignition Kill Switch - Toggle switch spliced into ignition that disables your vehicle. Fuel Kill Switch - Switch spliced into fuel system wiring that halts fuel supply to your vehicle. Steering Wheel Lock - Prevents steering wheel from turning. Gearshift Lock - Locks gearshift in place, disables shifting transmission. Tire/Wheel Locks - Tool wraps around tire/wheel to immobilize vehicle. Hood Locks - Prevents access to vehicle engine parts. Steering Column Collar - Protects steering column from ignition entry. Electronic Alarms - Alarms with kill switches are the most effective. Vehicle Tracking Systems - A transmitter in your vehicle enables your vehicle to be tracked electronically. Source: Toronto Police Service: To Serve and Protect.

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Women and Wheels

WHAT HAPPENED TO CIVILITY? By Ellen Voie

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HE WORD CIVILITY IS DEFINED AS FORMAL POLITENESS AND COURTESY IN BEHAVIOR OR SPEECH. ITS ORIGIN IS THE WORD “CIVILITAS” WHICH RELATES TO CITIZENS. Words aligned with civility include courtesy, politeness, good manners, graciousness, and respect. The Institute for Civility in Government goes beyond this definition to include “disagreement without disrespect.” What does that mean? It means we can hold opposing views while still recognizing the other person’s opinions as valid and deeply held. For those who have studied language in some capacity, you may be familiar with some of the arguments people use to discredit others. One of them is called the Ad hominem argument, which is a personal attack. You can see this tactic used in politics every day. Instead of addressing the statement, the speaker instead denigrates the other person’s character or motive to undermine the statement. Children use the Ad hominem argument all the time. I recall my niece choosing the name Rose for her doll and another little girl told her she was stupid

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for her selection. With children we can teach them to be more respectful, but once we’re adults, we should already hold these values to create a more pleasant environment. Visit any Facebook group and you’ll see some nasty comments directed at other posters. It’s called keyboard courage when you are just an anonymous icon hiding behind a long line of bitter and angry people. I’ve never understood the attraction in hurting another person, even if you don’t know them personally. What satisfaction does a person get from being mean? Many of us learned the adage, “If you can’t say something nice, say nothing at all.” I have bitten my lip to keep in some of the negative thoughts I would like to share so I am not lowered to the level of those who enjoy shooting electronically charged daggers. The trucking industry is a close community. Drivers really are good at connecting with one another, both in person and through technology. In the past, the CB radio was the most common method of interaction. Now, drivers use apps and websites and especially social media to find common ground with others. Unfortunately, that same venue could be viewed by those outside of our industry and more importantly, many who are considering becoming a part of the supply chain. Yet, what they are seeing is bickering, attacking, denigrating and profanity. What happened to a sisterhood or brotherhood?

Are you looking out for your fellow drivers on the road or at loading docks? Are you being supportive and helpful to encourage and validate others? If so, then I thank you from my bottom of my heart, as we need more civility these days. If you are quick to share a verbal barb or comment on another person in a negative way, why are you doing it? Wouldn’t you prefer to give someone a compliment and see a smile rather than hurt someone and make them unhappy. American President George Washington, hand wrote a list of 110 rules of civility and decent behavior. Many of these rules involve physical etiquette, such as not sneezing on people and others include table manners. However, the first rule is,” every action done in company ought to be with some sign of respect, to those that are present.” Civility begins with you. The next time you’re at a truck stop or a loading dock and you hear a person make a negative comment, ask them to please stop. Many times, people don’t realize how destructive their words can be. Think about how the trucking industry could return to the image in the past of the “Knights of the Road,” view the public held. Let’s make the trucking industry more civil, more accepting, and kinder and more welcoming. Let’s bring back the sisterhood and brotherhood trucking was founded on nearly a century ago. It’s up to you. Ellen Voie is the President and CEO of Women in Trucking.



East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT NEWS AND VIEWS COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO! (YER WELCOME!) NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Tender Issued to Replace Romaine’s River Bridge on Port au Port Highway A tender has been issued to replace Romaine’s River Bridge on the Port au Port Highway, Route 460, in Western Newfoundland. The tender calls for work to construct a new concrete girder, two-span bridge with a concrete deck to be constructed south of the current bridge, the realignment of the highway and the removal of the existing bridge. The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure anticipates construction will begin this winter and will be completed in 2024. This bridge replacement is in addition to more than 40 bridges rehabilitated this construction season, as well as six bridge replacements currently under construction on provincial highways, including Rushy Pond Bridge, Aspen Brook Bridge, and Shoal Harbour River Bridge on the TransCanada Highway; Coots Pond Bridge on Salmonier Line (Route 90); Hughes Brook

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Bridge on North Shore Highway (Route 450); and North River Bridge in Clarke’s Beach (Route 70). Planning continues on the replacement of other bridges on provincial highways. The replacement of Romaine’s River Bridge is in addition to other highway improvements that are set to begin on the Port au Port Peninsula. A contract valued at approximately $1.7 million has also been awarded to Marine Contractors Inc. to pave two kilometres of the Port au Port Highway (Route 460) through the community of Cape St. George and to pave three kilometres on Lourdes Road (Route 463) between Cape St. George and Mainland. Information on tenders issued and awarded by the department and other public bodies is available by visiting www. merx.com/govnl.

NEW BRUNSWICK What is the Road Ahead Plan? Province unveils three-year capital investment plan

The Road Ahead is a 3-Year Capital Investment Plan that outlines how the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DTI) plans to build, repair and maintain our province’s transportation network. It identifies which projects are planned, when they are planned and the overall expected investments. As part of the development of this plan, we have consulted with and listened to New Brunswickers, elected officials and Municipalities. Developing and publishing a 3-Year Capital Investment Plan provides transparency regarding future projects and has several main benefits, including the following: DTI has a defined plan for project implementation over the next three years. The public is informed of when and where work is planned. The transportation industry has the opportunity to plan for upcoming work. Early identification of projects is a large step in efficiently delivering capital programs.



East Coast Road Report

DTI’s 3-Year Capital Investment Plan identifies its planned capital investments in transportation assets as determined by evidence-based tools and documented processes. While there may be a need to modernize and, in some case, expand the highway infrastructure because of the aging infrastructure needs, DTI’s main focus in the foreseeable future is to preserve the existing assets. This is a rolling 3-year plan, which provides projects for the fiscal years 2022 to 2024 and is updated annually to add future years’ projects. The plan forms the basis for the multi-year budget submission and provides a level of detail that helps government understand the financial resources required to finance the identified projects and programs. For more information, visit: The Road Ahead Plan (gnb.ca)

NOVA SCOTIA Support for Emergency Services Providers The Province is investing more than $1 million to help first responder organizations purchase safety equipment needed to help and protect people and com-

munities. “Our volunteer first responders have an essential role in the safety of our communities, and I thank them for their dedication and commitment,” said Municipal Affairs and Housing Minister John Lohr. “They put countless hours into training and responding to emergencies. This funding will help ensure they have the tools and equipment needed to keep them safe.” The Emergency Services Provider Fund offers funding to fire departments and ground search and rescue organizations, including hazardous materials teams, to upgrade QUICK FACTS: 56 organizations are receiving funding under the program this fiscal year categories include personal protective equipment and self-contained breathing apparatus, communications, rescue equipment, miscellaneous firefighting equipment, hazardous materials equipment and emergency power for buildings, organizations can apply every three years, the program provides up to 75 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $20,000

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

CITY TO ADMINISTER PROPERTY CLEAN UP PROGRAM The City of Charlottetown, in partnership with the Provincial Department of Fisheries and Communities, will help administer a new tree clean-up program to support residents with the impact of post-tropical storm Fiona. Specifically, the program will assist residents with cleaning up damaged and fallen trees, along with removing tree debris from their private property. “While work crews continue clean up and recovery efforts across Charlottetown, we know that many residents have suffered significant damage to their private property that must be addressed,” said Charlottetown Mayor Philip Brown. “This City program will provide specialized expertise to assist residents with restoring their properties quickly and safely.” Starting October 11, Charlottetown residents can apply for the new program online or by phone. Next, City staff will assess the applications, conduct site visits and evaluate reported damage in order to prioritize impacted properties. City contracted crews will


then be deployed to address and clear damaged trees from these properties. What the Program Covers: Fiona-related uninsurable losses and damage to residential properties. This includes trees fallen in yards, damaged trees at risk of falling, and basic debris clean up on private property in the City of Charlottetown. What the Program Does Not Cover: • Fallen trees or debris on homes or vehicles. These are considered insurable losses, and homeowners or business owners are responsible for contacting their insurance company to resolve Fiona-related damage to their home or vehicle. • Uninsurable losses and damage to businesses and not-for-profit organizations. • Aesthetic work on private properties, including landscaping or pruning. How to Apply: Charlottetown residents can report storm-related damaged trees online at charlottetown.ca/fiona or by phone at 902.629.2594 during regular business

hours. Please note: Charlottetown residents who have already reported damage through the Province’s online damage reporting tool are being transferred to this new program and do not need to provide their information again. Members of the public who have questions about this program can call 902.629.2594. For All Other Uninsurable Losses: All other damage to uninsurable losses relating to residential properties, small businesses, and not-for-profit organizations not eligible for this new tree clean up program should apply for the Provincial Disaster Financial Assistance Program for Prince Edward Island.

Residents who have already paid for professional services related to cleaning up damaged and fallen trees on their property may also be eligible for the Provincial Disaster Financial Assistance Program for Prince Edward Island. For more information on the Provincial Disaster Financial Assistant Program for Prince Edward Island, administered by the Canadian Red Cross, visit: https:// www.redcross.ca/how-we-help/currentemergency-responses/hurricane-fio na-2022/hurricane-fiona-prince-edwardisland or call 1-833-966-4225. Source: City to Administer Property Clean Up Program - City of Charlottetown


Human Resources

TELL ME, TEACH ME, INVOLVE ME By Paul D’Adamo, RAS “Core Hunter”

EDUCATION IS NOT A COST N A RECENT URG ON THE GO PODCAST, DJ HARRINGTON ASKED ME ABOUT WEIGHING THE COSTS OF TRAINING VERSUS THE BENEFITS.

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My answer was, “There are no costs to education.”Plain and simple, all education is an investment and, if monetized properly, should be considered a profit center. Technically speaking, a profit center would have identifiable revenue and associated costs. But in the big picture, without employees aspiring to be their best and wanting what is best for the company, you have nothing. High-performing, welleducated team members generate boat-

loads of revenue and contribute to the bottom line. Anyone can buy inventory, but the only way to maximize the value of that inventory is to build a team that can support that inventory through the procurement, inventory, dismantling, sales, and post-sales processes

BEN FRANKLIN’S VIEW ON TRAINING AND EDUCATION Ben Franklin once said, “Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will learn”. I have always said that our industry is not one of book worms but immersive learners. Learning in seminars or online followed up by onsite teaching, and hands-on engagement returns higher education and retention rates. ARA University is a phenomenal resource for our industry and should be your go-to source for great online learning. Creating a culture of change where everyone is expected to evolve with the times and challenge themselves with new

skills and knowledge is the key to success. Business owners must be passionate about developing their team members to their highest potential. Don’t get hung up on registration costs for a convention. Spread the love and rotate who goes to the conventions. Consider it a deposit on their advanced degree. With the URG Conference just around the corner, this is not the time to pinch pennies. Invest in your people and reap the rewards of an intensive educational experience in New Orleans.

DJ HARRINGTON – “BEST OF THE BEST” DJ Harrington has always inspired me. As a life-long learner, DJ has always been passionate about the auto recycling industry. He has dedicated his life to promoting our industry through seminars, books, personal connections, and involvement at all major conventions. More importantly, he is someone who continually promotes education. He not only talks the talk, he walks the walk. Anyone who knows DJ would agree that he is very Ben Franklinesque. DJ is an innovator, educator, author, statesman, philosopher, and believer. We are blessed to have him in our lives. THE REST OF THE BEN FRANKLIN STORY . . . As one of the most often quoted Americans, Ben Franklin was born the 10th son of 17 children of a man who made soap and candles. Franklin learned to read very early and had one year in grammar school and another under a private teacher, but his formal education ended at the tender age of 10. This “uneducated” man became one of the foremost of the founding fathers, helping to draft the Declaration of Independence, and was active as a writer, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, printer, publisher, and political philosopher. Education is a lifelong process. We can all tell, teach, and be involved in making our industry stronger. Questions on QC Counts for Cores? Contact Paul at pdadamo@coresupply. com or 401-458-9080.

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FIX WELCOMES FIRST GRADUATES OF ITS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM INITIATIVE AIMED AT UNLOCKING TEAM’S POTENTIAL AND BUILDING FUTURE LEADERS

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IX NETWORK, ANNOUNCED OCTOBER 26, 2022 THE SUCCESSFUL GRADUATION OF THE PILOT GROUP OF ITS LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, AIMED AT SETTING THE BAR FOR LEADERSHIP CAPABILITIES AND TRANSFORMING HOW THE COMPANY ACHIEVES ITS MISSION. The program’s carefully curated curriculum used evidence- based research and behavioural principles that enabled our participants to solve real-world business challenges during their nine-month journey. Workshops are combined with internal expertise and industry professionals to create an immersive and impactful experience. The diversity of participants came from nominations across the organization which fostered collaboration and a community of thought leaders. “Professional development remains the top priority for the company,” Steve Leal, president and CEO of Fix Network, pointed out. “We are always seeking the next-level change-makers who can inspire and motivate while maintaining a high degree of collaboration within the organization. The program is an excellent opportunity to create a strong cross-functional leadership team of individuals who bring extensive experience from different sectors of our organization.” Anita Gouveia, Director of People Development at Fix Network, said leadership development will always remain a critical investment for the organization. “Our program was designed with a growth mindset; one that allowed our leaders to improve self-awareness and build on foundational trust,” she added. “The training allowed us to hone the skills for leading teams and executing on results, building a culture that supports innovation, adaptability and collaboration.” autoatlantic.com

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Talk of the Town

TAKING A PROACTIVE APPROACH TO DETER CAR THEFT By Sean Maddox

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U R E BOSS; I CAN DO THAT.” MY CONCLUSION AT THE END OF A CALL WITH MY EDITOR. CONTACT A FEW LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES; ASK A COUPLE QUESTIONS ABOUT THEIR PUBLIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND ENGAGEMENT. If lucky, be sent to a website or two. Unfortunately, my general questions about whom to speak to at the enforcement agencies about their work with the public on auto and truck theft education and prevention has not been answered. In all cases, I am still waiting for an answer. They are all looking into my questions. Not like our papers and radios are not full of reports about stolen cars and trucks. From kids starting down the dark

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road of joy riding to the sophisticated theft of high-end vehicles and trucks landing in ports around the world. It does not seem to matter these days what your driving, all vehicles are a target. Last year the most popular vehicle stolen in Canada was the Ford F150 truck. In Canada, more than 200 autos are stolen every day. Many exported right out of the country through the ports in Halifax. The loss to Canadians is estimated at over $1 Billion; over fifty percent paid by the insurance industry, affecting all our rates. Whether for parts, the vehicle, or just valuable metals the theft rate has become a national concern. We all need to take note. Looking around there are agencies working with the government to try to educate the public, companies and industries educating consumers about the cost and inconvenience of theft. Also, about precautions that we can all take to help stop the thieves. Not surprisingly, most public information on preventing theft is produced by the insurance industry. From the Insurance Bureau of Canada to NFP, compa-

nies and associations are working to educate the public. It is just good business. Another fantastic resource aside from Auto and Trucking Atlantic is the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA .ca). The website and public information has a lot of information on theft, deterrence, what to do if it happens. Even how to plan you next road trip to reduce risks for you and yours. Researching this article, I found that most tips for protecting your vehicles, belongings and loved ones comes down to using the vehicle and your smarts. Use the locks at all times. Do not leave vehicles unattended while running. Engage the parking break, hide valuables and do not leave pets or children unattended. Steering wheel or gas locks are still a cheap deterrent. Theft only takes seconds, as I learned 20 years ago What we need to change are our habits. Park in well-lit and secure areas. Lock valuables in the truck. Report theft and break-ins on local or national registries. Secure compounds. How many cars and trucks have been stolen right off company compounds this year alone? Be safe.



Future Technologies

HEADING

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At the Recycler’s Yard

ARAAC’S FIRST CONFERENCE IN THREE YEARS A WINNER

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HE AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLERS ASSOCIATION OF ATLANTIC CANADA (ARAAC) HOSTED ITS 2022 CONVENTION - THEIR FIRST IN OVER THREE YEARS. Despite Hurricane Fiona’s devastating effect on the Atlantic region, over 50 members, suppliers and industry stakeholders made it to Truro N.S. to learn, network and have a good time.

Paul D’Adamo headlined the event with his unique presentation style combined with his in-depth industry experiences and insight. D’Adamo discussed the growing auto core business from the perspective of quality control and how dismantlers feed the circular economy in the auto repair sector, not only with used parts, but a steady supply of remanufactured parts. He led a second session on managing your business with intelligent financial statements. At the Annual Meeting of members, the incumbent bard was re-elected to two year terms, with Andrew MacDonald from Maritime Auto Parts retaining the President position; Dalbert Livingstone from Island Auto re-elected as Vice President 28

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and Treasurer; and Paul Bell from Poehl’s Auto Recyclers elected as Secretary. Industry technology experts from both Car-Part and Hollander showed the latest inventory management updates. Their booths in the trade show area were always busy with eager members trying to squeeze the last bit of data and intel from their computer systems. Dave Giles from All EV Canada in Halifax wowed everyone with his knowledge of electric vehicles and how progressive auto recyclers are viewing electrification as a tremendous opportunity. It will no doubt change the industry, but by being proactive versus reactive will help position your business to survive and thrive. The final presentation was from the Nova Scotia D epa r t ment of Environment & Climate Change regarding contingenc y planning for auto recyclers. They provided numerous guides and tools to make the requirement easier to meet - always useful information coming from the industry regulator. The event wrapped up with a reception, dinner and entertainment - another successful meeting in the books. This year’s convention was generously sponsored by Car-Part.com, Copart, IAA, Monidex Distribution, Nova Scotia Department of Environment & Climate Change, PMR, Progi, Rebuilders Auto Supply and Solera/Hollander. The trade show featured booths from the Atlantic Used Oil Management Association, Auto and Trucking Atlantic Magazine, Car-Part. com, IAA, John Ross and Sons, Monidex Distribution, Rebuilders Auto Supply and

Solera/Hollander. Next year’s event is already set and scheduled - June 8-12, 2023 in Halifax, N.S. in partnership with the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries (CARI) and the Auto Recyclers of Canada (ARC) national board meeting.



Electric Avenue

VOLVO STUDY FINDS TEST DRIVING ELECTRIC CARS INCREASES ADOPTION AND PURCHASE CONSIDERATION

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TUDY FINDS 72 PER CENT OF CANADIAN DRIVERS WHO TEST DRIVE FULL ELECTRIC OR PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE WOULD CONSIDER PURCHASE In celebration of both World EV Day (September 8, 2022) and sustainable mobility and electric vehicle (EV) owner-

ship, Volvo Car Canada Ltd. conducted a study to explore the current state of EV consideration and adoption in Canada. For Canadian drivers, experience is everything. The study found that 72 per cent of drivers who got into a full electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) for a test drive would now consider purchase. This signals the importance of test drives and establishing first-hand EV experience and access for the next generation of Canadians drivers as we move toward an electrified future. “We support the vision behind World EV Day and hope each year it inspires and educates more Canadians on what an electric future looks like to them,” said Matt Girgis, managing director, Volvo Car Canada Ltd. Volvo Car Canada Ltd. believes that the road to a more sustainable future involves us all. In recognition of World EV Day Volvo Car Canada Ltd. will continue the #RechargeThursday initiative in partner30

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ship with One Tree Planted to reinvigorate the planet, through which over 6,000 trees have been planted to date. Every Thursday from September 15th, 2022, to November 3rd, 2022, Volvo Car Canada Ltd. will plant five trees for every test drive of a plug-in hybrid or pure electric vehicle at a participating Volvo Car Canada Ltd. retailers across Canada. Each test drive taken is also an entry for a chance to win one of four luxury sustainable getaways in

a Volvo Recharge vehicle. “We know experience leads to adoption, which is why we believe in initiatives like our #RechargeThursday program. With our global ambition to offer pure electric vehicles by 2030, we can’t wait for more consumers across the country to get into our vehicles and understand all the benefits of an electrified lifestyle.”

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE STUDY: • •

72 per cent of Canadians with experience driving an EV or PHEV would considering purchase 57 per cent of Canadian EV + PHEV owners said they were convinced to buy an EV or PHEV because of an interest in driving and living more sustainably 41 percent of Canadian EV + PHEV owners said they were convinced to buy an EV or PHEV because of previous experience driving one 53 per cent of Canadian drivers with

• •

experience driving an EV or PHEV said affordable installation of at home/condo charging station would get them to purchase 8 per cent of Canadians own an electric vehicle (EV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) 77 per cent of Canadian drivers have never driven an EV or PHEV

Released earlier this year, the insights from this recent study follow Volvo Car Canada Ltd.’s 2022 Mobility Trend Report, which explored how Canada›s changing commuting habits are projecting a more sustainable future. The report detailed that almost two thirds of Canadians say it›s important to contribute to a greener future with their car. Read more here. “The interest and adoption of EV and PHEV vehicles continues to grow,” said Matt Girgis, managing director, Volvo Car Canada Ltd. “We’re experiencing significant demand for our Recharge line up of vehicles, and we’re excited to engage our customers locally and across the country with this #RechargeThursday initiative. We look forward to continuing to find small, but meaningful ways for our customers to make the world a greener place, in addition to our larger initiatives.” Volvo Cars is on track to become a climate-neutral company by 2040, reducing emissions across its entire value chain. Volvo continues to proudly offer an electrified version of its entire lineup. By 2025, Volvo will aim for 25 per cent of the material in new Volvo vehicles to consist of recycled and bio-based content. The pureelectric C40 Recharge is the first Volvo to feature a 100 percent leather free interior, including steering wheel, gear shifter and upholstery. In Volvo’s commitment to always provide exceptional service to its customers, the brand has introduced its ‘One Price Promise’ for pure electric vehicles, a straightforward and transparent shopping experience that is negotiationfree, both online and in-store. To learn more about Volvo’s full range of products, services and electric ambitions visit volvocars.com/en-ca.



Human Resources

TIRE AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN PROGRAM’S A PATHWAY TO SUCCESS

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By Kastin Bradley

HE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR COUNCIL OF NOVA SCOTIA HAS OPENED THE DOOR TO EMPLOYMENT FOR SIX OF THE FIRST CANDIDATES TRAINED AS TIRE TECHNICIANS. After two years of industry-led planning, developing and partnering with NS Apprenticeship, NSCC and equity-seeking groups, the Pathways to Success program has come to fruition! Pathways to Success is a free eightweek program, delivered online and in the shop over two four-week blocks. The program provides individuals with entry-level knowledge and training as a Tire and Maintenance Technician (TMT). The program is designed to increase recruitment and retention in the automotive power industry while reducing barriers to employment. Core competencies have been identified that will qualify jobseek-

COHORT OF 6 PEOPLE IN AN AUTOMOTIVE SHOP WALKING TOWARDS AN OPEN GARAGE DOOR

ers for employment in the automotive industry and the opportunity to work towards being certified as a Tire and Maintenance Technician (TMT) and enrolling in apprenticeship. Block 1 covers competencies deemed necessary to work in-shop as a tire technician and prepares individuals ready to work for the upcoming tire-changing season in October. Block 2 covers competencies in regards to the vehicle fluid and general

PARTICIPANTS GUTU WAQO AND WASIU ABDUL LEARNING HOW TO FIX A TIRE FROM INSTRUCTOR ADAM LAPIERRE 32

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vehicle maintenance. Upon successful completion of Block two, the candidates are ready for full time work as a Tire and Maintenance Technician. The fall cohort was a wonderful group of individuals who were incredibly grateful for the opportunity to learn from such an experienced NSCC instructor, Adam LaPierre. Feedback from participants indicated that the Pathways to Success program has cultivated a safe learning environment for individuals of all skill levels.

PARTICIPANT BRANDON CARSON CHANGING A TIRE ON A HOISTED VEHICLE



Human Resources

During the in-shop training, one participant stated “Sometimes when my boss explains things it goes in one ear and out the other, but now I truly understand it.” Another stated, “This program is great because Adam’s never condescending and we have time to try things and say what we think might be right without it affecting a customer.” Participants also in-

different kinds of techniques, and safety rules and procedures. I am for sure gonna be using all the things from Block 1 at work.” Since the completion of Block 1 multiple employers are reaching out seeking to hire individuals from the program. The course is not only beneficial to the individuals who participate, but also to em-

creasing the time and money spent training them in your automotive shop. The Automotive Sector Council of Nova Scotia is excited to offer Block 2 of the program to our initial cohort in January, 2023. We are also recruiting for a new Block 1 cohort. Be amongst the first employers to refer your potential hires, or if you or someone you know is interested in participating or want more information, please contact pathways@automotivesectorcouncil.ca.‑ “Sometimes when my boss explains things it goes in one ear and out the other, but now I truly understand it” - Pathways to Success Participant “The program is so amazing and helpful to me. It also changed my attitude that I’m important.” - Pathways to Success Participant “[The program was] actually very helpful…it showed me how to work with others, be a good leader, different kinds of techniques, safety rules and procedures. I am for sure gonna be using all the things from Block 1 at work”.

(LEFT TO RIGHT: ASC STAFF JUDY DICKSON, ASC PROGRAM MANAGER KASTIN BRADLEY, CONNOR MACMULLIN, BRANDON CARSON, CHASE MACINTYRE, GUTU WAQO, WASIU ABDUL, KADEN WRIGHT, NSCC INSTRUCTOR ADAM LAPIERRE)

dicated that they learned more than they were expecting to during the first block of training! Post-program evaluation feedback included comments like: “The program is so amazing and helpful to me. It also changed my attitude… that I’m important.” as well as “[The program was] actually very helpful…it showed me how to work with others, be a good leader, learn

ployers. By hiring someone who has completed the Pathways to Success program, your new employee will require less training and be safety minded. Additionally, they have been selected for the program based upon the notion that they are dedicated to working within the field and have completed a Jobtomize Assessment for their “fit” for the industry. Therefore, it increases employee retention while de-

PARTICIPANTS KADEN WRIGHT AND CONNOR MACMULLIN LAYING ON THE FLOOR DETERMINING WHERE TO SECURELY HOIST THE TRUCK

ONE INDIVIDUAL GUIDING A TIRE TOWARDS THE MACHINE WHILE ANOTHER PERSON WAITS TO HELP THEM COHORT OF 6 INDIVIDUALS JUMP-STARTING A DEAD VEHICLE TOGETHER 34

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Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD NEWS AND VIEWS COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION… NEW WORLD RECORD FOR FASTEST CAR DRIVEN IN REVERSE NY FAN OF “THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS” MOVIES CAN NAME AT LEAST TWO TIMES SOMEONE DROVE A CAR IN REVERSE AS FAST AS THEY WERE DRIVING FORWARD.

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Of course, some of that is movie magic, but there are some real mechanical “things” happening that we can’t see. In the real world, a Tennessee man has made it his life’s mission to test and document the top reverse speed of vehicles. He recently set a Guinness World Record for the fastest mile driven in reverse with an average speed of 48 mph. He hit a peak speed in that average mile of 54 mph. The drive took place in June, and he just won

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Guinness recognition. Scot Burner runs the YouTube channel “Always in Reverse,” where he takes cars on-track in reverse to test their top speed. His record attempt took place in his 2017 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray at the National Corvette Museum’s Motorsports Park in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Burner told Fox News that his technique is simple: He turns around with his right hand on the passenger seat and steers with his left. The rear window is his only view onto the track ahead, which can be disorienting at first, but Burner says he’s been at it since 2000, giving him plenty of time to practice. Cars feature speed limiters that prevent them from traveling more than 60 mph in reverse, meaning the cars in the movies have been heavily modified to deliver 100 mph-plus speeds. Paul Walker did it with a Mitsubishi EVO 12 in «2 Fast 2 Furious,” and Vin Diesel did the deed in a flaming hotrod in “The Fate of the Furious” (or stunt drivers did, anyway.) Luckily for Burner, he wasn’t running from gangsters, and his car didn’t end in flames. Still an impressive record, however. Source: Tennessee man sets Guinness World Record for fastest mile driven in reverse | Autoblog

The car isn’t road legal. There aren’t any photos of the rear, and we doubt there’s a place for a license plate. It also looks like the back of the shanty sits directly on the ground, and that design won’t fly on public roads. The car ran and drove when the owner parked it two years ago, but it’s unknown if it’s still operational today. The seller is asking $2,000 for it. Cars have served as mobile homes in the past, so converting one to a portable

ice shanty seems natural. It might not be the most fun vehicle to drive, but driving isn’t its primary purpose. It’s designed to keep its occupants warm, the fish cold, and the outside elements from ruining a great day of fishing. The wood stove, chairs, and table provide all the ambiance one needs. Source: Chevy Cavalier Ice Shanty Is The Mobile Fishing Shack Of Your Dreams (motor1.com)

IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL COME Ice fishing often requires lugging a shanty out onto the ice for protection from the elements. A converted 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier attempts to simplify this process by combing the car and the ice shanty into one contraption. This Chevy Cavalier ice shanty is currently for sale on Facebook Marketplace, and it›s located in Maine. The only remaining bit of the Chevrolet are portions of the front clip, with everything from the A-pillars back replaced by the hut. The fenders are gone, exposing the chained tires, and a piece of wood has replaced the front bumper. The hood and headlights are still there, though, and there’s a strange wooden box between the car and the shanty. Inside, there’s a wood stove with a chimney poking out of the front. A storage rack sits above it. The vehicle’s controls stick out of the wall, with the instrument panel attached to a makeshift wooden dash. The shift lever is mounted sideways on the floor. The photos don’t show any controls for the accelerator or brake, but there are undecipherable things attached near the steering wheel. The available images don’t show off the entire interior space, including the drop-down table, the radio, and more. autoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

A SNEAKY TRICK For some drivers, it can be a challenge to find a parking spot. This is especially the case if you don’t have a garage or a driveway where you can park your car — and live in a congested city. However, there is a way to overcome this challenge. It’s a little dubious, though. On the Reddit social media site, a man recently shared a sneaky parking trick in which his neighbor saves a spot when he’s not home. Cars and mopeds parked on a street | Oscar Nord via Unsplash The post for the sneaky parking trick went viral on Reddit, with it eliciting many responses from users. In the post, a man with the username “MihaiPirogov123” shared the sneaky trick on the “Casual UK” forum. Along with sharing a photo of the parking tactic, he wrote, “My neighbour bought a broken moped to hold his parking spot when he’s not home.” In the photo, the broken moped is sandwiched between two cars, with a large gap between them. When the neighbor arrives back home, he removes the moped — and then parks his car in the open parking space. As of this writing, the Reddit post has over 3,900 upvotes, with hundreds of comments from other users, as detailed by Mirror. Many users think that it’s a strange parking tactic, especially considering the fees required to operate the broken moped. Also, some users joked that the moped would get stolen. Source: Man Shows Sneaky Parking Trick to Save Spot When Not Home (motorbiscuit.com)

ELON MUSK HAS MORE TO SHARE

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ABOUT A TESLA CYBERTRUCK “BOAT MODE” Knowing how Tesla CEO Elon Musk tends to operate, we may be in for a publicity stunt next year as the Tesla Cybertruck makes its way across the channel from SpaceX’s Starbase to South Padre Island. However, we’re going to make it abundantly clear that intentionally using your Cybertruck (or any Tesla vehicle) as a boat is a terrible and dangerous idea.

less you want your expensive electric car to end up at the bottom of a channel and risk your life. In the past, Musk published a few tweets like the following: We *def* don’t recommended this, but Model S floats well enough to turn it into a boat for short periods of time. Thrust via wheel rotation. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) With all of that said, Musk actually tweeted that the “Cybertruck will be

Honestly, intentionally using any car as a boat is likely to have dire consequences. Elon Musk has noted that Tesla’s vehicles can float, at least for some time, and won’t necessarily take on water like a gas car. There’s no intake, nor is there any engine to “hydrolock.” This means the EV could hypothetically operate for an extended period of time without losing power. However, it doesn’t mean you should test it out un-

waterproof enough to serve briefly as a boat.” He added that it will even be able to cross “rivers, lakes, and seas that aren’t too choppy.” The parts about “briefly” and “not too choppy” are scary. However, the tweet was published a few weeks ago, and despite many warnings about the dangers involved, the tweet still exists: Source: Elon Musk Has More To Share About A Tesla Cybertruck “Boat Mode” (insideevs.com)


The Mindful Trucker

CRIME IN TRUCKING A MINDFUL TRUCKER TALKS THEFT PREVENTION. By Dana Smith

THE DRIVER: R I V I N G A TRUCK THESE DAYS REQUIRES A LOT OF DIFFERENT SKILLS, AND OF COURSE SAFE DRIVING.

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is usually something that only an employee would know, or would have told someone outside the company. One thing

to consider and ask yourself when these things happen: Is the load worth your life? Absolutely not!! Don’t be a hero and try

From driving to navigation; from safety to load security, specialized loads to temperature control, to organizing their time efficiently, a big part of being a driver is staying safe on the road. This can be difficult at times when drivers are forced to park on the side of the highways, or in so-called bad areas. They can become a target without doing anything, just being in the wrong place at the wrong time. A driver’s safety is paramount. How does a driver deal with that?

HERE ARE A FEW WAYS TO PROTECT ONESELF: • • • • • • • • • •

Always be on the lookout for suspicious activity around you Never tell anyone what you’re hauling Look around your rig, and your immediate area when you get out of the truck When stopping, stop in familiar places as much as possible Park in well-lit areas Perform regular walk around checks on your vehicle to notice anything out of the ordinary Stay alert within your surroundings If you do suspect suspicious activity, call the authorities

THE CARGO: Cargo theft is another threat that drivers need to be aware of. It used to be that criminals would steal what they could from the back of a trailer that had been sitting around for long periods of time unattended. Nowadays, full trailers are being stolen in broad daylight. They steal the truck, trailer, and the load all at once. Sometimes criminals will steal a tractor, and go hook onto a trailer and drive away with it. Knowing what is in a trailer autoatlantic.com

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The Mindful Trucker

to take that on yourself. Call the authorities and let them deal with it. Things can get out of hand quickly. You don’t want to lose your life over a piece of freight, because freight can be replaced, but you can’t.

HOW CAN YOU, THE DRIVER AND YOUR COMPANY HAVE A FIGHTING CHANCE AGAINST CARGO THEFT? • • • • • •

Have a theft management plan in place beforehand Screen all employees involved in your supply chain Use trailer tracking GPS units attached to the trailer Educate the drivers on what to do should theft occur Stay alert with your surroundings all the time. Onboard cameras can be a great theft deterrent

STOWAWAYS AND DRUG CRIME: I’m sure you have heard of people stowing away in tractor trailers or containers from time-to-time. These people are looking to relocate to a different country and may hop aboard your trailer without you even knowing it. They could be already in your trailer when you pick it up. Human smuggling is a real thing. Being aware of this can save you a lot of issues. There are also people that would,

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and could stow drugs aboard your rig as well. You stop somewhere and they attach drugs under your trailer, or in your load somewhere. Maybe they are hidden in your load before you even pick it up. Remember that drugs can be worth a lot of money to someone, and they will go to great lengths to transport them along for the ride with an unexpecting trucker.

HOW CAN YOU THE DRIVER PROTECT YOURSELF FROM STOWAWAYS AND DRUG CRIME? • • • • • •

Always be on the lookout for suspicious activity around you. When stopping, stop in familiar places as much as possible. Park in well-lit areas. Check your back doors, and seals for anything strange. Perform regular walk around checks on your vehicle noticing anything strange. If you do suspect suspicious activity, call the authorities

CYBER-CRIME: We hear a lot today about cyber-crime. I’m sure you have had a computer virus at one time or another, or an email that has a virus embedded in it. Well it’s kind of like that. Anything that is attached to a computer is at risk. Hackers can break the codes and cause havoc. Imagine a truck-

ing company that has computer management systems, or dispatch and maintenance systems. If someone got into those systems, it could be catastrophic to the business. It literally could shut down the whole operation. The trucks and reefer systems could be shut down too if they are all connected to a main frame. The way technology is going, everything will be connected to a computer, and will be at risk.

SO, HOW CAN A COMPANY PROTECT ITSELF FROM A CYBER ATTACK? • • • • • • •

Conduct a cyber security assessment for your company. Create a cyber security plan. Educate and train staff on scams. Have secure passwords for employee computer access points. Back up your computer systems. Install security firewalls. Have a response plan in case a cyber attack happens.

You can see there are numerous ways of preventing crime while on the road. Companies can take steps to ensure the safety of their people, and their business. Using some or all of these precautions could mean the difference of whether you are the victim of crime or not. For more of Dana’s articles, visit Themindfultrucker.com



Succession Planning

PROTECTING YOUR LEGACY

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YLVAIN SEGUIN BELIEVES S H O P OW N E R S S H O U LD MAKE SUCCESSION PLANNING AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR BUSINESS STRATEGY.

It’s inevitable – sooner or late, as a shop owner, you will face the prospect of saying goodbye to the business you worked so hard for, nursed, and grew into a profitable venture. What happens to your legacy then? Are you concerned that the carefully accumulated value in your business will be wasted away? Succession planning is an uncomfortable thought and, most times, the reason for heart break. Most owners put off discussions on retirement, death, or business failure, until it is too late. In my opinion, it is an important issue that shouldn’t be avoided, especially if you are determined to protect your hardfought legacy. “Succession planning” can be as simple as asking a family member to take over your shop or grooming one of your high-performing employee(s) to ensure business continuity. By identifying your successor, you can rest easy with the thought that the business will continue to accumulate value in the long run. Smart entrepreneurs involve their families very early on in the process, al-

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most at the same time as they launch their business. I have come across several second-and even third-and fourth-generation owners within Fix Network who have been successfully groomed to take over from their parents. At Fix Network, as part of our program to empower franchisees, our operations team works closely with retiring owners and their successors to ensure that the business continues to be viable during the transition and beyond. We work together with the new leadership, familiarizing them with every aspect of the business and training them at our training centres across Canada. Planning your business succession is not as difficult as it sounds. Here are some best practices to help you throughout the transition and beyond.

IDENTIFY YOUR ROCK STARS Review employee performance objectively and shortlist those who are adaptable, problem-solvers and highly productive. You can either groom them as your successor or ask their help in supporting the family member who takes up the business.

INITIATE THE DISCUSSION If your successor is a family member, be prepared that their plans may not necessarily align with yours. If required, seek the help of a professional mediator who is acceptable to all family members. This is

critical as it removes the emotion out of a business transaction.

INVOLVE YOUR TEAM Once you have found your successor, communicate it to the rest of your team so your successor finds acceptance at the workplace and your team can support the new owner in every way possible.

MENTOR YOUR SUCCESSOR Be prepared to spend enough time teaching your successor all elements of the business. Encourage them to take whatever courses are needed to prepare for their new role. Do they need mentoring or to shadow an employee to learn more?

STEP AWAY COMPLETELY Once the transition is completed and the new family member understands all elements of the business, it is wise to step away and allow the new owner to take charge. An ownership change is one of the most important, life-changing moments in your entrepreneurial journey and a lot will depend on the choices you made years before, and not who you put in charge of the business. Here’s wishing you a smooth transition for your business. Sylvain Seguin is President – Canada for Fix Network, comprising brands such as Fix Auto, ProColor Collision, NOVUS Glass and Speedy Auto Service.



ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

INTERNET

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca

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Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

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ARAAC

1-519-858-8761

autorecyclers.ca

Auto Truck Atlantic

1-902-452-0345

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Auto Truck Atlantic

1-902-452-0345

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Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

fixauto.com

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Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-902-468-1396

fleetbrake.com

Corrosion Defense

1-844-766-7878

corrosiondefence.com

Dominion Sure Seal

1-905-670-5411

dominionsureseal.com

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Gear Centre

1-877-277-4327

shop.gearcentre.com

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Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

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Hope For Wildlife

1-902-407-9453

hopeforwildlife.net

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Hunter Engineering

1-902-880-9401

hunter.com

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Hunter Engineering

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hunter.com

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Hunter Engineering

1-902-880-9401

hunter.com

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

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Maritime Auto Parts

1-800-565-7278

maritimeauto.com

4

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

maritimecarwash.ca

21

Maritime Pro Stock

1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

10

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

12

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

31

NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY

ngksparkplugs.ca

Rhino Truck Lube

1-506-317-1038

rhinotrucklubecentre.com

19

Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

29

Spectrum Therapeutic

1-902-932-2395

spectrumtherapeuticsolutions.ca 36

The Mindful Trucker

1-506-317-1038

themindfultrucker.com

Truck Stop+

1-506-317-1038

truckstopplus.ca

18

WD-40

1-416-622-9881

wd40.com

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Worldpac Inc.

1-800-888-9982

worldpac.com

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VOLVO TRUCKS: FIRST IN THE WORLD TO USE FOSSIL-FREE STEEL IN ITS TRUCKS

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OLVO IS NOW INTRODUCING FOSSIL-FREE STEEL IN ITS TRUCKS. THE STEEL IS PRODUCED BY THE SWEDISH STEEL COMPANY SSAB AND THE HEAVY-DUTY ELECTRIC VOLVO TRUCKS WILL BE THE FIRST TO INCLUDE IT. The steel from SSAB is produced using a completely new technology, based on hydrogen. The result is a much lower climate impact than conventionally produced steel. Small scale introduction of the steel in Volvo’s heavy electric trucks will begin in the third quarter of 2022. “We will increase the use of fossil-free materials in all our trucks to make them net-zero not only in operation – but also when it comes to the materials they are built of,” says Jessica Sandström, Senior Vice President Product Management, Volvo Trucks. The first steel produced with hydrogen will be used in the truck’s frame rails, the backbone of the truck upon which all other main components are mounted. As the availability of fossil-free steel increases, it will also be introduced in other parts of the truck. 90% Of A Volvo Truck Can Be Recycled Today, around 30% of the materials in a new Volvo truck come from recycled materials. And up to 90% of the truck can be recycled at the end of its life. “We are continuously striving to further minimize our climate footprint. We are also moving towards greater circularity in both our operations and our trucks,” says Jessica Sandström. Volvo Group is collaborating with SSAB on fossil-free steel since 2021. The first machine, a load carrier made of fossil-free steel, was showcased in October 2021. Fossil-free steel will be an important complement to the traditional and recycled steel used in Volvo’s trucks.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Tina Melvin of Port Williams, NS, is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is December 31st, 2022

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NAME:

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

SEPTEMBER 2022 WINNER!

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ADDRESS:

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1. “Hawaii Five-O” Mercury driver

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5. Music pace and former Ford

11. Open hood support (4,3)

6. Piper’s kilt pouch

12. Plymouth’s Dodge Demon clone

7. Triangular sign order

14. Cabot Trail description

13. Pre-Sidekick Suzuki SUV

18. Specialized rink ride

15. Bloody Caesar juice

20. Avis and Budget rival

16. Common clam concoction

22. “___ on the tree” shifter

17. ‘63 ‘Vette split ____ coupe

23. Selected for a certain purpose

18. Bearded “Manic Mechanic” trio

24. Oyster Bed track location (1,1,1) 25. Ricky’s “Trailer Park” Chrysler (3,6)

(1,1,3) 19. NS plates word 21. Odd-style ‘01-’05 Pontiac

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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uperhero fans, we need to know the name of this famous crime fighting vehicle, and please, you can tell us more about its ‘driver’ too. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at rob@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is December 31st, 2022.

Best wishes go to Rick Cashol of Saint John , NB, who correctly answered “Danica Patrick was born in 1982, and won an Indy Car race in Japan in 2008, becoming the first female to win a major race., She then went stock car racing in 2010.” Thank you to all who entered our contest, keep trying, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE:

EMAIL: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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