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CONVOY OF COMPASSION – The recent horrors discovered in Kamloops are honoured with a trucking tradition: the convoy.

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BIGGER SCREENS BETTER SOUNDS – The evolution of infotainment systems in cars has evolved in ways that mirror the evolution of cars. By Kristen Lipscombe

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Indian car salesman Nav Bhatia’s inspiring story of growing and giving despite all the odds stacked against him.

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TRUCKING ANSWERS THE BELL FOR CHARITABLE FOOD TRANSPORT DRIVE – Trucks for Change makes nutrition program literally move.

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THE DOORS ARE OPEN – NB’s Paul McKenelley does his part to get your parts.

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BE RESPONSIBLE: USE PROTECTION! – When it comes to rust protection Corrosion Defence has seen it all and works at continuous improvement.

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ATLANTIC MODIFIED TOUR Nears 20th Anniversary Season – In what’s become a Maritime tradition it can’t be stopped even during a pandemic. By Tim Terry

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DA KINK IN MY BACK – New exoskeleton models help step up vehicle production while helping keep workers safe. By Carter Hammett

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NEW RHINO TRUCK LUBE CENTRES – they’re not just changing oil…

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COVID-19 REOPENING Safety Considerations for Trucking Companies – whether it’s reviewing hazard assessments or health, we’ve got ya covered! By Dave Elniski

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ROAD TEST: A DOGGIE ADVENTURE –What happens when a woman of a certain age loads her van with food, provisions, two dogs and hits the road? Find out here.

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THE SMELL OF BURNT RUBBER – For many teens, a driver’s license is the ultimate rite of passage. But sometimes life throws us a few curve balls. By Adrian Giorgio.

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DAD: IT’S TIME FOR SUCCESSION to Take Place – Succession planning often means passing the torch to the next generation. We look at the challenges too.

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WITH THE LATEST WOMEN IN CARWASH event just wrapping up, organizers realize the conference addresses two very different needs.

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NOVUS GLASS WELCOMES NEW LOCATION IN TRURO N.S. – The Fix Network’s latest addition adopts a unique hybrid model to serve you here.

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TESLA GRANTS $3 MILLION TO DAL for Advanced Battery Research – University researchers plan to lower battery costs, improve safety with new project.2

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Letter from the Editor

CONVOY OF COMPASSION

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By Carter Hammett

T WAS TRULY A SIGHT TO BEHOLD. ON JUNE 20, FATHER’S DAY, A CONVOY OF TRUCKS POURED THROUGH OTTAWA TO HONOUR THE 215 CHILDREN WHOSE REMAINS WERE FOUND THE PREVIOUS MONTH AT A FORMER RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL IN KAMLOOPS B.C.. Organizer Roger Steepe was quoted as saying he “didn’t want to make today a political thing. I wanted it to be a humanitarian thing. We’re all in it together. We’re all one community, one person, one humanity. It doesn’t matter if you’re Indigenous or not, we’ve got to support each other.” Moving its way down Highway 417, the convoy passed by Parliament Hill before making its way back to the highway where the rally ended. “As I saw the trucks roll in this morning, it really hit me that in a short time we could get all these drivers, especially on a Father’s Day to come and do this,” said Steepe. “Some people say we shouldn’t do it on a Father’s Day but all those kids didn’t get the chance to have a

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Father’s Day with their dad.” The Father’s Day convoy in Ottawa follows a June 5 convoy organized by trucker Mike Otto in Kamloops. Over 50 vehicles headed to Kamloops, joining school buses and emergency vehicles and others in one of three separate convoys that converged on the former residential school site. The convoys were among the lowered flags, vigils, moments of silence and other symbolic acts of support across the country for Indigenous peoples after Tk’emlups te Secwepemc confirmed that penetrating radar detection had identified the unmarked gravesite near the former school, which operated from 1890 to 1969. But the highest and loudest visibility came from the dozens of drivers who joined convoys in a parade of support for First Nations people while drawing attention to the atrocities—As we were going

to press, more unmarked graves were discovered near the former Marieval Indian Residential School east of Regina, S.K.— that have risen to the forefront and taken their place alongside other BIPOC urgencies of the past year. It’s hard to believe that truckers’ convoys were spawned as an outcome of the USA’s nation-wide 55 mph speed limit imposed back in 1973. Furthermore, 18 wheelers had become the targets of speed traps. Coupled with an oil embargo, the new restrictions made it virtually impossible for truckers to reach their destinations on time. Convoys began so that a plethora of trucks could operate together at high speeds with the idea that if and when they passed a speed trap, only one of the trucks could be pulled over by police. The movement inspired the C.W. McCall song, which inspired a movie. The movement also became a rallying cry for truckers’ rights shortly after a very frustrated driver named J.W. Edwards picked up his Citizen Band (CB) radio and inadvertently gave American independent truckers their first national voice. Back in the 1970s, CB radios were the social media of their day. Since then convoys have been used as everything from fundraisers—including the upcoming 10th anniversary Truck Convoy Saturday, September 18th, 2021 in support of  Special Olympics Nova Scotia-- to the protests that continue to this day. Few things raise people’s ire more than inconvenience, and convoys have a way of drawing attention to causes that other forms of protest don’t. But on Father’s Day it was a convoy of compassion that captured the attention of residents of the nation’s capital and reminded everyone that an entire country was stunned by the news coming out of Kamloops. Convoy co-organizer Lyoness Woodstock commented: “It’s pretty amazing to look in the rear view mirror and see a kilometre and a half of trucks with flags and ribbons and orange shirts on, four way flashers going, headlights on. It really puts a lump in your throat.”


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BIGGER screens BETTER sounds INFOTAINMENT SYSTEMS CONTINUE TO IMPROVE BUT GOOD MUSIC NEVER GOES OUT OF STYLE

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By Kristen Lipscombe

ROM THE BELOVED OLD EIGHT-TR ACKS OF THE 60S AND 70S AND THE SMALLER CASSETTE TAPES OF THE 80S AND MID-90S, TO THE SILVER COMPACT DISCS OF THE LATE 90S AND EARLY 2000S, AND THEN THOSE AUXILIARY INPUT JACKS THAT ALLOW DRIVERS TO PLUG THEIR APPLE IPODS AND OTHER MP3 PLAYERS DIRECTLY INTO THEIR VEHICLES. There’s no doubt that the technology that goes into car stereos is changing and growing as fast as the car models themselves. One thing that hasn’t changed: drivers and passengers love their road trips and car tunes. The most recent technological shift to the typical car stereo, the shiniest of new toys for newer vehicles and now also being installed as after-market parts in older vehicles as well, are of course full in-car entertainment (ICE) systems, more commonly referred to in the auto and trucking industry as in-vehicle infotainment (IVI). A solid definition from WheelScene.com calls a vehicle “infotainment system an in-dash system designed to both inform and entertain the driver, as well as the passengers… “An infotainment system controls the sound system, which can include the radio, maybe a CD player, connected audio device, satellite radio (and) on upgraded or luxury models it might contain a navigation system,” WheelScene says. “In addition, infotainment systems might do everything from (provide updates) when regular maintenance is needed to provide a digital copy of the vehicle owner’s autoatlantic.com

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Apps

manual. In some cars, the infotainment system even controls the heating and cooling systems for the cabin.” And the list goes on, with infotainment systems in some hybrid and electric vehicles providing energy storage and drivetrain updates, and new safety features such as back-up cameras, blind-spot detection, forward collision warnings and much more being continuously integrated as the technology itself improves. And of course, vital to any true stereo system, is the ability to throw on some music and hit the highway with your favourite musicians. For many consumers, their favourite music is all now stored on the mini-

DARRYL AND SARAH RUSSELL, OWNERS OF ATLANTIC CAR STEREO

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computers they carry around in their pockets or purses – their cell phones – which means car companies have adapted quickly with integrated systems such as Apple CarPlay and Google’s Android Auto. The latest addition to integrated vehicle infotainment systems is Android Automotive, which is starting to appear in vehicles from General Motor, Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi and will eventually even start replacing Ford’s own Sync system, which has been around for about a decade and a half. “The big thing with the infotainment with the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) car, like what comes in the car, is that it’s more integrated into the car,” said Darryl Russell, who owns Atlantic Car Stereo in Dartmouth, N.S., along with wife Sarah Russell. “The radio is no longer just a radio. It’s also a display for some of the functions of the vehicle; it allows you to access some of those features and modify them, whereas before you could never do things like that,” Russell says of the ever-evolving infotainment systems. “For us, it can be a little more difficult to adapt, so a lot of times we’re no longer changing the infotainment system, we’re upgrading the functionality,” Russell said. So for example, adding cameras to the original screens in pre-2018 models or Bluetooth capabilities to vehicles that

didn’t already have that function. “Since 2018, (back-up) cameras are mandatory,” Russell said, adding that’s opened up the door for more safety features to be included in infotainment systems, such as lane-changing cameras. “It’s much more involved,” Russell said of the changing stereo installation industry. “A growing side of our business is integrating with what is currently there versus just replacing (a whole system).” That even means adding Apple CarPlay and Android Auto to older vehicles that didn’t come ready-made with their own infotainment system that could connect directly with their driver’s smartphone. “We have seen an uptick in replacements in older vehicles,” Russell said, adding Atlantic Car Stereo is generally upgrading vehicles that are 2010 or up, particularly within the 2012-2014 range, including a lot of trucks that didn’t come with the technology then. “They’re integrating quite seamlessly with the phones now,” Russell said of the newer infotainment systems. “Before, everyone’s software needed to match, but some of that has become better.” Software improvements have been vital to ensure smooth transition from one car to another, and one phone to another, since as Russell points out, “everyone’s life is on their phone … So it’s about making


it seamless from one vehicle to the next and that things work the same way.” “Everything is plug and play,” agreed Nas Amiri, owner of the Canadian branch of Infotainment, a company which started south of the border and copyrighted the popular term, creating the websites Infotainment.com and Infotaintment.ca, where customers can shop online for systems that match their cars and sell their old vehicle radios, with dealer and wholesale discounts also offered. “People are most interested in upgrades that involve their phones, because they’re so integrated with them,” said Amiri, whose company is based out of Mississauga, Ont. “People spend more time on their phone than anything else, so they want that similar atmosphere … when driving.” And of course, drivers are also concerned about using their cell phones in their vehicles safely, with laws enacted in recent years to discourage talking or texting when behind the wheel. Infotainment systems allow drivers to make calls and interact with their phones totally handsfree. Like all technology, infotainment will continue to change based on customer wants and needs, as well as due

to general improvements in the systems themselves. Manufacturers are adding “more touch-screen interfaces that include the speedometer and the radio,” which means much bigger screens, Amiri said, estimating the ones in new Mercedes models to be 18 to 20 inches long. Overall, he said, the trend now is to become more and more personalized.” “Tesla, for the Model S, was a huge game-changer because that gave a whole different look and whole different feel to it, and made it a bit more personal,” Amiri said of its infotainment system including larger screen. “It’s also safer because you

can see things a bit better visually (using the cameras).” The Russells over at Atlantic Car Stereo agree “larger screens” and more touch panels are the next big trends in how infotainment systems will continue to change in look and feel. Another trend Atlantic Car Stereo is seeing, which is nice in that it’s kind of old school, is that “people are wanting better sound,” Russell said. “We did see a decline years ago … but now we seem to be back to like 20 years ago; people want true audio in their car; they want an experience like they’d get at home with their home stereo.” No matter how it’s played, good music never goes out of style. autoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD SUMMER 2021 BITS AND BYTES OF THE BIZARRE AND THE STRANGE GATHERED FROM AROUND THE WEB SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO . . . YER WELCOME!

BEER BOTTLE NOTE AMONG ARTIFACTS FOUND IN MICHIGAN CENTRAL STATION BY FORD’S RENOVATORS Since acquiring Michigan Central Station,  Ford  has been hard at work restoring the property to its former glory. In the process, workers have made dozens of fascinating discoveries, from sealed rooms to long-lost items. One — a beer bottle containing a handwritten note from 1913 — stood out. Ford historians believe it was left intentionally. The pre-Prohibition bottle of Stroh’s (stamped July 19, 1913) was found in early May by two plaster restoration contractors named Lukas Nielsen and Leo Kimble. The bottle had been placed behind a section of plaster cornice the two were attempting to remove. A few words on the note were fairly well-preserved. It appears to have been left by two people named Dan Hogan and Leo (or Lee) Smith, who may be from Chicago. It is dated July 10

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Carter’s Corner

1913, so at least we know the beer was pretty fresh. Nielsen says he hopes the message is something important that relates to the building. “I would drive past it and wonder what’s going to happen to the train station,” he told Ford. “Now, we are going to be part of the history of the building. It’s good to see it being revitalized after sitting derelict for so long.” Sadly, a century has passed since somebody wrote this particular note, and in its advanced state of deterioration, restoring it to complete legibility may not be possible.  Despite being “extremely” tempted, the workers who found the bottle resisted the urge to open it. They were praised for their discretion, as attempting to extract the note inside likely would have caused irreparable harm.  Other objects recovered from the station include a tea saucer from a set of china, files and accounting documents. A previously unknown room found behind the wall of an elevator shaft contained an adding machine, shoes and other discarded objects.  “The items that have been found show the care that each of the individual construction. | Autoblog

HINDUSTAN AMBASSADOR FIGHTS FIAT 1100 IN THE SLOWEST DRAG RACE EVER Have you ever wondered which popular taxi in India is the fastest? Well in Autocar India’s latest video we get to see the Hindustan Ambassador take on its arch-rival the Fiat 1100  in a heated drag race. Before starting the video make sure to clear your schedule as this quarter-mile run is going to take a while. The  Hindustan Ambassador  is a rug-

ged classic taxi used across India to shuttle passengers through congested city streets. These taxis must also tackle rough pothole-ridden roads on city outskirts putting an emphasis on durability. The simple Hindustan Ambassador is a favourite among taxi drivers who value its simple build and focus on durability. The Hindustan Ambassador was built from 1958 all the way until 2014 which means there are tons of examples available along with a constant stream of spare parts. The Ambassador used in this drag race features the more powerful 1.8-liter inline-4 which is good for about 60 horsepower (45 Kilowatts). This weak engine sends power to the rear wheels via a floor-mounted 5-speed manual transmission. On the exterior, the ambassador also features a strange wing mounted on the roof right above the windshield which is mostly for styling considering downforce isn’t a factor for a car this slow. To compete with the Ambassador, Autocar host Cyrus Dhabhar brought along his highly modified Fiat 1100. When Cyrus lists off the incredible parts like for his Fiat that includes Group A rally engine parts you would expect this to be a very unfair fight. That is until you realize the power was raised from 30 horsepower (22 Kilowatts) stock to around 50 horsepower (37 Kilowatts). The Fiat 1100 must also content with

a column-shifted transmission which isn’t ideal for racing applications. Which of these classic India Taxis is the best? Well in the case of a simple drag

race the stock Hindustan Ambassador beats out the plucky Fiat 1100 by a couple of seconds. Source: Autocar India

CAR PLUNGES THROUGH ROOF, TRIES TO GET INTO BED WITH HOMEOWNERS If you make a habit of cruising first responders’ social media posts, you soon discover that cars plowing into houses or even landing on roofs is a regular thing. But few wayward drivers have achieved the sheer verticality or stuck the landing quite like this one in the St. Louis area, where the car went nose-first down into a house and landed at the foot of the homeowners’ bed. “If you look at that crash it’s like, how did somebody not die?” Eureka, Mo., fire department spokesman Scott Barthelmass told the St. Louis PostDispatch. “It’s literally incredible. (The car was) literally just saucering through the air end-over-end.” autoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

From the description, the car was quite the pinball. The crash happened around 1:30 a.m., when the car, traveling down a road called The Legends Parkway (and adding to the legends), left the road, hit a tree and tumbled end-over-end down an embankment, hit a wrought-iron fence, seemingly catapulted into the air, and then tried to snuggle up with the homeowners. The newspaper said the homeowner had to douse a small fire with a garden hose. And the occupants of the car? Two teenage boys,  KTVI  reported, got out, seemingly unharmed. They had been attending a graduation party. | Autoblog

CAR SALESMAN FROM INDIA IN NBA’S HALL OF FAME: INTRODUCING NAV BHATIA’S INSPIRATIONAL STORY A car salesman from India becomes the NBA Hall Of Famer. Nav Bhatia, an Indian based in Canada has earned the prestigious honour in NBA’s history. His name was added to the Hall Of Fame without him playing or coaching or even owning a team. Here is Nav Bhatia’s inspirational story. Nav Bhatia was born and raised in New Delhi, India. He completed his Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering in Delhi and had to leave the country due to the AntiSikh riots in the year 1984. He settled in Canada. For an immigrant with a Turban and a beard, Nav’s life in Canada did not have a good start. Despite being a Mechanical Engineer, he failed to find a job.

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After filling out hundreds of job applications, he finally found a job as a car salesman in a rough part of town. The hate from the community at that time did not bring him down. Instead, he wanted to show hard work wins over everything. Starting as a car salesman Nav applied his skills of marketing and sold 127 cars in just 90 days. This is a record that still stands today. In recognition of his impressive achievement, Bhatia was hired as the general manager for a bigger dealership across town. The business was on the verge of bankruptcy and needed a quick turnaround to survive. But life flipped the coin around again for Nav as all but one employee of the dealership quit because of his ethnicity. Another challenge stared Bhatia’in the face, which he took head-on again! He recruited a fresh pair of hands at the dealership and got it running again. After a few years of dedicated hard work from the entire team led by Bhatia, the car dealership not only came out from the verge of bankruptcy but also became the most successful and largest dealership in all of Canada. He bought that dealership from the owner and added a few more under his belt as well marking his success in car sales in Canada. His achievements in the car sales industry were hailed by Hyundai’s CEO as well. Bhatia has won several awards, including RBC Top 25 Canadian Immigrant Award in the year 2018. However, there were other prestigious awards that he would collect! Apart from

being brilliant in the car sales industry, Bhatia shares his unconditional love towards the Raptors NBA team. From the very first day on the court back in the year 1995 when the Raptors came into existence, Bhatia has never missed a home game. It did not matter if the Raptors lost or won the match, he was always there for the entire season cheering his heart out in every game. His loyalty to the team earned him the Raptors Superfan title in the year 1998, where he was called to the centre of the court and was awarded the new title. Nav Bhatia’s undying passion for the team got his name into the history books when the Raptors won the NBA championship in 2018. He became the first fan in NBA history to receive an official championship ring and also was part of the team’s championship parade. However, his loyalty to the sport and the team made history again, when Nav Bhatia become the first fan to be awarded the Hall Of Fame status in the NBA. Stating this momentous event he said, “I made a promise as a kid to my mom I would never remove my turban. Today it is in the Hall of Fame. Embrace what makes you different. It is your superpower. This is the crown I wear each day. Thank you, mom.” Nav Bhatia spends over USD 300,000 every NBA season inviting children from different ethnicities to watch the Raptors game. He wants to unite the children from all backgrounds around the sport. - DriveSpark


At the Recycler’s Yard

PEI’S DALBERT LIVINGSTON IS THE NEW ARC CHAIR

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HE AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLERS OF CANADA (ARC) RECENTLY ANNOUNCED THAT DALBERT LIVINGSTONE FROM ISLAND AUTO SUPPLY IN CHARLOTTETOWN P.E.I. WILL TAKE OVER THE ROLE OF CHAIRMAN OF THE ASSOCIATION, REPLACING WALLY DINGMAN FROM ONTARIO AFTER 10 YEARS IN THAT POSITION.

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As Dalbert transitions into the role of chairman, Wally will remain on-call to provide guidance and continue to serve on the ARC board of directors. “I definitely still want to be involved in providing whatever guidance I can and assist in the transition to a new Chair,” said Wally. “As long as I can serve in a useful capacity, I’ll be willing.” When the time came to name a new ARC chairman, the organization immediately turned to Dalbert. “Wally and I have been speaking over

the past few months about his transition out of the chair position, and he asked if I was ready to take over,” Livingstone said. “While you never think you are ready to take over guidance of a national industry association, with Wally agreeing to stay on the board and mentor my transition, it was an honour I could not pass up.” While youthful in the industry, Dalbert has a long history of service. He purchased Island Auto Supply in 2013 from his grandfather Harvey Livingstone and joined the board of directors of the ARC


Atlantic affiliate, the Automotive Recyclers Association of Atlantic Canada (ARAAC) in 2012 to begin his education of working within industry associations. This was an especially sweet election, as Harvey Livingstone was one of the founders of the Maritime Auto Wreckers Association in 1972—the precursor to the present day ARAAC. Dalbert eventually worked his way up to president of that association and now serves as treasurer. He also spent four years on the board of directors of the U.S.-based Automotive Recyclers Association (ARA) as the organization’s Canadian representative. He joined the ARC board of directors in 2017. “I am incredibly honoured to be the chair, and I would like to help Canadian auto recyclers with any regulatory changes in their respective provinces, especially with the rapid deployment of high voltage cars coming to market,” said Dalbert. “ARC needs to be on the forefront of training, safety, and proper recycling of these EVs and their batteries. I would also like to help Canadian recyclers with the burden of time and money spend acquiring salvage and work to find ways to ease tension with the auction companies. Most of all I would like to see ARC continue as the driver for positive change in the industry, raising awareness of professional auto recycling in all corners of the country and on the international scene as well.” Island Auto Supply is the largest auto recycler in P.E.I. and one of the largest in Atlantic Canada, and has consistently scored in the top 5% of the country with their bi-annual Canadian Auto Recyclers Environmental Code (CAREC) audits.

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Truckers Corner

TRUCKING ANSWERS THE BELL FOR CHARITABLE FOOD TRANSPORT DRIVE

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HE FIRST-EVER CHARITY INITIATIVE ORGANIZED JOINTLY  BY TRUCKS FOR CHANGE, THE CANADIAN TRUCKING ALLIANCE’S BLUE RIBBON TASK FORCE, AND FOOD BANKS CANADA KICKED-OFF THE WEEK OF MAY 24TH AS THE FIRST FEW OF TWO DOZEN CTA-MEMBER CARRIERS BEGAN HAULING FOOD FOR NEEDY CHILDREN.   After Food Bell is an annual multifaceted program organized by Food Banks Canada that focuses on addressing immediate needs of children experiencing hunger while building lifelong skills in nutritional literacy. The program serves to provide nutritional “summer packs” to children who typically rely on school breakfast and lunch programs during the school year. ATB helps to ensure that children experiencing food insecurity continue to receive nutritious food after the last bell rings in June. “Volunteer trucking companies play a significant role in making the program move – literally – by transporting charitable loads throughout Canada. Considering all the challenges Canadians have faced throughout the last year, our involvement in this program couldn’t have come at a better time and I’m proud of how the trucking industry always steps up to the plate,” said Scott Smith, chair of T4C and president of JD Smith & Sons. “We have such a great partner in Food Banks Canada, and we look forward to continuing to work with them in the future.”  The first pallets began moving this week from Brampton, Ont. to La Pocatière and Mont-Joli. Overall, 25 different carriers have committed to moving 51 shipments made up of 65,000 ATB food packs throughout the summer at no charge. Deliveries to local foodbanks originating from Calgary AB and Prince George BC will start to be delivered next week while most shipments to 21 foodbanks throughout Ontario will begin in June.  Meanwhile, CTA is encouraging all carriers who take part in the program to document and share stories/images/video of their efforts and upload them to social media or send to CTA directly. At the end of the campaign, CTA will promote these efforts through its own social media channels. Click here for more info on how to document and share stories of charitable involvement: after the bell social media_public “With the trucking industry well-positioned to sustain the positive image it has gained as a result of its efforts delivering critical supplies during the COVID-19 pandemic, carriers have now expanded their focus on supporting Canadians in need,” said Doug Sutherland, chair of CTA’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on the Driver Shortage and president of Sutco Transportation Specialists. “Our industry was so overwhelmed by all the kind words and encouragement truck drivers, specifically, have been showered with over the last year, that it feels good knowing our industry always stands ready to give back.” 16

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www.napacanada.com VISIT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE FOR PRICING & INFO


Around the Atlantic

THE DOORS ARE OPEN: NAPA SHOPS IN CHIPMAN AND MINTO, NB AIM TO ENSURE EACH CUSTOMER COMES IN, LEAVES HAPPY

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By Kristen Lipscombe

F PAUL MCKENELLEY DOESN’T HAVE THE PART YOU’RE LOOKING FOR IN EITHER OF HIS TWO NAPA AUTO PARTS STORES IN SMALL-TOWN NEW BRUNSWICK, YOU CAN BET HE AND HIS EMPLOYEES WILL DO THEIR VERY BEST TO TRACK DOWN WHATEVER IT IS YOU’RE LOOKING FOR AND GET IT IN YOUR HANDS AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. “If you want something that’s odd, we’ll do our best to get it to you at a reasonable rate and supply it you,” said Mckenelley, who owns both Minto Auto Supplies and, just a quick drive down the road, A-1 Auto Supplies in Chipman, N.B., along with his wife Trila. “We’re a small market, so we try not to say ‘no,’ to anybody,” Mckenelley said of his attentive and committed customer service. “There’s no such thing as ‘you can’t get it.’ ” “We just try to treat everybody fairly; try to treat all the customers the same,” Mckenelley added. “It doesn’t matter who you are; if you’re walking through our door, then we want you to feel like you’re appreciated.” From batteries and brake pads, to alternators and rotors, with quick access to upwards of 500,000 quality parts, both of Mckenelley’s well-stocked shops cater mostly to the automotive industry, “but we also sell some industrial stuff, like heavyduty equipment parts, and we also do hydraulics.” That means that both the Chipman and Minto NAPA Auto Parts locations can help you find the tools and parts you may need for pretty much any mechanical job, including for both marine and farming equipment. And there’s no doubt Mckenelley knows what he’s talking about. He’s been working in the business since 1989, when 18

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he first got hired on at age 25 by thenowners Charles Main to work in his hometown Minto shop. “I just enjoyed getting up and coming to work,” Mckenelley said of why he has stuck with NAPA Auto Parts for more than three decades now. “When I started in ’89, I didn’t know if I’d like it or not, but once I learned about vehicles and cars and how things are done, it’s just a good job. You get to meet a lot of people.” He bounced back and forth between the two locations a bit over the course of the career, eventually in 2007 buying the Minto location, and then in 2018 purchasing the Chipman location, which now serves as his home base. He bought both shops off Ron Bustard. “The first (purchase) was just timing. The gentleman that owned it at the time told me if I ever wanted to purchase, he was willing to sell, and I decided it was time to take that step, take that chance,” Mckenelley said. “And then when Chipman came up for sale, it was only 20 minutes away, and I thought there’s another opportunity,” he said, adding “the store had good numbers and was doing well, so I tried it again.” Both shops staff local workers who grew up in the area, just like Mckenelley. Mckenelly finds running the two NAPA shops both challenging and rewarding. The industry itself, he said, has changed quite a bit over the years, with vehicles expanding beyond just the big major North American brands to include more foreign automobiles and most recently, hybrid models and electric vehicles. “More change is coming,” he said, adding learning the newest tricks of the auto trade is great for both himself and his staff members, because it creates a positive learning environment for employees, while also ensuring his two shops can meet the changing needs of their loyal customers. “We try to keep everybody that comes through the door happy when they come in, and happy when they leave,” Mckenelly said.

OWNER, PAUL MCKENELLEY, AND EMPLOYEES SUSAN MURRAY AND JAKE CRAWFORD AT THE CHIPMAN NAPA STORE.

MANAGER, JOSH WEST, EMPLOYEE KIM RICHARDSON FROM THE MINTO STORE.


At The Bodyshop

BE RESPONSIBLE: USE PROTECTION!

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VOID CERTAIN HARSH REALITIES OF LIFE, ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU’RE ON THE ROAD SURROUNDED BY STRANGERS, USE PROTECTION!

Consider this; the majority of cars today are all rusting behind their owners back. Don’t be shocked, all cars do it, they RUST all the time. RUST is a very dirty word. Corrosion Defence’s advice, be smart and use protection. Why? Consider the dangers when you don’t practice safe ownership. Rust is the deterioration of properties inherent in metals when interacting with the surrounding environment if unprotected. Condensation and moisture work hard to creep into cracks and crevices wherever they may be found and work tirelessly to degrade the surrounding metal eventually causing catastrophic damage and severely devaluing your unprotected car and reducing it’s potential life. Corrosion Defence protects and shields metals by displacing moisture and treating the surfaces with highly effective rust inhibitors. The penetrating inhibitors form a bonded layer on the metal and acts

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as a physical barrier protector to prevent water and salt from causing unwanted damage to our valued vehicle. For years, Corrosion Defence rust control program has contributed in extending the service life for many types of different vehicles. It really works! Corrosion Defence has taken issue with the present state of the rustproofing industry. The status-quo is simply not good enough, they decided to do better and this at a lower cost. They assembled a dedicated team of chemists, software engineers, marketing professionals and qualified applicatortrainers to develop a truly complete turnkey rust prevention program that adds value to the services already offered by automotive centres. Beyond superior rust inhibitor products, that are environmental friendly, non-toxic, non-drip but most importantly highly effective, they researched and developed specialized tools, efficient spray equipment, creative and attractive marketing materials, which offer customers a clean, effective rust-prevention service designed to stimulate repeat business far into the future. Corrosion Defence also developed an industry specific cloud-based customer management software that will invoice,

manage clients, send out reminders and promote their warranty program to mention just a few attributes. Their success will be to continue recruiting qualified and responsible shop owners who are eager to offer effective rust prevention products with distinctive competitive strategies. Their ongoing research and development team monitors the transportation industry to remain current with all spraying techniques to continually offer the most advanced corrosion preventative products and systems available today. They believe technology constantly evolves and they must embrace the necessary changes to succeed. Corrosion Defence offers low-cost affordable starter kits, which will allow you to become a professional rust prevention centre without putting a strain on your budget. If you have a free bay, you can use the space to increase sales by offering an add-on service for your current clients, as well as attracting new clients. Protection benefits everyone – especially if such a protection is innovative, current and addresses the needs of today’s vehicles. Be Smart… Use Protection! For more information call their tollfree number at 1-844-766-7878 or visit them online at: corrosiondefence.com


Atlantic Racing News

ATLANTIC MODIFIED TOUR NEARS 20TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON By Tim Terry

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HILE THE F O C U S FOR MOST RACE FANS IN ATL ANTIC CANADA IS THE PRO STOCK DIVISION AND THE MAJOR LATE MODEL SHOWS, ONE TRAVELLING DIVISION CONTINUES TO PROVIDE A UNIQUE BRAND OF ENTERTAINMENT. The racing Atlantic Modified Tour provides could not be stopped through a pandemic as they were the only touring division to produce a point championship season in 2020. That should come as no surprise as they have been riding out the ebb-and-flow of the motorsports industry in the Maritimes since 2003. In 2021, the Atlantic Modified Tour will celebrate 19 consecutive seasons of entertaining fans throughout the Maritimes and Northern Maine. While the faces in the cars and the venues may have changed through the years, the series is strong as it enters a year that sees the world rebound from a pandemic. The idea of a competitive but affordable class of open wheel cars that ultimately spawned the Atlantic Modified Tour of today came from Jim Duke. The region had seen open wheel divi-

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sions before, predominately the one held at Scotia Speedworld in the 90s, so the idea might not have been too farfetched. With the help of Dave Burnham, the first

wheeled powered by a 305 cubic inch motor. Teams are allowed to run different body styles and this season the tour switched to a used Hoosier 1070 “Pro

car was fabricated and the rest, as they say, is history. From an organizational standpoint, the Atlantic Modified Tour is one of only two oval-based touring series in Atlantic Canada that is a society and has an elected executive and board of directors. Unlike their Maritime League of Legends Tour counterparts, the executive is comprised of drivers and car owners, not allowing anyone outside of the driver’s seat or owner’s box to ultimately influence the direction of the series. In the winter of 2021, the members elected Doug Matchett as president of the series. Previous president Joe Hoyt continues to serve as vice president. The cars on the Atlantic Modified Tour are minimum 108” wheelbase, open

Stock” tire due to the COVID-19 pandemic limiting the ability for modified teams to get used Hoosier tires from Pro All Stars Series teams. They sound like a race car and fans can “feel the thunder” every time they race onto the track. It is not uncommon to see the drivers push their cars to the limit and go two-and-three wide for multiple laps at a time, leading to some exciting shows from green to checkered. The series hit the ground running in 2003 and has seen some familiar names in the region come through its gates. Similar to what the legend division has become in Nova Scotia, it has served in recent years as a melting pot of talent. Arguably its biggest export has been Ryan Messer. Messer would go on to win a Pro Stock 250 at Speedway 660, championships and


Atlantic Racing News

major wins in the Late Model Sportsman and compete part time on the East Coast International Pro Stock Tour following a championship in the modifieds. Justin Beers, who has gone on to success in the late model sportsman ranks at Petty International Raceway, has also won a championship in the series on his way up the ladder.

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While young drivers have made this division a stop up the ladder, several veteran drivers have called this division home. Former late model sportsman drivers Zean Dutcher and 2020 tour champion Yves McCray have settled into a modified over recent years. In the past, Larry Gulliver, Tom Betts and multi-time series champion Mike “Sparky” Raeburn settled

into the series in their later years behind the wheel. Rumor has it that Darren Sherwood has found himself a ride in the series after racing in various divisions over the past three decades. While not as “experienced” as some of their counterparts, Braxton Stafford and two-time champion Brandon Skidmore now call the Tour home after several years in various cars including Pro Stocks. Ok, so the names might not carry as much snap as Sommerville, O’Blenis, Flemming, Tucker, Turple or Slaunwhite. If you’re a late model mainstay, hear me out. The Atlantic modified tour might not be the main draw on the night of racing but the product that is on track is just as competitive as any division on the card on any given night. Like any division in motorsports, the car count has ebbed and flowed over the 19 years of racing. Like many divisions, the early-to-late 2000’s saw a boom in cars. With the industry seeing an upturn combined with the “new” factor of the car and division, the series was a must-see. The track visited many of the region’s top tracks and took part in many of the Maritimes marquee events, including a stop at the IWK 250 at Riverside Speedway in the late 2000’s. The track has visited Prince Edward Island and even make a trip to Lake Doucette Motor Speedway outside of Yarmouth, N.S. in its past. In recent years, the Atlantic modified tour has found a home in New Brunswick, with a majority of the drivers hailing from the province and all four major ovals within N.B. hosting events. In total, the 2021 schedule sees 12 point races and two exhibition events for a total of 14 shows over 12 weekends. The tour still visits the big events within the province, including SpeedWeekend at Speedway 660, the Mike Stevens Memorial at Petty International Raceway, the Very Best Fall Shootout at Speedway Miramichi and the Atlantic Championships at the CENTRE For Speed. For a Series that falls under a support class touring division, they are at the big shows in front of the big eyes they deserve to be racing in front of. It just goes to show the respect that the tracks and their fans have for the series and the hard work that goes in from the series executive. As mentioned, they were the only touring division to officially crown a champion in 2020 - and it was a new champion at that! The advantage of most of the drivers being New Brunswick based, while border restrictions are a hinderance, they are not the end of the world for the Atlantic modified tour. While other series sat idle


due to border restrictions and gathering limits from COVID-19, the modifieds got seven races in with six of those counting toward the point championship. Logan Power, a Street Stock Champion at Petty Raceway, started off the season strong with two wins in the first two races but the wheels quickly fell off of a championship run in September. Enter Yves McCray, who was consistent behind Power in his victories and was able to crack victory lane for the first time during SpeedWeekend 2020 at Speedway 660. The Neguac, N.B. driver followed it up with a championship clinching victory in the Keswick Kitchen Season Finale at Speedway Miramichi. While Miramichi drivers Zean Dutcher and Travis Conroy closed the gap heading into the sixth event of the year, they had to settle in behind the Sarkis Collision Centre sponsored modified. For a sportsman driver that had seen plenty success and a family who has shelves full of hardware, they had one more line to add to their resume. In six point races, the tour saw four different winners in 2020. Power and McCray each won two races, while Joe Hoyt and Chris Wilson each picked up a win at Speedway Miramichi and Petty International Raceway, respectively. Should McCray repeat as champion in 2021, he will become only the third driver in the 19-year history of the series to do so. Mark Price won championships in back-to-back years in 2008 and 2009. Mike “Sparky” Raeburn won four championships in five years from 2009 to 2013, broken up only by a Hoyt title in 2011. Raeburn has the most Atlantic modified tour championships with five, with his latest coming in 2017. “Sparky” has since retired from driving on the tour but served as race director for the series for a one-

year term in 2020. Hoyt and Brandon Skidmore each have two championships to their credit but not in back-to-back seasons. With the emergence of the veteran drivers prevalent in the series, it was Travis Conroy who struck first in the 2021 season. Amid closed borders and next to empty grandstands, Conroy was able to hold off McCray at Petty International Raceway on June 5th for his first career

Atlantic modified tour victory. McCray’s second place finish is the second year in a row he finished a bridesmaid in the season opening feature and we ultimately know how that finished up in 2020. As of press time, the border restrictions are starting to lift around the Maritimes and, maybe more importantly, the province of N.B. is re-opening from the COVID-19 pandemic. With increased gathering limits and crowds at race tracks, the Atlantic modified tour will continue to put on shows for their loyal fans and perform at big events around the province throughout the 2021 season. Their perseverance through the pandemic earned them the attention of readers of Tim’s Corner Motorsports when they voted the Atlantic modified tour as the fan favourite touring series in Atlantic Canada, defeating the perennial favorite east coast International Maritime Pro Stock Tour. With the 20th Anniversary of the Atlantic modified tour upcoming, the series has plenty to celebrate. First though, they have a 2021 champion to crown. If you find yourself in New Brunswick, get out to a race track and check out the series. For complete information on the series, you can visit AtlanticModifieds.com.

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Future Technologies

DA KINK IN MY BACK: EXOSKELETONS MAKING HUGE IMPACT ON AUTO MANUFACTURING

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By Carter Hammett

ITH THE ADVANCEMENT OF EXOSKELETONS AS A PRODUCTIVITY TOOL, AUTO MANUFACTURERS ARE DISCOVERING WAYS TO INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY WHILE REDUCING WORKER INJURY. The world of wearable technology has been getting a lot of ink in magazines in recent years. For the uninitiated, “wearables” as they’re known in the biz, include electronic devices worn close to or on the surface of the skin. Wearables can detect and transfer info on everything from vital signs to body movement. Wearable tech is one example of the “Internet of Things” including software and sensors that enable objects to exchange information through the Internet with a manufacturer or other connected devices minus the need for human interactivity. Wearables can include everything from smart shoes to watches and even tattoos. The technology has been making an impact across multiple sectors including navigation systems and even healthcare. In recent years even automotive manufacturing has gotten into the act with the introduction of exoskeletons. With an aging workforce and less people entering the trades, automotive companies are looking at different ways to alter productivity. Exoskeletons are being explored by most of the big players including Toyota, Hyundai and Ford, among others. They’re being perceived as excellent responses to tasks that are repetitive or overheard in nature, or that simply can’t be replaced through automation. There’s several models currently in development, including several from ULS Robotics. The models enable the wearer to lift an additional 20 kg and are powered by lithium batteries. Other companies like Hyundai and Toyota are developing exoskeletons that enable workers to perform overhead tasks more effectively. The end result is a safer workplace and a corresponding decline in workplace injuries. Wearable technology has a role to play in reducing these costs. As of March 2019 it was estimated 26

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that between the six major car companies, approximately 585 exoskeletons were currently in use. Another variable contributing to the growth of this wearable technology is the fact that ergonomist and manufacturing engineers from competing companies have the ability to communicate with each other. As a result, stakeholders can swap stories and innovations together which ultimately has the outcome of benefiting workers around the globe. Production lines are known for having short cycle times, meaning that a new vehicle is completed every three-to-six minutes. Workers may rotate tasks every two hours, but they’ll still have a lot of repetition and the same body motions on a daily basis. Ultimately, the motive industry wants to reduce the number of long-term injuries. Injuries aren’t usually isolated events. Rather, the body accumulates fatigue over the course of time until one day when the injury actually happens. Fatigue buildup occurs when the body hasn’t had sufficient time to recover from the daily grind that it requires. At a recent webinar co-presented by Toyota and the University of Waterloo June 2, presenters quoted McFarland and Fischer (2019) who wrote, “researching the impact of industrial-use exoskeletons on muscular fatigue and kinematics of the shoulder will continue to provide a more robust appraisal of their efficacy to reduce shoulder-related specific muscle demands.” Researchers identified several factors that potentially increase risk of injury in overhead work, including extended reaches, high frequency of arm elevation, high

precision requirements and the arm being forced to rotate internally. Here, the shoulder is identified as a “complex” rather than a “joint” which faces a range of complex issues that involve multiple parts, including muscles which can increase perturbation and contribute to injury. As of this writing there are three passive (unpowered) exoskeletons being utilized and developed, including shoulder support units that support the arms at or above chest level; hip exoskeletons that provide back support while the user is bending and “chairless chairs” that can lock into position while squatting. A 2019 study published in the Professional Safety Journal of the American Society of Safety Professionals, indicated an 86% improvement of high quality welds for workers wearing am exoskeleton that provided passive shoulder support during a welding simulation. At present, Hyundai is piloting exoskeletons in Korea and plans an eventual global disbursement, hopefully selling them to other auto manufacturers. The goal is to help with the company’s transition to autonomous and electric vehicles. The company recently announced that $17billion will be spent of new technology to aid with the transfer. That’s serious investment. And a sign that wearable technology is here to stay. Despite recent advancements in automation, vehicle manufacturers still require human input in areas like decision making that robots simply can’t duplicate. In tandem with exoskeletons, auto plant workers will be able to extend their productivity while reducing their likelihood of injury as we enter a new era of manufacturing.


Industry News

NEW! RHINO TRUCK LUBE CENTRES WE’RE NOT JUST CHANGING OIL. WE’RE CHANGING THE INDUSTRY.

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F T E R 3 0+ S U C C E S S F U L YEARS IN THE BUSINESS OF QUICK LUBE AND CAR CARE, OUR MANAGEMENT TEAM KNOWS ONE THING FOR SURE – EXACTLY WHAT IT TAKES TO BECOME A WELLOILED MACHINE.

We’re on the road to reinvent the heavy duty truck - quick lube and preventative maintenance sector in Canada. Our goal is to exceed the needs and expectations of the modern driver, allowing them to service their truck or RV when it’s convenient. With over 150 combined years of management experience, we’re driven

VOLVO LAUNCHES FREE TOW FOR LIFE

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O MATTER WHAT VOLVO YOU MAY DRIVE, ROADSIDE TOWING IS NOW AVAILABLE FREE OF CHARGE IN CANADA.

With road trip season just around the corner, Volvo Cars is expanding its suite of complimentary services available to 30

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to improve the uptime and experience for truck owner-operators, small or large size fleets, and drivers of motorhomes and RV’s. Our flag-ship Moncton, N.B. facility, will be the model as we rollout locations and quickly expand to provide no-appointment, warranty approved services to drivers across most Canadian provinces. Look for our Dartmouth N.S. location coming December 2021. Rhino Truck Lube Centres - No appointment, drive-through services include: Lubrication - Oil, differential transmission and grease (tractor and trailer) support for all vehicles. Filtration - We offer filtration services. Including oil, air, cabin air, and fuelwater separator filters.

Inspection - Offering full inspection services, including wipers, tires, grease, trailer and fluid levels. Amenities - We’re proud to partner with TruckStop+ to offer the optimal experience for all customers. The location’s amenities include fuel, card-lock, free WiFi, showers, laundry facilities and more.

Canadians with “Tow for Life”. This service complements the free towing already provided to in-warranty customers via Roadside Assistance and works alongside existing complimentary warranties such as the Volvo Lifetime Replacement Parts & Labour Warranty. “At Volvo, it is important to us that we help our customers get the service they expect, when they need it” said  Matt Girgis, Managing Director, Volvo Cars Canada, “We are committed to providing all of our customers with expert service that includes genuine Volvo parts and repair methods. With Tow for Life,

customers can get back on the road faster and feel confident in the safety of their vehicle.” Towing is already included as part of a suite of roadside assistance services available during the car’s warranty period. Tow for Life ensures that owners of disabled, in or out-of-warranty Volvos are towed to an authorized Volvo retailer for diagnosis and repair. The service covers towing to the nearest Volvo Retailer, without cost to the customer for the first 50 kilometres. Volvo customers can call for help through Volvo On-Call or via Volvo Customer Care at 1 800-263-0475.

For more information contact:: John O’Donnell, VP Operations and Marketing, J. L. Management Group Office 1-705-566-6192 ext 206; Cell 403-690-4336


Truckers Corner

COVID-19 REOPENING: SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR TRUCKING COMPANIES By Dave Elniski

INTRODUCTION With summer 2021 underway, it appears as though there is an attitude of hope in many areas with regards to the COVID-19 pandemic. While reopening is underway in some places and lockdowns remain in place in others, it is reasonable to assume that restrictions will begin to lift - even if they may be reinstated later. Businesses need to prepare themselves for how reopening may impact their operations. While we were used to things prior to COVID-19 entering the scene, the pandemic has been around long enough now that many people have grown accustomed to operating under varying levels of public health restrictions. It is not safe to assume that all workers will be eager and willing to get right back to the ways things were pre-COVID. In this article, I will explain some safety-related concerns businesses - especially trucking companies - should consider as they begin to see local governments lift public health restrictions. There is no one-sizefits all approach

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to bringing workers back to the office or removing pandemic operating restrictions, but the process requires more than simply modifying personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements.

REVIEWING HAZARD ASSESSMENTS Employers should assess the work they ask their workers to perform for hazards to the health and safety of their employees. This is a standard practice in occupational health and safety (OH&S), and is required in the OH&S legislation that applies to different workplaces. For the trucking industry, carriers that operate in more than one province can find their OH&S obligations in the Canada Labour Code Part II [1]. While general trucking continued operations during the pandemic due to the essential nature of the wo r k performed, the dayto-day routine of workers was likely affected to some degree

by pandemic restrictions. Office workers may have been sent to work from home. Drivers are familiar with self-declarations, self-isolation, and additional PPE. Loosening public health restrictions imply that the risk posed by the COVID-19 virus has lessened. This is great news, but not all people will react to it the same way. Since the aforementioned workers have had significant disruptions to their pre-COVID routines, it will take time for them to adapt to new routines even if new routines were the norm back in 2019. Businesses should reassess hazards present in their workplaces as COVID-19 restrictions ease. So much attention has been paid to public health-related hazards that it is fair to assume that other hazards have received less consideration. Once allowed to do so, the removal of plexiglass barriers and additional hand sanitizer stations may feel cathartic and symbolic of the end of an unpleasant era in an organization’s history. However, all pre-COVID hazards are still present.

PROACTIVE BUILDING MAINTENANCE Many buildings h a v e been operat-


Truckers Corner

ing at significantly-reduced capacity as people have been working from home. Before they reopen for increased occupancy, it is wise to assess the air circulation and water systems to make sure they are working and clean; underused systems that are suddenly expected to operate flawlessly at normal capacity may let businesses down [2]. Additionally, buildings that have not been used as much over the past year may not have been inspected as often. Inspections should be conducted prior to letting people return to work so that the air quality and comfort systems are known to function properly.

PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH HAZARDS Federally-regulated trucking companies are required to take action to prevent psychological injuries to their workers [3]. Regardless of legislated requirements, callousness towards people’s mental health is wrong. Not everyone will experience the re-opening of the world equally. Some will be happy. Some will be relieved. Some will be scared. Some will experience an anxious combination of all sorts of different emotions. I am no expert in assessing and controlling psychological hazards in the workplace, and I suggest that business and safety leaders consult credible sources for information. For example, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) offers many free resources for incorporating mental health into a health and safety program [4]. The Mental Health Commission of Canada (Home | Mental Health Commission of Canada) is another good resource to look into. What I can say with confidence is that leaders should take an approach of com-

passion, patience, and courage when addressing their workers and creating policies. Compassion helps leaders consider the wellbeing of workers. Patience helps leaders and supervisors give workers the time to adapt as well as reasonable leniency for mistakes. Courage provides the strength needed for the difficult conversations that may be needed to get to the root cause of certain problems.

CAUTIOUS OPTIMISM I would be remiss if I left out a section on preparing for a reversal of your jurisdiction’s reopening strategy. One lesson we should all take from the current pandemic is that the ability to adapt and change quickly is important for the effectiveness of a business. If, in 2021, we see a loosening of public health restrictions to the point where many of our hazard controls like plexiglass barriers, work from home orders, increased PPE, and hand sanitizing stations are removed, we should still keep these controls close at hand. Some of these controls may remain with us indefinitely. There is no perfectly correct response to the situation we are in now. Increasing vaccinations and decreasing restrictions are reasons to be optimistic for the future. However, I believe that optimism of this kind needs to be tempered with a reasonable amount of caution. We remember what the instatement of mass restrictions felt like. By being cautious in our reopening strategies, we can enjoy more freedom responsibly while remaining prepared to fight infection flare-ups should they be encountered.

SUMMARY

AUTO TECH ACCELERATES EXPANSION Government of Canada helps Quorum Information Systems ramp up growth opportunities Atlantic Canada’s advanced technology industry is an important part of building a strong, resilient economy. That is why the Government of Canada is helping automotive technology company Quorum Information Systems Inc. create more jobs and grow its business. 34

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Businesses that have become accustomed to operating under pandemic health restrictions need to consider how reopening may affect the health and safety of their workers. While many people will welcome the loosening of restrictions, many people may be anxious about what work will look like post-COVID. Especially since COVID is still with us. People will need to collaborate and show each other patience as we all see what the rest of 2021 has in store for us. I will end with a quote from Red Green that I think expresses my sentiments on the matter: “Remember, I’m pullin’ for ya we’re all in this together.” [5]

REFERENCES 1 - “Duties of Employers”, Canada Labour Code Part II, Government of Canada, accessed June 12, 2021, https://laws-lois. justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/L-2/FullText.html 2 - “Preparing HVAC Systems Before Reoccupying A Building”, ASHRAE Journal, accessed June 12, 2021, https://www.ashrae.org /file%20librar y/ t e chni c a l% 2 0 r e so ur c e s /a shra e % 2 0 journal/2021journaldocuments/january2021_022-027_mccarthy.pdf 3 - “Prevention of accidents, injuries and illnesses”, Canada Labour Code Part II, Government of Canada, accessed June 12, 2021, https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/ eng/acts/L-2/FullText.html 4 - “Mental Health”, Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, accessed June 12, 2021, https://www.ccohs. ca/topics/wellness/mentalhealth/ 5 - “Steven Smith Quotes”, GoodReads, Quotable Quotes, accessed June 12, 2021, https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/71704remember-i-m-pullin-for-ya--we-re-allin-this-together

The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Minister of Natural Resources and Member of Parliament for St. John’s South-Mount Pearl, on behalf of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages, announced a repayable contribution of $500,000 to Quorum Information Systems Inc. on May 11. Quorum provides customer management software solutions to automotive dealerships throughout North America. This investment will create three new jobs to help the company pursue new business partnerships, mergers and acquisitions. The announcement further demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to developing a more innovative economy by supporting growing technology companies.  “The tech industry in Newfoundland and Labrador is creative, innovative, and determined to grow even bigger. Investing in Quorum supports growth, creates jobs, and shows, once again, that we’re ready to take on the world,” said Seamus O’Regan.


The Lower 48

ROAD TEST: A DOGGIE ADVENTURE

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By Teresa Patterson  

HAT HAPP E N S WHEN A SINGLE WOMAN OF A CERTAIN AGE LOADS HER VAN WITH FOOD, PROVISIONS, TWO DOGS AND SETS OUT FOR A ROAD TRIP SHE’LL NEVER FORGET? ALL IS REVEALED HERE… I start my journey on a rainy Sunday, May 2 in a 2008 Dodge Grand Caravan departing from middle Kentucky (Ky.).  The first day is really about stopping to see a few friends. Although this adds almost 1000 miles to the overall trip it is definitely worth the time and effort.  I also learn that the GPS I use really hasn’t caught up to some of the road improvements made in Kentucky and Tennessee.   So I spent extra time going in circles; always fun in the rain.  Finally, with the help of a friend in Paducah Ky., I find the way out of there and get back on track toward Mississippi.   Tennessee is another challenge.    I have to go through Memphis and they are upgrading roads as well.  So I get lost and have a lovely tour of Beele St., which honestly is kind of cool.  I run a couple of red lights, oops, but get back on track eventually without any tickets, and am en route to Collins, Ms..    I arrive without incident, spend the night with friends, and continue on my journey next morning.    I stop and get gas and coffee at a little station on Highway 84W in Mississippi, not far from where I 36

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spent the night.   This is my third  fill-up and all at under $3 bucks a gallon:  not bad.  Buy some water for the dogs, and reset my GPS so I don’t have to go through the center of Texas.  This takes me back north but actually saves time.    There’s more rain the second day too.  

DAY 2: LET’S DO THE TWIST I go through Louisiana without stopping and make it through Dallas.  On the other side of Dallas I start seeing signs saying tornado watch in this area.  I keep driving.    The rain starts getting harder.    The next sign says tornado warning area.    I pass a couple of them.    I have somebody check for me and they say

the tornado is really close to my location.   About then the hail starts.    I take a ramp and all the traffic in front of me is under the overpass.  I think, holy crap, and say a quick prayer.  I get as close to the stopped traffic as I can; a tanker is next to me, and I wait for it to pass.  I guess the twister either goes over or behind us.    I later hear two people have been killed in the tornado the next day.      Nonetheless, I keep driving even though I’m shaken up.    I stop in a small town toward the western end of Texas to sleep because my nerves are shot; I even forget the name of the town.    I call someone and tell them where I am, “just in case.”  I sleep in the van with my dogs.  One of the dogs is a 10-month-old, 70lb American terrier that loves me so I’m not worried about anybody messing with me.  If you’re wondering why I make this trip with my dogs I’m happy to explain it.  I found myself in a marriage I wanted out of,  in a hometown I was tired of being in.    Most people follow their dreams when they are young and carefree.  I do things backwards.  I always wanted to move out west but was busy raising kids and doing the stuff that makes us put our dreams away to rust.  Recently I have had opportunities to pull those dreams out and clean the rust off.  I’ve had many dreams come true in the last year or so.  This journey being one of them.    My pup also being one.  I’ve wanted a blue pittie for years and just hadn’t gotten around to it.  My pup, Spirit, was meant to be mine.  He is one of my traveling companions.  I brought dog food but after the second day he discovers fast food and dog food is out. They may have eaten a couple bites of what was scattered all over the back seat of the van but cheeseburgers are the preferred meal.  And fries…can’t  forget those!  Even my glass of


The Lower 48

Coke is an option if he has half a chance! My older, smaller dog pretty much sleeps. He’s on an adventure too!  He also learns how to “open” the water I bought by chewing the handle of the gal bottles.  When they get too low for that to work he just chews the bottles up. The first couple couple of times I’m rather amused.  By the third day it’s rather annoying as I think I may need it going through the desert.  Luckily I don’t.    Yes, the inside of the van is a bit of a mess but as I had purchased it from my daughter who has 4 kids that really isn’t a big deal.  It still needs a good internal detailing to remove crayon marks and assorted sticky things I really prefer not to identify. I expect such behavior from him so don’t get too uptight about any of it.  He’s a puppy after all, albeit a 70-pound one.  Skeeter, my older dog basically sleeps through most of it because she’s been on smaller road trips and doesn’t get excited about such things.  She’s just happy to be with me.

DAY 3: ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH I start out at daylight and continue on.  The skies are finally sunny!  I get the

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rest of the way out of Texas and into New Mexico: Destination Roswell.   Arrive fairly early.  I don’t spend much time there but have to go through town so I can at least say I’ve been there!  By then I am pretty much in “just want to get there” mode and the dogs are too, I think.  I make it to Flagstaff to meet a friend on another planned stop, then onward toward California. I get some beautiful pictures of the sun setting in New Mexico.  I also make really good time. Of course the fact I gained two hours of daylight doesn’t hurt either.   Driving through the mountains is something I’ve never been crazy about and the northwest part of New Mexico plus most of the way through California is crossing the mountains.  I want to get to my destination that night but it isn’t going to happen so I stop at an exit several trucks are taking and pull into the parking lot of a small gas station.  When you’re traveling with a huge terrier and a little ankle biter you aren’t too worried about people bothering you.  It isn’t the best choice however because he growls half the night and after I wake up to him standing over top of me and the smaller dog standing over my head both

seriously growling at about 3 am, I decide to move on. I drive about 30 miles down the road and pull off in a small pull off area with three-or-four semis and go back to sleep until daylight.  It’s quite peaceful there.  I continue on my way.

DAY 4 It’s a beautiful day. The sun is shining. I know I’m in California because it’s quite cool.  One of the roads on my original route is under construction so the GPS directs me to a completely different route.  I really don’t mind although I think this adds a couple hundred more miles to my trip.  But I see some really gorgeous scenery and other than one fill up I have to make in BFE at $4.59 a gallon, it’s a great trip.  More mountains.  Lots more mountains but by now I’m site seeing so I just slow down and gawk with everybody else.  Kentucky has mountains but California has mountains!  They are gorgeous! I also have the pleasure of going through part of the Mojave desert on my adventure.  I have a thing for deserts and really love that.  The diversity of the US is really amazing and if I had taken more time and


explored each state in depth I know I would have found even more unique and amazing things. But I’m on a tight budget that I don’t go over.  Thankfully, no trouble with the van either.  I add just a little water in Flagstaff, less than a quart to the reservoir.  The oil is good, and after I unload the van I discover I have a back tire that could use a little air.  The total mileage for my adventure is right around 3,000 miles, but you have to remember I went to Mississippi and had a detour in California.  It costs around $500.00 including food to get here.  I sleep in the van except the first night when I stay at my friend Lana’s in Ms.. It’s definitely been an adventure worth the money!!  Would I do it again?  Not anytime soon but who knows what the future might hold!!  Maybe when the pup learns to “stay” a little better.  

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Road Safety

THE SMELL OF BURNT RUBBER FOR MANY TEENS, OBTAINING A DRIVER’S LICENSE IS THE ULTIMATE RITE OF PASSAGE. BUT SOMETIMES LIFE THROWS A FEW CURVE BALLS…

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By Adrian Giorgio

REMEMBER FEELING ALIENATED, HEARING THEM ALL INDIVIDUALLY DELIVER THE GOOD NEWS. GLEEFULLY ROLLING UP TO THE FRONT ENTRANCE IN THEIR MOM’S SEDAN OR SUV. It’s a given, right? Certainly, nobody else thought twice. 16 is a special age for a variety of reasons — none bigger than experiencing the sweet freedom of the open road. This wasn’t new for me. I was already

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someone who didn’t indulge in the typical teenage pleasures: alcohol, drugs or even just parties. I would occasionally attend a jam, observe everyone else throwing back shots, beer and whatever other concoctions they could consume. I’d be sure to stay quiet for most of the night before checking out early. Sure, there was the odd drink spaced out over the course of four hours, but it was methodically calculated and panic would still set in at the first feeling of intoxication. Weed use was rarer, but scarier. Ironically, cannabis would go on to become the product that most helped to subdue the condition responsible for all of my party anxiety: epilepsy. All in all, I was a low-key teen who was used to being extra-disciplined, responsible and level-headed. When the

first opportunity to deviate from that norm and become more free-spirited presented itself, I leaped. I certainly wasn’t underage when it came to qualifying for a set of wheels. It wasn’t until the age of 18 that the opportunity to even perform the written portion of my driver’s test arose. In Ontario, completion of the G1 alone doesn’t allow you to drive without an experienced passenger. Until requirements were met for G2 eligibility, I relied upon friends to pick me up and drop me off. I envied their liberty and nonchalant attitude toward navigating the city. They didn’t have to try a series of different medication combinations or frantically hope to stabilize their situation — they didn’t have to languish just to go six months without a seizure. Though that number seems so small and insignificant now, it was Ever-


Road Safety

est at the time. Constant close calls, near misses and medical skepticism restrained me to the point of rage and depression which--you guessed it!--caused more seizures. The lack of control bred the very triggers I was trying to avoid. In the summer of 2012, it finally happened. Three years of agonizing delay and uncertainty were coming to a close. I sat nervously, sweating with heart palpitations as the examiner approached. Driving school was complete and there were no more do-overs. It was time to pick up my friends for a change and travel north for the May long weekend. I pulled out of the parking lot into the intersection, merged and checked my blind spot; the light switched from yellow to red simultaneously. Turning back, I froze and stuttered to clear the intersection. The rest was just a formality. What hurt most were the words of “consolation” from my examiner: “Look kid, you clearly know how to drive. I can’t pass you because of that early mishap, but just enjoy your long weekend and come back soon!” Even though there was only a minimum of a week’s wait to schedule another test, all I could think about was yet another delay and ob-

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stacle to freedom. I went home fuming, feeling like all the progress I’d made had been in vain and ended with a cruel irony. A rollercoaster of emotion followed when I passed the second time around. I went from the deepest anger to almost being ecstatic, as I finally had the opportunity to drive my first car. That summer stands out for multiple reasons as being one of my favorites, but cruising in my 1973 Pontiac Firebird takes the cake. Having a considerate dad who’s obsessed with American vintage has its perks. I enjoyed the next few months of prime muscle car weather until returning to school for my third year at the University of Waterloo. The semester started off with a bang: I excelled at the necessary language courses for my degree, made some great new friends in my program, adopted some new extra-curricular activities and most importantly, hadn’t had a single seizure. The trend continued, onward and upward. Before I knew it, it was winter and finals were impending. There was immense pressure from considerations other than grades: roommate compatibility, relationships and volunteering for student causes, to name a

few. However, I persevered and was able to maintain my composure. This gave me an extreme amount of confidence, being able to withstand all of these stressors at the same time and at the right time. That determination and some hope pushed me to get through my classes. It wasn’t until a few days before my 20th birthday that things took a turn for the worse: symptoms of an upcoming seizure. I sat in class, clutching my head as it felt like it heated up to 100 degrees. My brain started to hurt and my changing perceptions caused panic. I gathered myself, focused and completed the task at hand. Not 30 seconds after submitting my exam, I passed out in the hallway corridor. Soon after, I returned to Toronto and made an appointment with my neurologist. He promptly adjusted my medications, recommended me to another specialist and revoked my license. Everything I had worked so hard for, all the sacrifices, strict self-discipline and unfailing resolve became meaningless. I lost my freedom as the ‘bird went back into the garage, under lock-and-key. Eight years later, I am more stable but still unable to drive.


The summer nights still roll in, the weather clement as ever and the roads rife with GM, MOPAR and Ford beauties gripping the tarmac. I may not be handling shifters, but I still catch myself subconsciously analyzing fenders, marker lights, bumpers, fins and bezels. What year is that Chevy? Why are Beaumonts so much rarer than Chevelles? If she were freed from her cage, my Pontiac would smoke those overhyped Camaros! Maybe one day that theory can best tested; for now, daydream drags will have to suffice. While that may be the case, I no longer feel the alienation in quite the same way. It would be a lie to say the lack of freedom is irrelevant to me, but age and its accompanying priorities have a way of rearranging your values. My friends respect my

use of transit systems and commitment to walking distances that would seem at best curious, at worst, stupefying. More importantly, rather than looking askance at my careful behaviour, they support it. We may no longer call them jams, but the get-togethers still occur and involve some of the same activities and experiences. It’s truly gratifying to know that I can attend them anxiety-free and with a re-

served passenger’s side seat at the end of the night. A future my nerve-addled teenage self would have deemed impossible. Adrian Giorgio is a writer and editor with a passion for language, philosophy and the social sciences. He is returning to school to study Neuropsychology. He has contributed to mental health, spirituality, historical, political and cultural organizations.

VOLVO CARS CANADA LAUNCHES FREE TOW FOR LIFE

No matter what vintage Volvo you may drive, roadside towing is now available free of charge in Canada. With road trip season just around the corner, Volvo Cars is expanding its suite of complimentary services available to Canadians with “Tow for Life”. This service complements the free towing already provided to in-warranty customers via Roadside Assistance and works alongside existing complimentary warranties such as the Volvo Lifetime Replacement Parts & Labor Warranty.  “At Volvo, it is important to us that we help our customers get the service they expect, when they need it” said  Matt Girgis, Managing Director, Volvo Cars Canada, “We are committed to providing all of our customers with expert service that includes genuine Volvo parts and repair methods. With Tow for Life, customers can get back on the road faster and feel confident in the safety of their vehicle.” Towing is already included as part of a suite of roadside assistance services available during the car’s warranty period. Tow for Life ensures that owners of disabled, in or out-of-warranty Volvos are towed to an authorized Volvo retailer for diagnosis and repair. The service covers towing to the nearest Volvo Retailer, without cost to the customer for the first 50 kilometres. Volvo customers can call for help through Volvo On-Call or via Volvo Customer Care at 1 800263-0475. autoatlantic.com

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Bob’s Business Development

DAD: IT’S TIME FOR SUCCESSION TO TAKE PLACE By Robert (Bob) Greenwood, AMAM Accredited Master Automotive Manager

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HILE DAD RECOGN I Z E S THAT IT’S ALMOST TIME TO PASS THE TORCH, HE MUST ENSURE THAT JUNIOR’S READY TO TAKE OVER THE REINS. The industry must get through succession sooner than later, however the older generation is having an exceedingly difficult time with this issue. For business owners that are fortunate to have offspring that are interested in taking over the business, we hear comments from parents that their “child” or “children” are not ready for this business yet as they are only 21 or 23 years old. Based on that statement it is clear how parents and especially fathers are not engaging or involving their children properly. First, the parent must acknowledge that the 21 or 23-year-old is a young adult, not a child……unless you, the parent, have always kept them at that level with your interactions with them. If you as a parent have done that then the question of “why are you doing that?” must be honestly answered. Are your own insecurities today getting in the way of the future? Second, for a successful succession to take place an “apprenticeship training period” must take place. This means that the young adult is fully exposed to all issues within the business and industry from all points of view. A good apprenticeship can take place for up to five-to-10 years where the son or daughter become the “right-hand person” with their opinions and views fully expressed at closed door meetings. We all mature at different rates so the right time frame must be monitored. Now they are making an informed decision as to whether they want this business to be their career. I do not believe that parents want their children to take over a business they don’t have a true passion for. That would just create future stress and misery. The problems I have witnessed oc44

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cur when Dad won’t let go. He takes the attitude that Dad is always right, however the son or daughter desire to go down a more modern road by introducing better business processes and/or newer business technologies to streamline the systems and operate more efficiently and professionally. Dad is having a tough time grasping the new ways, so he rationalizes “we have done pretty well up until now, why change and who says that stuff is right for our business?” If succession is going to move forward successfully, Dad must start listening, understanding, and respecting their opinions, as well as stop “cherry picking” what information their child sees or is involved with. They must be properly exposed to all issues within the shop and be part of all discussions leading to solutions. Their opinions must be supported, respected and in the end, they too must be held accountable. Accountability will teach the next generation where mistakes are/have been made and where successes are realized to embrace. They must attend as many business management courses as possible and even if travel is involved, make sure the investment is made. Ensure the content within the course is truly relevant and get a written money-back guarantee on the course to ensure no one is wasting their time. They will require a minimum of sixto-eight days of business management courses a year moving forward to ensure the business depth is fully understood in this ever changing autocare industry. The next generation should be attending some key technical classes with the shop’s technicians to also get an overview on vehicle technology and build positive, respectful relationships with the staff. The next generation must be exposed to all industry association meetings and events to interact, network, connect and understand the industry which helps them to understand their own business.

Now that being said, here are some real issues. First, Dad must acknowledge that all this is an important step to take and the investments must be made. Second, Dad you must attend with them so you can experience and discuss what all of you have been exposed to and what you have learned from the event or the course. It is through unbiased discussion that courses of action can be drawn out and confidence can be built. Accept that mistakes will be made, and Dad, is that now how you learned too? The experiences for the son and daughter are invaluable. There are also times when the parents do not have the skill or confidence to proceed down this succession road with their sons or daughters and that is the time when it must be recognised that additional help be brought in to facilitate the discussion and keep the process moving forward. That is a positive decision and should be embraced. Take the time and seek out the right individual that you would be comfortable with and engage in the succession discussion. If after the discussion period you are comfortable, then it is time to introduce that professional coach to the next generation so everyone can start the process. Time is growing short for a proper succession period to take place. Everyone in the current generation must make this step a priority and get things written out and a plan put together keeping in mind what a good apprenticeship period will have to be to ensure absolute success for both sides of the family. Remember, words are what people hear with their ears; behaviour is what they hear with their eyes.


At The Car Wash

WOMEN IN CARWASH IV: IT’S A WRAP!

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HE FOURTH WOMEN IN CARWASH CONFERENCE JUST WRAPPED UP AND PLANNING IS UNDERWAY FOR CONFERENCE #5.

Like the January 2021 event, this one was going to be live but had to be virtual due to continuing uncertainties and travel restrictions. But if it weren’t for the need to pivot to a virtual conference, the

conference hosts never would have discovered that they have two very different audiences. Says Brenda Johnstone, co-organizer, “We had people join from across the continent with many representing small organizations that, particularly in these times, would have struggled to send people to attend.” According to Andrew Klukas - the other half of the team – “The virtual conference is here to stay to accommodate those that can’t attend the inperson events.” As for the event, it focused on personal strength, building community and more. Johnstone and Klukas envisioned treating the entire event “…like a single corporation that is striving to help people uncover their driving passion and put their talents together as a big team.” The roster of presenters was stellar. Jessica Potts kicked off the conference with an uplifting Monday evening keynote on Uncovering Your Strengths and Discovering Your Passion. This talk set participants on a clear path to overcoming those nagging doubts and inhibitions that add nothing useful and just get in the way of a fully satisfying career and life. Potts brought a sparkling energy that perfectly complemented the subject matter and left participants uplifted and ready to dive into day two. “I enjoy being a part of Women In Carwash™ for multiple reasons. As women in the car wash industry, we are a minority in a male dominated industry- but we are on the rise! It’s important to have such a 46

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At The Car Wash

wonderful network of leaders and car wash professionals such as the Women In Carwash™ to support each other. I thoroughly enjoyed this year’s virtual Women in Carwash™ conference- it had many wonderful guest speakers, authors, and gave every participant a chance to share their stories, learn and grow from each other. Thank you, Brenda Johnstone for putting together such a fabulous group of industry professionals- I look forward to supporting WIC and watching their presence grow.” Melissa Pirkey Vice President Car Wash Division Assured Partners Insurance Tuesday morning picked up from the keynote by focusing on what participants haven’t yet done but would do if they were brave enough to try it. Bravery Becomes You set out a new perspective on fear, doubt and worry and focused on how to navigate your obstacles to success, honor your strengths, and enjoy the adventure of discovering powerful, passionate, on-purpose you. This followed with a highly motivational talk on building amazing teams by leading with compassion and grace.

their mom to camp for so many weeks? Being asked to consider how we might be brave in different aspects of our lives was a significant question, and challenged me to consider where in my work life I’m not stepping out.” Additional sessions focused on communications skills and empowering yourself to make sure your own needs are met while giving yourself to others. Many of the sessions incorporated virtual breakouts into small groups that enabled people to exchange experiences in the context of what was learned in the sessions and promoted a cross-pollination of ideas. “Just finished an awesome virtual leadership conference called Women in Carwash. This conference had a great speaker line up over three days! I feel like I got a lot of very valuable and informative information. It was also great how they structured the breakout rooms to enable smaller conversation and #networking! If you are in the industry, you should keep an eye out for the next conference... hopefully in person! Margaret Horsfield President and CEO at J.E. Adams Industries

“Sandy’s travel journey was remarkable. How many people’s sons would ask

One thing that began to emerge after the last conference was a discussion

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of the need for ongoing education and training and this led to the announcement at the conference of a new academy that will offer micro-credentials and badges to those who successfully complete both inperson and online programs. As a division of Women in Carwash™ , C-Academy will begin September 14, 21 & 28 with three, two-part sessions held virtually, and will move to in-person, lunch-andlearn sessions later this year as part of a pilot program that will eventually result in the availability of program packages that recognize the achievements of individuals striving to build their careers. Courses offered will focus on a variety of topics but will need to meet standards set out by Women in Carwash. “We know from speaking with many women from within the carwashing market, that there is a need and a desire for education that provides insights into both personal and business growth” states Johnstone. As North America continues to open up planning is underway for the fifth Women in Carwash™ conference to be held January 17 – 19, 2022 at the beautiful Ocean B Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. www.womenincarwash.com or email bjj@womenincarwash.com or andrew@womenincarwash.com for more information.


Industry News

NOVUS GLASS WELCOMES NEW LOCATION IN TRURO, NOVA SCOTIA

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OVUS GLASS TRURO FEATURES ADVANCED ONSITE GLASS REPAIR SERVICES AS WELL AS FULLY EQUIPPED MOBILE VAN TO SERVE CUSTOMERS AT THEIR OWN CONVENIENCE.

Mark Weeks, Regional Vice President – Atlantic for Fix Network, is pleased to welcome NOVUS Glass Truro into the network, introducing advanced glass repair and replacement services in the Nova Scotia town of Truro. Located at 65 Old Courthouse Branch Rd in Valley, NOVUS Glass Truro is a combined vision of two of the most reputed names in the region’s automotive industry – Scammell Auto (a used car dealership) and Taylor Automotive Services (a glass repair and mechanical service shop). NOVUS Glass Truro offers advanced auto glass services both at its onsite facility as well as through a fully equipped mobile unit that offers customers the added convenience as the expert NOVUS Glass technicians come to them to repair their vehicles. The team has over 20 years of experience in all aspects of the aftermarket industry, including auto glass and mechanical repair services. “At NOVUS Glass Truro, we are always thinking out of the box on how to integrate customized services that meet our clientele’s needs,” says Peter Scammell. “At the same time, we were exploring options to grow and expand our expertise in other areas and to serve our community overall with another reputable business. We believe aligning our business with

NOVUS Glass is the way forward.” For almost five decades, NOVUS Glass has been the industry leader in automotive glass repair and replacement. It holds 27 patents for glass repair products and a dedicated research and development team that is constantly innovating as vehicle technology evolves. NOVUS Glass proprietary resins, tools and techniques restore to the highest level of optical clarity in the business and outperforms all others. “We chose NOVUS Glass because its ground-breaking technology repairs chips and long crack repairs of up to 18 inches,”

WE’RE BIG ON

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores

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says Chris Taylor. “Fix Network is a great network of individuals who locally own and operate their business. NOVUS Glass itself is well-known for pioneering chip repair technology.” “We’re delighted to welcome NOVUS Glass Truro and its fantastic team to the Fix Network family,” says Mark Weeks. “They have the right knowledge, training and passion to build a successful NOVUS business in their community. We are keen to support their operations with the management and marketing tools they will need to grow a successful business.


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 43

ARC

1-519-858-8761

autorecyclers.ca

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

56

Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

43

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

39

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

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Bradford Exchange

1-877-595-9507

bradfordexchange.ca

IN

Corrosion Defense

1-844-766-7878

corrosiondefence.com

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dominionsureseal.com

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Dominion Sure Seal 1-905-670-5411

INTERNET

PAGE

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Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-902-468-1396

fleetbrake.com

Gear Centre

1-877-277-4327

shop.gearcentre.com

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Hope For Wildlife

1-902-407-9453

hopeforwildlife.net

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

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John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

35

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

fixauto.com

2

24

maritimeauto.com

4

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

maritimecarwash.ca

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Maritime Pro Stock

1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY

ngksparkplugs.ca

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

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NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

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NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

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NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

IN

42

Peterbilt Atlantic

1-506-451-2001

peterbiltatlantic.com

28

Rhino Truck Lube

1-506-317-1038

rhinotrucklubecentre.com

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

13

SPCA of NS

1-844-835-47980

Spectra Premium

nstsa.ca

novascotiaspca.ca

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1-800-641-3090

spectrapremium.com

16

Truck Stop+

1-506-317-1038

truckstopplus.ca

28

1-416-622-9881

wd40.com

WD-40

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Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

worldpac.com

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Valvoline 1-800-TEAM-VAL

valvoline.ca

41

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D

ALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY RESEARCHER AND LITHIUM-ION BATTERY PIONEER JEFF DAHN HAS BEEN COOPERATING WITH TESLA SINCE 2016, AND THE PARTNERSHIP HAS ALREADY RESULTED IN SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS THAT TESLA HOPES WILL LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ITS VAUNTED MILLION-MILE BATTERY PACK.

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1-902-493-3051

NSTSA

TESLA GRANTS 3 MILLION TO DAL FOR ADVANCED BATTERY RESEARCH

Now Professor Dahn, along with his Dalhousie colleagues Chongyin Yang and Michael Metzger, have received a grant of $3.1 million from Tesla, and another, for $2.9 million, from Canada’s Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) to develop advanced batteries for EVs and grid energy storage. The goals of the project include lowering battery costs, increasing battery longevity and energy density, improving safety and increasing the content of sustainable materials in the batteries. “This will allow Chongyin, Michael and I to solve many remaining puzzles that will help improve battery lifetime and lower cost,” says Dr. Dahn. “The students trained in this program are finding, and will continue to find, immediate employment in the advanced battery sector locally and around the world. Tesla is a wonderful partner and a world leader in electric vehicle, solar and electrical energy storage products.” Source: Dalhousie University via Electrek


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Tom Parsons of Saint John, NB is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is August 26th, 2021

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: info@autoatlantic.com NAME:

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

MAY 2021 WINNER!

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ADDRESS:

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ACROSS

DOWN

1. Leather-clad riders, often

1. Drive-thru purchases, perhaps

8. NS-NB border Big Stop location

2. Steering column type

9. Land Rover and Lotus home

3. Competed at Scotia Speedworld

10. Lost traction alarmingly

4. Obeys a triangular sign

11. Above-cab moving van portion

5. Tourists’ trunk contents

12. Squid catcher in song

6. Mensa member’s car, maybe

14. NL-born comedian Rick

7. Motorcycle attachment, sometimes

17. Off-roader’s action camera, often

12. Leaping cat emblem cars

19. Auto-defect fix campaigns

13. Maritimes coastal issue

22. Repo car sale, sometimes

15. Cape Breton’s Celtic ____ event

23. GPS recommendation

16. “Dukes of Hazzard” Charger

24. Techs’ diagnostic symptoms (7,6)

colour 18. ‘70s AMC “fishbowl” model 20. Big rig’s load 21. Ski-Doos, slangily

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

U

K automotive fans, we need to know the name of this famous brand, and please, can you tell us more about the car itself too. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at info@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is August 26th, 2021.

Best wishes go to Brad Welcher of Grand FallsWindsor, NL, who correctly answered: “The Beatles Yellow Submarine . . .” Thank you to all who en tered our contest, keep trying, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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Profile for Auto & Trucking Atlantic

ATA July / August 2021  

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