ATA January / February 2022

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auto CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS

C-STORES • INSTALLERS • RECYCLERS

& trucking

MOTOR MATTERS WINTER 2022 EDITION (STORY ON PAGE 18)

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JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022 $4.95

AFFECTS OS TRUCKING BOTTLENECKS (PAGE 32)

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CHAIN REACTION!

HOW THE SUPPLY CHAIN BOTTLENECKS AFFECT THE CANADIAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY OWNED AND PUBLISHED BY ALFERS ADVERTISING & PUBLISHING INC.

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atlantic VOLUME TWENTY TWO • ISSUE 1 • JANUARY / FEBRUARY • 2022

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DEPARTMENTS Page 4

EDITOR’S LETTER – Cybersecurity in the trucking industry.

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WOMEN AND WHEELS – Introducing our new column on the trials and tribulations of women truckers. By Taru Virkamaki

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT –Fourteen PEI groups will be receive over a million dollars to help Islanders adapt to climate change. • More!

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MOTOR MATTERS – Our roundup column includes the highlights of a study that forecasts savings of up up to $37 million in fleet electrification

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Baby born in Tesla kicks off this issue’s latest regular.

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ELECTRIC AVENUE – Our new rotating column on all things EV kicks off with the spotlight on the world’s first EV Tundra Buggy.

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CHAIN REACTION – How the supply chain bottleneck affects Canada’s automotive and trucking industries. By Carter Hammett

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TRUCKING SAFETY AND WELLBEING FOR 2022 – With a focus on wellness, truckers can be helped as they navigate uncertain times. By Dave Elniski

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AFFECTS OF TRUCKING BOTTLENECKS – The Mindful Trucker gives you the lowdown on supply chain hiccups and how they affect our industry. By Dana Smith

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THE TOP 10 TRUCKING AND AUTOMOTIVE APPS OF 2021 – Adrian Giorgio walks us through some old standbys and throws in a few surprises for good measure.

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Letter from the Editor

CYBERSECURITY IN TRUCKING

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By Carter Hammett

RUCKS AND TRUCKING HAVE NEVER BEEN MORE CONNECTED THAN THEY ARE TODAY. WITH CONNECTIVITY RUNNING THROUGH EVERYTHING FROM ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICES (ELDS) TO MOBILE APPS TO GPS, LOGISTICS HAVE IMPROVED, SAFETY’S BEEN INCREASED, AND ULTIMATELY, MONEY’S BEEN SAVED. Corresponding with these advances, however, is the increased risk of cyber attacks. In December 2020, for example, a trucking and freight logistics company was attacked with a Hades malware infection that forced the company to remove its entire IT system offline while it tried to find solutions. Another recent example of this occurred with US-based Titan Transfer which experienced “total disruption of its day-to-day operations for four days” after it felt the impact of ransomware last year. Drivers and fleet owners alike need to

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be proactive to ensure cargo arrives at its destination intact. One of the main objectives of cybercriminals is gathering intel about where truckers are located so they can make off with cargo. Employees need to be trained around basic security issues to ensure they follow the proper procedures in case cargo is stolen. But that’s not the only thing cyberattackers want. Hackers may not just be interested in your data, they might be interested in your customer base so they can be attacked as well. Ransomware is probably the most common form of attack used by cybercriminals. But whatever form the attacks take, it can seriously disrupt your business when your client can’t locate their freight or the driver can’t move it. A lesser-known but equally harsh threat is something called social engineering. Here, an organization may receive an email from what appears to be a trusted client asking for funds to be wired into a new bank account. By the time the company learns it‘s been duped, it’s often too late. It’s fairly obvious that many fleet owners aren’t doing enough to protect their technology systems, so the question becomes what can be done to lessen

threats to your IT systems? For starters, constantly review your IT departments and make updates as needed. A cybersecurity plan should be in place and can include variables like procedures for logging into company systems. Employee education is a critical ingredient. The more awareness your team has regarding cybercrime methods, the better your defence system. Safeguards like firewalls and multi-step authentification can also be positive steps towards lessening an attacker’s impact as can chunking out different parts of your company’s network. If one piece of the pie is attacked, the threat won’t affect your entire system. Have in place a disaster recovery plan in the event you’re hacked. It’s always advisable to use a cloud-based system and/ or create backups for your software as well as encrypting all emails that contain sensitive or important information. And don’t forget to train employees to recognize phishing emails while reminding them to create strong passwords. Likewise, drivers can take preventative measures such as regularly contacting dispatch for check-ins, being trained against theft and requesting ID from those unloading trucks. Safety technology can enhance a driver’s security such as the GPS tracking systems that sound an alarm when a truck deviates from its route. A 2019 survey entitled Eye for Transport, implied that that fewer than half of all trucking and logistics companies had a chief of security. If these companies don’t have a security lead, then chances are they don’t have a disaster relief plan in place either. As the industry evolves and the interconnectedness of things becomes more common, the more the industry leaves itself open to attack. It’s a rude reality to think that cybersecurity needs to keep up with a host of ever-changing vehicle technologies. Having contingency plans in place will limit the threat of safety and promote harmonious growth in the trucking industry.



Supply Chain Management

CHAIN RE

HOW THE SUPPLY CHAIN THE CANADIAN AUTO

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EACTION!

N BOTTLENECKS AFFECT OMOTIVE INDUSTRY

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By Carter Hammett

OUGHT A CAR AND STILL WAITING FOR IT? WHAT ABOUT THAT TREADMILL THAT STILL HASN’T SHOWED DESPITE THE FACT IT WAS PURCHASED MONTHS AGO. BETTER GET USED TO IT. At least for a while say pundits, because here’s another new normal for you to adjust to: broken links in the supply chain, that is.

MAYBE THE TOILET PAPER WAS OUR FIRST CLUE. You might recall back in March 2020 shortly before the first widespread lockdown when just about anything in a container or plastic wrap went flying off the

shelves as panicked consumers scrambled to stockpile goods. Fortunately, retailers stepped up to the plate, putting ceilings on consumer purchases and positioning themselves more than adequately to replace supplies. As time went by more and more news stories gradually started to creep up about frustrated consumers who purchased things like kitchen appliances only to wait months and months before they ever showed, if materializing at all. Indeed, stories about cargo ships idling at sea, shipping containers sitting for weeks, months, on docks with nobody to move them and dire warnings that presents under the tree might be a little more scarce this year all started to accumulate and form a picture as enlightening as it was frustrating. The picture that emerged was of cracks exposed in a supply chain unprepared to deal with global pandemics; without an emergency response plan to sidestep backlogs of supplies and materials needed to fill a swelling Western demand for laptops, boats and workout gear. But it wasn’t just household goods that salivating consumers were lining up for. The pain points cut across multiple industries as well. Among the hardest hit included manufacturers forced to cut back production of both vehicles and parts. So how did all this start? When will it end? Will it ever end? And how have these distribution hiccups which have caused massive disruptions, and triggered price increases on everything from gasoline to food caused us to evaluate a system’s effectiveness?

LET’S FIND OUT. The automotive industry has been hit particularly hard by supply chain bottlenecks. Many Canadian auto manufacturers were forced to shut down plants while others announced product reductions. General Motors closed its plant in Ingersoll Ont. early in 2021. Toyota meanwhile chopped 40 percent of its global production while Ford cut truck production in October. Other automakers cut production during the first two quarters of 2020 because of projected sales shortages. In an attempt to thwart the spread of the virus among workers, most major North American manufacturers—including those outside the motive industries--suspended operations. This in turn caused shipping companies to reduce their output in response to the anticipated shortage of moving goods. And yes, while industries like tourism and restaurants were indeed hit hard, others experienced a surge in demand for things like home appliances, gym equipment and technology as more and more workers moved into remote employment. Money that ordinarily would have been spent on things like travel got redirected into home-based ventures. The need was so high it basically put a choke hold on the distribution system since factories couldn’t obtain all the materials necessary to meet the demand. As if that weren’t enough, shipping containers were suddenly stuck—in places they shouldn’t have been. China sent huge numbers of PPEs and medical equipment autoatlantic.com

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Supply Chain Management

to different places around the globe but an abundance of shipping containers wound up in countries that usually don’t return product back to China, so these piled up. The lack of available containers then drove the cost of shipping up. Canadian ports weren’t hit as bad, that is, until the terrible mudslides and floods that decimated critical access to roads and rails in southern British Columbia. With highways and bridges wiped out or underwater, food and fuel deliveries were severely disrupted. “Global supply chains have been stressed since before COVID and we’re increasingly seeing long-standing weaknesses in our supply chain systems being exposed,” says Pat Campbell, vicepresident, strategic initiatives, with Supply Chain Canada. “This situation has been caused by a number of factors which have compounded upon each other. Examples of non-COVID-related pressures are the ever-given blockage that brought this key global trade route to a standstill for over three months. Wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme climate events have also

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contributed to disruptions. The importance of protecting workers through social distancing impacted productivity among warehouse workers, truck drivers, rail and port workers. All of these factors were compounded by high consumer demand.”

WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN Another major factor contributing to the bottleneck has been a global shortage of semiconductors. Just about anything containing these chips became virtually impossible to obtain. This is a key reason why so many people have been waiting months for kitchen appliances and other household items. (The mounting demand for electronic devices triggered a shortage of the integrated circuits that makes so much of our stuff work.) Toyota, which knows a thing or two about supply chain efficiency, realized that a lack of these tiny yet critical chips could prove to be a key link in the process and actually squirrelled a six-month supply away just as competitors were slashing orders for fear a certain pandemic would hamper demand.

That six-month cushion evaporated quickly and with it, so did such details as power steering, windows, digital displays, safety features and entertainment units. “There’s an overabundance of demand on chips,” says Pedro Antunes, chief economist with the Conference Board of Canada. “This may have been disruptive, but with the addition of COVID restrictions, it created an excessive demand we didn’t really expect.” It’s an observation which Pat Campbell agrees with. “There are chips in nearly everything electric you own, from your phone to your computer to your car. There are even chips in items you wouldn’t expect, such as your washing machine, refrigerator and electric toothbrush. But these tiny parts that power so much of our lives are now in critically short supply. “As the world shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many factories closed with it, making the supplies needed for chip manufacturing unavailable for months. Added to this situation was increased demand for consumer electron-


ics that enabled many workers to shift to working from home, students to learn from home and everyone to remain connected. This demand caused shifts that rippled up the supply chain. Orders began to pile up as manufacturers struggled to create enough chips to meet the new levels of demand. A backlog began to grow and grow and grow.”

BUT WAIT…THAT’S NOT ALL Other variables have to be acknowledged too. As of this writing the Omicron variant is proving itself to be one tough combatant as it has taken a stranglehold on major production outlets in Malaysia and Vietnam. Supply chain headaches have also done much to highlight a labour dearth distributed across multiple sectors. Although Canada’s current employment figures are actually quite healthy, a shortfall of workers in agriculture, energy and transportation has been deeply felt. Furthermore, a global shortage of truck drivers has further contributed to delivery delays. Here in Canada, there’s a

shortage of about 18,000 drivers estimates Trucking HR Canada. But that figure’s expanded to escalate to 55,000 by 2023. Criticism lobbed at government officials include accusations that the feds aren’t doing enough to attract talent to the industry. Part of the problem is that there’s not enough training dollars available to increase access to potential drivers. Licensing is expensive and can cost up to $15,000.00 depending on where in the country you live. On top of that the pandemic has thrown a wrench into driver turnover and early retirement which is contributing to further shortages. The Canadian Trucking Alliance is gearing up to introduce a three-year recruiting campaign in an attempt to lure more drivers into the sector. Things may be bad in Canada, but in Britain there’s an estimated driver shortage that clocks in at an estimated 100,000. That’s due to life after Brexit when thousands of eastern European drivers decided new rules weren’t worth the headache.

SHOP LOCAL? The headaches and delays within the system are indeed a global problem. And it’s triggered debate closer to home about an over-reliance on foreign suppliers and a shift away from a “just in time” model to a “just in case” model where the need to consider ramping up domestic production of semiconductors and other essentials on our own turf should become a reality. “This is an interesting debate taking place across the automotive and other industries that rely on global trade,” says Pat Campbell. “Future agile and resilient supply chains must ensure all links in the chain respond cohesively to demand changes and reduce latency times. This will require more visibility throughout the entire value chain. Visibility will require more data and analytics while simultaneously prioritizing information security. All of which will require a digitization strategy of the end-to-end value chains of key industries, such as automotive. “ For his part, Antunes says that he feels “it’s difficult to comment on how the in-

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Supply Chain Management

dustry will adjust but it’s perhaps wise to suggest that manufacturers consider reducing down to a lean-and-mean model. We need a reversal, not just in automotive but in general. It’s not just manufacturing, wholesale and retail. We’ll have to look at building something more robust in the future.” Some pundits take it as a given that those that can will take the plunge and invest in production on home ground while also diversifying their sources of supply, or if not that, determining ways to make the existing system more flexible. This debate coincides with both a rise in protectionism as the Biden administration tries to navigate the currently frosty relationship it has with China, and the current call for greener energy. In fact, China had been leaning precisely in this direction, but was caught empty-handed after massive electricity shortages caused the country to reconsider its restraints on fossil fuels. China also controls most of the world’s rare-earth elements that are used to power such things as electric vehicle batteries and wind turbines while also controlling most of the world’s magnesium which is used in auto parts among other things. It has already demonstrated that it is not afraid to leverage this fact to its own advantage. This has hit Europe badly, although the US has largely been spared this problem because of contracts with Mexico and Canada. In fact, Canada produces about one third of the minerals Washington has declared as essential to its security and much of these used by the auto industry. Obviously this could bode well for both parties in the not too distant future. “The Battery Metals Association of Canada (“BMAC”) recently released its report entitled Maximizing Canada’s Battery Metals Sector, addressing Canada’s ability to build a “mines mobility” supply chain to contribute to the rapidly growing bat-

WE’RE BIG ON

tery metals industry,” says Pat Campbell. “The report follows a virtual workshop held in March 2021 during which representatives from the Canadian battery supply chain addressed roadblocks hindering Canada’s effective participation in the global battery market and identified steps to overcome them. Our organization supports the work of BMAC.” Whatever the outcome of our current situation, pundits appear to agree that the supply chain situation will eventually sort itself out. Indeed, Antunes appears cautiously optimistic about the relatively healthy state of the Canadian economy. “Our recent unemployment rate hit 6% which are record lows. The trucking industry has lots to be aware of—not just the supply chain but also transportation and energy prices and labour shortages across key sectors. There’s also the multiplier effect: You hit one sector and it creates a ripple effect to others. It affects purchasing, power, food, gas, transportation.” And yet, he adds with a note of pride: “Through this pandemic I’ve been amazed at the resilience in the supply chain. It’s essentially been shutting down the economy. Despite some shortages, nobody’s going hungry. Going forward this shake up my actually generate productivity again. The adoption of technology has helped us to effectively manage the economy; Telehealth is one example of this.” It’s a point of view echoed by Supply Chain Canada. “It’s important to highlight how hard Canada’s supply chain professionals have been working. From extreme weather events to ensuring the delivery of goods during the pandemic, they have stepped up to the plate across the country and ensured that Canadians were well-supplied,” Pat Campbell says. “This has been a challenging time, but it has also been one that has highlighted some of the impressive work done across the country to keep our supply chains safe.”

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores

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FINAL THOUGHTS FROM SUPPLY CHAIN CANADA’S PAT CAMPBELL: Supply Chain Canada members represent the wider profession that includes the breadth of supply chain roles such as sourcing, procurement, logistics, inventory, transportation, distribution, operations, sustainability, replenishment, and contract management. By working with practitioners, professionals and leaders across the supply chain spectrum, we are able to strengthen our collective capabilities and reduce vulnerabilities that may exist. While supply chain has experienced challenges over the past year, we have also had many successes. Our ability to work together allowed us to quickly distribute PPE and vaccines to communities and people across this country. We saw, for instance, members of the supply chain sector come together to ensure that people were taken care of during extreme weather events in British Columbia. This is a sector that is filled with creative and entrepreneurial professionals, who put in the work to ensure accessibility for all Canadians.



Truckers Corner

INTRODUCING MY NEW COLUMN IN THESE PAGES . . .

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By Taru Virkamaki

T ’ S A LW AYS NICE TO SEE YOUR OWN NAME IN PRINT, SO I WAS QUITE EXCITED TO BE INVITED TO WRITE A COLUMN FOR AUTO AND TRUCKING ATLANTIC. My connection to the trucking industry? Intrigue and fascination from being a life-long, very close friend to someone whose husband drove tractor trailers for over 20 years before a degenerating eye condition took his vision and him off the road at 56 and into early retirement. I remember the stories of problems on the road, the days, sometimes weeks of separation from family, the long drives with never enough sleep, the hit-or-miss meals and snacks, the stress of discovering missing cargo more than once, and the toll all of this took mentally and physically. I sometimes wondered if the forced early retirement for Bill was such a bad thing! And while the spouses/partners at home have their own stories and perspectives on this lifestyle--for a lifestyle, it is-my interest and focus in these pages will be the 3-3.5% of women in Canada’s la-

bour force who have chosen the trucking industry as their career. From truck drivers, owner/operators through to managers, directors and CEO/ Presidents, I will cover the gamut exploring the particular trends and challenges faced by women in a sector that is still male dominated. How do we collaborate and work together to improve the working conditions for all of us? How do we attract the next generation of women to choose a career in trucking? The questions are endless and there isn’t one answer that fits all. I’ve spent several weeks digging into all things trucking reading the stories of the fascinating women who get behind the wheel, or establish associations that bring women’s voices together to share experiences--the victories and the challenges. Often children end up doing what their parents do or did. It’s the life we/ they know best. Women who choose a career in trucking typically follow the footsteps of a mother who did the same. However, recruiting the next generation this way leads to a very, very slow growth! The post-pandemic world--even though we aren’t there quite yet-- is ripe for opportunities! The attrition of male drivers, as an example, has left the trucking industry in dire need of drivers. Perhaps welcome vacancies for women? For the 2021-22 fiscal year, the Government of Canada is offering a Student Work Place-

ment subsidy worth up to $7,500 per student, an attractive offer for students pursuing a career in trucking. These are just a few of the themes I will be digging into for future columns. What about truck stop restrooms? How clean are they anyway? Or what about the disturbing reports of harassment, sexual or otherwise, that’s taken over the news in the past few years? No sector has been safe! Mental and physical stressors seem to be escalating. Or is it that we’ve become more attuned to demanding a healthy work-life balance and no longer willing to settle for less? Truck parking, tolls, insurance costs, crime. So much to research, so much to discuss. And what do I bring to this? An inquisitive mind with a gentle sense of humour. I am an experienced leader in nonprofit management, a writer and editor. Most recently, I’m a consultant providing employment services to people with disabilities-a perspective that may also show up in my column. My career was launched with a Master’s degree in Women’s Studies/Immigration history, and led to a life-long commitment to gender equality, cultural diversity, and a passion for social justice. I look forward to engaging discussion and thoughtful debate in the coming months over issues that matter to you, the women in trucking!



East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE COLLECTED FROM ACROSS THE ATLANTIC REGION. NEWFOUNDLAND Contract Awarded for Replacement of Shoal Harbour River Bridge A contract valued at $9.2 million has been awarded to Trident Construction Ltd. to replace the Shoal Harbour River Bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway near Clarenville (photo below). The work includes the construction of a new steel box girder bridge, grading and paving, installation of a new guiderail, and installation of topsoil and hydroseed. The contract also includes the removal of the Shoal Harbour Bridge and Shoal Harbour CNR Overpass. The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure anticipates work to be completed in 2023. A contract valued at $1.67 million to J-1 Contracting Limited to realign the highway to the new bridge location and install a new underpass culvert for the T’Railway has been completed. The bridge is one of six being replaced this year in addition to 27 bridges being rehabilitated. A tender for the replacement of Aspen Brook Bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway in central Newfoundland was also issued last week. Information on tenders issued and awarded by the department and other public bodies is available by visiting www.

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merx.com/govnl. “Replacing bridges like the Shoal Harbour River Bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway is crucial to ensuring that people and businesses in our provinces can stay connected and have safe and reliable road infrastructure. We encourage motorists to drive cautiously while this work is ongoing,” said the Honourable Elvis Loveless, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Information on active highway construction projects and repairs is also available by visiting nl511.ca and on the NL 511 mobile app.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND Climate Challenge Fund supports Island innovation Fourteen groups will receive over a million dollars through PEI’s Climate Challenge Fund to help Islanders adapt to climate change, develop new technologies and opportunities, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in innovative ways. The goal of the Climate Challenge Fund is to empower people of different backgrounds, experiences, and expertise, who work across sectors and in different communities throughout the Island, to contribute to climate action in any or all of the following areas:

adapting to projected impacts of climate change; • reducing greenhouse gas emissions; • increasing opportunities for carbon sequestration (the removal and storage of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere); • building capacity and resilience through public outreach and education; and/or expanding climate change research and knowledge. “We are committed to achieving our ambitious net zero targets and exploring the challenges and opportunities that come with a changing climate. The Climate Challenge Fund supports homegrown solutions and innovations. Islanders are ready and willing to take action when it comes to lessening their impact on the environment,” said Environment, Energy and Climate Action Minister Steven Myers. Announced in February 2019, the Climate Challenge Fund has provided $1 million annually. The projects approved in this round will receive up to $1,024,759 in support. The Climate Challenge Fund accepts applications from a wide range of organizations, including First Nations; municipalities; academic institutions; businesses; and non-profit organizations.


Available at your local Atlantic NAPA Store!


East Coast Road Report

Projects approved for support under the Climate Challenge Fund include: • Maritime Electric Company $56,845 for climate risk assessment and adaptation plan for transmission and distribution assets. • North Shore Fisherman’s Association - $75,150 for climate change impacts to sediment transport at select small craft harbours. • RE-FUEL Renewable Fuels Inc. in partnership with Aspin Kemp & Associates - $100,000 for green hydrogen: power to gas with C02 direct air capture. • Saint Mary’s University - $100,000 for PEI shoreline assessment and ecosystem services tool for nature-based climate change adaptation. • Smart Grocery Store Inc. $100,000 for Monsieur Vrac plastic reduction. • Town of Stratford - $32,550 for an inventory of Stratford’s urban forest, assessments of natural areas and the creation of a management plan for Stratford’s natural areas.

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NOVA SCOTIA Nova Scotians Encouraged to ‘Be Winter Ready’ The Province is encouraging all Nova Scotians to prepare themselves and their vehicles for winter conditions before the snow starts to fall. “As Nova Scotians, we know our weather can be unpredictable,” said Finance and Treasury Board Minister Allan MacMaster, on behalf of Public Works Minister Kim Masland. “That’s why it’s so important to be prepared. Just as our maintenance staff and operators are getting ready to keep provincial roads safe, we want to remind Nova Scotians to get ready for safe winter driving, too.” Booking a service appointment is the first step in being prepared for snow and ice on the roads. Vehicles should have snow tires, antifreeze and an emergency kit. Other winter driving tips include: • wear seatbelts (seatbelts are required year round) • slow down and leave additional space between vehicles – it takes more time and distance to brake in adverse conditions

• • •

maintain a safe distance from snowplows to give operators room to do their job keep the gas tank at least half full plan ahead and include extra time for possible delays.

To help spread the word about winter preparedness and road safety, the Province is running its annual Be Winter Ready campaign. Featuring television, radio and online ads, the campaign promotes safe driving tips and shares details about the tools and services that are available to make winter driving easier and safer. “I encourage everyone to be mindful of winter road conditions, but also the human conditions before deciding to drive. Give yourself adequate time, slow down and always drive sober and distraction free. If you feel you need to interject before someone else drives when conditions are unsafe, please do your part to keep them and others road users safe. Please enjoy this holiday season safely and responsibly,” said Inspector Don Moser, Assistant Support Services Officer, Nova Scotia RCMP.



Industry News

MOTOR MATTERS - WINTER 2022 EDITION

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EOTAB AND ENTERPRISE FLEET MANAGEMENT STUDY QUANTIFIES COST AND CO2SAVING OPPORTUNITIES FOR FLEET ELECTRIFICATION FINDINGS INCLUDE POTENTIAL COST SAVINGS OF $33 MILLION FOR CUSTOMERS IF 13% OF ANALYZED VEHICLES WERE ELECTRIFIED TODAY Underpinning their commitments to sustainability and vehicle electrification, Geotab, a global leader in IoT and connected transportation, and Enterprise Fleet Management, a leading fleet management provider with more than 649,000 vehicles across North America, today announced results from one of Geotab’s largest fleet Electric Vehicle Suitability Assessments. With the transition to electric vehicles (EVs) underway across North America and fleets faced with the challenges of meeting new sustainability standards, Enterprise Fleet Management and Geotab analyzed vehicle data from portions of Enterprise’s fleet vehicles to identify the cur-

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rent electrification opportunity and better understand how the shift to EVs will affect fleets. Utilizing Geotab’s Electric Vehicle Suitability Assessment (EVSA), the massive study included more than 91,000 of Enterprise Fleet Management’s leased vehicles. In addition to helping Enterprise Fleet Management better understand how the shift to EVs will affect its business today and beyond, the study also enables the leading fleet provider to better consult with its customers by using tangible, datadriven insights for their respective business clients.

ACCORDING TO THE STUDY: Of the 91,252 vehicles analyzed, 13% (approximately 12,000) were good candidates to be economically replaced by range-capable EVs today. Near-term electrification of these estimated 12,000 vehicles could achieve a total potential savings of $33 million and 194,000 tons of tailpipe CO2 emissions over four years. Up to 45% (approximately 42,000) of the analyzed vehicles could be electrified as EV pickups enter the market. Shifting to EV pickups would equal 1.3 million tons of tailpipe emission reductions across the

entire fleet, over a four-year service life. Electrifying almost half of Enterprise Fleet Management’s vehicles would result in a potential cost savings of $167 million or $4,056.20 per vehicle. “With the transition to EVs underway across North America and fleets faced with the challenges of meeting new sustainability standards, Enterprise Fleet Management recognizes the importance of successfully delivering EV solutions to customers,” said Dain Giesie, Assistant Vice President at Enterprise Fleet Management. “We have already helped several organizations integrate these vehicles into their fleet.” Enterprise Fleet Management’s work in the EV space and the results achieved from the study are playing a valuable role in the journey to long-term EV viability. In fact, these efforts are part of a broader strategy led by their affiliate and leading mobility provider Enterprise Holdings to build consumer awareness and understanding of EVs as the company transitions its fleet over the coming years. “Our goal with this study was to map out what we need to know and to help us understand what we need to provide



Industry News

our customers now and in the near future so we can continue to be the best fleet management provider possible,” continued Giesie. “It did that, highlighting our customers’ opportunities and needs so we can keep our strategic planning process on track and continue to be a fleet management leader for those we serve.” Helping customers make confident decisions about fleet electrification, Geotab’s EVSA tool offers data-driven adoption recommendations by analyzing a fleet’s unique driving profiles and patterns. By leveraging aggregated data from Geotab to show how vehicles were being used by Enterprise Fleet Management clients, the companies were able to produce a suitability assessment on a scale never attempted before. “By combining Geotab’s analytics with Enterprise Fleet Management’s real-world data on a large scale, we’ve been able to provide a unique perspective on how the company can expect its fleet to evolve in the coming years,” said Charlotte Argue, Senior Manager, Fleet Electrification for Geotab. “In addition, an assessment of this kind highlights the value of fleet-specific data, since it enables us to minimize assumptions and thus increase the accuracy of our analysis. More importantly, equipped with tangible data, Enterprise

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Fleet Management can make confident, strategic decisions when it comes to fleet electrification.” According to Giesie, “The scope of the study went beyond EV vehicle availability today and tomorrow. We contributed real-world experience that informed data inputs for depreciation, fuel costs, vehicle costs, after-market costs and more to give us a deeper perspective into our customers’ potential future needs and how we can best support those needs.” The Geotab EVSA uses telematics data to understand a fleet’s specific needs and makes EV adoption recommendations, paired with a projection of financial savings and environmental benefits of transitioning to EVs. Backed by the largest dataset of real-world EV performance metrics, it can be used regularly to understand a fleet’s electrification potential as new models enter the market, and as fleet needs and macroeconomic factors change. The EVSA forms part of Geotab’s broader suite of solutions designed to help organizations achieve zero-emissions or their sustainability goals. For more information on Geotab and Enterprise Fleet Management’s EVSA study, visit geotab.com.

A ROAD MAP FOR PLASTICS

Increasing the ability to recycle automotive plastics has led to funding of a new report between ARC and ECCC. As part of its focus on the circular economy, Environment & Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is looking at various ways in which to promote sustainability through recycling. A big push has been on plastics and a few years ago ECCC hired Dillion Consulting to conduct a master study on plastic waste. The report looked at different aspects, including where the waste is being generated, where it goes; which sectors of the economy contribute to it and the significance of those contributions. The report concluded that around 9% of plastic waste can be attributed to the transportation sector.

MORE INFORMATION NEEDED At present, there is very little data on this within our industry, yet because it is a sector that ECCC closely interacts with on a regular basis, two major funding proposals were put forward. One focused on pre-shredding activity, the other, postshredding. From this, discussions with our association led to the development of a proposal to prepare a final document entitled The Automotive Recyclers of Canada Roadmap to Increase Recycling of Auto Plastics from End of Life Vehicles in


Canada. This project will be undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change and their Zero Plastic Waste Initiative. The ARC ELV Roadmap research agreement covers several key areas: Survey and Profile of Amount of PreShredder Auto Plastic Potentially Available for Recycling. The ARC Roadmap project will start with a survey of over 500 companies identified as active in the ELV sector nationally. The purpose of the survey will be to compile information on current practices in auto plastics management and recycling, and to identify opportunities to divert more auto plastics directly at these sites. Tear Down Research of ELVs to Identify Auto Plastics, Logistics and Recycling Options. A tear down research project would be carried out at two ARC member facilities on a representative sample of typical ELVs that are commonly scrapped. This tear down of selected vehicles would identify the plastic components that could be removed prior to the shredding process. Assess Potential Approaches to Increased Auto Plastics Recycling. The third component of the Roadmap would explore current best practices in auto plastics recycling globally and also identify the practical elements of increasing recycling of auto plastics in Canada. Develop a Roadmap to increase preshredder auto plastics recycling in Canada. The finding from tasks 1, 2, and 3 will be used to develop the ARC Roadmap to guide activities in auto plastic recycling for the next five years (2022 to 2027), in order to help reach higher automotive plastic diversion targets. To help facilitate this project, ARC is working with a number of consultants who have done work in the areas of ELVs, plastics recovery and circularity. The project is scheduled to be completed by March 31, 2022.

STUDIES PLANNED

The key points listed above essentially relate to what our industry is already doing regarding plastic component removal and disposal from end of life vehicles. Two of the biggest plastic related items that recyclers currently remove are bumper covers and fuel tanks. As part of the research, we will be conducting motion studies with our members, many of which already have a solid understanding on what they spend in terms of time and steps to disassemble and de-pollute a ve-

hicle for their regular business activities. From that we will be able to determine what plastics we can recover, identify and measure. There will also be engagement with the OEMs to determine where and what type of plastics are in their vehicles, along with what is required in terms of purchasing recycling plastics and whether it makes more sense to do this either pre or post-shredding of these parts, both of which have benefits and drawbacks. Most of the current findings around the world

are leaning toward the post-shredding model, which is more efficient, less labour, but more capital-intensive than preshredding. Ultimately, the goal is to determine how much of these plastics that are removed from ELVs, can be recycled and put back into the circular economy. The research report aims to demonstrate whether the goals set by the ECCC are practical and achievable—where gaps in the process can be identified and filled,


Industry News

and where auto recyclers can generate sustainable profits from this process to enable them to continue investing in it for the future. Source: A Road Map for Plastics - Automotive Recyclers Association of Atlantic Canada (araac.ca)

FIRST PHASE OF ISLAND-WIDE PUBLIC TRANSIT SYSTEM LAUNCHES OCTOBER 12 WITH $2 ONE-WAY TRIPS TO HELP MEET NET ZERO TARGETS BY 2040 The Province of Prince Edward Island launched the first phase of an Island-wide Public Transit System with two new public transit routes to eastern PEI on October 12. The two new eastern routes, along with the existing route operated by County-Line Express connecting Summerside to Charlottetown, will be $2 per trip. An integrated, provincial transit system was a commitment in the 2019 Speech from the Throne and a key recommendation of the province’s Poverty Reduction Action Plan, Sustainable Transportation Action Plan and the Premier’s Council for Recovery and Growth. “The continued strength of our prov-

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ince relies on creating new opportunities for our communities. Local and intercommunity transportation services will link workers to jobs, students to schools, shoppers to stores and Islanders to the essential services they need to enhance their quality of life.” - Premier Dennis King One route will connect Charlottetown with St. Peters and Souris, while the second will connect Charlottetown with the Montague and Georgetown areas. These routes will run three round trips per day, Monday to Friday. The eastern PEI routes will be operated by T3 Transit(link is external) and will connect riders to the existing transit system available in the capital area or any other stops along the dedicated routes. By January 2022, on-demand service will also be available through the mobile app, Kari(link is external), to assist Islanders get from their communities to the main transit routes in their area. The program will be further expanded in early 2022 to include a western PEI route connecting communities west of Summerside with the existing routes to complete an Island-wide system from Tignish to Souris.

“This partnership will ensure safe, convenient and accessible transportation options for Islanders to get where they need to go,” said Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure James Aylward. “Having reliable public transit for all Islanders will have widespread benefits, including reducing our carbon footprint and reducing transportation barriers for rural Islanders.” With transportation being one of the largest carbon emitters in the province, this initiative is key in reaching PEI’s goal of being the first net zero province in Canada by 2040. “Transportation is one of the leading causes of greenhouse gas emissions in our province,” said Minister of Environment, Energy and Climate Action Steven Myers. “To meet our ambitious climate targets, we need to help Islanders make greener transportation choices and this is another step in the right direction on our path to net zero.” The new Islandwide Public Transit system will provide safe, reliable, and affordable public transit for all residents across the province to work, study, or access essential services across the province while helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions.



Truckers Corner

TRUCKING SAFETY AND WELLBEING FOR 2022

BY LOOKING AFTER OUR INDUSTRY WORKERS’ WELL-BEING, TRUCKERS CAN BE ASSISTED NAVIGATING THEIR WAY THROUGH UNCERTAIN TIMES. Dave Elniski

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UPPLY CHAIN ISSUES HAVE DOMINATED LOGISTICS-RELATED HEADLINES THROUGHOUT THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC. These headlines often focus on predicted or actual shortages, backlogs of certain commodities, and the effects of bottlenecks in certain areas. Throughout 2020, trucking was fea-

tured prominently in the media for the industry’s role in transporting essential goods throughout our country. As many people were forced to isolate and restrict their travels, truck drivers continued to work to keep the economy going. Truck drivers and their carriers are still working as hard as ever. If, though, during 2020 the trucking industry was hoping that by now their operations would be back to normal, such hopes appear to have been dashed. Pandemic-related restrictions, product shortages, and severe weather events in late 2021 have created an environment where long-term planning is difficult to do. As 2022 begins, it is worth remind-

ing carriers and truckers alike of what remains certain: the need for clear thinking. When panic-buying occurs in response to constant media barrages about shortages and supply issues, it is difficult for even the most level-headed amongst us to not want to assess our own inventory and wonder if we too should be stocking up. It’s better, after all, to run on the top-half of the tank instead of the bottom-half. Balancing the need to evaluate options slowly and rationally with the need to respond to changing conditions with flexibility is tough. As we all try to navigate through uncertainty and the daily deluge of information, the bottlenecks we have the most control over are our indi-



Truckers Corner

vidual abilities to take in and process information and make informed decisions. Having some basic principles to lean on can help good options stand out to us amongst the mediocre and the bad. The following section will discuss one such principle: getting home in good condition.

GETTING HOME IN GOOD CONDITION

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Getting home in good condition means more than not having collisions. Of course carriers don’t want collisions, but getting a driver and vehicle home in good condition means both can be depended on for future trips. Good condition means workers’ mental and physical health is protected, and while jobs in trucking are often demanding, business plans need to be made that take into account the wellbeing of those who must execute the plan. Burning out workers isn’t sustainable. Using the words “workers” instead of “drivers” in the previous paragraph is intentional, too. Truck drivers have challenging jobs, but the wellbeing of the carrier’s support staff should not go unaddressed. Dispatchers, safety workers, border documentation coordinators, technicians, managers, salespersons: these and any other role within a carrier represent jobs with the potential for high levels of stress. In many companies, roles overlap and a single person may fill multiple positions; clearly such situations have the potential to push people beyond their limits. Just because the home-at-night workers see their families more often than others doesn’t mean their lives are easy. Going home stressed and worried is not the same as going home in good condition. Going home in good condition means workers and managers alike are able to enjoy their non-working hours and be emotionally available to those they love. Giving thought to how a carrier’s workers and management can get home in good condition is a way carriers can navigate through future uncertainty. Decision-making that results in the neglect of people’s wellbeing is not sustainable. Protecting the wellbeing of staff is important no matter what lies ahead. The next section

will discuss another element of carrier operations that requires attention regardless of other uncertainties: carrier safety.

CARRIER SAFETY IN THE NEW YEAR Specific safety regulations in Canada, the USA, and in individual provinces change regularly. What remains the same, though, is the requirement for safe and compliant operations. Those responsible for carrier safety and compliance who are worried about uncertainty can take some comfort in this: the spirit behind safety regulations is much less likely to change than are the specific details of the regulations. Consider the hours-of-service regulations, for example. In Canada and the USA, the adoption of electronic logging devices (ELDs) has been a hot issue. While ELDs represent change for many carriers [1], what hasn’t changed is the spirit behind hours-of-service and ELD rules: carriers and drivers need to work together to protect themselves and the public from dangerously-tired commercial drivers. Hours-of-service rules play a significant role in minimizing the risk from this hazard. The spirit of the hours-of-service rules isn’t likely to change. Fatigue-related health problems and collisions are always going to be important areas of concerns for trucking employers. Carriers must comply with the regulations; they should also occasionally take a high-level look at how their hours-of-service program is doing in terms of driver wellbeing. It’s taking the time to look at the forest and not just the trees. The year 2022 will bring all the usual challenges including many we can’t predict now. As carriers respond to these challenges, a high-level examination of the safety-related impacts of business decisions will prove valuable in overall risk reduction and the consideration of driver wellbeing. Compliance is a moving target which we must hit, but safety should, at its roots, be concerned with protecting people. As carriers make their way through uncertain times, they mustn’t lose sight of this.

WRAP UP The demand on trucking companies to haul freight isn’t going away; consumer demand is high, and for many companies it appears as though there are shortages of everything but loads to haul. Uncertainty will present challenges to operations of all sizes. By keeping the wellbeing of workers and safety in mind when making decisions, carriers will lay the groundwork for sustainable operations in the New Year.



Carters Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF THE BIZARRE, THE HORRIFIC AND THE DOWNRIGHT

PUZZLING SCOOPED UP FROM VARIOUS PARTS OF THE WEB SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. YER WELCOME. BABY BORN IN TESLA WITH HELP FROM AUTOPILOT Yiran Sherry’s water broke one September morning, but, thinking she had more than enough time, she insisted her husband take their 3-year-old son Rafa to school before heading to the hospital. However, the seven-mile drive came to a crawl in rush-hour traffic, and their baby girl stubbornly refused to wait until they reached their destination. Yiran focused on managing her pain, contemplating whether she should begin to push. Her husband Keating activated Autopilot —keeping his left hand on the wheel while offering his right for Yiran to squeeze. By the time they reached the hospital, the family of three had already become a family of four, with Yiran delivering the baby girl en route. Hospital staff met them at their car, and doctors cut the umbilical cord in the front seat before

wheeling their patients inside. The baby girl, whom they named Maeve, is believed to be the first baby born inside a Tesla. The Sherrys considered giving her the middle name Tess as an homage to the vehicle, but instead went with Lily in honor of Yiran’s mother Baby born in Tesla with help from Autopilot (autoblog.com)

TEEN WITH GOPRO SOLVES 27-YEAR MYSTERY A BC teen had no idea his GoPro would be instrumental in solving a nearly three-decade-old mystery. Deep in the murky water, barely visible even in the GoPro was the undercarriage of a Honda that had been sitting there undiscovered since 1992. The boy and his parents called the police, who sent a dive team down to check out the car a few days later. To their shock, there

was a body inside. After pulling the car from the lake, they were able to identify a woman named Janet Farris who was in the driver’s seat. The grandmother of five disappeared as she was driving to a wedding. Her disappearance haunted the family since day 1. While most of the time found vehicles are empty and were either used to commit a crime or were part of an insurance fraud scheme, on rare occasions there’s a body inside and a mystery that’s solved. As for the 13-year-old boy, police say it was “good detective work on his part” and hinted they might be looking to him as a future employee. (motorious.com)

SPEEDING TICKETS AROUND THE WORLD COST FROM NINE CENTS TO ABOUT $1M In Australia, speeding fines vary depending on the state where one gets


Available at your local Atlantic NAPA Store!


Carters Corner

caught. New South Wales authorities, where Sydney is, will ring you up for $2,350 AUD ($1,682 U.S.) for doing more than 45 km/h over the limit, while Victoria, where Melbourne is, maxes out at $793 AUD ($568 U.S.) for a similar speed — but this is all before the mandatory license suspensions, which will end up costing the offender more money. Outside of Oz, some countries imposed fixed rates, others base a fine on the driver’s base income as a way to ensure the wealthy don’t view speeding tickets as a mere inconvenience on their time. In the latter case, Budget Direct used the median national income as the benchmark for judging the average size of a speeding ticket. Sudan had the lowest fixed rate. In both cases, the company didn’t include the costs of extra charges like being a repeat offender, getting caught racing, or reckless driving. According to the Budge Direct charts created by NeoMam Studios, the U.S. takes the crown for all of North America, our maximum levy being $2,000, but the chart doesn’t pinpoint the state. Accord-

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ing to the table at FindLaw, the state in question appears to be Oregon, assessing “Class A - D traffic violations with fines from $250 to $2,000 (OR Statute Sections 811.109 and 153.018).” Compare that to Nebraska, where going more than 21 mph over the limit will get you slapped with a bill for $200. Argentina owns the collections box in South America, its max fine being $3,716 U.S. Much better to be caught speeding in neighboring country Paraguay, where the authorities charge $0.13. That’s right, 13 cents. If you want to save more money, don’t hit the throttle until you reach Sudan, the country with the lowest fixed fine at $0.09. Having covered the gargantuan fines issued by some European countries, all of which were based on the driver’s income, it’s no wonder that the top 20 speeding fines ever issued are all in Europe. Breaking that down further, the top three happened in Switzerland out of four total for the country of chocolate and cows, Belgium and the UK score one each, the remaining 14 were rung up in Finland. The

biggest whopper was a nearly $1M U.S. fine levied when a 37-year-old Swedish driver took his SLS AMG up to 180 miles per hour on the A12 between Bern and Lausanne, Switzerland in August 2010. The second-largest fine happened that same year in that same country in January, when a man in a Ferrari Testarossa was caught doing 85 mph in a 52-mph zone. Budget Direct clocks that fine at $327,000 U.S., but the Guinness Book of World Records lists the incident as the largest fine ever at $290,000. Either way, it›s a lot of money. Just as incredible, the sixth-largest fine of $141,661 got slapped on someone doing just 32 mph. Speeding tickets around the world cost from nine cents to about $1M (autoblog.com)

MORE WOLVES REDUCE DEER COLLISIONS WITH CARS, BUT NOT WHY YOU THINK Unfortunate collisions between deer and motor vehicles are a real problem that’s both dangerous and costly. To find a natural solution to this expensive infra-


structure problem, the team at Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America (PNAS) has turned to study wolves. In their research, PNAS has discovered a unique trend that shows a drop in deer-vehicle collisions (DVC) directly related to the population of wolves. This study focused on the state of Wisconsin, however, the date could have far-reaching implications around the world. The study from PNAS is very clear, “Wolf entry reduced DVCs by 24%, yielding an economic benefit that is 63 times greater than the costs of verified wolf predation on livestock.” This massive benefit to the economy can also save the lives of drivers. The study explains that “About 1 million DVCs occur every year in the United States, causing 29,000 human injuries, 200 human fatalities, and nearly $10 billion in total economic losses.” This massive impact on both the economy and the unfortunate loss of life means that reducing DVCs could have huge implications. So how do the wolves factor into all of

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this? Well based on PNAS data the reduction in DVCs is not caused by a reduced population due to wolf predation. Instead, it’s related to the way wolves hunt deer. Wolves tend to follow man-made infrastructure when hunting deer and favor the use of roads and pipelines as an efficient travel path. Deer understand this preference which causes them to stay away from roads to avoid running into a pack of wolves.

The result is a more diverse natural ecosystem with a reduced chance of accidentally hitting a dear causing both costly damage and the loss of human life. Obviously not every part of the United States and Europe is ready to support a pack of wolves. However, in more rural environments, it’s clear that introducing apex predators back to the food web has a host of positive impacts.


The Mindful Trucker

AFFECTS OF TRUCKING BOTTLENECKS By Dana Smith

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HEN IS THE LAST TIME YOU MADE A PRODUCT PURCHASE THROUGH A STORE OR ONLINE? HAVE YOU EVER STOPPED TO THINK ABOUT HOW THAT PRODUCT GETS TO YOUR HOME OR THE STORE THAT YOU BOUGHT IT FROM? How long does it take, and where does it come from? Most people don’t, as long as they get it when they want it. There are a lot of things that happen in between the time you purchase the product and it arrives to you, or the store. Products are made all over the world, they are stored in warehouses and are ready to ship when someone wants them. Then someone has to create supply chain processes to make sure the product gets to where it’s supposed to. Once the order is received, the product is then put on a truck, train, ship, or plane to the destination. Sometimes, it may travel on all modes before arriving. We have all come to expect products to be at our disposal when we want them. But what if they weren’t? What if the product you needed just wasn’t available? Rewind back to the beginning of COVID. When the pandemic broke, most people were quarantined to their home, thus purchasing more products online. This put a huge strain on the supply chain. Factor in a driver shortage, and you have a recipe for a big problem. It was hard enough to find professional drivers before the pandemic. With a lot of drivers retiring, and a bunch leaving the industry due to the pandemic rules and regulations, it has become increasingly difficult to find and retain new drivers to get the freight to its destination. Because a lot of people worldwide were confined to their homes, imagine what happened to the manufacturing industry. Some had to slow down production or even close down due to COVID exposures. This created a gap in the supply of goods. When manufacturing slows or shuts down, a gap is created where there are little-or-no products available. 32

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We are seeing those gaps appear in the supply chain now. It is getting increasingly hard to obtain a lot of the things we use every day because of this gap. Remember the giant container ship, the Ever Given, that got stuck in the Suez Canal? This is one of the world’s most vital shipping lanes. This left more than 100 ships stuck on each end of the canal for days. Given the fact that 90% of all goods on earth are transported by ships, it was just bad timing and a bad spot to have this happen. When something like this happens, it causes delays everywhere. All those products stuck for days on the ships, not moving. How does this affect the trucking industry? If you are a container hauling company hauling out of the ports, then your trucks are waiting for the ships to dock to retrieve the containers on it. If

you can’t get them, then your trucks are sitting in a port, or at your yard not moving. This becomes a ripple effect for the economy. When your trucks aren’t moving, it is hard to pay expenses. When your people are sitting, you are still paying them. This creates possible layoff situations for employees. The other side of this is not getting parts or products needed daily to run your trucking company, such as truck parts. Equipment, such as trailers. What about truck tires? Fuel? Maybe it’s something in the making of the tires that they can’t get or are waiting for. If you can’t get these things to run, it affects everyone. Remember that automobiles and their parts are also transported by ships. You may have noticed that the car dealers lately haven’t had much stock to sell. This may be caused by these very things. It can take up to three months to get pickup trucks these days because some of the parts just aren’t available. This drives prices up as well. Supply and demand. You have heard the saying “time is money”? Well this is ever so true in trucking. Until we stop using trucks to ship goods all over the world, we will continue to expect delays in all aspects of the industry. Imagine having a 500-truck operation, and you go to your tire supplier and they tell you it’s going to be a month before they can get the tires you want. At some point the tires will wear out and need to be replaced. What will you do as an owner to create a solution for that now? This is just one item that you use every day. What about the others? Something else to think about, what about the mental health of the company owners, the management, and the team members when these things happen. This puts an enormous strain on people because they are asked to find solutions to these issues, and find them now. When someone is stressed, their performance drops, and they become less focused on the task at hand. This has huge implications for the trucking company in the health and wellness sector of the business. If someone is stressed and not working to full capacity, it will affect their home life, health, finances, and life as a whole. So the next time you order or buy a product, think about what it takes to get it where it needs to go, and all of the people involved in it. Because at the end of the day, it may be someone you know.



Future Technologies

WELCOME TO ELECTRIC AVENUE!

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By Frontiers North Adventures

NTRODUCING OUR NEW ROTATING COLUMN THAT SPOTLIGHTS INITIATIVES ON EVERYTHING ELECTRIC! WELCOME TO ELECTRIC AVENUE! If you have a story idea regarding electric vehicles of any kind feel free to reach out to us! We’re pleased to kick things off with an awesome new concept from Frontiers North Adventures.

FRONTIERS NORTH ADVENTURES DEBUTS WORLD’S FIRST ELECTRIC VEHICLE TUNDRA BUGGY® On November 20, we launched our new Electric Vehicle Tundra Buggy® (EV Tundra Buggy) in Churchill, Manitoba, Canada: the Polar Bear Capital of the World. Together in collaboration with Red River College (RRC), we have transformed one of our diesel-powered Tundra Buggies into a battery-powered vehicle, a collaboration made possible through Manitoba’s new Conservation and Climate Fund, the Vehicle Technology Centre (VTCI), and inkind support and technical services from RRC Polytech’s Vehicle Technology & Energy Centre (VTEC).

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Our new EV Tundra Buggy emits zero emissions and minimal sound, providing a less-intrusive experience for our guests and wildlife. “In addition to contributing to Frontiers North Adventures’ reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the main deliverable of this EV Tundra Buggy will be a silent touring experience for our guests,” says John Gunter, CEO and president of Frontiers North Adventures, adding, “The EV Tundra Buggy makes it easier for machines to fade more into the background of any guest’s wildlife experience in Churchill.” As Canada’s only B Corp®-certified adventure travel operator, we are committed to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and plan to convert our entire fleet of 12 Tundra Buggies from diesel to electric power before the end of the decade. As we continue to transform our remaining Tundra Buggy fleet, our GHG emissions could be reduced by more than 3,600 Tonnes of carbon dioxide over the next 25 years. Our Tundra Buggy® fleet also includes Tundra Buggy One, the research vehicle for Polar Bears International, the only nonprofit dedicated solely to polar bears and the Arctic sea ice. Through this partnership, Tundra Buggy One

hosts scientists as well as Polar Bear Live Cams powered by explore.org, the largest live nature network in the world, reaching millions of viewers. Frontiers North Adventures’ purpose is to share in the stewardship of the communities and environments in which we operate. We are a certified B Corporation® and have been a leader in Canada’s travel and tourism sector since 1987. We specialize in adventures in Canada’s North, providing our guest’s opportunities in Churchill to dine beneath the northern lights, kayak amongst curious beluga whales and lock their gaze with wild polar bears. www. frontiersnorth.com Polar Bears International’s mission is to conserve polar bears and the sea ice they depend on. Through media, science, and advocacy, we work to inspire people to care about the Arctic, the threats to its future, and the connection between this remote region and our global climate. PBI is the only nonprofit organization dedicated solely to wild polar bears and Arctic sea ice, and our staff includes scientists who study wild polar bears. The organization is a recognized leader in polar bear conservation. For more information, visit www.polarbearsinternational.org.



Carters Corner

NEWS YOU CAN USE . . . NEW REPORT FINDS ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLE AVAILABILITY GROWING ACROSS CANADA N A NEW STUDY COMMISSIONED BY TRANSPORT CANADA ON ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLE (ZEV) SUPPLY, DUNSKY ENERGY + CLIMATE ADVISORS FIND THAT ZEV AVAILABILITY HAS INCREASED SIGNIFICANTLY ACROSS CANADA, GROWING BY 81% BETWEEN FEBRUARY 2021 AND FEBRUARY 2020.

frastructure investments, and an increasingly diverse range of ZEV options on the market. The full report can be found here – https://www.dunsky.com.

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The report shows that all provinces in Canada have appropriate ZEV inventories with 8 of 10 provinces over supplied. The data was collected in November 2020 and February 2021. “Automakers are bringing an increasing number of ZEVs to market to meet consumer needs,” said Brian Kingston,

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FEDERAL EV REBATE PROGRAM TOPPED WITH $73M IN FALL ECONOMIC UPDATE President & CEO of the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association (CVMA). “Efforts must now focus on addressing the well-documented barriers to ZEV adoption including higher prices of ZEVs, insufficient consumer purchase incentives, a lack of charging infrastructure and consumer education”. According to the report, overall ZEV inventory levels are now in “optimal range”. The report acknowledges that demand for ZEVs is directly linked to governmental financial support, charging in-

The first $300 million budgeted in 2019 was snapped up in less than 20 months, with 72,000 Canadians getting between $2,500 and $5,000 cut off the price of a new plug-in hybrid or battery-only electric vehicle. OTTAWA — Transport Canada is topping up its electric vehicle rebate program so there is enough money to cover demand until the program gets retooled in the spring. The fall economic statement this week budgets another $73 million to the Incentives for Zero Emission Vehicles program, bringing the total budgeted since 2019 to


almost $660 million. The first $300 million budgeted in 2019 was snapped up in less than 20 months, with 72,000 Canadians getting between $2,500 and $5,000 cut off the price of a new plug-in hybrid or battery-only electric vehicle. A year ago the government added another $287 million, and all but $48 million of that had been spoken for by of the end of October, which at the current rate of uptake wouldn’t last even two more months. Transport Minister Omar Alghabra is working on retooling the program in time for the spring budget to accommodate used electric vehicles and more expensive SUVs and pickups expected on the market next year. The Liberals promised to spend another $1.5 billion on the rebates over the next four years. - The Canadian Press

set 2022 plans aside to best support the health and safety of our community. We want to thank all of our AutoShow partners, sponsors, exhibitors and consumers for their interest in coming back in 2022, but can assure them we’ll be back bigger than ever in 2023 for what will be our 50th year.” Stay connected with the Canadian International AutoShow on Instagram @

cdnintlautoshow, Twitter@autoshowcanada and Facebook /autoshowcanada.

DEAD CAR BATTERY? DON’T GET STRANDED IN THE COLD Being stranded in the cold with a dead battery is the last thing any driver wants, but dead batteries are a leading cause of breakdowns in winter months, say the battery experts at CTEK.

2022 CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL AUTOSHOW CANCELLED TORONTO, Ont. — With the Government of Ontario re-instating capacity limits on indoor venues in an effort to stem a steep rise in case counts driven by the quick-spreading Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus, the Canadian International AutoShow, in consultation and agreement with its manufacturer partners, has taken the decision to cancel its planned 2022 event this coming February. Plans were well under way to return to an in-person event at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre for the 2022 AutoShow in February. Those plans have been put on hold as the province works to limit the spread of the virulent Omicron variant with a return to capacity limits. Indoor venues that can accommodate more than 1,000 people are limited to 50 per cent capacity. The new rules take effect Saturday; the province did not set an end date. “It is with great regret that we have to make this announcement, but the health and wellbeing of our community needs to be our first priority,” says Jason Campbell, General Manager of the Canadian International AutoShow. “What has been clear over the past few months in our discussions with our consumers and our manufacturer partners is how much they all value our in-person live AutoShow event experience, and how hungry they all were for it to return. “We had been working hard in recent months for the AutoShow to return in a big way, but in light of the recent developments, and in consultation and agreement with our manufacturer and sponsor partners, we have agreed that it’s best to autoatlantic.com

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Carters Corner

Cold temperatures require a battery to use up to twice the normal current to start the engine, an extreme demand that shortens battery life. “A battery loses as much as 35% in performance when temperatures hit freezing, and up to 50% if temperatures sink below that,” said Bobbie DuMelle, Executive Vice President of CTEK North America, the leading global brand in vehicle charging and battery management solutions. “People think only older batteries are affected by cold weather, but newer batteries are equally vulnerable,” explained DuMelle. “Today’s vehicles rely heavily on onboard computers and electronic systems, all of which draw from the battery and can reduce its capacity during the winter months.” In sub-zero temperatures, dealing with a dead battery isn’t just an inconvenience, it’s also a safety risk. Drivers may be left exposed to the elements as they wait for assistance. For winter peace of mind, CTEK has developed a portable battery charger, the CS FREE, that drivers can take with them and never need to worry about being stranded with a dead battery again. The award-winning CS FREE uses revolutionary Adaptive Boost technology to gently and safely give a dead battery enough charge to start in 15 minutes. The CS FREE also has USB-A and USB-B ports to charge phones, computers, tablets and other devices making it the perfect addition to a winter emergency car care kit. In addition, the CS FREE can be used as a portable charger to top-up your battery charge levels or plugged into a power

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outlet for battery conditioning and longer term maintenance charging. Comedian Jay Leno, an avid car enthusiast and host of Jay Leno’s Garage recently added a CTEK CS FREE to his own collection. The CS FREE, as well as other CTEK products and accessories, are available on Amazon or at smartercharger.com.

SHIPPER, INDUSTRY GROUPS GO TO BAT FOR TRUCKING AS BORDER VAX MANDATE WEEKS AWAY Canadian shippers and other industry associations are backing statements made by the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) which call on the Government of Canada to delay the timing of the border vaccination mandate. The mandate, slated to take effect in January 2022, could cause significant supply chain disruptions and have wide ranging impacts on various sectors of the economy at a time when businesses across the country are already stressed by high inflation and routine service disruptions, says CTA. The Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME) released a statement of support today urging governments on both sides of the border to reconsider the timing of the mid-January border mandate. CME acknowledged the mandate – if it moves forward as planned – would worsen the severe labour shortage that currently exists in the trucking industry, amplifying the dire supply chain disruptions manufacturers are already experiencing in various critical sectors. CTA would also like to thank groups

such as the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC), which also expressed its concerns to Ottawa over severe supply chain bottlenecks this mandate would create. The CCC echoed CTA’s calls for a delaying the implementation date and urged further discussions with all members of the supply chain on how to mitigate imminent challenges. Several U.S. Senators recently asked US President Biden to exempt Canadian truck drivers that cross the Canada-US border from the U.S. vaccination requirement. In their request, the senators expressed major concern the mandate would further exacerbate the existing supply chain challenges already felt throughout the integrated economies of both countries and supported CTA’s call to action in both Ottawa and Washington. As the mid-January implementation date continues to loom, CTA members are strongly encouraged to educate their customers on the various impacts the pending domestic and border vaccination mandates would have on service levels and truck capacity, as well as decisions carriers will be forced to make about prioritizing certain customers or sectors due to the rapid rate of reduced driver availability and related capacity conditions brought on by the mandate. CTA continues to actively work with multiple shipper groups and associations to educate them on the impact of this mandate. The Alliance is encouraging these and other groups throughout the supply chain to continue voicing their concerns to Ottawa or reach out to CTA at opera-


tions_safety@cantruck.ca for more information on the ramifications this mandate would have on their businesses and their customers. - Canadian Trucking Alliance

DOMESTIC VACCINE MANDATE COULD FRACTURE SUPPLY CHAIN: CTA The government of Canada’s decision to mandate the COVID-19 vaccine for domestic federally regulated workers in the trucking industry – including many truck drivers who have been delivering products to Canadians throughout the pandemic – would put an even bigger strain on an already beleaguered supply chain, says the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA). The announcement comes after Canada and the U.S. released plans last month to mandate vaccines for truck drivers crossing the border. CTA is calling on Ottawa, Washington, and all members of the supply chain to meet and discuss the impacts of such implementing these mandates in early 2022 and consider a more suitable policy approach and timeline to protect the health and welfare of the Canadian supply chains and the economy. The Canadian public is taking notice and has begun to feel the impact of supply chain challenges on their lives at home and at work. A Nanos Research poll commissioned by CTA in November found that an overwhelming majority of Canadians – 83 percent – have concern about the supply chain fragility and feel that it’s becoming harder to get goods. In Western Canada (the Prairies, in particular), this unease was expressed by almost 90 percent. The growing worry among the Canadian public are not unfounded. The current challenges faced by the supply chain, which include an acute and growing truck driver shortage, will worsen significantly if the Government of Canada moves ahead to mandate a vaccine policy for the trucking industry in early 2022. The Government of Canada had exempted the trucking industry from the current mandate on federally regulated sectors, because, CTA believes, of the severe disruption it would cause a fragile supply chain that is already 18,000 truck drivers short as well as the extremely low COVID-19 cases and transmission rates among truck drivers throughout the pandemic. Combined with the cross-border vaccine mandate announced last month, CTA estimates that, by the time the domestic vaccine mandate also takes effect, be-

tween 15,000 and 30,000 Canadian truck drivers would immediately exit the supply chain or choose to work for Driver Inc, companies – a growing subset of carriers operating in the underground economy, who sidestep safety, labour and environmental rules and who routinely misclassify employee truck drivers as contractors to avoid tax and labour obligations, like

the proposed vaccine mandate. Although compliant majority of the trucking and governments industry have worked hard to identify and stamp some of these unscrupulous carriers, CTA is concerned that a domestic vaccine mandate could fuel their growth in the market. Consequently, all sectors of the economy, which are currently experiencing


Carter’s Corner

some form of supply chain disruption, would find even less transportation service providers. Some smaller businesses in certain parts of the country where capacity is already scarce might not be able to access any drivers at all to carry and deliver their freight, adds CTA. With 10 to 20 percent drivers in certain sectors and regions leaving the industry, some trucking companies will have no choice but to prioritize customers based on size, frequency of shipping, driver treat-

ment, and difficulty of freight handling. While all sectors of the economy will be affected, companies located in rural/agricultural sectors are expected to feel the biggest impact. Sectors that are not at full capacity, like various manufacturing facilities, could also face challenges securing truck capacity to match increased output. “This is not a trucking issue at all. This is a supply chain issue that can have severe ripple effects throughout the entire North American economy,” says CTA president

Stephen Laswowski. “It hasn’t been easy, but the Canadian trucking industry has continued to move the economy through the global pandemic as efficiently as possible despite continuous challenges and obstacles. We have done that by working with governments and health care experts to implement health and safety protocols that keep our workforce safe while also ensuring factories keep operating and store shelves remain full.” - Canadian Trucking Alliance.

RANGER SPLASH IS BACK! CLASSIC NAME REIMAGINED IN A NEW PACKAGE FOR 2022 MODEL

A

SPORTY, STYLISH BLAST FROM THE PAST RETURNS AS THE FORD RANGER ADDS THE SPLASH™ PACKAGE FOR THE 2022 MODEL YEAR

Ranger Splash Package includes distinctive orange and black body-side graphics, unique matte black wheels, orange and black trim inside and out, and specially designed seats DEARBORN, Mich., Sept. 1, 2021 – Ford Ranger fans, the Splash™ is back. The much-loved special appearance package from the 1990s is making a comeback, reimagined for today and starting with the 2022 Ford Ranger Splash™ Package. “Ranger customers love to personalize

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their trucks, and with Splash, we’re giving them something exclusive,” said Chad Callandar, Ford Ranger marketing manager. The Splash™ Package comes with body-side orange and black graphics and special 18-inch 12-spoke wheels finished in matte black. Ranger Splash includes orange grille nostrils, plus gloss black accents on the grille, bumpers, rearview mirror caps, wheel lip mouldings and fender vents. The interior features exclusive seats with orange contrast stitching and unique carbon grain with tuxedo stripes – leather-trimmed in Lariat. Orange contrast stitching also appears on the steering wheel, gear shifter and parking brake boot. Lariat models get orange accent stitching on front and rear armrests and on the dash top. Ranger Splash™ Package will be avail-

able for SuperCrew models optioned in XLT and Lariat trim series and can be combined with the FX4 Package to add more off-road capability to its distinctive looks.

ABOUT FORD MOTOR COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED Ford of Canada’s operations include a national headquarters, three regional offices, three vehicle assembly and engine manufacturing plants, two parts distribution centres, two R&D sites, and three Connectivity and Innovation centres. Ford employs approximately 8,000 people in Canada, while an additional 18,000 people are employed in the more than 400 Ford and Ford-Lincoln dealerships across the country. For more information, please visit www.ford.ca.


Apps

2021: APPLIED ASSISTANCE IN REVIEW

T

By Adrian Giorgio

ECH AFFICIONADO OR NOT, THE APPLICATIONS BELOW ARE BUILT FOR THE AID AND CONVENIENCE OF PROS AND NOVICES ALIKE. WHETHER YOU’RE DRIVING A SEMI OR A SEDAN, THESE DIGITAL TOOLS HAVE GOT YOU COVERED. TRUCKS:

Trucker Path: Versatility in a smartphone, TP is the number one navigation app to find truck stops, parking, weight stations and CAT scales. The GPS technology helps you to avoid low bridges, find the nearest competitively-priced fuel stops with necessary truck clearance and log

service hours. It also provides a bevy of job listings and offers a driver’s forum. Weigh My Truck: No need to get out of the cab. Known for its efficiency, WMT allows drivers to pay for their transactions digitally through platforms like PayPal, EFS, Comdata, ACH or an ordinary credit card. Sent straight to your smartphone, you can get back on the road without any extra fuss. If you still need a hard copy for billing purposes, a physical CAT Scale ticket is accessible at the fuel desk for an hour after weighing. Gas Buddy: In a word, vast. GB has more than 150,000 gas stations recorded in its database. North Americans can select from or combine up to 27 ways to save on gas and diesel. Finding cheap prices is its game, from any brand station. Search filters also include price, location and amenities. The in-built alert system helps to notify you when there’s an im-

pending fuel price hike and a trip cost calculator operating via motion detection can show you which events are hampering your fuel economy. Rolling Strong: Shifting from fuel to food economy, RS offers personalized exercise coaching and dietary advice. Dedicated to truck drivers, this app factors in your daily sleep, exercise, water and calorie intake to provide tailored nutritional and exercise guidance. If the specialized online coaching component isn’t your style, it can also identify the nearest fitness spots that offer truck parking. Additional benefits include hydration reminders and redeemable rewards points. Calm: Looking to a different type of nourishment, Calm is a hub for music and meditation. Offering over 500 HD audio channels to stream relaxing music, genres range from binaural beat therapy and nature sounds to jazz and pop-rock. Per-

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Apps

haps the most shining feature of this app is its focus on mental health. Meditation content comprises but is not limited to: anxiety and stress management, relationship maintenance, gratitude and mindfulness.

Parkopedia: Okay, maybe Buddy isn’t the thing on

Gas only vast this l i s t.

and Tesla options are proffered in North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. The world’s largest EV driver community, PlugShare not only lets users find points that are compatible with their needs, but also station ratings, availabilities and descriptions. Participating locations even extend an in-app payment system for charging. Edmunds: Contains expert car reviews and ratings on used and new vehicles from

CARS:

T u r o : Airbnbs on wheels. Thrifty car renting with more variety, Turo provides access to high-end vehicles that conventional rental agencies don’t offer. Over 400,000 vehicle listings worldwide can help facilitate moving day or that fancy weekend getaway in a roadster. They’ve even developed safety accommodations through multiple contactless check-in options. Smart Dash Cam: An ingenious alternative to costly traditional means. Equipped with collision detection and auto-loop technology, it can capture natural landscapes or record valuable accident footage. In that vein, its material is also admissible in court. Available in English, Spanish, French and German. Additional silent witnesses may cost extra.

Parkopedia offers access to 70 million spaces in 15000 different cities. Search filters like free, street parking only and credit cards accepted help you find a great space with prompt directions. While it doesn’t possess an in-app payment feature, it does offer detailed information about availability, pricing and hours of operation. PlugShare: An app that’s user-friendly to new electric vehicle owners. Pointing you to the closest charging station, EV

WE’RE BIG ON

SECOND CHANCES. Thrift Stores 42

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a l l makes and multiple models. Buying and leasing is a whole lot easier with their internal payment calculator and market pricing system. Discovering the average transaction price for a prospect is vital to make sure you’re not overspending. Finally, if you’re not inclined to visit a dealership, a picture and in-depth video feature can show you the status of every car on your short list. There you have it. A guide to all things techy, innovative and convenient over the last 365 days. Check them out to make your driving experience a little more holistic and a lot more efficient.



ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 37

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

48

Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

37

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

41

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

41

Avis Budget Group

1-902-492-7561

avisbudget.com

36

Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-902-468-1396

fleetbrake.com

39

Dominion Sure Seal 1-905-670-5411

INTERNET

PAGE

dominionsureseal.com

11

Gear Centre

1-877-277-4327

shop.gearcentre.com

26

Hope For Wildlife

1-902-407-9453

hopeforwildlife.net

43

Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

36

John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

17

Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

42

Krown Rust Control

1-800-267-5744

krown.com

33

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

maritimeauto.com

35

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

maritimecarwash.ca

31

Maritime Pro Stock

1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

35

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

2

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

15

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

29

NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY

ngksparkplugs.ca

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

5

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

13

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

16

NS Dept of Labour

1-800-9LABOUR novascotia.ca

16

Rhino Truck Lube

1-506-317-1038

rhinotrucklubecentre.com

25

Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

27

SPCA of NS

1-844-835-47980

Truck Stop+

WD-40

novascotiaspca.ca

10

1-506-317-1038

truckstopplus.ca

24

1-416-622-9881

wd40.com

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

44

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TEAM HONDA SERVES LOCAL COMMUNITIES ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

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ORE THAN 7,000 VOLUNTEERS PARTICIPATED IN THE 5TH ANNUAL TEAM HONDA WEEK(S) OF SERVICE EVENT, WHICH WAS EXTENDED FROM ONE WEEK TO THE ENTIRE SUMMER TO SUPPORT MUCH NEEDED PROJECTS RELATED TO COVID-19 RECOVERY.

In support of communities throughout North America, Honda associates, dealers and suppliers conducted nearly 400 service activities, both in-person and virtual, including beach and park clean-ups, blood drives, canned food drives, school supply collections, and meals and care package delivery. In total, 158 dealers and 94 suppliers throughout North America joined Honda in conducting acts of service in their own communities. The community impact from this year’s Team Honda Week(s) of Service included: • • • • •

Food items donated: 20 tons School supplies donated: 46,794 items Blood donated: 1,255 pints Park and beach clean-ups: 35 areas Meals served: 1,725 meals

The actions of Honda volunteers this year also included virtual food drives and school supply drives – collecting more than 50,000 items. The virtual drives enabled Honda associates to donate to foodbanks and schools across the country from the comfort of their home. The virtual food drive collected 18,700 items valued at over $43,000 and the virtual school drive exceeded its goal of 10,000 items with more than 33,000 goods collected – a value of $41,067. “We’re pleased to have had such strong participation in our summer-long Week(s) of Service initiative,” said Yvette Hunsicker, vice president of Corporate Social Responsibility and Inclusion & Diversity for American Honda. “We are grateful to our business partners and Honda associates who supported our communities this year.” Team Honda conducted group volunteer activities in 35 states, Canada and Mexico. The Week of Service is traditionally held during the second week in June, timed to the anniversary of the establishment of the first Honda business operation in America, in Los Angeles, Calif., on June 11, 1959. For additional updates on the Team Honda activities, follow us on Twitter using the hashtag #TeamHondaCares or check out: http://csr.honda.com.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Caycie DesRoches of Charlottetown, PE is our latest Crossword45 Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is February 26th, 2022

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME:

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

NOVEMBER 2021 WINNER!

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ACROSS

DOWN

1. Body shop documents

1. It’s bent at the bar

6. Tire filler

2. Certain campsite visitors

8. “The girls are out to ____” lyric

3. New Brunswick road hazard

9. AutoAtlantic.com, for one

4. Wrecker assignment (3,3)

10. Cabbie’s common query (5,2)

5. Minivan habitats, often

11. Carwash cycle

6. Adjust front wheel toe-in

12. Fast lane actions

7. Semis’ frozen food trailers

14. ‘90s Chevy vans

12. Racer’s tech team (3,4)

17. Gas siphoner, often

13. Hwy 2 Big Stop site

19. Tasty clam concoction

15. Tach warning mark

22. Recycled tire, in a way

16. Wolfville university

23. Plymouth Reliant’s Dodge clone

18. Being pulled along (2,3)

24. ESE compass opposite

20. Race track shapes

25. Top Fuel and Funny Car rides

21. Succumbs to road salt

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ovie fans, we need to know the name of this well known Hollywood vehicle, and please, can you tell us more about the car too. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at rob@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is February 27th, 2022.

Best wishes go to Rick Cashol of Saint John, NB, who correctly answered: “H e n d r i c k M o t o r s p o r t s , d r i v e r of the #5 car is Kyle Larson . . .” Thank you to all who entered our contest, keep trying, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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