ATA March / April 2020

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auto

FRAN

CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS

C-STORES • INSTALLERS • RECYCLERS

& trucking

WHEELS STILL PLAY AN IMPORTANT PART OF MARITIME RACING (STORY ON PAGE 28)

CARWASHES • SERVICE STATIONS DEALERS • GARAGES • BODY SHOPS

MARCH 2020 $4.95

CARWASH WATER SAVING STRATEGIES. . . (SEE PAGE 16)

CULTURE IS THE WORD FOR YOUR SHOP (SEE PAGE 22)

ON A (RECYCLED TIRE) HIGHWAY! (SEE PAGE 40)

WIN PRIZES!!!

A RUST CHECK SWAG BAG OF GOODIES OR A STANLEY 123-PIECE SOCKET SET FROM NAPA!

WHEELING through

2020

NEW TIRE TECHNOLOGY IS KEEPING PACE WITH THE RAPID EVOLUTION OF VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY.

CROSSWORD GUESS & WIN DETAILS ON PAGES 45 AND 46!

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THE FUTURE IS PLANT-BASED? Wouldja believe tires made out of…dandelions?

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WHEELING THROUGH 2020 – When new tire developments keep pace with evolving vehicle technology, the whole world seems to run just a little bit smoother…by Kenneth E. Seaton

Page 12

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – PEI residents can now alert the government about road issues via text • More!

Page 16

WATER SAVING STRATEGY FOR CARWASHES AND HOW TO IMPLEMENT THEM – With water and sewer costs rising a whopping 50% during the last decade it’s time for companies to consider multiple ways of managing their H20

Page 20

REMEMBERING ROY SHANNON – The Atlantic automotive industry mourns the loss of a friend

Page 22

CULTURE: DON’T DISTANCE YOURSELF FROM THIS WORD – But how do you define it? Bob Greenwood investigates

Page 28

TIRES STILL PLAY AN IMPORTANT PART IN MARITIME RACING – Tim Terry enlightens us on why tires and rims are so important to the game

Page 32

LEWISPORTE NL AUTO SUPPLIES GAINS IDENTITY THROUGH BUMPER-TOBUMPER AFFILIATION – And the neighbourhood’s better for it!

Page 34

DIVERSITY THE NAME OF THE GAME FOR NAPA TWILLINGATE NL – When in doubt about the future diversify, diversify diversify writers contributor Pat Lee

Page 36

HOW TO HIRE THE RIGHT CAR WASH MANAGER – The message seems to be “engage the mindsof all employees” says Anthony Analetto

Page 40

LIFE IS A (RECYCLED TIRE) HIGHWAY – There really is life after end-of-life tires and you might be surprised at the second coming of these bad boys writes Carter Hammett

Page 45 Page 46

WIN BIG! Rust Check Jacket, hat, touque and winter package, or a Stanley 123-Piece socket set from NAPA in our contests!! autoatlantic.com

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Letter from the Editor

TIRE FUTURE IS PLANT-BASED?

I

By Carter Hammett

N CONTRIBUTOR KENNETH E. SEATON’S COVER STORY THIS ISSUE, YOU’LL COME ACROSS A REFERENCE TO TIRES MADE OUT OF—WAIT FOR IT—DANDELIONS. You read that correctly. Dandelions, those annoying, invasive weeds that never seem to leave your lawn actually have benefits in ways you might not have thought about before. For several years now, German tire manufacturer Continental Tire has been researching how the flowering weed can be used as a key component in tires. In conjunction with several partners, Continental has tested the first tires where the tread is composed entirely of dandelion natural rubber as a polymer. Up to 30 percent of the car tire includes natural rubber, while trucks use proportionately higher volumes. Most rubber is sourced from rubber trees which can only be cultivated in the rubber belt around the equator, which occupies only a tiny portion of the earth’s land surface. With global demand for natural rubber projected to in-

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crease sharply and potentially outpace the supply available, it’s only natural for researchers to seek out alternative sources. This is where dandelions come in. But it’s not just any dandelion. There’s a Russian species which is the only plant that can so far be used an alternative source for natural rubber production. That’s because the roots of this particular species contain the natural rubber latex needed for tire production. The implications include a supply that’s less sensitive to weather than traditional rubber trees. Shipping rubber from developing nations in South America or Africa to places in Europe or North America is a costly and time-consuming process that has a huge impact on CO2 output. Dandelions are a hearty plant that are adaptable in moderate climates and areas unfit for food production. Furthermore, it takes about a year to cultivate, compared to seven from traditional sources. Initial tests indicate great potential for the so-called Taraxagum tire produced by

Continental. Of course, hurdles remain. It’s difficult, for example, to synchronize all stages of an entire growing process with a demand that’s both huge and fickle. Nonetheless, dandelion appears to be proving itself as both a cost-effective and sustainable alternate to traditional methods. Earlier this year Continental rolled out a line of Taraxagum bicycle tires, which made their debut at the Tour de France to positive feedback. Not to be outdone, a joint venture between partners Goodyear and Dunlop have been testing nothing less than soybeans. This incredibly versatile crop is used in everything from industrial oils to animal feed, so it seems a natural to experiment with. Their new soybean tires are said to have 10 percent more grip than traditional tires while requiring a lot less energy to produce, the companies claim. Another added bonus is the fact that soybeans sequester carbon from the atmosphere, not add to it, so that’s another plus in their consideration as an alternative to conventional tires. Continental’s long term goal is identify a solution that’s ecologically viable, socially responsible and financially sound. With a Taraxqagum Lab unveiled in December 2018, the R&D’s location is optimized for both farming and extraction of the dandelion. The company has great designs to introduce the raw material into serial production within the next decade. As of this writing, it is currently developing prototypes for truck tires, having already rolled out a new line of bicycle tires, introduced at the Tour de France last year. If all goes according to plan, it’s not just tires that would get a boost. The rubber could conceivably be used for everything from filling potholes to flooring to toys and playgrounds. In the process, rainforests would finally get a break and we could look forward to a future that’s both a little bit more sustainable and environmentally conscious among other benefits. If this is what we have to look forward to, I’ll gladly count myself in.



WHEELING through

2020

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NEW TIRE TECHNOLOGY IS KEEPING PACE WITH THE RAPID EVOLUTION OF VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY WHICH MEANS A BETTER MARRIAGE BETWEEN YOUR CAR AND THE PARTS THAT KEEP IT MOVING.

I

By Kenneth E. Seaton

MAGINE IF YOU WILL, THAT IN THE NOT-TOODISTANT FUTURE, IT’LL BE POSSI BLE TO DRIVE IN A WORLD WHERE FLAT TIRES EXIST ONLY AS A MISERABLE UNPLEASANT MEMORY, THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A TIRE BLOWOUT, WHEELS NO-LONGER DETACH FROM VEHICLES TO BECOME AIRBORNE AND TIRES NO LONGER SHIMMY, SHAKE AND/OR VIBRATE WHEN TRAVELING AT FREEWAY SPEEDS. Historians generally agree that it was in Mesopotamia, around 3500 B.C., that the earliest wheels first appeared. They were made of stone and primarily used for milling, or as a potter’s wheel. It took man another 300 years or so, to realize that they could be used for other things. Things like wheelbarrows for transporting items or for moving people. Wheels have had a long and illustrious history and today’s tires – tip of a lug wrench to tire founding fathers Edouard and Andre Michelin, John Boyd Dunlop, Charles Goodyear – and those tires that are still pinned to drafting boards can only be described as mind blowing. From a tire rubber that can be produced from dandelions, to using 3D printers to customize replacement winter and summer tires. Tires and the tire industry are making some extraordinary advances.

RUBBER ONCE RULED THE ROAD Back in 1839, when American inventor Charles Goodyear accidently created the process to vulcanize rubber, no one could have predicted the trips that his discovery would take drivers on. His original process was further developed and used in the modernization of the old, heavy leather-rimmed solid iron-clad wooden

wheels. Over time, those wooden wheels evolved into wheels that were made from solid rubber and these in turn morphed into the more modern pneumatic, or airinflated radial tires that are still in use today. Ever moving forward, the tire industry rolled out bias-ply tires, steel-belted radial tires, non-pneumatic tires, carbon fiber wheels, and others. However, everything that has been done to and about tires pales in comparison to the recent advances that have been accomplished resulting from the contribution of new tire technology. Shrewd tire manufactures are paying close attention to ongoing changes to government regulations and to prospective customers, who are demanding greater fuel economy and safer vehicles.

ROLLING ON THE NEW TECHNOLOGY HIGHWAY As new vehicles drive out of the showrooms and onto the highways, there are a lot of techy things going on in the engine, on the dashboard and in the tires. As vehicles develop a greater reliance on artificial intelligence and become more widely connected, the next evolution will be the trend towards “Smarter Tires”. Today’s drivers have the advantage of using Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) to monitor their tires. There are two types. The first is Direct TPMS and it monitors tires by measuring air pressure via wheel mounted sensors. If the air pressure drops below 25%, it triggers an alert via a dashboard light. And there’s another type of TPMS called Indirect. Indirect TPMS works with a vehicle’s Antilock Braking Systems (ABS) via wheel speed sensors. Tires with a lowered air pressure roll at a different wheel speed than fully inflated tires and this information is picked up by the sensor. It then via the car’s onboard computer, also alerts the driver by way of a dashboard indicator light. Tire sensor technology is advancing past simple TPMS to the point that it can signal drivers when it is time to change a tire. It can monitor tires and report details

about uneven and/or dangerous tire conditions. Additionally, it can even distinguish between different road conditions and aid in preventing vehicles from slipsliding across road surfaces. Tire manufacturers are hard at work producing new technology that best enables sensors to collect real time data. This data is forwarded to the vehicle’s onboard computer. Then, the computer, will evaluate and assimilate the numerous aspects of the tire’s performance and road conditions. Lastly, adjustments are made which will allow the tires to run at the most optimal performance levels. Continental AG is introducing two new tire technology concepts that it claims will make for even greater road safety and comfort in the future. The two systems support the continuous monitoring of the tire’s condition as well as situation-matched adaptation of the tire performance characteristics to prevailing road conditions. Continental’s “ContiSense” will use tire sensors to measure tread depth and temperature and will alert drivers to any tire damage. The system is based on the development of electrically conductive rubber compounds that enable electric signals to be sent from a sensor in the tire to a receiver in the car. “ContiAdapt” will continually adjust tire pressure and rim width to adapt contact patch to road conditions. It combines micro-compressors integrated into the wheel to adjust the tire pressure with a variable-width rim. The system can thus modify the size of the contact patch, which under different road conditions is a decisive factor for both safety and comfort. In March, the Ford Motor Company announced that its 2020 Explorer will be the first car to come equipped with Michelin Selfseal tires. The tires contain a natural rubber sealant, which can either surround an embedded object or patch a hole that an object leaves behind. This is different from run-flat tires which will lose some or all of their air if they are punctured, but they will still allow the vehicle to drive on for a limited distance at a reautoatlantic.com

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Tires and Treads

duced speed. While advances in new technology are driving designers to make changes to the wheels that are rolling on the road, other interesting influencers are also compelling tire manufacturers to – if not, at least keep pace – but to also strive to stay ahead of the automotive industry. Electronic and autonomous vehicles will soon be changing the automotive landscape.

EVS & AVS HAVE SPECIAL TIRE REQUIREMENTS As electric vehicles (EVs) become more commonplace on the roads and with autonomous vehicles (AVs) just around the corner, there’s an ever-increasing need for smarter tires for smarter vehicles. Studies have shown that traditional tires wear 30% faster on EVs than on conventional vehicles, thereby creating the necessity of designing ever increasingly complex types of tires. As EVs operate, they put more resistance on the wheels, so that the batteries can continually regenerate, which in turn puts more strain on the tires. Electric vehicles generate huge amounts of instant torque and this factor, combined with the extra vehicle weight of the battery, also takes its toll. Lighter weight tires are needed to counter the vehicles’ additional weight. Additionally, since EVs operate on a much quieter scale, tires also need to run as silently as possible. Similarly, autonomous vehicles will have to run on more specialized types of tires. Designers are developing future concept tire models as they anticipate the needs and requirements of the self-driving vehicle. Tire vehicle communication will become paramount. AVs will require continual updates on specific tire conditions, temperature and pressure sensor monitoring and predictive wear-and-tear maintenance information, in order to ensure the safe operation of the vehicles.

THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY IS LOOKING TO TECHY TIRES Owners and fleet managers – ever mindful of the necessity of increasing company profits – are more and more turning to new tire technology as one means of improving their businesses’ daily operations. With proper understanding and the correct utilization of the Internet of Things (IoT) and other new technologies, they can run tires for longer periods of time, minimize vehicle failures and lower company fuel cost, etc. What was once fantasy is now becoming commonplace. Top tire manufactures, and by extension owners and fleet manag8

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ers, are embracing this newfound reliance on IoT data to provide added support to their businesses and fleet operations. IoT sensor data will enable vehicles to be tracked, tires monitored, have information analyzed, and all in real time. Every time a company vehicle enters a fleet terminal, tire data will be collected and displayed via the internet to all fleet offices. The data is then scrutinized for any potential issues, i.e. high temperature or low tire pressures, and if warranted, action is taken. By using this technology, there will no longer be a need for doing manual tire pressure checks throughout

the fleet depots or at its fuel islands. Tire manufacturer Continental recently unveiled a new digital tire monitoring platform developed for “intelligent” steer tires. Named “ContiConnect”, the tires will deliver direct information about temperatures and pressures via an integrated sensor mounted to the tire’s inner liner. The system’s IoT SIM technology can be monitored in the vehicles cab and/or transmitted to the fleet office. Fuel efficiency is becoming increasingly important to owners and fleet managers. Techy tire solutions, engineered for maximum fuel efficiency, can not only improve a fleet’s bottom line but will also enable companies to lower their carbon footprints. This will also increase a company’s eco-awareness platform for advertising purposes. In the past, owners and fleet managers found that there was often a trade-off between the life span of rolling resistant

tires and fuel economy. Moving to improving a fleet’s’ fuel costs and understanding the call for greater fuel efficiency, tire manufactures have worked hard at designing technological improvements and have developed tires with much lower rolling resistance. Tire manufacturers like; Bridgestone, Yokohama, Cooper Tire, have all made major in roads in the use of advanced materials and innovations. Silica tread rubber and more rigid tread designs will not only lower the tires’ rolling resistance but also maintain and increase a tire’s durability and treadwear.

EYEING THE FUTURE OF TIRES Tire manufacturers constantly strive to push the envelope. Their future model concepts and innovations continue to transform the automotive industry. So much so, that often car and truck owners are on pins and needles as they anxiously wait for the next teaser prototype to be trotted out at trade shows. Ever mindful of public expectations that new technology will be used to increase car safety, tire manufacturers are developing a system known as Contact Area Information Sensing (CAIS). Researchers are working on a premise that this new technology will be able to share information with other similarly equipped vehicles thereby allowing vehicles to anticipate actions from vehicles that are traveling in front them. CAIS will also use a sensor that’s attached to a tire’s interior wall to monitor how it interacts with the road’s surface. The system will continuously check the road surface to distinguish conditions and then it will send real time information to the driver via a digital screen. Expecting to revolutionize the industry by removing the need for air pressure, Hankook has been engaged – as are many other tire manufacturers – on developing an airless non-pneumatic tire. Its research and development teams have put significant effort into ensuring their non-pneumatic prototype will perform as well as, if not better, than conventional tires. Continental Tire is developing a replacement for rubber known as “taraxagum”, that the company claims could be in production within five-to- 10 years. The material can come from as many as 1,200 different types of plants, though researchers are leaning toward the Russian dandelion that takes less than a year to grow. Researchers believe that dandelion roots are much easier to harvest than rubber from trees and are better for the environment. “Most people view dandelions as a nuisance,” said a statement from Con-



Tires and Treads

tinental, but researchers at the German company “embrace the flowering weed as a key component to the future of tires.” French tire manufacturer Michelin and American manufacturer General Motors, have partnered to work on developing a prototype tire named Uptis (Unique Puncture-proof Tire System), this tire supports additive manufacturing technologies. The system will be mounted on an assembly designed without air to avoid all punctures. The companies presented a 3D printed prototype at last year’s Montréal’s “Movin’On” summit on sustainable mobility. The manufacturers believe that this puncture-proof tire will eventually reduce the number of tires that are thrown away due to punctures and ensure better safety for motorists.

tires and wheels is so prevalent. Much like a racing pit crew, determined thieves armed with a jack and a battery-operated tool, can pull off all four wheels in under 10 minutes. Wheels are usually untraceable and are easily fenced. The more expensive the wheels, the more money thieves can make selling them to unscrupulous tire resellers. Also, sometimes thieves steal them to sell to collectors, or they just dump them on scrap dealers for a quick cheap sale. Once vehicle owners understand that they and their vehicle are extremely vulnerable, some simple needed steps can be taken for protection from parts-and-vehicle thieves.

PROTECTING TECHY TIRES & WHEELS

Park in well-lit areas, where there’s lots of pedestrian or vehicular traffic. Thieves like to work in the dark and don’t like having any potential witnesses around. When leaving a vehicle for a long time, park it where it’s highly visible and whenever possible, park it in a lot equipped with surveillance cameras. Turn the vehicle’s wheels to a 45-degree angle when parking. The wheels get tucked into the wheel well, thus making

Even though technological advancements in the auto industry are moving at warp-speed, old-fashioned wheel and vehicle theft remains a major problem. The Insurance Bureau of Canada estimates that auto theft cost Canadians close to a billion dollars a year. Vehicle owners often spend huge amounts of money on aftermarket rims, wheels, and tires. There are many reasons why stealing

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ESSENTIAL STEPS INCLUDE:

it harder for thieves to get at the lug nuts. Since the steering column is locked and without an ignition key, it’s very difficult to straighten out the wheels. And when parallel parking, always park as close to the curb as possible. The closer a vehicle is parked to a curb, the less room thieves will have to place a jack under the vehicle. Purchase lug nut locks and install an alarm with a sensor. Replace one – some owners replace all – of the tire’s original lug nuts with a lock. The lock requires the use of a specially sized wrench for its removal. Install a car alarm that is equipped with sensors that attach to the wheels. The alarm detects when the vehicle is subjected to an angle change or gets tilted, and the wheel sensors can also detect if the wheels are being tampered with. Be it for added vehicle performance or just aesthetic reasons, investing in aftermarket rims, wheels, and tires can represent a sizable investment and often have much sentimental value to owners. Spending the time and expense to get the wheels insured is often well worth the added piece of mind. And, if they do fall to thieves, marking them with some personal identifying mark may aid in their recovery.


Around the Atlantic

DIVERSITY THE NAME OF THE GAME FOR NAPA TWILLINGATE, NL

I

By Pat Lee

F YOU WALK INTO TWILLINGATE AUTO SUPPLIES, YOU CAN BUY MORE THAN WIPER BLADES.

On top of parts for your vehicle, you can also buy snowmobile parts, snowblower parts, industrial parts and hydraulics as well as gear for your fishing boat. Oh, and they’re also a franchise for The Source should you need any electronics. Owner Garry Guy said in a small community, you do what you have to do. “We had to diversify to survive,” said Guy, who is also in construction and trucking and owns some rental properties. “You need to be in everything to survive in a small town.” The business also carries a diverse inventory as they are the only auto shop in the isolated community in the northeastern part of the province. “We are the only game in town but there are others within two hours.” Guy said he went into business in 1976 with his father and brother while still in

business school at Memorial University in St. John’s. Guy said he wanted to own a business and was looking for a way a way to return home when school was done. “I wanted something to do … so came back to my hometown and started up the store,” he said. “My brother and I got into it together. He had a keen interest in cars and my father was in the trucking business, so it seemed a natural thing for us to get involved in.” Over the years, Guy said he looked after the business side of things while his father remained in trucking and his brother, now retired, looked after the day-to-day operations at the shop. His son David now manages the business, which employs five, including Guy’s sister. Also, a nephew works in another part of the business. For several years now the auto parts operation has been under the NAPA banner, and before that C.A.W.L. and UAP. Being connected to the NAPA Auto Parts network means the business has access NAPA’s many programs and huge in-

ventory of quality auto parts. The business gets its orders from NAPA’s centrally located Moncton, N.B., warehouse on a daily basis, from Monday to Friday. Guy said they have experienced the ups and downs of the economy, mainly riding the highs and lows of the fishery over the years. “Our business is affected quite a bit by the fishery.” He said a spike in tourism in recent years has helped in the summer months. Now semi-retired, Guy leaves the operation to his son to look after. “He’s pretty much taken it over now.”


East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION NEWS FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION NEWFOUNDLAND

The provincial government announced December 11 that $325.2 million will be set aside in the 2020-21 capital budget for the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure. “Our government is continuing to take a responsible approach to spending,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Oliver. “Strategic and well-planned investments in our provincial roads and

The department will continue work on several projects, including; Anderson Bridge; Coles Island Bridges; Petitcodiac River Bridge; Centennial Bridge; Route 11, Shediac River to Cocagne River; and Route 11, Cocagne River to Little Bouctouche River.

Division’s logo yesterday (Monday, November 11) at the North Atlantic Aviation Museum. The two-kilometre section of highway east of Gander extends one kilometre east and west of the midpoint between the cemetery and the Silent Witness Memorial, which commemorates the crash site of Arrow Air Flight 1285 where the 248 members of the 101st Airborne Division and eight civilians died in 1985. “Gander has always welcomed the world as a stopover for the thousands of men and women who served their countries in times of war and peace. We value their service. The naming of this historical stretch of highway is a fitting tribute and reminder of their heroic contributions for which we owe a debt of gratitude. I thank Sergeant (Retired) Robert J. Smith for his initiative and all who played a role in making this tribute possible ” said Haggie.

bridges can support improved economic outcomes. Proper maintenance can also save money over the long term and can be reinvested in further improvements to our transportation network.” The department will allocate $137.6 million to its highway program, $44.4 million to its bridge program, $87.3 million for the federal-provincial program, $30.9 million for public works and infrastructure, $15 million for the Vehicle Management Agency and $10 million for the Municipal Designated Highway program. “We will continue to look at opportunities to partner with the federal government on projects which align with our priorities for improving or maintaining existing infrastructure,” said Oliver. “We will do so by using the asset management system to take politics out of infrastructure spending.” The department’s capital budget is included in the government’s $599.2 million capital budget that maintains continuity and builds upon the financial progress made over the past year.

Additionally, the government has committed $1 million this year to begin work on the engineering design of a replacement bridge in Shippagan-Lamèque and for work to assure the safety of the existing bridge, including cable replacements, while design work on the new bridge is being done. Oliver said that while the government understands some difficult decisions needed to be made, the focus must be on maintaining the province’s current infrastructure.

Trans-Canada Highway Near Gander Named Remembrance Way The Department of Transportation and Works, in collaboration with the Town of Gander, has named a section of the TransCanada Highway near Gander as Remembrance Way in honour of the 100 Second World War soldiers and airmen laid to rest at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery and members of the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division. The Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, took part in a ceremony to unveil a sign displaying a poppy and the 101st Airborne

NEW BRUNSWICK

Capital budget focuses on maintaining infrastructure

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NOVA SCOTIA

Province Releases 2020-21 Five Year Highway Plan Nova Scotia will invest at least $300 million to improve and upgrade roads, highways and bridges across the province. The Five Year Highway Plan includes more than 150 major construction and improvement projects for the coming year that will make roads, highways and bridges safer. “Transportation is critical to ensure our economy and to the safety of the peo-


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East Coast Road Report

ple who use our roads and highways,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “It’s part of

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

our commitment to ensure safe and connected communities.” Twelve major construction projects are planned for the focus on twinning portions of Highways 101, 103, 104 and the Sackville-Bedford-Burnside Connector on Highway 107. The department will continue to spend on safety improvements for highways not being twinned. That work involves improving intersections, adding passing lanes, climbing lanes and turning lanes, interchanges, as well as roundabouts. The plan outlines new projects such as: construction of the Bridgewater Interchange in Lunenburg County construction of a new roundabout at the intersection of Highway 105 and Route 252 in Inverness County design work for Trunk 30 from MacLellans Cross Road to the Victoria/Inverness County line Investment in in the Gravel Road Program to rebuild existing gravel roads in rural Nova Scotia, improving safety and reducing maintenance costs continues to be a priority. Funding for the plan is subject to approval in the 2020-21 budget. The plan can be found at: https://novascotia.ca/tran/highways/fiveyearplan.asp

Islanders can now easily report broken traffic lights, broken pavement, problems with the Confederation Trail, and plowing/sanding issues to government by text message.

“We want to provide better service to Islanders and we know it’s convenient to send a quick text. We also want to know about road issues right away so we can fix small problems before they become big problems. The technology allows us to make sure a response on our end is happening in a timely manner, and it lets us track trends over time so we have good data on what’s happening on our Island roads.” - Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy Minister Steven Myers Report provincial road issues via text message using the following numbers: Kings County - 1-902-200-2122 Queens County - 1-902-200-6649 Prince County - 1-902-200-1014 “BamText is a Prince Edward Islandbased customer and public engagement platform used by North America’s largest companies to engage with public to receive feedback, suggestions, or to notify a government/business of an issue,” said Jordan Fraser of BamText. “Built on SMS technologies, BamText is currently live in more than 1500 companies throughout North America including Irving Oil, Circle K and Parks Canada.” Islanders can continue to report issues

Through a partnership with the Island company BamText, Islanders can text information, pictures or video to highway maintenance staff in their county. Staff will use this information to investigate concerns and dispatch crews as needed.

by phone or email. All contact information is available at Report a Road or Traffic Problem. All the latest road conditions are made available via phone at 511 or via mobile device or computer at www.511. gov.pe.ca

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Report road issues by text message


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At The Car Wash

WATER SAVING STRATEGY FOR CARWASHES AND HOW TO IMPLEMENT By Steve Samudio, Paul Spence and Denise D. Wight

W

ATER RESTRICTIONS OR NOT, THERE’S GOOD REASON TO MAKE A COMMITMENT TO WATER CONSERVATION AND WATER RECLAMATION IN THE CARWASH INDUSTRY.

Water and sewer costs have increased an average of 50 per cent since 2008. Water and sewer costs are becoming the number one operating expense for carwash operators. Companies should be actively managing water use because doing nothing now will cost more later. There are many steps operators can take;

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from checking for leaks and limiting flow through nozzles to RO reject recovery, but the most effective way is through water reclamation. What is reclaim? The definition of reclaim is “to retrieve or recover something lost.” Reclaim, by carwash industry definition, is the re-use of previously used water in the carwash process. It is important to note that a small percentage of the wash water is lost due to evaporation and carryout. Let’s talk about the water we can re-capture and re-use. There are three main sources; Reverse osmosis (RO) reject water, rainwater and reclaimed carwash water. Reverse osmosis (RO) reject water: A Reverse osmosis system uses city water in the process of making spot-free water.

The byproduct of this process is called reject water. RO reject water has been treated for chlorine by the carbon filter and has gone through a five-micron prefilter but is high in total dissolved solids (TDS). The high TDS negatively impacts chemical performance and therefore should not be used for chemical applications. The best use for RO reject water is a rinse after the wash process and before the waxes, clear-coats and spot-free rinse. RO reject does a great job of prepping the vehicle for the final spot free rinse. Rainwater harvesting: Rainwater can be used as an alternative water source for your carwash. Rainwater is soft water, so it can be used for many different applications. Capturing and storing the rainwater to reuse in your carwash is a form of


GNR 7117

GNR 7129

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GP3000i

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1700

2300

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2200

3000

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OHV

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Engine Displacement Starting Method

3000

80 cc

149 cc

212 cc

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1.2 Gallons

1.06 Gallons

2.6 Gallons

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7.0 Hrs

4.5 Hrs

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Run Time @ 25% Load

10.75 Hrs

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46.6 lbs

59.5 lbs

109.1 lbs

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90 days Limited

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91399

1,38199

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2,03900

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GNR 6998

GNR 7172

GNR 7174

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POWERPACT

GUARDIAN

GUARDIAN

Watts

7.5/6 kW

10/9 kW

13 kW

50 Amp, 8-Circuit Transfer Switch

45 Amp, 16 space, 24-Circuit

60 Amp, 16 space, 24-Circuit

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240 V

Engine/Alternator RPM

240 V

240 V

3,600

3,600

3,600

Generac OHV 420 cc

Generac G-Force 400 Series 460 cc

Generac G-Force 800 Series 816 cc

Fuel Consumption @ 1/2 Load NG cu. ft/hr

73

101

154

Fuel Consumption @ Full Load NG cu. ft/hr

117

127

225

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31.6

36

56

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51.6

54

90

69

61

65

db(A) at Exercise Warranty Dimensions (L" x W" x H")

3 Year Limited

5 Year Limited

5 Year Limited

36" x 27" x 35"

48" x 25" x 28"

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280 lb

338 lb

385 lb

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At The Car Wash

water reclamation. Some counties have restrictions on use of rainwater, check with them first before implementing rainwater harvesting. Reclaimed wash water: All water that was used in the carwash; the reclaimed wash water, the city water mixed with chemicals, spot free water (RO), and RO reject water. All can be repurposed not just for the carwash, but in many cities, can also be used for irrigation systems at your facility. Check with your local municipality for any restrictions. The ability to utilize reclaim water for landscaping keeps your reclaim tanks fresher and decreases your discharge to sewer (getting you ever closer to true zero discharge). This helps the environment and helps your pocketbook!

to a certain size particulate (micron) that is appropriate for your wash. There are several different ways to do that: cyclonic separation, multimedia and filter bags. Keep in mind that the smaller the micron size, the higher the quality the reclaim water will be. Reclaiming water is a necessary part of the modern-day carwash. By minimizing the amount of water discharged out to the sewer you are reducing waste, taking care of the environment and saving money. Understanding how reclaim works and spending the time to find the right people to help you create a properly designed carwash is extremely important. If you get this wrong, it’s expensive and time consuming to correct.

to settle to the bottom of the tanks enabling you to get rid of most of the contaminants. Using Stokes Law, the tanks are sized depending on water flow/volume. Ideally, when the water enters the first set of tanks, it will take 60 minutes to travel to the last tank. This allows enough time to settle solids but also prevent stagnant water which will begin to develop bacterial growth and will lead to foul smelling water. The second step to reclaiming the wash water is using cyclonic separation to refine the wash water. Not only is it very effective, it is virtually maintenance free. There are many cyclones on the market, make sure you utilize a system that cleans down to the five-micron level. Micron size has a direct correlation

There are two steps to cleaning the used wash water; both steps are equally important: First step are the settling tanks. These are typically underground. Above ground tanks can also be used when digging is not an option. The goal of the settling tanks is to separate the oil and floatable material from the water and to give the suspended solids in the water time to settle to the bottom of the tanks. (Note: If the first step is done incorrectly, the endresult will be diminished water quality.) The second step for cleaning the wash water is the reclaim system itself. The reclaim system will bring the water down

HOW TO RECLAIM WATER

to wash quality and carwash equipment failure. The smaller the micron achieved consistently, the more effective the reclaim system will be. Five-micron quality water allows for more reclaim water to be used, is suitable for high pressure pumps and keeps your wash bay and equipment cleaner. The water is pulled from the underground tanks using a single pump setup, it is then sent through the cyclones to spin out remaining solids. By using a single pump setup, five-micron cyclones and a VFD, you can consistently recirculate the water in the tanks while also feeding the carwash simultaneously. We call this an on-demand system. There are

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There are many ways to reclaim carwash water these days and while there are multiple technologies available, few produce the quality water that most operators want and need to be successful. There are pros and cons to all technology but after much practical field experience, we’ve found the process described below, if followed correctly, is by far the most effective. The first step in this reclamation process is to settle out solids. By using gravity and time as our friend, settling tanks are the answer. The combination of both gravity and time allows for heavier solids


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At The Car Wash

systems that we call batch systems due to them having to process and clean water, store the water, and then deliver to the wash. This can lead to problems such as not enough water to feed the wash, and or stagnant water that starts to develop bacteria, which I mentioned…… yes, creates foul smelling water. In addition to removing the solids to five microns, you must also recirculate and aerate the reclaim water in the settling tanks. The most effective recirculation process runs 24/7 and has ozone introduced to treat and kill bacteria. Yes, the most effective systems run 24/7. I like to explain to customers that it’s like a swimming pool: “You know that pump you have that comes on and off throughout the day? That is to prevent water from becoming stagnant.” The same thing with an effective reclaim system except now you’re dealing with highly contaminated water and you want to circulate and clean this water as often as possible. While recirculation is going on ozone is introduced into the recirculation stream. Ozone is a gas that is produced on the reclaim system by first concentrating ambient air into dry, clean, pure O2. The gas is pumped into the ozone system where the O2 molecules are split by high voltage arcing (corona discharge) and formed back into O3 molecules, which is ozone. Ozone is a contact killing agent

that is 20 times stronger than chlorine. It is 3000 times faster to purify water than chlorine. Bottom line is that ozone is the strongest, fastest, commercially available disinfectant and oxidant for water treatment. Lastly, as with any good strategy, how it is implemented is crucial. Train employees to be water champions and help look for leaks in the wash bay, in the bathrooms and on the property. Educate your employees as well as your customers. Install signage and monitor and meter your results. Remember, work with a partner that will evaluate your site from entrance to exit to ensure the proper water treatment solutions are put in place. Reclaiming water in the carwash industry isn’t difficult, you just need the right strategy! Steve Samudio is the director of operations for New Wave Industries. Steve has helped engineer NWI products for 20 years and is named on some of NWI pat-

ents. Steve’s vast experience with water treatment in the carwash industry positions him to be a leading expert for years to come. He can be contacted at ssamudio@purclean.com . Paul Spence is a technical sales manager for New Wave Industries. Paul has been in the carwash industry for over 23 years. He’s done everything from install tunnels and automatic carwashes from the ground up, to providing technical training and troubleshooting classes throughout North America. He can be contacted at pspence@purclean.com . Denise D. Wight is the vice president of New Wave Industries, manufacturer of the PurClean Spot Free Rinse system and the PurWater reclaim system. She has been in the carwash industry for over 30 years and has extensive experience with water related issues as well as point of sales systems for the carwash industry. She can be contacted at Dwight@purclean.com.

IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROY SHANNON

I

T IS WITH HEAVY HEARTS THAT THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY SAYS GOODBYE TO A DEAR FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE, ROY SHANNON.

Roy wore many hats over the years starting with the Woolco Auto Dept. in Saint John, NB. From there he became the Atlantic sales rep for Wagner Brakes in 1977. In the mid-80s Roy became the sales manager for Battery Electric Ltd. (later becoming McKerlie Millen). In 1993 Roy left to become regional manager of Cooper Automotive, which later became a part of Federal Mogul. Roy continued there in the regional manager role until 2005. He then became general manager of APM Ltd. for several years before going to work with ZPS. Roy’s zest for life was unparalleled. Every day was a new adventure and he embraced each day with enthusiasm. His work life was always in the automotive aftermarket business where he made true and loyal, lifelong friends. His personal life was all about family, friends, community, and a life shared with Ruth on his slice of heaven on earth, his home on Pickett Lake. 20

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Bob’s Business Development

CULTURE – DON’T DISTANCE YOURSELF FROM THIS WORD

M

By Bob Greenwood

ANY SHOP OWNERS HAVE NEVER EMBRACED THE NEW WAY OF DOING BUSINESS. THEIR ATTITUDE IS THAT THINGS HAVE NOT CHANGED AND THE SHOP IS STILL FOCUSED ON PRICE AS “THE” ISSUE WITHIN THEIR MARKETPLACE. CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ENLIGHTENING STATEMENTS:

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In 1898, Charles H Duell, Commissioner of the U.S. Patents office said, “Everything that can be invented, has been invented.” In 1943, Thomas J. Watson, Chairman of IBM, predicted that there was a world market for “about five computers.” In 1977, Ken Olsen, President of Digital Equipment Corp., authoritatively stated that “there is no reason for any individual to have a computer in their home.” These statements were made by men who were experts in their field. They based their statements on their past experiences and realities of their time. Many Shop owners will focus on the words above “realities of their time.” and justify in their minds why price remains the key focus issue in their market place.

I submit that it is time to serious embrace the following statement: “We, the Independent Sector of the Automotive Aftermarket Industry, are called to be architects of the future, not its victims.” A Shop has a tremendous amount of “influence” within a marketplace IF the business truly understands it can create a future. Are you, as a shop owner/manager an architect of our industries future? This is probably one of the most serious, thought provoking, questions of the current generation. We have never looked at our industry in this way. Consider that if the average shop owner in Canada has been in business 18 years, he or she now has a “responsibility” not only to set up the next generation (continued on page 26)





Bob’s Business Development

(continued from page 22) of their business (succession) but also set up the state of their marketplace they will leave behind. Consider “price” is a culture, “value added” is a culture, “wow factor” is a culture and “service” is a culture. Which one of these culture words does not guarantee a future? “Price” is the answer that jeopardizes the entire industries future. The remaining words enhance the aftermarkets future. Consider that a shop owner can be the architect of their marketplace. This is done by establishing a complete culture throughout the entire shop business as to a “way” of doing business. Consider that the following 10 policies throughout a shop’s business develop a “culture” that can change a given marketplace as well as the Net Income of the service centre business:

but also each other, then perhaps there would be more communication between the internal parties. Consider that “Service” improves Net Income. Does each person within the shop understand what “service” means to each other they work with? 2. The shop must be fanatical about the words “customer service” - In other words nobody blames anybody within the business in front of the client as to “why” something went wrong.......they simply make it right!! AND understand they have the “authority” by Management to make it right. The client “rules” in this service shop and live by the words “we will not let you down.” 3. Continuously striving for improved service levels - All staff and Management have an attitude “there is a way we can do this better and I WANT to be part of that solution.” No one within the shop believes we have the best service in town YET. There are always ways to improve service levels and we must find that solution.

1. Everyone within the shop itself has clients - the internal workings of a shop’s business is just as critical to establishing a “culture” as do the external workings of the Service Centre. If the Service Advisor and the Technicians realized that their client is not only the person on the end of the telephone and the client they service,

4. Policy and procedures that “befriend” clients must be eliminated - Get

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rid of procedures, rules and so called company policies that chase clients to the Dealership competition. “We” as an Independent Automotive Service Shop are here to serve you and “stand by you”. This is a definite culture change that is long overdue. Remember we are talking about developing long-term “clients”. 5. Allow your people to make decisions - they call this empowering your people. How can you expect your employees to handle angry customer/client situations if you haven’t taught them how or given them the authority to correct the situation? Consider it is far easier and less costly to correct most situations then to find another client of equal volume and cash.


6. Believe that “Service” drives NET income - today “service” rules. The client requires the work performed in an accurate and timely manner for safety,, reliability and efficiency. If the culture within your Service Shop system is totally “service” driven, the net income of the Shop WILL improve. 7. Listen to your clients - if you are not prepared to truly listen to your clients then how do you determine “what they value”? You perceive value is price, but in reality they truly value something else, consequently, over time, the shop loses the client’s business because the shop didn’t deliver what the client valued.

vehicle. When you “train” a client well and the shop has earned the client’s trust by never misleading or letting them down, then the culture of that client changes towards the shop’s culture. Consider a “price culture” shop trains to, develops, and attracts a price marketplace. A “value-added”, “service orientated” shop culture trains to, develops, and attracts a value-added, service orientated, clients. The latter enjoys less stress, is

more profitable and enjoys a better ROI than the former. I truly believe that with the right discipline, focus, and effort, you really can be the architect of your future. Consider accepting and committing to this challenge….. and re-energize your business. Don’t believe it to be possible? …… Well…You are the expert within your marketplace today. Consider what was said by experts in 1898, 1943 and 1977.

8. Define to the market and staff the service levels plans - what do you mean and how are you going to deliver them? 9. Care about your people - Staff relations will mirror your client relations. Treat your people poorly and they will in turn, treat the businesses clients poorly as well. The opposite also is true. Treat your staff well and with respect and watch the difference in your client relationships with the shop and the volume of business that you do with each client. 10. Staff reviews are a must - Shop staff must “understand” that they are, and “feel” they are, an important part of the success of the business. The facts are “they are”. How the bookkeeper collects or manages the receivables is just as important as the clean-up person disposing the shop’s garbage in a timely manner. There is a very powerful saying about staff relationship building that goes like this; “Praise your people in public, condemn your people in private”. Your relationship with each staff member reflects on the bottom line of the business. Think about this carefully when analysing the shop’s “profitability”. The culture of an Independent Service Shop business reflects on the marketplace it works within. A weak shop culture will produce a weak client marketplace, whereas a strong, positive shop culture will produce an excellent marketplace to sell in. This is most prevalent in smaller communities. If all shop owners within the larger city communities carried out their “industry responsibilities” properly, then price would NOT be so prevalent as a “culture” in their society. Consider that no one else has more influence on a client in terms of “how” they see our sector of the industry than the Independent Shop they have service their autoatlantic.com

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Atlantic Racing News

TIRES STILL PLAY IMPORTANT PART IN MARITIME RACING By Tim Terry

O

VER THE YEARS, WE HAVE CHATTED IN THIS SPACE ABOUT MANY TOPICS. THOSE INCLUDE SCRATCHING THE SURFACE OF MANY TECHNICAL ITEMS OF THE VARIOUS STOCK CAR RACING DIVISIONS WITHIN THE ATLANTIC PROVINCES. Among those subjects we have devoted space to in these pages in the past are tires, which is what this issue is rolling on - no pun intended!

As the old saying goes, “the more things change, the more things stay the same.” There have not been a ton of change to tires in the region, some divisions have seen slight changes on what rims can be run, but since the last time we tackled the subject a few years ago, tires haven’t seen a ton of change. To refresh, tires and rims are two of the most pivotal things about a racecar, or a car in general as a matter of fact. The four black patches of rubber are the contact of the car to the road, or in our case, the track. When the car heads down a straightaway and falls into a banked left turn, while the suspension is doing a ton of work flexing and traveling as the car sinks into the bank, it is still the tire that has that connection to the surface. While you need to have the full setup package from bumper to bumper and a driver to

get up on the steering wheel to ultimately land a team a trip to victory lane, the car rolls on tires to get it to that celebration when the checkered flag falls. Most divisions in this region are on a spec tire. In short, those classes have a certain type of tire they must run. Some have tread depth rules and the rules on tire softener vary from sanction to sanction, but the tire itself comes from the same manufacturer. The Pro Stock/Pro Late Model division runs a Hoosier 1070 slick tire, while the Late Model Sportsman and Street Stock run a Hoosier 890 grooved tire. The Legend division runs on a Federal tire supplied by US Legend Cars International (USLCI) and their Bandolero counterparts run a tire also supplied by the USLCI shop in Harrisburg, North Carolina. The Passione Flooring & Interiors East Coast Mini Stock Tour and the Scotia

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Speedworld Thunder cars run on a used Legend car Federal tire, which is based off a street tire and can be bought with the same general specs from the manufacturer as a DOT tire. The Atlantic Modified Tour also runs with a used tire rule, utilizing used Hoosier slick tires that run on the Pro All Stars Series. Tires can also be one of the biggest numbers when it comes to a racing budget throughout the year. Sure, a used tire is going to cost you less than a new tire and some teams can get away with running used tires over new tires. The Four Cylinder and Mini Stock teams that run on street tires have a floating budget. Several teams use tires from junk piles while others will buy brand new, top of the line tires that fit the rules for their respective track and get them cut, buffed or shaved to maximize their patch of rubber hitting the track when the green flies. A number of tracks and series that run Street Stock, Sportsman and Pro Stock divisions have tire rules, where a team is only permitted to buy a certain amount of new tires per season or per the amount of races they have competed in. Even with those rules, the tires in those divisions cost in the ball park of $200 per tire, give or take a $20 bill or two in the balance. Top running full-time teams on the Parts for Trucks Tour have tire budgets of five figures in order to compete for the championship over their 12 race schedule. At the end of the day, it is a necessary evil and a tough balance to make in a budget. If you go without new tires when you are allowed to run them, you are, in essence, behind even before the green flies. Teams need to have an allowance of new tires at some point to prevent wearing the tire past the point of giving up. It is also car racing and you cannot race without tires on the car. It is an important balance to figure out for any short track team budgeting for a racing season. Chemically altering the tire compound, or using “tire softener” as mentioned above, is still a hot button topic through racing circles. Some race tracks in the region allow their Sportsman and Street Stock teams to soak their tires, creating what some call within the region a chemical warfare. Other tracks have a number for a durometer (measuring the hardness of a tire) reading in their rulebook, which disqualifies a team if their tires are softer than that set number. Some have a “dry tire” rule in their rulebooks, discouraging teams from using softener. The Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour and Speedway 660 take it a step further in their top class. The two sanctioning

bodies impound the tires and rims used for racing in their Pro Stock/Pro Late Model divisions with the ultimate goal in mind of keeping the chemicals and the alteration of the four round patches of rubber on each race car has in contact with the pavement out of the equation. Additionally, it takes extra man power throughout the week and sometimes on race day on the track or series behalf to break down

tires and mount tires. At the end of the day, it creates as level as a playing field as you can in the top division of pavement oval racing within Atlantic Canada and it has worked for both sanctions for the better part of, if not more than, two decades. We could be here for pages debating tire softener, whether it is good or bad for the sport. Some say chemically treating a tire can make it last longer and therefore

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29


Atlantic Racing News

helping a driver’s budget in the long run. There is also the debate that the chemicals used in creating the perfect softener are harmful to your health and could have effects in the long run. It also brings the science into it; some drivers have their “recipe” for softener figured out and it works for them while others try to mix chemicals in an effort to concoct that perfect balance to make them go faster. Whatever way you slice it, the debate over tire softener is one that is talked about at the beginning of every year at competition meetings throughout the Atlantic Provinces and will likely be one until the final tire spins to a stop at pavement tracks in the region. When it comes to rims, most divisions are running on a specially designed racing rim. Several manufacturers make racing rims and come in different sizes and specs based on the tire and what car they are going on. For the most part, the four cylinder classes around the region are the exception to the rule with those classes mandating that teams run the rims that are stock to the car. After all, those cars were once street cars and weren’t purposely built by Honda, General Motors or Dodge to be hustled around a closed circuit. Some sanctions do allow race rims

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on their four cylinder cars though. Speedway 660 allows the Sharp Shooter division to run racing rims on the right hand side of their cars while the East Coast Mini Stock Tour allowed their cars to run racing rims with the used Federal Legend car tires beginning in 2019. Some teams saw the racing rims as a more solid choice with the strain on their stock rims which ultimately led to breaking those rims. For the East Coast Mini Stock Tour, it was also a choice of evolving the class into a racing tour to set themselves a part a bit from the norm of most Honda divisions in the region. The racing rims are not mandatory with the Series, which still allows a weekly competitor to run with them, but it gives the full time drivers an option if they so desire. If we were to peer into the crystal ball, what would or could we see change with tires and rims in the near future across the region? I think the only ones with that clear vision are the decision makers within the sport - the tire and rim manufacturers, track and series promoters and their technical inspection personnel that govern the rules packages. Like anything, whether it be parts, tires, safety gear or ever changing technology, the industry is

ultimately a business at the end of the day and those things cost money. Something as simple as international trade could have a trickle down effect on the short track racer if their parts come from outside North America. Not to mention the exchange rate between the US and Canadian Dollar having a direct effect on prices and what our local teams in this region pay for what they need to go racing. We’ve discussed this circle a bit here in the past, but it all essentially comes around and has an impact on this industry as a whole, which eventually makes its way to Atlantic Canada. On the surface, not a lot has changed since we’ve talked about this topic within these pages. The proverbial apple cart may have hit a bump or two along the road but has continued to roll on without a ton of major changes, whether that be to rules, prices, compounds used, the softener debate or other aspects. Could we see a shift? Sure, anything is possible, but only time will tell. I guess we will have to look back here in a few years and see what has changed! Until next time, keep the hammer down and we’ll see you at the track!



Around the Atlantic

LEWISPORTE, NL AUTO SUPPLIES GAINS IDENTITY THROUGH BUMPER TO BUMPER AFFILIATION

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By Pat Lee

A RVE Y W HITE STA RTE D WORKING IN THE AUTO SUPPLY BUSINESS 40 YEARS AGO AND HAS DONE IT ALL, FROM PUMPING GAS TO SELLING PARTS TO MANAGING THE OPERATION.

“I started pumping gas and moved inside,” he said with a laugh. Not only has he done most of the jobs, he’s been through a few ownership changes and moves, but since 1994 has managed Bumper to Bumper – Lewisporte Auto Supplies. The business is owned by Rex Freake, who also owns Newhook’s Auto Parts in Gander, also affiliated with Bumper to Bumper. The shop has four employees, including White’s brother Doug. White, who is retiring in April when he turns 63, said he’s enjoyed his career in the industry, which started in 1978 when he was hired at a business with a four-bay garage and a small parts department. The manager said on top of the move from rotary phones and cardex filing systems, he’s seen plenty of other changes over the years, including the kinds and number of parts they sell.

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“Back in the day it was mufflers and exhaust systems,” White said. “Now you hardly sell any of that.” He said there’s been similar changes with brakes where they used to sell all the individual parts to rebuild the brakes for vehicles. “Now there’s no such thing, almost.” He’s also seen their inventory climb from about 40,000 parts back in the ‘80s to about 300,000 now. “I’ve been through all the changes in the world,” White said. One change he views as a plus is the shop’s affiliation with Bumper to Bumper. Bumper to Bumper is a Canadian auto parts distributor that has been in business for 50 years. Better known in western Canada, Bumper to Bumper is one of the country’s largest auto parts networks with 72,000 square meters of warehouse space in 160 stores and 4,000 affiliated mechanical shops. “What we’ve found is identity,” White said. “We were always known as Lewisporte Auto Supplies, which was great because you knew everybody in town. But as you know, people come, people go, people die. All of the sudden you’ve got a younger crowd and they’re looking for a name. So, it’s Bumper to Bumper.” He said this distinguishes them from a few other businesses in town that provide

HARVEY WHITE IS MANAGER OF BUMPER TO BUMPER – LEWISPORTE AUTO SUPPLIES IN LEWISPORTE, NL.

similar services. White said he’s enjoyed meeting a lot of people in his line of work. But come retirement in the spring, he’ll pass the reigns to someone else as he heads off to his cabin in the woods or hits the road with his camper.




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At The Car Wash

HOW TO HIRE THE RIGHT CAR WASH MANAGER SEARCH FOR MANAGERS CAPABLE OF DELIVERING A CONSISTENTLY SUPERB CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

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By Anthony Analetto

NY COMPANY TRYING TO COMPETE MUST FIGURE OUT A WAY TO ENGAGE THE MIND OF NEARLY EVERY EMPLOYEE.” – JACK WELCH, FORMER CEO, GENERAL ELECTRIC

Several months ago, I wrote about crafting a car wash manager job description for running the day-to-day operations. Today, I’d like to talk about human capital and the investment needed, financially and otherwise, to find, and retain a good manager. One who can become a

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force multiplier for your wash in terms of positive customer takeaway. Delivering a customer experience that differentiates your wash from the competition may begin with equipment, marketing, and technology, but ultimately ends with a skilled manager, trained to enhance and support your organization’s brand. I’ve written a lot and advised colleagues about what I consider to be the core traits of a quality car wash manager—hands on, customer-focused and entrepreneurial in spirit; but where do you find them? While online classifieds, job fairs and on-site signage are all good ways to advertise for new talent, they tend to elicit canned responses from potential candi-

dates. In other words, they are giving you answers they think you want to hear rather than their true thoughts and the skills they bring to the table. I prefer to see the qualities I’m looking for in person and I’m always prepared to capitalize on opportunities that present themselves. For example, I once found one of my best managers while shopping for a set of tires for my truck. My first stop was at a big-box retail store with a temptingly low price. But when I got to the tire section, there was nobody at the counter to help me—and no way to get anyone’s attention—so I walked outside to the garage and found the manager. He said it would be “about 10 minutes



At The Car Wash

before I can drop a car from the lift to help you.” I got the impression that my buying tires was an inconvenience to him that day–not the type of manager I’d invite to work for my business. I politely said I had some other shopping to do and would come back, but immediately made a beeline across town to another tire store that I knew specialized in selling tires only, albeit at a higher price point. When I got there, I noticed a man in a clean dress shirt and slacks huddled with two other workers. I overheard him instructing them how to put a new shipment of tires into the store’s inventory system.

Right off the bat, I was impressed with this individual’s concern and involvement in the training of his employees. “Can I help you sir?” he offered as soon as he observed that I was in the store. The service level in the span of an hour between both places was like night and day. A few minutes later, I had a quote for four new tires in my hand, confident that I got a good deal even though the price was slightly higher than the previous store. I thanked him for his attention to detail and constructive suggestions and asked him what he liked most about his job. Technical skills can be taught I thought but the passion to cultivate satisfied customers not as much. When he answered that he likes working with customers most, I continued with questions about how he got into his current career and where he hopes it’ll lead him—In other words, I just conducted my first interview with this manager candidate. 38

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He passed my initial criteria, so I advanced to the next step and I handed him a business card, a gift card for a free wash, and the lead-in question— “What do you know about the car wash industry?” He said that he didn’t know much, other than his own personal experience from getting his car washed at a place near his home. My point is that you must be prepared to reach into your pocket when you meet a potential managerial candidate. Do you have a supply of free wash cards readily available? Have you prepared a series of interview questions to qualify potential m anager ial c a n d id at e s you encounter? What 30 -second elevator pitch have you crafted to sell your business to a prospective manager? Be concise but to the point here. For a manager, who first and foremost, loves deliver i ng a great customer experience, managing a car wash, especially the newer formats—with pay stations and equipment automation— can be a dream come true.

STICK TO THE MAIN TALKING POINTS: • They will likely be managing fewer staff. • There is typically less handling of cash. • There is little or no inventory to manage. Next, let them know that your business automates most of the mundane tasks and allows them to focus on what they love - and you need - satisfying your customers. Now close by talking about the growth opportunities specific to your business, and boom! If they aren’t left with a burning desire to embark on a career as a professional car wash manager, then it’s likely they

may not be cut out to become a professional car washer. Managers in our industry need to have a mechanical aptitude, and career moves from auto parts, or other industrial retail outlets are an obvious choice, but I’ve also hired managers from restaurants and even once from a pet store. What I look for is individuals who are used to not just surviving, but thriving, in a fast-paced retail environment because they tend to be highly organized and are able to adapt to changing conditions on the fly.. The expectation is that when you bring this type of individual into your wash, they will more easily adapt to running the business and deliver an excellent customer experience, resulting in repeat business and more growth from word-ofmouth referrals. One thing I do not recommend, is poaching from another car wash. This isn’t just an ethical choice of mine, it’s good business. You’re looking to introduce someone to our industry, help them discover their passion for it, and carry that enthusiasm into maintaining your brand experience for your customers for years to come. On a side note, treat them right and proactively manage their growth in your business or you may discover you trained a great manager for your competitors. Formal education isn’t a prerequisite for a managerial position, but being capable of operating the business professionally is; including the ability to defuse the occasional unhappy customer. Those aren’t the only traits I consider but the ability to turnaround a negative customer experience is most definitely one of the most important to me as an operator. In the end, we are a customer service industry and ensuring customer satisfaction should be first and foremost on the mind of every one of us in the business. Hire a leader who thinks from a customer point-of-view and you’ve likely hired the right car wash manager to grow your business. About the author Anthony Analetto - President Joining the company in 2000, Anthony serves as the President of SONNY’S CarWash Equipment Division. In this role, Anthony leads the innovation of new products to drive client success, and oversees all operations, engineering, and supply chain management. Washing cars for over 30 years, Anthony was the director of operations for a 74 location national car wash chain prior to joining the company.


At The Bodyshop Around the Atlantic

FIX AUTO FREDERICTON INCREASES SHOP EFFICIENCY WITH THE REVO SPEED CURING SYSTEM

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FIRST IN THE MARITIMES, FIX AUTO FREDERICTON IMPROVES THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE UTILIZING THE REVO SPEED ACCELER ATED CURING SYSTEM.

efits of this system are: no shrinking of filler or primer products, no wait time to install decals or stripes over fresh paint and no wait times between coats of primer, paint and clear coats. Once a vehicle moves into the REVO station, it only takes a short period of time to complete the job from start to finish.

With our state-of-the-art equipment, facility, certified technicians and processes we are equipped to handle any repair that comes through our door!” The team at Fix Auto Fredericton would also like to thank Atlantic Air Cleaning, Global Finishing Solutions, Axalta and their local NAPA supplier for all their support in setting up

Fredericton (New Brunswick), February 6, 2020 – Ensuring repairs are of the highest quality possible for their customers, the team at Fix Auto Fredericton are constantly updating their shop with the most state-of-the-art equipment available today. The newest addition to their facility, the REVO Accelerated Infrared Curing System. The REVO System means the shop now has some of the fastest curing times in the industry which in turn drastically reduces cycle times. What does this mean for customers? “With this highly advanced curing system, we have increased our capacity and throughput in the shop, which means our customers get their vehicles back sooner with a very high quality repair,” said Corey Etheridge, Fix Auto Fredericton General Manager. Some of the greatest ben-

“We make these types of investments in our shop with the customer in mind,” notes Etheridge. “We want to ensure each repair is completed to the highest quality with a fast turnaround so our customers are back on the road safely and quickly.

their REVO System. With over 285 locations across the country, Fix Auto is part of the Fix Network which is Canada’s largest automotive aftermarket services provider. Visit fixauto. com for more information.

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Tires and Treads

LIFE IS A (RECYCLED TIRE) HIGHWAY WITH INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS RANGING FROM POTHOLE FILLER TO PLAYGROUND FOUNDATIONS, THE POSSIBILITIES GENERATED BY REPURPOSING END-OF-LIFE TIRES APPEARS ENDLESS.

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By Carter Hammett

HETHER ITS NEW H I G H WAY STRETCHES, SOUND-PROOF WALLS OR PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT, IT TURNS OUT THERE REALLY IS LIFE AFTER END-OF-LIFE FOR TIRES. With innovative products ranging from pothole filler to playground foundations, the possibilities generated by repurposing end-of-life tires appears endless. es. You may be surprised to notice that

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mulch in your garden is lasting longer these days. By adding rubber to asphalt liquid, pavement life is significantly increased. Rubber-modified asphalt binders can be used in open-graded asphalt mixtures which claim to reduce vehicle spray and hydroplaning. While visiting a social purpose enterprise in Cambodia a few years ago, I was struck by the diversity of goods being offered for sale. One of these included a line of handbags made entirely from repurposed tires. Ottawa Ontario is one of Canada’s leading pothole creators. A saavy engineer decided to create a method of reducing pothole frequency by creating a volume of crushed stone and putting it in a

thin-walled tire. Once the aggregates are confined within, moisture could no longer enter, which in turn reduced those pesky potholes, saving you mucho deneros in the process. Those are just a few of the innovations that have been produced by end-of-life tire (ELT) recycling and, when mixed with technological advances, the possibilities appear endless. More than this, however, is the recognition that ELTs can still pack value as either an energy source or as a secondary raw material. The process of ELT recovery can be both a green practice as well as a cost-effective method for generating new products. It’s unfortunate that many countries, however continue to send tires to landfill sites. The World Business Council on Sus-


tainable Development defines an end-oflife tire when it can’t be used safely on vehicles any longer. It’s estimated that one billion tires are generated annually and this sheer volume has made finding environmentally-sound ways of disposing and repurposing tires an industry priority. According to the Tire Recycling Association of Canada, ELTs can create a lower-cost fuel source when located near a major fuel consumer like, say, a power plant. Tire-derived fuel is the major use for ELTs in both the US and Japan. More interesting perhaps are the innovations generated by raw material production that ELTs can generate. When used in either shredded or whole forms, a huge range of products can be created, especially for civil engineering projects. This can include everything from embankments, road insulation and jetty bumpers. When converted into crumb rubber, listen: running tracks, ground cover, sports fields, asphalt. The list goes on and on. Tires are long-lasting, lightweight, permeable and good insulators. Why wouldn’t you use them? Canadas tire recycling methods are unique, especially considering our smaller number of vehicles overall and greater distances, as well as variables like less urban density and varying processing technology. So how does Canada perform on the global stage? According to The Canadian Association of Tire Recycling Agencies, Canada remains a solid performer in that nearly all regulated scrap tires available for Canadian collection are being recycled. With fair fees and a relatively transparent production process Canada appears to be in good shape. The country also holds a fairly distinguished track record for innovative projects as well. Alberta-based Eco-Flex has recently introduced the eco-wall, apparently the first recycled rubber fence in Canada. Actually, a sound barrier, the shield reduces sounds coming off a highway. With longevity predicted at up to a century and virtually no maintenance required, this is one product that’s um, gaining traction. New Brunswick’s TRACC company produces a line of rubber mats called Tough Loc. These industrial-strength mats are used in horse stalls, garages and gyms throughout the Maritimes and are especially noted for their durability and tough design. The company claims its products’ aesthetic and quality are available in a diverse range of shapes, designs and engravings.

Euroshield out of Calgary has you covered in a rather unique way: all their shingles are made from recycled tires. Because tires don’t break down it makes the ideal material to have on your roof. It’s products like these that demonstrate recycling can be both environmentally friendly while adding to a company’s

bottom line. With the demands of a new generation reflecting changing values, a fickle public is prepared to seek out companies that reflect issues that are held near to the heart. Recycling innovations that remagine the possibilities of products once thought dead indicate new possibilities and new

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Tires and Treads

profit streams. The opportunities appear to be as endless as the benefits.

USED TIRE RECYCLING PROGRAMS IN ATLANTIC CANADA Newfoundland and Labrador - The Multi Materials Stewardship Board (MMSB) Phone: (709) 753-0948 Toll-Free: 1-800901-MMSB (6672) Fax: (709) 753-0974 Website: http://mmsb.nl.ca Nova Scotia - Resource Recovery Fund Board Inc. (RRFB Nova Scotia) 35 Commercial Street, Suite 400, Truro, Nova Scotia B2N 3H9. Phone: (902) 895-RRFB (7732) Toll-free: 1-877-313-7732 In Truro, NS: (902) 895-7732 Website: http://divertns.ca Prince Edward Island - Island Waste Management Corporation. Phone: 882-0525 Toll Free: 1-888-280-8111 Fax: 1-902-8820520 Website: www.iwmc.pe.ca New Brunswick - Recycle NB. Phone: (506) 454-8473 Toll Free: 1-888-322-8473 Fax: (506) 454-8471 Website: www.recyclenb.com.


Are you looking to shine some light on your business, or introduce a new product or service?

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e can help you with that! We can offer a full or half page to run in our magazine and on the web site. We can organize it in a number of ways. We could do a combination of a story, picture or two and an advertisement all rolled into one page. You supply the picture or pictures and we will write the story and produce the ad. We will do all the work and supply you with a proof

of the finished product for you to sign off on before it runs. Very effective and it couldn’t be easier for you. Lets get your name out there! Call us in Halifax, NS toll free at 1-866-4233939 or Email us anytime at info@autoatlantic.com for the details on what we can do for your business!

51 Bethany Way Halifax, NS B3S 1H6 Canada Office: 1.866.423.3939 l Fax: 1.902.423.3354 autoatlantic.com

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ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 27

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

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Cabot Shipping

1-800-565-0606

cabotss.com

Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

fixauto.com

Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-9 02.468.139 6

fleetbrake.com

Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

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Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

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INTERNET

PAGE

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MacLellan & Moffatt 1-888-893-0508

mmgc.ca

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

maritimeauto.com

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maritimecarwash.ca

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maritimeprostocktour.com

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Maritime Car Wash

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Maritime Pro Stock Tour 1-902-873-2277

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

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NAPA Auto Parts

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NAPA Auto Parts

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NAPA Auto Parts

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NGK Spark Plugs 1-877-2-SPARKY ngksparkplugs.ca

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

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Uni-Select (BtoB)

1-506-857-8150

uni-selectcanada.com

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Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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STEFAN JANOLS JOINS SPECTRA PREMIUM AB AS MANAGING DIRECTOR

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ROLLHÄTTAN (SWEDEN), JANUARY 28, 2020 – WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT MR. STEFAN JANOLS HAS JOINED SPECTRA PREMIUM AB, THE SWEDISH BRANCH OF SPECTRA PREMIUM, AS MANAGING DIRECTOR.

Mr. Janols has a strong industrial background, particularly in the automotive industry where he occupied key research & development, sales, production and quality management roles for Swedish OEM companies such as Autoliv (automotive safety supplier) and Plastal (automotive thermoplastics) for over 26 years. He will be responsible for managing Spectra Premium’s European OEM operations and supporting business development activities. “Stefan’s vast experience in various management positions and in the automotive industry will ensure a strong presence at our Trollhättan facility. It is an honor to welcome him within our ranks and we wish much success in his new tenure as Managing Director,” says Jacques Mombleau, President and CEO at Spectra Premium. Mr. Janols graduated from Chalmers teknsika högskola (Chalmers University of Technology, located in Gothenburg, Sweden) with a Master of Science in Engineering (MSc.), Industrial Engineering. On behalf of Spectra Premium, we wish him a warm welcome and good success in his new function. Spectra Premium Industries (www.spectrapremium.com) is a privately-owned global company that develops and manufactures OEM and aftermarket parts for automobiles, off-highway vehicles, light-duty and heavy-duty trucks. Automakers, industrial manufacturers, auto technicians and car-owners choose the reliability and quality of Spectra Premium products for the heating & cooling, fuel delivery and engine management systems of their vehicles. Trust your vehicle to Spectra Premium.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

JANUARY 2020 WINNER!

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Ian Robertson of Barney’s River, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is April 25th, 2020

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

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Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com

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NAME:

CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

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1. Lowriders and lead sleds

1. Windshield and paint problems

5. East of Causeway guy, slangily

2. Coastal car corrosion cause (4,3)

8. Waited at red light

3. Techs’ electronic diagnostic

9. TCH access lanes

10. Unwell, on a boat

4. Scotia Speedworld action (5,3,5)

system (1,1,1,1,1)

11. Slower dragster, usually

5. ‘66-debut Toyota sedan

12. Restorers’ references (US sp.) (5,8)

6. Gas station sights

15. Carroll Shelby’s muscle car 17. Repositions tires 20. ‘61-’66 Rambler mid-size 21. Pixar “Cars” Willys Jeep 22. Junkyard car description 23. Tasty Nova Scotia treat

7. Keltic Lodge and Digby Pines 12. Indy 500 start vehicle (4,3) 13. ‘70s TV cop in Gran Torino 14. Province crossed by Hwy 401 16. Cops, in trucker slang 18. Musk machine 19. Exceed the limit

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ire fans, maybe you can name what this well known and famous type of automotive tire is, or anything more about it. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is April 25th, 2020.

Congratulations to Steve Ayr of Halifax, NS, who answered that the vehicle in the photo is a 2021 Tesla Cybertruck electric pickup, which can go 0 to 60 mph in less than 6.5 seconds. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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