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2021 BEST CAR AND TRUCK APPS (STORY ON PAGE 9)

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atlantic VOLUME TWENTY ONE • ISSUE 1 • JANUARY / FEBRUARY • 2021

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ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 44 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers (902) 452-0345 rob@autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com SALES MANAGER Dan Hillier (902) 999-1027 dan@autoatlantic.com Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly

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AUTOMOTIVE TRENDS FOR 2021 – Automation addresses the skills gap among the predictions for the upcoming year.

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FROM PANDEMIC PROTOCOL TO POSITIVE EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCES – Whether pivoting in response to COVID issues or trying to broaden diversity strategies, human resources play a great unsung role in the automotive industry.

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A HIGHLY SUBJECTIVE LIST OF 2021 BEST CAR AND TRUCKING APPS – Looking for the best place to park your car? As the old adage goes, there’s an app for that!

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SERVICE ABOVE SELF – At Lahave Street Auto Clinic in NS, it’s people who make the difference . . . no, really!

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COVEY’S AUTO RECYCLES STILL MOTORING STRONG AFTER 60 YEARS – Six decades in and this business still runs with parts in hand.

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WORKPLACE HARASSMENT IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY – With Bill C-35 looming, is the trucking industry ready to take a stand against workplace harassment?

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WHY MEASURING YOUR CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS MATTERS – Bob Greenwood asks if you know the difference between a service advisor and a service consultant.

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FIX AUTO FREDERICTON RED SEAL CERTIFICATION – Red Seal is not only the sign of a high standard of service, it’s transferrable too. Congrats to the Fix team!

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A LAP AROUND COVID: RACING REFLECTIONS DURING A PANDEMIC – Tim Terry says there’s always winners and losers. But in 2020 it’s the fans that lost…big time.

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VIRTUAL CARWASH CONFERENCE – Brenda Johnstone gives us the 411 on transforming a unique event into a unique virtual experience during a pandemic.

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – PEI ramping up charging stations and parking for electric cars • More!

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Don’t let moose lick your car … and other pearls of wisdom gathered from around the virtual world.

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HOW CARWASHES CAN BOOST PROFITS IN 2021 – With COVID-19 taking a bite out of 2020 profits, the carwash industry needs to figure out how to best rebound.

by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, Nova Scotia B3M 0H5. Tel: 902.452.0345. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

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Letter from the Editor

AUTOMOTIVE TRENDS FOR 2021

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By Carter Hammett

ITH THE EXCEPTION OF TRUMP BEING DUMPED, IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING THAT 2020 WAS AN ANNUS HORRIBILIS FOR JUST ABOUT EVERYONE. That only enhances the rationale for why this issue of Auto and Trucking Atlantic looks at HR issues in the Canadian automotive sector and the attached trends in the year to come. Let’s look into the crystal ball and see what’s in store for the industry in 2021.

put, Toyota ranks first. It’s expected that this position will be sustained well into the new year and beyond. Despite this, there are still some doubters out there that question if Japan’s contribution to the Canadian economy is just as important as our neighbours’ to the south. While there’s still reason to approach any predictions with caution, it’s high time to acknowledge the contributions of both Japan and the U.S. as nearly equal players in this regard. For its part, optimism is fairly high with investments by FCA, Ford and General Motors in Canadian manufacturing amenities.

MANUFACTURING

AUTOMATION ADDRESSES THE SKILLS GAP

The manufacturing sector endured a fairly rocky year in Canada, but this has also opened the door to welcome in change and innovation. Maclean’s reports optimism in Canada’s automotive sector as Toyota and Honda’s combined Canadian investments are expected to be responsible for 50 percent of Canadian vehicle production for 2020. This is also the first year where Japanese-owned manufacturers produced more vehicles in Canada than their American competitors. In terms of sheer out-

Among labour market professionals and automotive industry pundits, filling the skills gap has been a major source of anxiety. There has been a lot of talk about “future proofing” the workforce in recent years and while Canada has been somewhat slow on the uptick, automation is the answer everyone’s pointing at. Yes, some jobs will be lost in the process, but new jobs will also be created as manufacturers work towards adapting to the rapidly changing environmental requirements.

THE SALES HAVE IT Covid-19 also left a trail of destruction in the sales results of auto sellers across the country. Showrooms either shut down completely or at least partially, leaving everyone wondering what the future would hold. Vehicle sales bounced back somewhat in the second half of the year after second quarter losses that clocked in at 250,000 units. Still, price drops, fuel efficiency and the promise of environmental responsibility were among the perks used to woo wary drivers back into the showroom—at least to some degree—sales recovery appears to be “in motion.” Despite occupying a relatively miniscule place in the overall market, midsize pickup truck, sales were up 17 per cent in the third quarter and remained five per cent stronger than where they placed this time last year. With half a percentage point gain, these babies now outsell midsize cars and continue to make an imprint. And with new entries by both Honda and Nissan in 2021, keep an eye on sales performance. Likewise, full-size trucks, with Ford F-series in the lead, moved up the sales ladder with a fairly healthy 15 per cent increase and account for about twenty percent of all Canadian light vehicle sales.

AND FINALLY… Limited space doesn’t allow me to expand much on so many things that I’d like to. But one thing from the last year stands out that I’d like to acknowledge. The Atlantic region endured a particularly rough year in terms of tragedies on multiple levels and if nothing else Maritimers proved themselves a remarkably resilient bunch, able to absorb an incredible amount of punishment again and again, only to rise with the kindness and humility that other regions would have lost long ago. That’s something to be proud of and an example to the rest of us who can only stand back and admire the region that keeps on trucking, while remembering what’s truly important. Keep up the good work, guys and gals. 4

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Human Resources

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FROM PANDEMIC PROTOCOL TO POSITIVE EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCES: A LOOK AT HUMAN RESOURCES INSIDE CANADA’S AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

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By Kristen Lipscombe

OR DARTMOUTH, NS ELECTRIC CAR STORE ALLEV, THE ONGOING PANDEMIC HASN’T POSED MUCH OF A PROBLEM. In fact, the forward-thinking vehicle store, nestled among the many other businesses within the well-known Burnside Industrial Park in Dartmouth, N.S., opened its doors in January 2020, right before the COVID-19 craze hit Canada. And the company is growing, including a small second location in Charlottetown, P.E.I. – and succeeding – despite current pandemic pressure on economies both here at home and abroad. David Giles, vice-president of ALL EV Canada, Ltd., credits much of this incredible success to the senses of comradery and teamwork among a diverse group of staff members, from the executives running the show to the technicians on the ground floor. “We’re trying to make it like a family,” Giles said of both ALL EV’s approach to human resources and the general day-to-day atmosphere inside the new Nova Scotia shop. “We want everyone to feel important. We do have a job to do so we hold each other accountable.” Another important value the company emphasizes as part of its human resources mandate is “integrity.” “We are new, so we are excited, obviously. We are excited about the product we are helping because it is a green initiative as well as electrification and convenience,” Giles said. “Our philosophy is basically helping educate any customer that comes in.” “A lot of times dealers are looking at

numbers, cars … but we feel that the shift of going to gas and diesel to eletric is, people are sampling the water; they’re not really sure,” Giles said, “so our philosophy is about not making the sale, but really making a believer.” ALL EV has also been committed to diversity and inclusion since first starting their business. “We have a woman that is an apprentice with us and we heavily engage with ISANS,” Giles said of his role as co-chair of the Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia. “Really, the industry is changing so dramatically in the automotive sector, so we’ve got to try and introduce new people to the trades,” he said. “The trades are starting to evolve, especially with electric vehicles and how repairs are done, and the thought processes; … (these) are very high-tech positions.” “We look for people who are very open-minded when it comes to learning new technologies,” Giles said. Martin Szydlowski, human resources business partner with NAPA Auto Parts, isn’t surprised to see the success of companies such as ALL EV, particularly with such strong HR policies already in place. He also believes the Canadian auto industry has been ahead of the curve in terms of how it has handled the COVID-19 pandemic. “I’ve been in HR now for a number of years and I remember dealing with SARS,” said Szydlowski, who is based in Cambridge, Ont., but oversees several Canadian geographical regions including Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. He also looks after several different divisions including heavy duty vehicles and the importation of parts from both Asia and Europe. These regions and divisions consist of about 1,400 employees total. “Back then, even, we were starting to put together some pandemic manuals, and how to deal with infectious diseases. We had an emergency response plan, hand sanitizers and different technologies that would allow us not to have as much biological exposure; so SARS sort of started it all for us.”

Of course, the sudden onset of COVID-19 last March still came as a surprise to all of us, and there’s no real rulebook on how to handle a pandemic, but the auto industry responded quickly and swiftly to protect its employees and customers alike. “It was a bit of a challenge, starting to deal with it all … and understand the timing of the virus, the incubation, the infectious timeline of it and kind of tracing back and working through it for our risk analysis,” Szydlowski recalled. “That’s what we do now, any time we have a store manager or business manager call us and say, ‘hey, I have an employee who is maybe showing symptoms,’ ” he said. “It’s basically walking through a risk assessment of exposure in the workplace … Who did they talk to? Who did they deal with? And we follow the key safety protocols we have in place as a company.” Other important safety measures include physical distancing, of course, “and wearing mask at all times.” “We have company-supplied medicalgrade masks,” Szydlowski said. “They’re three-plied blue masks that we found were the best protection for our employees; they have 85-87 per cent filtration, allowing for that high safety.” “We ask all our employees to wear them,” he said. “To wear them when they can’t physically distance, to wear them when they’re walking through the business units, or if you are walking from your office to the lunch room or a common area or what have you, people have to have their masks on. In some cases, in our distribution centres and stores, we ask them to wear masks at all times.” Personal hygiene such as handwashing and hand-sanitizing is also strongly emphasized, while cleaning and disinfecting common areas is enforced by strict schedules. Managers are also responsible for health screening their own employees daily, Szydlowski said. Curbside pick-ups, deliveries, limiting customer interactions in store, providing masks for customers, Plexiglass dividers in stores, and floor stickers and signs indicating physical distance are all other ways that the auto industry has “put the focus autoatlantic.com

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Human Resources

… on health and safety.” “That not only includes COVID, but now translates into mental health; people dealing with COVID fatigue and pandemic fatigue and not being able to see friends or family and isolating or quarantining, and everything we’re dealing with in terms of lockdowns,” Szydlowski said. “We offer a number of supports such as the employee assistance and family service, we have support workers who can connect with medical or guidance type of psychological advice through our health insurance carrier, we’ve got podcasts and training available on ways to deal with difficult situations and manage stress and how to cope,” he added. “And then obviously our managers are trained to listen, talk, engage and look out for the mental health of their staff and how people are dealing with certain situations. We’re taking a very proactive approach in order for us to ensure that we are being preventive in our battle with the pandemic, or the virus, rather than reacting to it.” Szydlowski pointed out that many of these measures were in place across NAPA’s facilities before any such regulations were mandated by provincial governments and Public Health offices. “We were already ahead of the game,” he said. “I remember the first time I had to deal with a potential COVID situation at one of our business units. When we had the review with Public Health and the nurses that were responsible for that particular case, … we were already above and beyond what their expectations are, so we were getting quite a bit of praise … for the proactive work that we had already implemented.”

Outside of pandemic protocol, there are other top HR priorities across the auto industry still being on worked hard on daily behind the scenes. Those include staying ahead of the market and keeping competitive, staying on top of changing technology, ensuring customer expectations are met and exceeded, “and making sure that we as a service company can successfully continue our business in the time of the Amazons of the world,” Szydlowski said. “It’s making sure that we provide that high-level support, that we focus on the customer experience and that we have the product, the knowledge and the support to provide to our customers in order for them to be successful.” Diversity and inclusion also remain important focuses for human resources professionals within the auto sector. “It’s a big part of our day-to-day,” Szydlowski said, adding his department works hard to reach out to different communities and educate employees on the importance of diversity and inclusion in the workplace. “We have a lot of employees of various cultural backgrounds, coming from all over the world, that are in key positions, taking on key leadership roles and are changing the overall feel of the industry that would have been many years ago considered to be a boys’ club – it is no more.” Ensuring workplace harassment doesn’t happen, dealing with it appropriately when it does and protecting the rights of all employees are also “taken very seriously with a high-level of commitment.” “In all different levels of the company, right from executives, senior VPs and

management to positions in the stores or in warehouses or in service businesses, (our human resources policies) allow us all to flourish.” At the end of the day, it’s the people that keep NAPA going day in and day out. That’s why there is also a major focus on “positive employee experience,” Szydlowski said. “We do a lot of things like employee engagement surveys and understanding the feedback that we receive through those surveys.” “It’s making sure that we have a great onboarding experience, that the way we integrate our employees and guide them through their position within a company is a successful and positive experience for them.” Ensuring their diverse team members have positive experiences in their new workplace is exactly what ALL EV encourages as well, and those workplace values seem to be paying off despite the pandemic. “It actually went really well; COVID actually didn’t hurt us at all,” Giles said of plugging his business into the competitive auto industry market during what has been a tense time for companies big, medium and small around the world. “We sold cars and we opened a second dealer during COVID,” Giles said. “I think a lot of people, being home, are doing a lot of research, possibly thinking the electric car thing might be a good idea, so we have a lot of people that would contact us, ask us questions – and we’ve sold cars.” For more information on HR at NAPA, and to check out what jobs are available now, please visit www.careers.uapinc.com For more information on ALL EV, please visit www.allev.ca.

LEFT TO RIGHT. DAVID GILES, JEFF FARWELL, MIKE KENNY, JEREMIE BERNARDIN

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Apps

A HIGHLY SUBJECTIVE LIST OF 2021 BEST CAR AND TRUCKING APPS

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By Carter Hammett

HETHER IT’S LOCATING A PARKING SPOT IN A NEW CITY, OPERATING A DASH CAM WITH YOUR PHONE OR SIMPLY TRYING TO FIND THE BEST REST STOP FOR A BREAK, THE SCOPE OF OFFERINGS HAS NEVER BEEN BROADER WHEN APPLIED TO AUTOMOTIVE AND TRUCKING APPS FOR YOUR SMARTPHONE. HERE’S A “HIGHLY UNBIASED” LOOK AT SOME OF THE BEST. I think we can all agree that 2020 was a pretty horrible year. Not just because of Trump. Not just because of COVID. Not just because of the havoc that the year wreaked on the economy and people’s mental health, not to mention long-term care and our vulnerable seniors’ population. Fortunately, 2020 was also the year that saw technology being used in new and innovative ways to help us just get through this mess. And that technology wasn’t simply limited to two-dimensional video conferencing. No, 2020 also reminded us that phones play a critical role in our lives and go beyond mere communication. Many of us sought refuge in our vehicles to escape the humdrum isolation that lockdown brings. And we enhanced that driving experience with a range of apps that became central in a variety of activities, ranging from car safety to finding the perfect parking spot. Here then is a round-up of some of the best apps in no particular order that we enjoyed during 2020 and that will help you rev up for the year ahead.

WAZE

No app list would be complete without Waze. Available on both IOS and Android, this free resource has become the go-to app for route planning. But wait: capa-

ble of so much more, Waze offers users data on speed cameras, accidents, traffic jams etc, which enable users to plan their routes accordingly. Believe it or not, there’s also a carpool feature if you don’t mind sitting with strangers. The one downside is that if you live in an area where people don’t use the app, you probably won’t get that much from the experience. That aside, the app is pretty much considered essential by most drivers.

PLUGSHARE

Cost: Free; Available: IOS & Android One topic in the automotive world that gets my motor running like few others is the rise of the electric vehicle. Complementing this increased use is a pragmatic new app called PlugShare, which guides you to the nearest charging station should you need it. It’s especially helpful if you’re new to the world of Evehicles.

SMART DASH CAM

Cost: Free; Available: IOS & Android Dash cams have become considered almost essential for many road users but part of the problem is that the cost is often prohibitive. Smart Dash transmogrifies your phone into a dash cam. This is a great alternative to physical dash cams and could have lots of benefits in the long run.

GAS BUDDY

Cost: Free; Availability: IOS

and Android Gas Buddy makes the list again this year for the simple reason that it’s one of the best things out there when it comes to finding the most affordable gas near you. The app is free but there are memberships with perks like discounted gas and roadside assistance. If there’s something to complain about, Gas Buddy relies on its network of user reports so you may come across errors in the information if there’s not a lot of people using this app in your area.

PARKOPEDIA

Cost: Free; Availability – both IOS and Android While, there’s numerous applications that can assist you to locate a parking spot, we are rather fond of Parkopedia. True, it doesn’t have an in-app payment feature, but it comes with a huge index


Apps

of more than 70 million parking spaces in more than 15,000 cities globally. That’s not too shabby. Definitely worth a look-see.

CARFAX

Cost: Free Availability: IOS and Android The marketing tag boasts that this application has “everything you need to maintain your car and preserve its value in one convenient place. Finally, something that lives up the hype! With Carfax you can receive alerts when it’s time for tire rotations, vehicle registration or emissions inspections, among other service details. You can display your service history, receive recall alerts and even access a list of trusted service shops.

WHATSAPP Whatsapp is a popular messaging tool that offers users a hands-free way of receiving and sending messages. After receiving a message you can voice-activate the app to craft and send replies. If a GPS happens to be in use while driving, messages will still display the key screen, thus avoiding accidents. Updated versions of the app support call waiting and include a fingerprint option to add another security level.

TRUCKING APPS

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We’d be remiss if we didn’t include at least a few of the better trucking apps that we’ve come across, so without further ado, here are some raves for our faves.

KEEPTRUCKIN Commercial drivers are empowered to communicate effectively and efficiently with their dispatchers using this app. Security is improved as drivers can easily send messages from their live location that’s accurate and timely. Electric logs are here for better or worse, and this app makes it easy to fill in the necessary tracking data. There’s lots of other features as well, including trucking safety, violation alerts, task recaps and inspection reports. All of which add up to a highly rated and dependable app that’s used by over half a million drivers.

TRUCKER PATH

Cost: Free; Availability: IOS and Android This is another go-to app for people in the trucking industry. Billed as a navigation app, this resource enables users to identify information ranging from parking spots to locating a decent place to eat and rest. Among the dozens of features included in this app are elements like weigh station, fuel station locator, trip planning, job listings, address search and even a truck-

ers’ forum. This app’s considered a must for drivers of all kinds.

BIGROAD

Cost: Monthly fee; Availability: IOS and Android Claiming to make the transition to ELD, Big Road offers a “no nonsense plug and play design that makes DIY installation effortless.” This app helps truckers keep daily logs quickly, accurately and easily. There’s a product that helps in creating inspection-ready reports while maintaining logs automatically. The app also comes with a host of features that includes fuel tracking, risk notifications for upcoming violations and 24/7 customer support. All of which make this app another standard for truckers. So there you have it: our list of the best of the best. We love sharing new information with our readers, so please contact us if you feel we’ve missed anything or just want to share something cool you’ve found. This list is far from comprehensive, and we know there’s lots of great car apps to be found out there. From navigation to diagnosing issues with your vehicle, the scope of service that the best apps offer has never been wider. And as we gear up to drive into 2021, you’re going to make sure you have only the best for your vehicle.


Around the Atlantic

‘SERVICE ABOVE SELF’. . . THE LAHAVE STREET AUTO CLINIC TEAM IN BRIDGEWATER, NS TAKES CARE OF EACH OTHER AND THEIR CLIENT

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By Kristen Lipscombe

ASON KNICKLE LOVES GOING TO WORK EVERY DAY AT LAHAVE STREET AUTO CLINIC IN BRIDGEWATER, N.S., BECAUSE OF THE PEOPLE HE GETS TO WORK ALONGSIDE EACH AND EVERY DAY. “My favourite part is interacting with the clients,” the 41-year-old operations manager said of what he looks forward to most while on the job, running the NAPA AUTOPRO shop alongside his business partner Richard Knickle, who as you can guess by the last name, also happens to be his father. “Just talking with them and hearing their stories and getting to know them on a personal level,” Jason said of his daily

client in mind,” Jason said, adding the highest quality customer service and attention to detail possible is of the utmost importance to Lahave Street Auto Clinic. “We really focus on taking care of their best interests and not padding your pocket.” “You have to be honest and you have to explain things properly,” Jason said. “Honesty and customer service are what we bank on and what we strive for,” he said, adding “we have such a strong team, and such a hardworking team, that we can get a lot of work done. We can get stuff done that a lot of other shops can’t accommodate.” Some of the company’s success also stems from Jason’s hiatus away from the shop. He pursued a career with the Canadian Armed Forces for five years, during which time he studied mechanical engineering at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ont., and then moved back to his home province to earn a business diploma at Nova Scotia Community College. After working a few odd sales jobs, Ja-

RICHARD KNICKLE, JARED ERNST, MORGAN LEARY, BYRON AUCOIN, JOSH GOUDEY, JASON KNICKLE

highlight. “Every day is different.” Clients and customers have always been top priority for the family-run shop, which opened its doors more than three decades ago, in December 1989. That’s when Jason first started learning the business from his father as a 10-year-old kid taking it all in from the start. “You do everything you can with your 12

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son was ready to bring his new expertise and knowledge back to the family business. “I wanted to learn the things needed to help make the business grow,” he said. “I think I brought a different perspective to the business.” And that he did. In fact, since he returned to work at the family shop in fall 2011, Lahave Street Auto Clinic has “grown year over year,”

particularly over the past five years, with major renovations that doubled the number of auto bays on site from two to four, and grown staff numbers significantly to a total of seven full-time employees, including five mechanics. “We can take care of our clients from A-to-Z, and we can … do it in a good time frame,” Jason said. “We have a good mix of regular clients. We have a number of fleets that we maintain as well and that always keeps the bay doors opening and closing. “There’s not just one type of client that we help; we take care of everyone.” That also includes many families in the small town who rely on Lahave Street Auto Clinic for car services ranging from maintenance to repairs. “Oil change time at the best service station on the South Shore, in my opinion,” wrote one happy customer on the auto clinic’s Facebook page. “That time again – great service at Lahave NAPA AUTOPRO – car tune-up and inspection,” reads another comment. Such comments are very much thanks to the shop’s employees who service everything from fleets to individuals and families. Staff members are also truly key to the business’s growth and success, which is actually continuing through the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Jason emphasized. “We all get along really well,” he said of his fellow Lahave Street workers, who he sees more as team members. “We just have fun together; a lot of laughs, a lot of sharing. At the end of July, one of my guy’s bought a new house, and all of my guys went to help him on a Thursday night after work; worked all day and then went and helped him move 50 kilometres away from where he was. “It says a lot about the team we have and the team we’ve built here, and the culture – looking after each other.” Looking after his employees, just like his clients, is vital to the Knickle family business. “Your employees’ well-beings; if you take care of that, the work takes care of itself,” Jason said. “You have to take care of your staff and their families and your family.” “You have to make sure you take care of your people,” he said. “It’s about service above self.” Visit the Lahave Street Auto Clinic on the NAPA AUTOPRO website: napaautopro.com.


At the Recycler’s Yard

COVEY’S AUTO RECYCLERS STILL MOTORING STRONG AFTER 60 YEARS

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By Kristen Lipscombe

T’S A SPECIAL KIND OF BUSINESS THAT CAN KEEP MOTORING SUCCESSFULLY FOR SIX DECADES. AND COVEY’S AUTO RECYCLERS, LTD., IS EXACTLY THAT. It also takes special types of people to ensure those companies run smoothly. In the case of this thriving business based in Blandford, N.S., current president Derek Covey is the man behind the wheel. Derek, now 53, started working at his family’s auto recycling company parttime at the tender age of eight, learning the tools and tricks of the trade from his

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father, Hale Covey, who proudly opened the doors to his then-brand new auto recycling shop in 1960. “He had an interest in vehicles and he was in XXX service for five years, and travelling back and forth from home, he had actually wrote-off a couple of vehicles,” Derek said with a chuckle. “They (the cars) were sitting … and people wanted parts off of them,” he said, “and that’s how it all began and it just snowballed from here.” “He saw that there was a market and went with it,” Derek said with another light chuckle, the memories of his father and what he learned from him both inside and outside of work still kept close to his heart. Sadly, Covey’s visionary and founder passed away 20 years ago. Fortunately, Hale’s business acumen, industry knowledge, and the skills needed to keep the business in racing condition for decades has been carefully passed down to

the next generation. Derek continued to work part-time at his father’s business until he was 20, but like most young people, he wanted to spread his wings a bit, so he successfully applied to Acadia University in Wolfville, N.S. “When I left high school, I wasn’t sure what my plans were, so I decided to take a business degree, thinking that if I come back to the business, it would be beneficial and it definitely was,” Derek said. “I’ve brought a lot of what I learned (to Covey’s Auto Recyclers).” Derek also spent a year out west working for another auto recycling company in Vancouver, B.C. “To be honest, I followed a girl,” he said with yet another friendly chuckle and while that young relationship didn’t work out, what did work out was being able able to take some lessons learned from the west coast business back to his family’s east coast business.


feels like for Covey’s to reach the big 6-0 in 2020. Perhaps that chance will come postpandemic but in the meantime it’s business as usual for the essential work that goes on at Covey’s Auto Recyclers. “(We) definitely help the local econo-

my, and quite a few people,” he added, “so it’s a good feeling.” Check out Covey’s Auto Recyclers online at www.coveys. com. “It’s nice; there’s not a lot of businesses that have been around this long, so you know you’re doing the right thing to stay around,” Derek said of what it feels like for Covey’s to reach the big 6-0 in 2020. “And it definitely helps the local economy, and quite a few people,” he added, “so it’s a good feeling.”

“I like the business and I saw the potential,” Derek said of landing back home. “And I enjoyed working with my father. It was just a good fit.” As much as Derek loves his work, his first job is that of single dad to 11-year-old Max and nine-year-old Dex, who now live with him in the very same home where he grew up in Blandford, which is about halfway between Bridgewater and Halifax, the town and city that represent Covey’s largest chunk of the auto recycling market. The youngest Coveys love the family business and “want to get right in there,” but Derek also likes to ensure they find other passions to pursue. “I try to keep them somewhat at a distance; they’re busy with other things, like sports.” Those include hockey, speedskating, taekwondo, soccer; “a little bit of everything.” Back to business, Derek is very proud of the strong values Covey’s Auto Recyclers abides by each and every day, with ensuring customers are well taken care at the top of that list. Covey’s customers range from “any automotive-related business,” such as body shops and mechanical repair shops to members of the public in search of specific parts. “The bulk of our business is we deliver and ship our parts,” with two delivery trucks on the road to Bridgewater and Halifax daily and 10 employees, including Derek, dedicated to getting parts to where they need to be effectively and efficiently. “We try to cater to our customers as best we can, we stand behind our product – we have a great warranty,” Derek said. “We try to bend over backwards for our customers; they’re ultimately the ones that keep us alive.” As for how Covey’s is celebrating its 60th anniversary, “we’ve had to celebrate in-house this Year, which is unfortunate, as we would have liked to share this milestone with friends, family, customers and business associates. We have some long standing relationships.” “It’s nice; there’s not a lot of businesses that have been around this long, so you know you’re doing the right thing to stay around,” Derek said of what it autoatlantic.com

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Human Resources

WORKPLACE HARASSMENT IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY

WITH BILL C-65 ABOUT TO BECOME LAW, IS THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY READY TO PIVOT AND OPEN ITSELF TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES?

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By Isabella Akaliza

HE NEW REGULATIONS APPLY TO ALL FEDERALLY-REGULATED EMPLOYERS, INCLUDING TRUCKING AND LOGISTICS COMPANIES THAT OPERATE OUTSIDE OF THEIR HOME PROVINCE. These employers now have a legal obligation to understand and implement an anti-harassment framework for their workplaces. A 2019 Trucking HR research study concluded that 15% of employees in the industry experienced an incident of workplace harassment or violence during the previous 12 months. In fact, half of the workers polled said that they have been affected by this issue over their career. However, half of the employ-

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ers surveyed by Trucking HR Canada said they had no formal process for preventing or managing incidents of workplace harassment and violence, and 60% did not provide mandatory workplace harassment or violence training for their employees. With more than 20,000 unfilled truck driver positions in Canada, and with 60% of transport truck drivers over 45 years of age, and more than 30% over 55 years old, can the trucking industry benefit from Bill C-65? Many agree that anti-harassment frameworks will improve the diversity and inclusion in the trucking industry. As it stands, Canadian transport truck drivers are much older than the average for the workforce in Canada. Less than 18 percent of truck drivers in Canada are from the millennial generation—people born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s— compared to 34 percent in the overall workforce. Furthermore, the truck driver occupation is dominated by men – only 3 percent of drivers identify as female. The trucking industry is rapidly

changing. Its workforce is aging. Fewer young workers are entering the industry. At the same time, there are increasing demands for truck drivers as industries relying on trucking continue to grow. This means there is an urgent need for the trucking industry to recruit, develop and retain employees to meet the needs of its customers and consumers, and continue its critical role in supporting Canada’s economic growth. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in layoffs, due to a reduction in demand for their services, which has resulted in a moderating of labour shortages in the short term. It seems that this reprieve from labour shortages may be short lived. Recent labour market intelligence from Trucking HR Canada, indicates that shortages within the truck driver occupation will reach and even exceed our pre-COVID labour market projections by 2023. The implementation of successful recruitment and retention strategies is more important than ever. Canada’s labour force has increasing numbers of women, visible minorities, Indigenous peoples, and persons with disabilities. People come to today’s workplace with different backgrounds and different needs and expectations. These groups are currently underrepresented in trucking, which means there are untapped labour pools for which the industry needs an attraction and retention strategy. And perhaps Bill C -36 might just be the answer! Boiled down to the basics, the regulations are about ensuring that federallyregulated employers are all working from the same rulebook when it comes to handling workplace harassment and violence. The hope is that these new rules will bring consistency to what employees can expect from their company, in terms of rights, responsibilities, and guarantees. To achieve this, employers will have to take steps to prevent workplace harassment and violence, respond appropriately and in a timely manner if it occurs, and provide support to affected employees.


VISIT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE FOR PRICING & INFO


Bob’s Business Development

WHY MEASURING YOUR CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS MATTERS

THE ROLE OF THE SERVICE ADVISOR IS CHANGING. ARE YOU KEEPING UP WITH BEST PRACTICES?

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By Bob Greenwood AMAM

HE MOST SUCCESSFUL SHOPS IN OUR INDUSTRY UNDERSTAND THAT TO SUCCESSFULLY GROW A PROFITABLE BUSINESS, THEY MUST CLOSELY MEASURE THE RELATIONSHIPS OF THOSE THEY CHOOSE TO DO BUSINESS WITH. Notice the phrase “choose to do business with?” Not everyone walking through the door qualifies as a potential client. Successful shops highlight their un-

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derlying value proposition, so their clients truly understand the bigger picture, rather than focusing only on the cost of doing business. These shops know who they are selling to, and because of that, they understand the importance of earning the clients’ trust. Capturing trust can lead to securing a future business transaction down the road. These shops slow the process down dramatically and counsel the client on the vehicle’s maintenance requirements. They draw from the manufacturer’s interval recommendations, and tailor their advice to the client’s expectations for safety, reliability and efficiency based on “how” they use their vehicle and their expectations from that vehicle. This value proposition requires in-depth conversations with each

client to utterly understand their unique situation. The key to this process is for shops to recognize their front counter people are no longer service advisors but rather, service consultants. This is an important term to wrap your head around. Understanding this transition is critical for our industry, as it’s important to remember that clients are never sold to; they are educated and counselled by service consultants to determine the best course of action for the client’s particular needs. These counsellors do not “recommend” to the client any services, they lay out clearly what is “required”. Acknowledging this new terminology and format regarding the role of the service advisor, transitioning to a strategy that is more aligned with a consulting


role, is a prime example of how the aftermarket itself is in a transitional phase.

HOW TO MEASURE YOUR CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS Measuring the progress of your client relationships is something that can be tracked each month using a simple calculation. Rather than measuring the average sales per invoice, figure out your shop’s productivity measurement by calculating the average labour hours billed per invoice. To calculate average billed hours per RO, take the total maintenance labour dollars sold for the month and divide it by your current maintenance labour retail door rate. This will give you the total labour hours billed for that month. Do the same for your diagnostic billed labour and re-flash labour sold also. Add all the hours into one total. Next, subtract the opening invoice number on the first day of the month, from the closing invoice number on the last day of the month. This gives you the total number of invoices/ROs written for the month. Take the total labour hours billed and divide it by the number of invoices written. This will give you the average labour hours billed per invoice. Unfortunately, the average shop is billing between 1.4 to 1.7 hours per invoice. The goal of a maintenance and repair shop for basic consumer work should be to average a minimum of 2.5 hours per invoice. Given the amount of unperformed maintenance work across the country, it is rare a client’s vehicle does not need additional work done. If you are not finding that work and showing what is required to the client, that work – justified by the vehicle manufacturer’s own service recommendations – will not be done. In other words, you will be releasing the vehicle back to the client in a less-than optimal condition. When a shop is consistently averaging 2.5 hours or more per invoice for basic consumer vehicles, we find that they are getting all the maintenance and repair business from the client, and they have earned, and are maintaining, the trust of their client base. Their clients do not shop around from one shop to another; the shop gets the full scope of the client’s potential vehicle business. These shops are not measuring their business on sales and vehicle count that the aftermarket always promotes. Instead, they are measuring their shop based on the overall productivity,

value, and quality that they offer every client. They ensure that they charge for their services at the right price based on their competency, not simply the cheapest price. These are the shops that will remain profitable as the aftermarket continues to evolve. At the end of the day, remember to slow your processes down, measure your relationships, and continue

to invest in their growth, as it is absolutely critical to your success. Bob Greenwood is an Accredited Master Automotive Manager (AMAM) who offers personal business coaching and ongoing management training for aftermarket shops, focusing on building net income. He can be reached at 1-800-267-5497 or greenwood@aaec.ca.

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19


Industry News

FIX AUTO FREDERICTON TEAM ACHIEVES RED SEAL CERTIFICATION

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ED SEAL RECOGNITION IS A POWERFUL ENDORSEMENT OF TECHNICIANS’ SUPERIOR KNOWLEDGE OF COMPLEX AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS

HALIFAX (NS), December 16,  2020 – Mark Weeks, Regional Vice-President (Atlantic) for Fix Network, has announced that technicians at the Fix Auto Fredericton location in New Brunswick are now Red Seal certified – an important recognition that endorses their superior knowledge of the most complex automotive repair technologies. Ryan Wilson, owner of Fix Auto Fredericton, and Corey Etheridge, General Manager, are strong believers in processes that can build credibility for their facility and teams, especially among customers and insurance companies. Investing in advanced repair equipment and skilled technicians has therefore taken priority at the five-year-old facility. “Learning never stops at Fix Auto Fredericton,” says Etheridge. “We take our training and certifications very seriously and want our technicians to have the most superior knowledge and training available. In this regard, the Red Seal

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certification is an important endorsement that increases our team’s credibility and makes us stand out from the rest.” Introduced to assess the skills of tradespeople across Canada, the Red Seal program is developed by the federal government along with the provinces and indicates that the candidate has demonstrated the knowledge required for the national standard in that trade. While not mandatory, the Red Seal endorsement promotes excellence to employers, instills pride in skilled workers, and facilitates labour mobility. To be certified, candidates have to pass a stringent examination process developed in cooperation with the regulatory bodies, apprenticeship training and professional certification organizations in each province or territory. Preparing for the Red Seal certification involves a great deal of time and effort. Over the past year, Fix Auto Fredericton has been encouraging its team to take the Red Seal examinations. The Red Seal certification, they believe, will give their customers complete peace of mind to know that their vehicles are in the safe hands of the Fix Auto Fredericton team. Since 2015, Fix Auto Fredericton has emerged as a one-stop destination in New Brunswick for advanced collision repair.

Spread over 14,800 square feet, the facility houses state-of-the-art finishing booths, REVO infrared drying equipment, digital measuring, squeeze type resistances spot welding, aluminum repair equipment, plastic repair equipment, paint-less repair, glass repair and 3M paint protection film. Congratulating the team, Mark Weeks, Regional Vice President-Atlantic for Fix Network, says, “Fix Auto Fredericton has an amazing team of inspired technicians who consider continuous learning a critical part of their corporate culture. With their latest achievement, they have taken their game to another level altogether and distinguished themselves from other collision repairers in the region.”

ABOUT FIX AUTO Fix Auto is part of the Fix Network which is Canada’s largest automotive aftermarket services provider. Celebrating more than 27 years of excellence, each Fix Auto centre is owned and operated locally offering hassle-free care and services that return vehicles to their pre-collision luster and performance. With over 285 locations in Canada and 675 points of service worldwide, Fix Auto is the premier global body shop network. For more information, visit fixauto.com.


Atlantic Racing News

A LAP AROUND COVID - RACING REFLECTIONS DURING A PANDEMIC By Tim Terry

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ITH THE C U R TA I N SET TO FALL ON 2020 AND THE 2021 CALENDAR YE AR JUST WAITING OFF STAGE FOR ITS DEBUT, IT IS TIME TO REFLECT ON A YEAR THAT WAS. Like any industry, 2020 was a year that showed how strong business really is. The same can be said in the auto racing industry and in Atlantic Canada, it was four different provincial tales that told the story. Rules and regulations concerning large gatherings and sporting events under COVID-19 health guidelines separated Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland while the

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four provinces were linked under a common Atlantic Bubble. If there was a clear winner, and we are talking about the sporting and entertainment business here, there are winners and losers in both, it was the province of New Brunswick. In New Brunswick, the four paved ovals had a chance to operate under public health guidelines much looser than their neighbors. This resulted in car counts not seen at some events in over a decade and sell outs that had two tracks adding grandstands and opening seating areas to accommodate more fans. Two race tracks in that province, Speedway Miramichi and Petty International Raceway, planned to open at the end of June for racers. Under the restrictions set forth when these events were organized, fans would not be allowed as no gatherings larger than 50 were permitted at an outdoor venue. That changed the day before Speedway Miramichi’s first event on June 20th and while it did not allow

officials much time to turn around, they opened their gates to fans. Petty Raceway would do the same the next week. The big loser in these two events were racers and fans outside of the province, who were not permitted to cross into New Brunswick without having to self-isolate for 14 days. Of course, this changed when the Atlantic Bubble was formed on Friday, July 3. The next day, Petty International Raceway hosted the first Pro Stock event of the season, which saw a healthy crowd of fans who had been cooped up since March to watch a full field of Late Models battle for the first major checkered flag of the year. The next week, Speedway 660 re-opened with their Riverview Ford Lincoln Season Opener. This “perfect storm” led to some big back gate numbers. Petty International Raceway saw one of their shows reach 112 race cars total in August while Speedway Miramichi saw 71 Demolition division cars enter their pit area in September.


Atlantic Racing News

Petty Raceway added a Turn Four grandstand for their Mike Stevens Memorial race while Speedway Miramichi turned away hundreds of fans for their first July event due to protocols around COVID-19. The racing season was in full swing in New Brunswick, while government officials still had the red flag out in the three neighbouring Atlantic provinces. Then, Lake Doucette Motor Speedway received consultation to operate their facility in two 250-person bubbles, one for spectators and one for participants. In mid-July, they became the first track to reopen. The next weekend, Sydney Speedway opened to competitors only after consultation with government officials but offered a pay-per-view video broadcast of the event to those who could not be at the venue due to public health guidelines. A similar two-bubble system was put in place at Scotia Speedworld before they and Riverside International Speedway received approval for multiple bubbles of spectators to put up to 1,250 fans in their seats. A system like that was soon approved by government officials in Newfoundland to allow several pods of fans to enjoy races at Eastbound Park and Thunder Valley Speedway. Thunder Valley had

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been operating, starting with no fans, since late July. Oyster Bed Speedway stayed closed due to tight restrictions and Valley Raceway officially abandoned their season in August. The Atlantic Modified Tour, a New Brunswick based Series, was able to compete in seven races from August to October. With Bryn Enterprises overseeing promotions and marketing, the Tour saw new marketing partners enter the fold of touring series competition in the midst of a pandemic due in part to the work of Brenda and Glyn Nott. The Heart of a Champion Hot Rod Classics saw three races in what was to be their inaugural season. The Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour schedule was hacked from a dozen races to two in their 20th year, both of which happened in the province of Nova Scotia. The Maritime League of Legends Tour and the Passione Flooring and Interiors East Coast Mini Stock Tour both cancelled their seasons in the Spring due to the pandemic and the toll it had taken on both marketing partners, host tracks and their teams. The tracks that opened late eventually saw their regular customers at both gates

pass through their turnstiles. With the unpredictability of the pandemic early in the year though, several teams scaled back their schedules or simply did not race in 2020. Several teams took advantage of the New Brunswick government’s view of the pandemic and the Atlantic Bubble and made the trip, some multiple times, across the border to get some racing in. In short, New Brunswick’s gain at their race tracks came in part, some small and some large, at the expense of the restrictions held against tracks and sanctioning bodies in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Think of it this way. When a race team travels, they are supporting the economy in the surrounding area of the track. If a team hauls several hours to compete, chances are they may stay in the area, giving hotels and AirBNB type establishments a boost in a time when their income had been severely slashed due to a low tourism season. With New Brunswick open for business for a month and a half before most even got approval to do so in Nova Scotia, teams and fans alike paid visits to businesses in Moncton, Fredericton and Miramichi as they enjoyed the sport they love.


While each track, like most businesses in the province of New Brunswick, received visits from Public Health, each event continued on. Some of those events saw thousands of race fans on site and could have been considered “super spreader” type events with the number of individuals on the property. Here’s the kicker though - not one

case of COVID-19 surfaced from these events. Not a single one. Chalk it up to what you will but the virus did not spread at a stock car race in Atlantic Canada in 2020 and they were the biggest gatherings of people recorded in the Summer of ’20 in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The pandemic helped businesses like Speedway Miramichi stay open and

the season helped pay the mortgage in a make or break year prior to the pandemic set in. Petty International Raceway and Speedway 660 formed a partnership that saw the two tracks race on opposite weekends. Fans and teams rewarded them with great crowds of both spectators and cars at each track. In addition, Speedway 660 opened “Rucker’s Reels” in their

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Atlantic Racing News

front parking lot. Rucker’s Reels is a drivein movie theatre showing family friendly motion pictures when the track sat silent. If you had a race car in the Maritimes, you got to travel to a track to get some racing in. Whether it was across the Confederation Bridge to the mainland or a local track in Nova Scotia or New Brunswick, you had options. That is more than what some had across the country. Sponsorship was down for several teams and, as mentioned before, some teams decided to keep their proverbial horses in the stable for another time. So, even if it was a different looking landscape in 2020, racing continued on. In some places, it survived. In New Brunswick, it could be argued that the following for motorsports grew exponentially. But now, with the focus shifting to 2021, what is next? The short answer, who knows?! Since the 2020 season ended, a second wave of COVID-19 has entered Atlantic Canada, virtually putting a pin in the Atlantic Bubble. At press time, every province except Nova Scotia requires you to self isolate if you enter their borders from another Atlantic Province. Those rules put the brakes on the Speedway Miramichi Awards Banquet in November and sent the Maritime Short Track Summit organization meeting into a virtual mode. Within the province, while New Brunswick is closed to visitors, their rules haven’t changed much. Speedway Miramichi is planning a Winter Demolition

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event for mid-January. Whether the borders will be open to allow Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island competitors and fans remains to be seen but, should the Miramichi region be in the “Yellow” recovery phase, they should be able to operate their outdoor event much like they did back in the Summer. Should New Brunswick tracks have the same restrictions, or looser, in 2021, you’d have to believe they will continue to see the sport flourish. If neighbouring provinces loosen their guidelines and open to more races and fans, you’ll likely see the car counts dwindle a bit in the less significant races in New Brunswick in 2021. If the tracks continue to work together like they did in 2020, they should do fine. Several sanctioning bodies, including the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour, Lake Doucette Motor Speedway and Riverside International Speedway have released their dates for 2021. The Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour schedule mirrors their 2020 pre-pandemic schedule with events slated for the same weekends in the new year. That, in theory, sets three of Riverside’s races with the fourth sliding into the same weekend as it was scheduled for in 2020. What will the pandemic look like in Nova Scotia by the late May start for Scotia Speedworld and June for opening day at Lake Doucette and Riverside? You’d have to think the precedent each venue set in 2020 will give them a great foundation to deal with what COVID has to

offer in 2021 but only time will tell. Will the United States/Canada border be open and how will that effect the flow of traffic? Several American teams come to Canada to compete and vice versa. The border has changed plans for many within the sport over the past nine months and that is sure to continue in some way into the new year, beginning with the big season opening events in the south east United States. Then there are talks of a vaccine. How will that impact our daily lives when it comes to gatherings, let alone what it will do to the sport? When will it be available to everyone? Will it allow Riverside International Speedway to hold an IWK 250 like event in 2021? Can we return to having pre-race concerts, bonfires and social gatherings that were shelfed in 2020? Again, only time will tell. In short, the sport of stock car racing and motorsports is still around to see 2021 with all the venues and series it entered 2020 with in Atlantic Canada. The same can’t be said for several regions across North America within the same industry. As is the case in most years, plans usually begin to flood the community from tracks in the early months of the new year. Expect January and February to be busy as tracks, series and teams begin to form a plan of attack, and likely a Plan B and C, for 2021. Here’s hoping there are plenty of green flags in our future for the new year and all provinces can return to somewhat normal competition in 2021!


At The Car Wash

HOW WE CHANGED AN IN-PERSON TO A VIRTUAL CARWASH CONFERENCE

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By Brenda Johnstone

ITH COVID-19 OVER THE LAND, IT’S NOT ONLY AFFECTED HOW WE CONDUCT BUSINESS; IT’S ALSO HAD AN IMPACT ON ORGANIZING SPECIAL EVENTS. Here’s how one conference managed a pivot to meet attendee expectations while maintaining their value and credibility. Waking at 4 a.m., staring at the ceiling, asking myself over and over, do we go, do we not? What’s the best thing for my business, and what’s the best thing for our

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customers? Well, when I’m waking up in the middle of the night with a sick feeling in my gut and my brain rehearsing what I’m going to tell our sponsors and everyone else, it’s time to make the call. Following is the journey that we have undertaken to switch a live conference event to a virtual one. We begin with a call to our team to discuss where to start and who can take on which details. From calling the venue to sponsors, to contest entrants to telemarketers, everyone must be contacted and details discussed. The first call is the hardest to make: the venue. The hotel or conference centres are our partners in any event. During the past nine months, the time spent getting everything organized has added up to innumerable hours and with one phone call that all changes.

Since the pandemic began, hotels and convention centres have had an unprecedented loss of business. Thousands have been furloughed (a new term that seems to have developed this year), and thousands more have lost their jobs with an expectation that they won’t be coming back until well into 2021 if at all. When planning an event it’s crucial to establish a strong relationship with the venue host and team. When something like a world-wide pandemic hits and cancelling your event is the only option, this relationship will ensure that cancelling and re-organizing the event will be with little stress.Next on the list are the speakers. How will they react to hosting sessions from their home offices? Are they comfortable, and will they be as enthusiastic talking to their computer screen as they would be to a


At The Car Wash

roomful of happy, eager faces?

ZOOM ZOOM! What about the topics? Can the session topics be effectively presented virtually? As with many sessions, some are better enjoyed live. We can’t always get what we want, so we cancel one-or-two and save them for the next live event. It’s imperative to speak with each presenter and ensure that they have the necessary mic, video, and screen to present a professional session. We don’t want to have someone’s dog playing in the background during the session. Your guests are paying for this conference and they expect professionalism. If you’re going to be recording your sessions for viewing on your website later, it’s imperative not to scrimp on the recording details. If you have to buy and send your speakers the proper microphone, do it. The cost will be worth it.

DIGITAL MEDIA Don’t attempt to host your virtual conference with a low-end video conferencing program. Purchase a license (or more) from a credible source that can serve the number of attendees your anticipating and then add another 100 to be sure. You need to have both video and microphone recording capabilities, especially if you’re selling tickets to your event. Remember: if you’re paying for something you want, you expect the best value for your money.

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Make it the best, and they’ll remember. You only get one chance for the first time. A crappy conference will not get you more business.

WHAT ABOUT YOUR SPONSORS? Once the virtual event is confirmed, you’ll need to speak with your sponsors. They’ll want to know how the event is changing. How has their sponsorship package changed? Will this package be discounted? Calling your sponsors might be difficult, but remember that future events will be a real challenge without continued support. Assure sponsors that you and your team will be working hard to ensure that the value offered will be met. You might consider offering additional passes for their staff to attend or something else that adds more value. Depending on the type of event you’re hosting and the audience, you could get creative in the valueadd details. Virtual events have a lower overhead cost to the organizer, but the organizer also has to put everything on the line. How we promote a sponsoring company needs to surpass the value initially promised. Don’t be surprised if the virtual change makes some sponsors nervous and you lose a few in the process. Not everyone is buying into the new normal. That’s okay. You have an excellent opportunity to show your customers what you and your group can do that will

surpass their expectations and if you succeed, they’ll be back.

A NEW TWIST TO AN OLD THANK YOU In these days of virtual calls, meetings, tradeshows, and conferences, wouldn’t it be nice to receive something just for you? Something that you can use to bring you and other attendees together? We thought so too. We’ll be hosting the third Women in Carwash™ conference virtually on January 18 – 20 2021. Our cocktail reception will be a virtual event for a half-hour before the opening keynote speaker. All registrants will receive a special gift box before January 18th to help them enjoy the cocktail reception as you make new online friends and share a drink before our keynote takes the spotlight. We’ve altered the start time for all sessions to enable registrants coast-to-coast to participate live. Speaker topics include: 21st Century Demand for Women Leaders, Fraudulent Claims at the Carwash, Digital Marketing, Leaders as Role Models, Applying a Data Lens to Your Operations, and Modern Day Slavery in the Sex Industry. Switching from in-person to a virtual event hasn’t been easy, but that’s what we’ve had to do. After the January event, our next in-person conference is scheduled for June 2021 in Niagara Falls. Women wishing to learn more can follow this link: womenincarwash.com


From the Showroom Floor

FORD COMMITS $1.8 BILLION TO EV’S

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ORD MOTOR COMPANY OF CANADA, AND UNIFOR HAVE REACHED A NEW GLOBALLY COMPETITIVE NATIONAL LABOUR AGREEMENT ESTABLISHING FORD AS THE FIRST AUTO MANUFACTUR E R IN CANADA TO BUILD FULLY BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES (BEVS) AS PART OF A C$1.8-BILLION INVESTMENT. • Ford of Canada hourly employees ratify a three-year, globally competitive labour agreement • New agreement includes a C$1.8-billion investment to build new battery electric vehicles at Oakville Assembly Complex • Operational improvements in the agreement will maximize production flexibility • Hourly employees receive wage increases, bonuses and other benefits Based on the collective agreement ratified by employees today, Ford is committing to transform its Oakville Assembly Complex from an internal combustion engine (ICE) site to also become a BEV manufacturing facility, starting in 2024, as well as introducing a new engine program at its Windsor operations. Employees have also voted in favour of the three-year agreement that enable several operational improvements to increase the efficiency of Ford’s Canadian facilities. “Working collaboratively with Unifor, and as discussions continue with both the federal and provincial governments, this agreement is an important step toward building a stronger future for our employees, our customers and our communities,” said Dean Stoneley, president and CEO, Ford of Canada. “By introducing battery electric vehicle production at Oakville Assembly Complex, we are cementing our Canadian operations as a leader in advanced automotive manufacturing.” autoatlantic.com

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East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT NEWS YOU CAN USE GATHERED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR On November 24, the Honourable Derrick Bragg, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure; the Honourable Sarah Stoodley, Minister of Digital Government and Service NL and MHA for Mount Scio; Ken McDonald, Member of Parliament for Avalon, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; Dan Bobbett, Mayor of Paradise, announced funding for two water and wastewater projects in Paradise. The projects consist of replacing 800 metres of existing water, sanitary, and storm sewer mains and services on Ashgrove Drive and Willow Drive in Evergreen Village. In addition, the lift station in Paradise will see the replacement of inner pipework as well as the construction of a new

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underground chamber and underground pipework. These projects will provide more reliable and safe infrastructure for residents and increase the capacity to manage wastewater and storm water. The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is investing over $1.5 million towards these projects while the Government of Canada is investing more than $2 million through the Green Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. The Town of Paradise is also contributing more than $1.5 million. “Replacing water and sewer mains is important for the protection of our homes to ensure our services work as they should and so that people can continue to have clean drinking water. Improve ments to the lift station will also ensure

the health and safety of residents and municipal workers in these neighbourhoods,” said the Honourable Derrick Bragg Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure

NEW BRUNSWICK Coles Island bridges detour now open The detours for the Coles Island bridges are open to traffic, the provincial government announced November 20. “The new detour enhances traveller safety and convenience on Route 10,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Jill Green. “Completing this first phase is a welcome step toward a final replacement of this key strategic resource corridor.” The two detour bridges have been constructed to take the traffic off the existing bridges. This allows work to begin


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East Coast Road Report

on removing the current structures and the construction of replacement bridges which is expected to start in 2021 and to take up to three years to complete. “Transportation and distribution of goods are a vital part of our local, regional and national economies,” said federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau. “The upgrades to Route 10 increase the fluidity of trade at this strategic transportation

corridor and will help local businesses compete while fostering economic growth for New Brunswick.” The total cost of the project is estimated at $45 million. The federal government is funding $22,062,000 through the National Trade Corridors Fund and the provincial government is funding $22,800,000. Provincial funding for this phase of

the project was provided through the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure’s $493-million capital budget for 2019-20 and the $504-million capital budget for 2020-21.

NOVA SCOTIA Geotechnical Study of Highway 104 Available A geotechnical study investigating the potential risk for sinkholes forming around the Oxford section of the TransCanada Highway is complete. The study found the threat to Highway 104 is low, provided the province continues to regularly monitor for ground movement and take additional measures to control water run off from the highway and its ramps. “Keeping the travelling public safe is our number one job,” said Lloyd Hines, Minister of Transportation. “We are moving immediately on the recommendations in the report by improving ditching and also by strengthening our monitoring program.” The department will also develop a contingency plan to be followed if subsidence is observed near the highway and ramps. The study, conducted by Harbourside Geotechnical Consultants, examined subsurface soil and rock conditions along and beneath the highway west of Exit 6. 34

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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND More signs marking electric vehicle parking and charging stations will be added across the Island The province has approved regulations under the Highway Traffic Act  so that electric vehicle parking and charging stations can be clearly marked and more visible to Islanders. The new signage regulations are a positive step in providing Islanders with clarity around where electric vehicle parking spots are located and who can use them. Businesses and organizations can also create their own branded signage under the regulations.  “Signage continues to evolve as we work towards a more sustainable future for PEI. We hope to see more Islanders purchase new or used electric vehicles and we need the infrastructure in

place to make this happen. Transportation is a big cause of our Island’s GHG emissions and electric vehicles are one way to help reduce that impact,” said Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy Minister Steven Myers. The province encourages Islanders to be aware and not take a parking space that is meant for an electric vehicle. People who park a non-electric vehicle in a charging spot will potentially face fines. “The network of electric vehicle chargers continues to grow across the Island. I think many people would be surprised at how many already exist in communities. I hope the new signage will bring more attention to existing chargers and helps to eliminate some of the anxiety people have in terms of how far they may have to go to find a charging station,” said Minister Myers. Encouraging the use of electric vehicles is part of the Sustainable Transportation Action Plan. Supporting more sustainable transportation in Prince Edward Island will help Islanders lower their impact on the environment, while also encouraging people to walk, cycle and use community transit more often.

It found that while deposits that can dissolve in water (water soluble) such as gypsum are prevalent in the area, the deposits that can result in sink holes were deep underground. Water diversion efforts from the highway area with work underway will further reduce risk. The study was prompted after a sinkhole formed beside the Oxford Lion’s Club in the Town of Oxford in 2018.

QUICK FACTS: the study focused on a 500 metre section of Highway 104 just south of the Town of Oxford the investigation included or laser imagery, topographic and geological mapping, aerial photos, the drilling of six boreholes and lab analysis of the core samples the area investigated is more likely to experience gradual settling of the ground surface than a sudden collapse, according to the study. A monitoring system to detect ground deformations was recommended to manage risk at the site water soluble deposits ranged from just under 10 metres to almost 60 metres below the surface

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: The study is available at, https://novascotia.ca/tran/roadsafety/NSTIR-OxfordHwy-104-Sinkhole-Investigation.pdf autoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND BYTES OF THE BIZARRE, AND THE STRANGE GATHERED FROM AROUND THE WEB SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO…YER WELCOME! LEADING OFF WITH CANADIAN CONTENT . . . DON’T LET MOOSE LICK YOUR CAR! Yes, you read that right. Officials in Jasper, a resort town in Alberta, have put up signs asking motorists to avoid allowing moose to lick the salt off their cars. “They’re obsessed with salt, it’s one of the things they need for the minerals in their body,” a Jasper National Park spokes-

man said. “They usually get it from salt lakes in the park, but now they realized they can also get road salt that splashes onto cars.” At the Jasper National Park, where people often park on the side of the road in hopes of catching a glimpse of the moose, letting the animals near your car is actually a serious danger. By allowing moose to lick the salt off

your car, they will become habituated with being around cars. That poses a risk to both the animals and the drivers who can accidentally crash into them. “Moose and cars are not a good mix. If you hit the moose with your car, you take the legs out from under it and it’s going through your windshield,” Young said. The best way to stop a moose from coming close to your car is simply driving away when you see them approaching, he added. While other animals typically run away when humans approach, moose will stand their ground and charge if they feel threatened. Visitors are not allowed to feed, entice or disturb wildlife in national parks and violators could face fines up to $25,000, he added.

U.K. LICENSE PLATE ‘O 10’ SELLS FOR $170,000 AT AUCTION Autoblog recently reported about how personalized license plates aren’t offered

in many countries and how a cottage industry has sprang up in the UK based on trade and auction of license plate numbers. One family recently sold a simple three-digit plate reading “O 10” for the low, low price of £128,800 ($170,000). The plate sold at Silverstone Auctions  stayed in the same family for 118 years, a result of the seller›s grandfather, Charles Thompson, being the 10th person in line when the Birmingham vehicle registration office first opened its doors in 1902. Since the plates stay with the owner (and not the car, as in some U.S. states) the number subsequently adorned Thompson family cars for two generations, including Austin A35s, Minis,  Vauxhall  Cavaliers,  Ford  Cortinas,  Peugeots  and  Jag36

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What’s better than the shop copy of Auto and Trucking Atlantic?

Your own digital copy.

You have a busy day and it is not easy to enjoy all the great content that you get in every issue of Auto and Trucking Atlantic during the work week. Sometimes one of your co-workers has “misplaced” the latest issue. Problem solved. Just go to our website, autoatlantic.com, and enjoy every article of the industry standard for Atlantic Canada. You can even sign up for your own personal paper subscription!

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Carter’s Corner

uars. After Charles Thompson’s son Barry passed away, the family used the plates, which they say have always been a great conversation piece, for two years before consigning them to the auction house. As a show of how insane the bidding for exclusive number plates can get, this sale doesn’t even crack the top 10 of alltime highest prices paid in the U.K. The most expensive plate is “25 O”, sold in 2014 for £518,480 (about $684,000 at today’s exchange rates) to the owner of a Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta. Today, it’s estimated  to be worth £750,000 ($990,000 USD). According to  Car, as of 2018 the sale of desirable plates has raised more than £2 billion ($2.64 billion USD) for the U.K. Treasury. That’s more than the GDP of at least a dozen nations. The all-time most expensive plate is expected to be “F1”, which sold in 2008 for £440,625, is expected to be worth £1,000,000, but is currently  asking  £10,000,000 ($13 million USD). As a reminder, for that money you can also buy an actual McLaren F1.

PREEEEESENTING: THE AMAZING TESLA CYBERTRUCK CAMPER There are plenty of Tesla Cybertruck replicas out there, but this is arguably the most useful Cybertruck-based creation we’ve seen to date. We’re certainly excited about the fu-

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ture of large electric vans and electric RVs. The Tesla Cybertruck and Tesla Semi could offer a solid starting point for such creations. However, this particular Cybertruck camper is meant to be towed by any vehicle capable of towing it, though it might draw some interesting attention if you pull it with your coal-rolling diesel. Most of the Cybertruck replicas we’ve seen have either been art pieces, gaspowered vehicles decorated with a Cybertruck-like body, or downsized electric versions of the real deal. While these  Tesla  mock-up projects deserve plenty of praise, and some may be drivable on public roads, they›re not going to be very useful once the real Tesla Cybertruck comes to market. With that said, this Cybertruck camper built by  Ivan Zheltonogov  is not only already very useful, but it could be an amazing addition to any upcoming Tesla Cybertruck owner’s collection. For people who aren’t planning on buying a Cybertruck, or can’t afford one, the Cybertruck camper might be worth a look. Perhaps you could tow it with your  Model X  or Model Y? Source: insideevs.com/news/457533/ video-tesla-cybertruck-camper/

AND FINALLY….APPARENTLY BEGGARS CAN BE CHOOSERS… Among the few bright spots during 2020 was the pheenom response to a Tik-

Tok video posted by Nathan Apodaca, as he skated along a road while drinking Ocean Spray cocktail and listening to a 40-year-old Fleetwood Mac song. As a thank you for the free publicity, the folks over at Ocean Spray gifted Apodaca with a pickup truck after the video, which pictured him skating away from a broken down pickup truck, went viral. Turns out the Nissan Frontier Pro-4X wasn’t much to the recipient’s liking after he was pictured posing with his new Chevrolet Silverado shortly after. Turns out Apodaca’s action, no matter how unappreciative he may appear to be, isn’t illegal since the truck was essentially a gift from Ocean Spray. Neither Nissan nor Chevy was involved in the trade off. As it turns out, whatever the brand, the vehicle is still considered a gift from the venerable juice company.


At The Car Wash

HOW CARWASHES CAN BOOST PROFITS IN 2021 By Del Williams

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ITH THE N E W YEAR APPROACHING, CARWASH OWNERS NEED ALL THE HELP THEY CAN GET TO BOOST INCOME IN 2021. With income tight, this means bringing in as much business as possible without spending much in the effort. It also means providing vehicles an outstanding clean of high visibility, even premium areas like wheels, with less labour to control costs. Fortunately, tunnel wash owners can stand out and attract attention, clean

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wheels better without the labour, and provide a superior polish while reducing potential vehicle damage. For tunnel wash owners, one of the easiest ways to catch customers’ attention and give their business an instant visual makeover is by changing out all the cloth hangdown, foam and brushes at once, instead of a few at a time. When these materials are worn out and need to be replaced anyway, this is a zero-cost proposition. The only choice is which colour best reflects the brand or stands out the most. The visual upgrade is all the more striking when all the items are changed at the same time, which can give customers the impression that you have invested in brand new equipment to enhance the wash. Even if this means switching out some materials before they are fully worn out, the cost is nominal in comparison to the benefits which can include new cus-

tomers, return visits and more club memberships. “Anytime you replace the foam, cloth hangdowns or wheel brushes with a fresh, new colour people are sure to notice. Customers will also see that you are constantly improving and keeping your materials fresh,” says Robert Pecora, an expert on brush materials and president of Erie Brush & Manufacturing in Chicago, IL—a brush, cloth, foam and detailing supplier to the carwash industry since 1948. To have the greatest impact, Pecora suggests that tunnel wash owners should also coordinate the colours to reinforce their signs, logo, and any corporate or location-specific colour schemes. “The colours should complement those in their operation,” says Pecora, whose company offers one of the widest ranges of beautifully coloured foam, cloth brushes and hangdowns in the industry (red, green,


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

INTERNET

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 31

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

48

Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

31

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

Avis Budget Group

1-902-492-7561

avisbudgetgroup.com

24

Bastarache

1-888-288-6621

bastaracheauto.com

31

Bradford Exchange

1-877-595-9507

bradfordexchange.ca

IN

Covey’s

1-866-737-8911

coveys.com

25

Dominion Sure Seal

1-905-670-5411

dominionsureseal.com

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Feed Nova Scotia

1-902-457-1900

feednovascotia.ca

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Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

fixauto.com

Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-902.468.1396

fleetbrake.com

19

Hope For Wildlife

1-902-407-9453

hopeforwildlife.net

29

Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

25

John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

13

Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

24

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9

2

MacLellan & Moffatt 1-888-893-0508

mmgc.ca

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

maritimeauto.com

4

35

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

maritimecarwash.ca

34

Maritime Pro Stock

1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

23

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

17

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

21

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

27

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

39

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

40

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

41

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

NSTSA

1-902-493-3051

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

11

47

Rust Check

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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light blue, dark blue, yellow, orange, gray, and black). To improve the efficiency and consistency of wheel cleaning as well as reduce labour, many automated washes have installed rotating, pencil-type wheel brushes. Unfortunately, these too have fallen short as wheels continued to get larger and more complicated, making them harder to reach and deep clean. Typical brushes may be too small to adequately cover today’s bigger wheels and many cannot reach into their nooks and crannies. With the complicated dips and curves in wheels, most brushes simply ride along the outside edge. This has spurred new innovations from specialized carwash brush manufacturers with expertise in design, who have responded with new automated wheel brush size and shape configurations. With unique names like the Wheel Wonder and the Poodle Brush, these brushes are characterized by filaments that are gradually varied in length between four to seven inches to create a wave-like pattern or resemble a well-manicured poodle. As a vehicle travels through the automated carwash, the longer bristles reach deep into wheel crevices while the shorter bristles clean the wheel surface. The contoured brush designs also reach higher on bigger vehicle wheels and rims while more thoroughly cleaning wheel nooks and crannies. According to Pecora, a carwash that uses a high-quality gentle foam material can reduce damage claims to nearly zero, while offering a better final polish and a quieter wash. Unlike typical foam, which is usually offered at standard levels of softness, gentle foam is significantly softer. The gentle foam does not catch and pull on mirrors, antennas, license plates, or loose moldings like cloth sometimes can, and is designed to be soft and stretchable. “When engineered properly and used with enough soap and water, fans of gentle foam feel that it has the softest touch, that it cleans and polishes for a better shine, and that it outlasts other materials,” says Pecora. “The highest quality foam offers a range of softness, density, and thickness to optimize its use in conveyor or rollover washes. For instance, softer, thinner foam spun at lower RPMs is better for the sides. For rocker panels, the foam can be stiffer and thicker to prevent going inside pickup truck wheel wells, which can beat up thinner foams.” Pecora suggests that a slightly thicker foam also can work well in horizontal shaft top brushes and is able to get into the nooks and crannies at the bottom and top of the windshield, where trim goes around. Further information is available by calling 800-711-3743 (ERIE) in US, 773-477-9620 internationally; emailing sales@eriebrush.com; visiting eriebrush.com; or writing to Erie at 860 West Fletcher St., Chicago, IL 60657. Del Williams is a technical writer based in California.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Gary Girouald of Irishtown, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is February 28th, 2020

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

NOVEMBER 2020 WINNER!

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: info@ autoatlantic.com NAME:

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ADDRESS:

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1. Treat in a roll, sometimes

1. Slower drag racer

5. Honda for palindrome lovers

2. Cheap winter rides

8. Gentlemen, ____ your engines!

3. Registration document

9. ‘90s Plymouth hot rod

4. Rides seized by lenders

10. Frozen food trailers, slangily

5. Water and antifreeze blend

11. Zamboni driver’s workplace

6. Tire hiss source, maybe

12. Navigation from the dashboard

7. Detailers’ tools, briefly (3,4)

15. ‘50s “horse collar grille” brand

12. NS single malt distillery

17. Common car finish damage

13. McNabs and Lawlor

20. Tech’s diagnostic data (1,1,1,4)

14. New car “package” items

21. Drum brakes footwear

16. Town Car or Crown Vic

22. Patty and Selma, to Bart

18. Boss Hogg’s driver, sometimes

23. Company funding racer

19. Bob and Doug McKenzie word

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ockey fans (or technology fans for that matter), we need to know the name of this and well know ice machine, and you can you tell us more about it. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at info@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is February 26th, 2021.

Best wishes to Jennefer MacDonald of Sy d n e y River, NS , who correctly answered: “The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is a battery powered four wheeled rover used on Apollo moon missions . . .” Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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