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RHODES EAST PRIORITY PRECINCT INVESTIGATION AREA URBAN DESIGN REPORT 2017 ROBERTS DAY | 1


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

Title

Rhodes East Priority Precinct Investigation Area Urban Design Report

Prepared for: Date: Status: Prepared by: Approved by:

DPE and Canada Bay Council May 2017 DRAFT Angela Koepp Martine White

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 2


CONTENTS SETTING THE SCENE FOR URBAN RENEWAL

4

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

8

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS

10

RHODES EAST VISION

14

OBJECTIVES15 DESIGN APPROACH 

16

THE URBAN DESIGN PLAN

36

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN

38

RHODES EAST CHARACTER AREAS

50

DESIGN STRATEGIES

68

DELIVERY STRATEGIES

94

DESIGN STRATEGIES

98

STAGING106 DELIVERY108


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

SETTING THE SCENE FOR URBAN RENEWAL RHODES EAST Rhodes East is part of the Rhodes Peninsula between Brays Bay and Homebush Bay on the southern bank of the Parramatta River, approximately 16km to the west of Sydney CBD. It has an area of 36ha, is located to the east of the Northern Rail line and is bounded by the Parramatta River to the north and Brays Bay to the east. The study area is currently predominantly residential with light industrial land uses located along the northern edge, adjacent to the Parramatta River and McIlwaine Park to the south.

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RHODES EAST WILL CELEBRATE THE UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PLACE WHILST CREATING A FRAMEWORK TO BECOME A 21ST CENTURY TRANSIT ORIENTED, HUMAN SCALED WATERFRONT COMMUNITY.

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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

SETTING THE SCENE FOR URBAN RENEWAL A PLAN FOR GROWING SYDNEY A Plan for Growing Sydney, released in December 2014, details the NSW Government’s vision for Sydney’s future, as a ‘strong global city, a great place to live’. One of the biggest challenges is how best to provide the 726,000 new homes for the extra 2.7 million residents predicted by 2036, while also creating strong, healthy and connected communities. A Plan for Growing Sydney identifies Rhodes as a Strategic Centre within the Global Economic Corridor. A priority for the Central Sub Region is to: “Work with Councils to identify suitable locations for housing intensification and urban renewal… particularly around Priority Precincts, established and new centres and along key public transport corridors”.

PRIORITY PRECINCT Rhodes East was nominated as a potential Priority Precinct by the City of Canada Bay Council in November 2014. The Priority Precincts program aims to provide for new housing and jobs in centres with good existing or planned transport services and coordinates the delivery of infrastructure to ensure that the growth will be supported by improved public open space and community facilities to makes these places attractive places to live and enhance people’s lifestyles and living standards. Further demographic and economic information is included in Appendix A. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 6

CURRENT POPULATION

733

MEADOWBANK, RHODES, WENTWORTH POINT, OLYMPIC PARK & BREAKFAST POINT

*OF SALEABLE INTERNAL AREA

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD

2.67

$10-13K/SQM* AT

PEOPLE

AVERAGE AGE

42.5yrs

land value has increased x2 IN PAST 5 YEARS

DEVELOPERS PAY $200K/APT FOR LAND

LOW USE OF BUSES 46% OWN MORE

24% TRAIN TO WORK THAN ONE CAR


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Rhodes Corporate Park

FIGURE 1 RHODES EAST PRIORITY PRECINCT 0

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Concord Hospital

Investigation Area Boundary ROBERTS DAY | 7


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION A range of consultation with the local community, key stakeholders and relevant government agencies has been undertaken during the preparation of this proposal, including: • • • •

Drop in Sessions On Line Survey Three Community Workshops DPE Website

• Building heights should be scaled to retain views, minimise overshadowing and create a human scale • A preference for development controls to provide certainty • Leeds Street foreshore to be used for recreation, community events and cafes and restaurants • Greater density could be located closer to the Station

These community views have informed the design outcomes particularly in relation to housing density, building heights, land use The outcomes have been used to ensure that the community views are and open space. considered throughout the design process. The key outcomes of these consultation activities have been Some of the key views expressed included: documented and are included in Appendix B of this report. • Local character is important • Housing choice and affordability is important • Parramatta River foreshore access is desirable • Road and rail networks are congested

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THE OUTCOMES FROM THE CONSULTATION PROCESS HAVE BEEN USED TO ENSURE THAT THE COMMUNITY VIEWS ARE CONSIDERED THROUGHOUT THE DESIGN PROCESS.


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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

FIGURE 2 ACCESS & MOVEMENT

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS

Railway Line

Pedestrian Path

Bus Route

Pedestrian Crossing

Ferry Route

Vehicle Underpass

Bicycle Path

Investigation Area Boundary

A critical component of a Place Led approach is to develop an understanding of its current identity by analysing its physical characteristics, key destinations, and the movement of people throughout the area. A comprehensive Place Audit led to the identification of the following Opportunities and Constraints.

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ACCESS & MOVEMENT

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• A fine-grain approach to density is not facilitated by the current planning system, discouraging pedestrian movements • The railway line is a barrier with few crossings • Cost and overall impact of additional east-west connections on place and function should be considered • Concord Road is a physical barrier that inhibits pedestrian movement across the Peninsula

ord R

• • • • • •

Identify and work towards a model shift target Create a Transit Orientated Development Connect to the broader region Work with TfNSW to understand the ability to increase train frequency Increase and improve crossings across Concord Road Improve east/west connectivity Invest in the public domain to encourage active transport Explore innovative parking solutions Consider additional railway line crossing points Consider new ferry stop

Leeds St

Blaxland Rd

• • • •

CONSTRAINTS

Conc

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Brays Bay Rhodes West

Rhodes Corporate Park

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Concord Hospital


FIGURE 3 BUILT FORM Heritage Item Views from Rhodes West Apartments Community Facility Rhodes West - 33ha, 5000 dwellings Rhodes East - 33ha, 274 existing dwellings

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BUILT FORM

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• Deliver quality affordable housing in the most appropriate locations • Work within the confines of the current legislation to deliver affordable housing • Balance affordability with sustainability • Balance redevelopment and respectful consideration of heritage • Fourteen heritage listed lots are dispersed both east and west of Concord Road • Heritage trees are located along Llewellyn Street, Cavell Avenue and Cropley Street • Uhrs Reserve is under utilised but also heritage listed • Water-based heritage includes boat sheds located off Llewellyn Street properties

Leeds St

Walker St

• Apply inclusionary zoning to capture a proportion of the value uplift • Consider an ‘affordable living’ approach • Consider changes to the ARHSEPP and/or SEPP 70 to deliver the best affordable housing outcomes • Retain authenticity of heritage items • Leverage off existing mature trees • Consider heritage buildings for community/cultural uses • Integrate heritage and art into the public domain

CONSTRAINTS

Blaxland Rd

OPPORTUNITIES

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Brays Bay Rhodes West

Rhodes Corporate Park

Concord Hospital |

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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS LANDSCAPE AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OPPORTUNITIES • Engage with the waterfront • Co-locate habitat areas with community uses to encourage stewardship • Utilise generous amounts of open space for shared purposes • Identify opportunities for Rhodes East foreshore ‘beacons’ to be visible from the north shore • Maintain existing views and visual connections, and create new ones • Embed long term resilience in the Urban Design Plan • Deliver innovative planning • Explore opportunities for passive heating and cooling building systems • Improve the water quality of Parramatta River • Consider additional railway line crossing points • Consider new ferry stop

CONSTRAINTS • Privatised eastern edge with fragmented ownership • Established government policy of no new over-water structures • Barrier of the railway line makes sharing of facilities between east and west difficult • Managing the Rhodes West residents’ investment expectations of views • Variable heights are required to achieve a ‘value in depth’ • Significant slope through the middle of the site • Lack of data on flooding and sea level rise • Site affected by acid sulphate soils and some areas require remediation • Ability to deliver next-practice sustainability strategy within the project timeframes is yet to be determined • Balancing bespoke, sustainable building solutions with the affordability mandate • Habitable floor levels are to be located above RL 3m AHD and 100 year ARI plus 0.5m freeboard • Access level to basement car parks to be located above the PMF

UHRS RESERVE INTERFACE WITH SEA SCOUTS HALL

RHODES WEST SHARED PATH URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 12


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western winter winds (3pm)

FIGURE Parramatta River4 LANDSCAPE & NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

Nina Gray Ave

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Blaxland Rd

Views to City

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Planning Flood Level Public Open Space

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Mangroves Acid Sulfate Soil

McIlwaine Park

10m Contours

Rhodes Station

Privatised Edge

Brays Bay Rhodes West

southern winter winds (3pm) Rhodes Corporate Park

Natural High Point Hill Top Views to City Prevailing Winds

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Investigation Area Boundary ROBERTS DAY | 13


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

RHODES EAST VISION Rhodes East will be a model for sustainable, low-rise high density development, which builds upon the existing character and heritage of the area. It will provide more high quality housing choice, close to public transport and catering to a variety of household types. It will be supported by connections to the water, and local streets will be redesign to support walking, cycling and use of public transport. Improved amenity will encourage residents and visitors to spend time and continue to take pride in the area.

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OBJECTIVES

PLANNING Ensure Rhodes East can meet the challenges of the future by building sustainability and longevity into planning, design and commercial capability from the start.

ACTIVE TRANSPORT Design integrated transport services and experiences that prioritise walking, cycling and the use of public transport.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING Provide affordable housing options for key workers in the area, for example, people working in occupations such as teaching, childcare, policing or nursing. Utilise walking, cycling and the use of public transport.

DENSITY WITH A HUMAN SCALE Deliver a range of built forms, from terraces to apartment buildings, that promote activity on lower levels of the buildings. The range of built forms will result in more open space, more sunlight into buildings, and a close connection to the ground.

WATERFRONT ACCESS Provide enhanced public access to the Parramatta River foreshore, including the provision of housing and public open space with views to the water.

PUBLIC SPACES Provide a range of high quality, pedestrian prioritised public spaces that are safe for gathering and socialising.

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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH INTEGRATING EXISTING CHARACTER AND ADOPTING A PLACE LED APPROACH The redevelopment of Rhodes East has been framed around a place led approach that builds on the existing urban fabric and character to create a pedestrian friendly human scaled outcome. Traditional city-building has created the worlds most loved and successful urban places which typically consist of a broad range of lots, blocks and buildings assembled to create livable, mixed use walkable communities Development was incremental and delivered, not only a diversity of lot sizes and building types, ranging from the very small to the very large, but also a strong public realm. This approach is evident in Sydney’s inner city neighbourhoods that are widely recognised for their walkability, sustainability and liveability. However, in more recent times, this diversity has unfortunately been replaced with a more homogeneous approach that has resulted in places that are not human scaled and, as a consequence, are less walkable and with a lower quality public domain. Throughout the consultation process, the local community has consistently affirmed a desire to celebrate the inherent character of Rhodes East. As a result, the existing urban structure has informed a fine grain human scale urban renewal that will provide a genuine

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point of difference and create a unified community that is greater than the sum of its parts. However, recent experience suggests that relying solely on a combination of architectural and DCP controls will not deliver the authentic fine grain, organic character the community is seeking. A more effective way is to focus on the creation of streetscapes with multiple developments of different scales achieved by introducing a range of lot sizes and frontages. Diversity in development and form will be the key driver in realising a point of difference at Rhodes East. An analysis of the current urban fabric of Rhodes East on the basis of land use, street pattern, public domain and built form has identified five distinct Character Areas. The Character Area Analysis can be found in Appendix C. The Character Areas will be used to build character and identity through specific built form controls, function and use, landscape treatment and street types creating a series of distinct places that celebrate and evolve their existing character. The boundaries of the Character Areas typically include both sides of the streets to ensure a consistent character that contributes to an attractive and legible environment.


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FIGURE 5 CHARACTER AREAS

Rhodes Station

Rhodes East Gateway

Brays Bay

The High Point

Rhodes West

Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct Rhodes Corporate Park

Concord Road Corridor Eastern Foreshore

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Investigation Area Boundary ROBERTS DAY | 17


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

EXISTING CHARACTER AREA ANALYSIS SUMMARY

RHODES EAST GATEWAY

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT

THE HIGH POINT

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR

EASTERN FORESHORE

A key transport hub with limited commercial uses located between Rhodes Station and Concord Road with a character influenced by adjoining built form and functions.

A predominately light industrial area on the waterfront with large building structures and heavily transport dominated (vehicles, trains, river traffic).

Centrally located area on the Rhodes Peninsula with a mix of residential and community uses situated on the most elevated part of the Investigation Area.

An area heavily dominated by the wide Concord Road corridor containing residential, community and light industrial uses.

A green, leafy area characterised by low scale residential development with connections to the waterfront.

RHODES EAST GATEWAY - BUILT FORM URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 18

RHODES EAST GATEWAY - LANDSCAPE


EASTERN FORESHORE- LANDSCAPE AND BUILT FORM LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT - DESTINATION

THE HIGH POINT - BUILT FORM

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR - DESTINATION

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR - BUILT FORM

EASTERN FORESHORE - LANDSCAPE AND BUILT FORM ROBERTS DAY | 19


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH ESTABLISHING A PENINSULA OF CHOICE Rhodes West was developed on remediated industrial land. High density development was facilitated through the creation of large blocks that provided new housing types with a range of social infrastructure and community facilities delivered through Voluntary Planning Agreements. In contrast, Rhodes East is an established urban area with an existing community. It contains a number of different places, each with its own unique identity and character, contributing to the overall experience and attraction of the Peninsula. This provides a genuine point of difference and an opportunity to deliver an alternative urban experience than that found at Rhodes West. The commitment to delivering 5% Affordable Housing across the whole development, combined with the definition of a housing mix within the DCP, will ensure that Rhodes East provides choice and variety to the Peninsula.

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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

RHODES WEST - 8 INTERSECTIONS/ 10HA

rd co

Walker St Blaxland Rd

Cavell Ave

DESIGN APPROACH

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BUILDING URBANITY THROUGH DENSITY

A crucial difference between pre and post – war development can be linked to the growing reliance on private vehicle movements. This change in personal mobility patterns fundamentally changed the urban structure and resulted in larger blocks, fewer intersections and less street frontage to activate the public realm. Whilst overall density was not impacted, the quality of the public realm deteriorated leading to reduced pedestrian activity and movement. Successful urban renewal projects increase intersection density or the number of intersections in a given area. Intersection density corresponds closely to block size, so the greater the intersection density, the smaller the block. Small blocks make neighbourhoods more walkable and, in conjunction with smaller redevelopment sites, creates the pre-conditions to deliver authentic fine grain, human scale development in accordance with the Rhodes East Vision.

RHODES EAST EXISTING - 6 INTERSECTIONS/ 10HA

Kokoda Track Memorial Walkway

rd co

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n Co

Leeds St

Walker

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Cavell Ave

Wentworth Point

The diagrams opposite compare street layouts and the number of intersections per 10 ha in Potts Point, arguably one of the most walkable neighbourhoods in Australia, with Rhodes West and East. Increasing intersection density inherently improves frontage density. Frontage density is the amount of ground floor building frontage engaging with the street providing a place-based framework for activities, experiences and uses to evolve over time. Increasing the extent of ground floor frontages promotes walkability and a more activated streetscape and public realm. With lower intersection densities and larger blocks, ‘lot density’ is also reduced. An area developed pre-war consisting of typically 100 lots of varied sizes, would often now be reduced to about 4 super lots dimensioned to attract a single market segment developer. By reducing lot density fine-grain buildings have been replaced by fewer larger buildings with less relationship to the street and pedestrian environment. The large floor plates are often driven by basement car parking requirements reflecting parking rates that encourage private vehicle ownership and driving rather than walking, car share or public transit use.

Averill St

Rd

One of the key challenges facing the redevelopment of Rhodes East is the capacity of the network movement to accommodate an increased population. As a result, a key focus has been to create an urban structure that maximises opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport patronage. Improving connectivity through additional street and pedestrian connections is critical to achieving the modal shift required to support the new Rhodes East community.

Research suggests that there is a direct correlation between intersection density, block size and walkability. There is further research that concludes that if intersection density is doubled walking will increase by 40 percent. (Travel and the Built Environment: A Meta-Analysis, 2010).

Denham

Blaxland

INTERSECTION, FRONTAGE AND LOT DENSITY

Rhodes Station

Concord Hospital Parramatta River

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Cropley St Gauthorp

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Rhodes Station

POTTS POINT - 23 INTERSECTIONS/ 10HA

Kokoda Track Memorial Walkway

Concord Hospital

1 HECTARE GRID

10 HECTARE SAMPLE AREA

INTERSECTION

The above images illustrate a 1 hectare grid overlaid onto a 10 ha sample area to determine intersection density. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 22


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FIGURE 6 GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES (CURRENT)

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Sample 10 ha

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Development Block McIlwaine Park

Public Frontage

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Public Open Space Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Brays Bay Rhodes West

Investigation Area Boundary

TOTAL Rhodes Corporate Park

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6478M of Frontage 10 Blocks Concord Hospital

1120M of Frontage in Sample 10ha Block ROBERTS DAY | 23


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH BUILDING URBANITY THROUGH DENSITY ADAPTABLE GROUND FLOORS Increased intersection, frontage and lot density all contribute to creating resilient urban places where non-residential uses at the street level of buildings can develop organically over time as a place and market demand matures. A portion of every development should be formally designated with adaptable ground floors that can be converted from residential or podium parking to retail or commercial uses, as redevelopment progressively occurs and market demands change providing flexibility and resilience. PROVIDING PUBLIC BENEFIT A range of social and physical infrastructure is required to support healthy happy communities. At Rhodes East, this infrastructure is critical to facilitate density and population growth and encourage a modal shift. In particular, the new streets, are fundamental to the delivery of the intersection and frontage densities necessary to support the public life envisaged. The planning process provides a range of mechanisms to deliver this infrastructure including:

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• • • • •

S94 Contributions SIC Contributions DA Consent/In kind Contributions Voluntary Planning Agreements Height and FSR Bonuses to incentivize developer funded infrastructure

Depending on the quantum of funding required, a combination of these processes maybe required. Incentivizing developers to fund infrastructure through bonuses is an effective and transparent model that reduces the reliance on public funds and can deliver infrastructure in shorter time frames. This approach provides an opportunity to deliver strategically located taller buildings, on designated sites, in return for the delivery of a nominated public benefit. In many instances, this will result in communities having access to the infrastructure more quickly than if it was funded through the contributions under the planning regime. It is critical, however, to create a clear nexus between the public benefit and bonuses provided to the developer, to ensure that the community and all stakeholders have a clear understanding of the relationship between the delivery of the infrastructure and resultant built form.


MANDATING COMMERCIAL FLOOR TO CEILING HEIGHTS ALLOWS THE USE OF BUILDINGS TO TRANSITION OVER TIME

ADAPTABLE GROUND FLOORS PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITY FOR LIVE - WORKS AND ADDITIONAL COMMERCIAL FLOORSPACE AS NEED DICTATES ROBERTS DAY | 25


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR A MODAL SHIFT Achieving model shift must be addressed from both a transport and an urban design / placemaking perspective. Simply providing density and a mix of uses within close proximity to one another is not enough to encourage people to choose walking, cycling or public transport over driving. Every trip begins with walking so the pedestrian experience must be the priority. An integrated high quality urban design outcome, not just density, is required to engage and stimulate the pedestrian, particularly along key desire lines. Active transport infrastructure, and reduced or zero parking rates within close proximity to public transport, is part of an integrated urbanity model. As the existing road network is constrained, in order to provide a high quality urban environment for existing and future residents, a significant modal shift will be required. The proposed design approach can inform an urban design outcome that actively encourages active transport options.

CONNECTIVITY Urban design can directly influence modal shift by creating the preconditions to support active transport including: • Context Sensitive Streets • A permeable urban structure that promotes walking, cycling, bus, train and ferry use • Creating smaller, more compact blocks encouraging a diversity of small, medium and large developments that will enhance the pedestrian environment and encourage pedestrian interest and movement • Increasing intersection densities that activate the public realm and encourage walkability • Identifying Vibrant, Friendly and Mixed Facades for each block edge to encourage pedestrian movement

PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR A MODAL SHIFT CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREET DESIGN Context Sensitive Street design reflects, the principles contained with the TfNSW “Movement and Place Framework” (see Appendix D) and aims to balance the often competing objectives of traffic capacity with place amenity, or place-led character. Context Sensitive Streets consider both character and capacity. The configuration of the streets and public domain do not adversely affect traffic functionality. However, instead of the changes to street configuration responding solely to traffic requirements and hierarchy, the streets change in response to the land use and/ or character area that they move through. This approach creates links between the user group and the environment. Streets that connect key destinations support and prioritize pedestrians and cyclist through cycleways, wider pedestrian paths and shade trees. While the safety and functionality of the private vehicle is not impacted, a modal shift is promoted by providing infrastructure and expenditure in the areas where it will be used. Context Sensitive Streets are: Place-led Streets are the most important asset of a city. They are more than just transport corridors, they are used by everyone, everyday, and therefore should be designed for all users. They form the main

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civic space of communities; significantly affect the retail, cultural and leisure experience, and can provide inspiration for spontaneous activity, public art, creative lighting and greenery. They are the backbone of a healthy, ecological and lovable city where a high quality public domain forms the setting for daily life. Economic Context Sensitive Streets stimulate economic growth by creating attractive places with greater street activity, increasing the number of potential customers passing shop fronts and the length of time spent in a place. This typically leads to increased retail spending, enhanced desirability of business and residential addresses and ultimately increased property values. Healthy In 1970, 80% of children walk or rode to school. Today only 20% do. (source: ABS via www.bicyclenetwork.com.au). Context Sensitive Streets provide a safe space for walking and cycling and offer universal access, providing greater independence for children, as well as the elderly and disabled, encouraging more physically active lifestyles. The enhanced social activity and spontaneous encounters can also have positive impacts on mental health, whilst the increased number of street trees improve air quality and lower ambient temperatures. Overall, Context Sensitive Streets enhance the everyday quality of life for residents, workers and visitors by providing safe, comfortable spaces for public activities.

Walkable To remain competitive and attract people and businesses, a city must be walkable.

PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR A MODAL SHIFT

Context Sensitive Streets address the 10 elements of walkability as outlined in Jeff Speck’s Walkable City (2012):

ZERO PARKING

• Consider pedestrians first • Mix land uses • Get the parking right • Let transit work • Protect pedestrians • Welcome bikes • Shape public spaces • Plant trees • Create active frontages • Prioritise investments wisely

Rethinking conventional parking controls can be a very effective way to assist with housing affordability and encourage residents and visitors to reassess their mobility choices. Best practice transit orientated development located within 400 metres of train station typically does not provide any on site parking to reinforce the desirability of public transit. Reduced parking standards are also desirable within 800 metres of a train station. Rethinking parking standards should be accompanied by a parallel investment in active transit opportunities ensuring that personal mobility is not compromised. The Context Sensitive Streets strategy prioritises pedestrians, cyclists public transport and then motorists to create an environment that is conducive to active transit.

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RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH CREATING A FINE GRAIN PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT HUMAN SCALE PLACES The worlds most loved and successful urban places consist of a broad range of lots, blocks and buildings assembled to create liveable, mixed use walkable communities. In more recent times, this diversity has unfortunately been replaced with a more homogeneous approach that has resulted in places that are not human scaled and, as a consequence, are less walkable and have a lower quality public domain. Whilst Rhodes West is acknowledged as a successful and high quality development, the Rhodes East consultation process has consistently affirmed a desire for the renewal of Rhodes East to differentiate itself through a fine grain, human scale high density approach to built form. Recent experience suggests that relying on architectural and DCP controls does not deliver the authentic fine grain, organic character that will create a genuine point of difference with Rhodes West. The most effective way to achieve this outcome is to create streetscapes with multiple developments of different scales through introducing a range of frontages, styles and form. Diversity in development and form will be the key driver in realising a point of difference at Rhodes East.

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By establishing a maximum lot frontage and lot size for each Character Area, a fine grain, activated and visually interesting built form and streetscape outcome can be delivered. Diversity in lot size will also attract a broader range of potential developers, some of whom could not afford the land costs associated with larger super lots. Traditional city-building was incremental and delivered, a diversity of lot sizes and building types, ranging from the very small to the very large, and also a strong public realm. This approach is evident in Sydney’s inner city neighbourhoods that are widely recognised for their walkability, sustainability and liveability attributes.

Maximum frontage length controls promote an authentic fine rain and architectural, experiential variety.

However, more recently, as seen at Rhodes West, development has typically involved super lot developments that can deliver large floor plate buildings, accommodate modern parking requirements and maximise financial return. At Rhodes East we have an opportunity to use a tailored planning system to deliver a broad range of lot sizes and building types that will lead to neighbourhoods that are walkable and liveable. Ground floor residential should activate the street through mechanisms such as, buildings set close to the street, elevated ground floors balancing privacy and surveillance, street address and informal gathering opportunities such as front ‘stoops.’


TRADITIONAL CITY-BUILDING WAS INCREMENTAL AND DELIVERED A DIVERSITY OF LOT SIZES AND BUILDING TYPES, RANGING FROM THE VERY SMALL TO THE VERY LARGE.

Connectivity and the streetscape experience will be critical within new development areas.

Residential streets can have active/ friendly faรงade through attention to address.

Corner activation along key desire lines. ROBERTS DAY | 29


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH CREATING A FINE GRAIN PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT THE HIGH - LOW MODEL Whilst the idea of increasing densities within neighbourhoods is not new, its success in terms of its ability to create quality urban environments has varied. The concept of a high-low density model seeks to achieve both a high quality public realm and efficient housing solutions that blends pre war and current development models. Delivering quality density is primarily related to the ability of taller buildings to create an engaging and active pedestrian experience. This can be achieved through a high – low density model, where height is distributed in a manner that allows for good solar access, orientation and view corridors in addition to active facades and lively ground floor controls. Under this model, desired densities can be achieved without overshadowing community open space, parks or other buildings by

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 30

strategically locating the tallest elements on the south west of blocks with the balance of development being low to mid rise. Fine grain buildings and the high-low model can be achieved and controlled through two mechanisms: • Fine grain Heights Map within the LEP and/ or • An intentional combination of FSR and Height controls within the LEP Typically, FSR and height controls achieve a relatively consistent built form outcome when applied either independently or together. This leaves amenity to be controlled by the Apartment Design Guide and/or a DCP where applicable. A high low outcome is achieved when the height limit can only be fully realised on part of the site in order to comply with the maximum FSR constraints.

Whilst a developer could choose to maximise the FSR with none of the buildings reaching the maximum height, typically a developer will choose to construct a single taller element to optimise views and the high values associated with upper level apartments. The balance of the available floor space is sufficient to deliver low to mid rise development such as walk-up or terrace apartments as part of integrated development. The developer benefits from a height limit that allows a strategically located taller element, whilst the public domain is protected from the effects of a more consistent bulk and mass. Where these controls are further supplemented by frontage type controls an active and human scale streetscape and pedestrian experience is created.


CONVENTIONAL PLANNING

MIXTURE OF DWELLING TYPES

MIXED USE STREETSCAPE

Conventional planning and developers typically maximise the density of different uses by building large, monotonous blocks.

The above demonstrates that the same density can be achieved with a mixture of dwelling types and land uses within each block. This achieves greater diversity and vibrancy and human scale development in priority pedestrian areas.

The fine grain, vibrant mixed use streetscape creates an active and attractive pedestrian environment that encourages walking and cycling.

ROBERTS DAY | 31


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH CREATING A FINE GRAIN PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT BASE BUILDING

BUILDING TYPOLOGY FRONTAGE CONTROLS

At an average walking speed of 80 seconds per 100 metres, 15 - 20 stimulation points of interest are required to entertain a pedestrian and encourage them to walk further. The role of the base building is to create this stimulation in the built form/ public domain interface zone encouraging the desired pedestrian movements.

An LEP can control the percentage of a street frontage occupied by a certain building typology. By mandating a significant portion of a primary or priority street to be fronted by terraces and multi-unit terrace apartments a safe and animated streetscape environment will be achieved.

The base building is typically the first 3 storeys of a development which is generally the height perceived by the pedestrian. A taller form generally sits behind the base building and is set back. The base building provides an appropriate transition to existing lower scale development as higher density redevelopment incrementally occurs. Most importantly, the base building effectively frames the public realm and protects pedestrian amenity. Facades controls such as 15 - 20 doors per 100 metres, independent at-grade access requirements, varied uses and visual richness in facades should be contained within the DCP. In the absence of further controls, a base building is typically realised as a 3 storey podium of an apartment tower. In order to provide a vibrant, authentic, fine grain base building streetscape façade and frontages controls are required.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 32

The percentage requirement for these typologies should be less on secondary streets to ensure the opportunity for vehicle access and servicing. Strata titled terraces will contribute to the ‘missing middle’ as discussed within the draft Medium Density Guide.


4m or greater setback to tower building from base building

4-6m setback can be used for balconies

0-6m base building setback to the road reserve for the first three levels

4m

2m

3m 3m 3m 3.8 m

ROBERTS DAY | 33


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN APPROACH ENSURING A FEASIBLE AND SUSTAINABLE OUTCOME Balancing an increased population with the constraints of the existing rail and road network has been a key consideration at Rhodes East. The focus has been to generate a human scaled sustainable development outcome, rather than maximising the potential development. A liveable, walkable and sustainable environment will encourage active transit and reduce reliance on private vehicle trips. This not only reduces local traffic volumes and eases congestion, but provides healthier lifestyles and activates the public realm. In addition, building typologies have been developed that represent the “base case” development outcome necessary to provide a commercially acceptable financial return whilst contributing to affordable housing and the agreed public benefits. These “base case” building typologies have been used to inform planning controls that will ensure a human scaled high density outcome.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 34

Site specific FSR bonuses will be available to incentivise developers to deliver new infrastructure such as the new streets proposed within the Precinct. This approach lessens the cost to Government, increases the likelihood of infrastructure being delivered more quickly and ensures taller heights are strategically located to minimise the impact on adjoining development. In addition, DCP controls will clearly demonstrate the link between the delivery of the new roads and FSR bonuses providing the community with certainty as to the potential development outcomes. Increased BASIX and NABERS targets are proposed for both energy and water elements to ensure built form sustainability.


Primary street

Secondary street

+ 30% GFA bonus 15 storeys

GFA road transfer

11 storeys

8 storeys 6 storeys

ROBERTS DAY | 35


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

THE URBAN DESIGN PLAN The Rhodes East Urban Design Plan reflects and celebrates the unique characteristics of the place whilst creating a framework to evolve and to become a 21st century transit oriented, human scaled waterfront community. A variety of experience- based destinations will attract residents and visitors whilst a series of more intimate spaces will create opportunities for smaller gatherings and facilitate the organic growth and maturation of Rhodes East over time. These special places are connected by green streets and paths and supported by a vibrant, fine grain, activated, pedestrian- focused built form environment. Delivering the Rhodes East Urban Design Plan will be incremental and long term. A focus on the first three storeys experienced by the pedestrian and a maximum lot size will ensure that the progressive redevelopment sensitively responds to the existing character and built form and maintains a village feel. All of the design strategies incorporated into the Urban Design Plan reinforce Rhodes East as a ‘walkable’ community. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 36

FEATURES

1

Proposed Ferry Wharf

7

Community Spine

2

Leeds Street Foreshore Plaza and Promenade

8

Foreshore Access

3

Shared Street Character

9

New Streets

10

New Pedestrian Links

11

Potential School Location

12

Potential Railway Bridge Locations

4 5 6

Potential Concord Road Pedestrian Bridge Station to McIlwaine Park Land Bridge/ Retail Arcade River Pool


Ry d

eB

rid

ge

1 2 10

10 3

Leeds St

10 10

Cavell Ave

7

9

10

Averill St

7 10

Denham St

12

4

9

10 Cropley St

10

Blaxland Rd

9

8

10

Conco

rd Roa

d

12

11

5

6

ROBERTS DAY | 37


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN TRANSPORT CAPACITY MODELLING During previous consultation sessions, the local community raised reservations with respect to the existing traffic and transport situation in the precinct. The community commented that the road and rail network was currently operating at, or close to, capacity. Subsequent detailed transport analysis confirmed the same.

The results of the transport modelling are set out in detail within the Traffic and Transport Assessment and have been prepared in close collaboration with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) and the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS). In summary:

• Concord Road, a congested arterial road, is a key bus and freight corridor; Any additional vehicular or passenger movements from new • During peak hours, train loads approach capacity at Rhodes Station; development at Rhodes East would therefore need to be carefully • The local road network is constrained and has a lack of bus priority modelled and appropriate mitigation measures put in place and opportunities; improvements proposed to ensure that any additional population • Major transport infrastructure act as barriers to east-west can be supported. movements for walking and cycling; Accordingly, various development scenarios were modelled to assess • Mitigation measures will be required to key intersections on Concord Road to ensure travel times are not significantly altered; the traffic impacts on the road network but to also provide an • Additional southbound train services will be required during the indication of potential rail demand. These scenarios ranged from land use options that proposed new development across the entirety morning peak; and • A change in travel in behaviour is critical for the success of the draft of the investigation area, to more modest land use options which Precinct Plan. indicated development at limited locations within the precinct. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 38

DEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY TESTING Another key investigation involved testing the scale of development required to provide a commercially acceptable return whilst ensuring that agreed broader public benefits could be achieved. Noting traffic and transport constraints, combined with community and Council’s vision of medium rise high density development for Rhodes East, an assessment of the base feasibility i.e. the minimum commercially viable level of development, was undertaken. This analysis identified a series of building typologies for each ‘Character Area’ within the precinct and took into consideration the following criteria: • • • • •

existing land values; units sales and size of comparable developments; construction costs; council fees and charges; and other miscellaneous costs.


N

Parramatta River

e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

Government may also choose to consider a phased approach to the rezoning based on infrastructure availability.

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

d

The results of the detailed transport analysis and feasibility testing have determined that it is not viable to redevelop the whole of the Investigation Area. In response to the results of technical studies and investigations undertaken, the draft Precinct Plan proposes to rezone land between the railway line and Concord Road only. However, it is to be noted that commitments to the delivery of infrastructure are essential to trigger rezoning within the precinct post-exhibition. If Government decides in the future to invest additional substantial transport infrastructure in close proximity to Rhodes, such as Sydney West metro, the Precinct Plan may be subject to re-evaluation for increased density.

dge

ord R

REZONING OF LAND

Bri

Conc

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

McIlwaine Park Rhodes Station

Brays Bay Rhodes West

Rhodes Corporate Park

FIGURE 7 RHODES EAST PRIORITY PRECINCT Land to be Rezoned

0

250

500m

Investigation Area Boundary Concord Hospital ROBERTS DAY | 39


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN THE EXISTING URBAN STRUCTURE Rhodes East comprises the area east of the rail line on the Rhodes Peninsula. It is predominantly a residential area with access to a range of supporting non residential uses located throughout the broader Peninsula. Key services currently not provided include a Primary School and destination and experienced based retail. The area is serviced by a passenger rail service via Rhodes rail station with Concord Road providing the only road access to the wider area. Both the road and rail networks are congested. Most local trips are car dependent, reflecting the current spatial distribution of land uses, poor connectivity and limited infrastructure to support and encourage walking and cycling. In addition, although Rhodes East has more than 1.5 kms of water frontage, there are few public connections to the foreshore, resulting in 70% of the foreshore being inaccessible to the public. If McIlwaine Park is excluded from this calculation, then 90% of the foreshore is currently privatised. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 40


OPEN SPACE AND ECOLOGY

CHURCHILL TUCKER RESERVE MCILWAINE PARK

A key project objective is to ensure that: ‘Connections to, and along, the waterfront will be reinforced by a well connected open space and linkages system.’ The open space and ecological components of Rhodes East were the key driver for the development of the Structure Plan. The plan opposite, and those over the following pages, are a build-up series demonstrating how the layers of the Urban Design Plan were logically developed as a series of interrelated systems beginning with nature. The solid base masks the existing fabric to reinforce that the Urban Design Plan has been envisioned as an holistic redevelopment proposal to occur over the long term.

MILL PARK

LEEDS STREET PLAZA KING GEORGE V PARK

UHRS POINT RESERVE

The existing parks, plazas and open space within the Peninsula will not only be retained but enhanced.

ROBERTS DAY | 41


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN CONNECTIVITY

LAND BRIDGE POTENTIAL PEDESTRIAN RAILWAY BRIDGE

Improved connectivity builds on the importance of the open space, ecology and waterfront as a framework to support the future growth and redevelopment of Rhodes East.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 42

Rd rd

The additional connections increase the frontage and intersection density and create small blocks. Small blocks make a neighbourhood more walkable and, when combined with smaller redevelopment sites, provides the pre conditions to deliver authentic fine grain, human scale development in accordance with the Project Vision.

ell A ve

co

• Optimise the use and public benefit of the open space system, • Provide visual and physical connectivity to the water, and • Maximises walking, cycling and public transport patronage critical to achieving the modal shift required to support the new Rhodes East community.

CYCLE PATH

Cav

n Co

A network of new pedestrian links, local streets, and pedestrian land bridges will:

IMPROVED CONNECTIONS

ds

e Le

St PEDESTRIAN LINKS


LAND USE The expanded residential community will be supported by a range of supporting uses, accessible by walking or cycling through a connected street and open space network. Convenience retail and potentially a primary school site will be located near the Station. A proposed land bridge over Concord Road will provide safe active transit to these key destinations reducing reliance on private vehicle trips.

MIXED USE INCLUDING POTENTIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL

RIVER POOL

RESIDENTIAL

DESTINATION RETAIL

The following activation mechanisms will encourage walking, cycling and ferry use to relieve pressure from the road and rail networks, promoting healthy active lifestyles and provide the physical framework to enable Rhodes East to evolve and mature: • Leeds Street Foreshore destination and experiential retail and associated leisure activities leveraging off the now publicly accessible foreshore • Mixed use corners along key pedestrian desire lines, created through improved connections, promoting fine grain organic activation, and • Adaptive ground floors along Concord Road ensure that employment opportunities are not limited in future redevelopment. ROBERTS DAY | 43


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN PUBLIC DOMAIN The landscape of the existing open space system will be enhanced celebrating the site’s natural ecology and proximity to the Parramatta River. The streets will be transformed into linear parks through a series of landscape and public domain treatments creating a safe and attractive pedestrian environment encouraging people to choose to walk or cycle for recreation and daily needs. The configuration and public domain treatment of each street reflects the street type and the Character Area through which it moves. Streets categorised as ‘shared’ balance an intended public domain character with the ability to accommodate traffic functions and volumes as required.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 44

GREENWAY BOULEVARD

RIVER POOL

COMMUNITY SPINE

COMMUTER STREET

SHARED STREET

LEEDS STREET PLAZA


HEIGHT RESPONSE The maximum heights and densities at Rhodes East balance: • the co-location of density with amenity, and • view sharing particularly for pedestrians Higher densities are located adjacent to the two key destinations, the Station and Leeds Street Foreshore Plaza.

E

IN KYL

EY S

N SYD

Strategically located pedestrian paths and building envelopes will ensure breaks in the building mass safeguarding existing views and introducing additional views providing legibility and value in depth.

DOW

D SY

N

EY

BAN

K

I YL SK

R PA R

IVE

AR TT MA

RA

The balance of the development tiers down from the railway line towards the eastern waterfront maximising views across the broader area and ensuring new development does not compromise the amenity of existing lower density development. Further opportunities to provide views are created by the high -low approach to development controls that will ensure upper level views are achieved.

MEA NE

ROBERTS DAY | 45


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN HERITAGE RESPONSE

RHODES STATION

The listed heritage items at Rhodes East are retained, respected and valued as an integrated component of the Master Plan.

MCILWAINE PARK RHODES COMMUNITY HALL

In all cases, appropriate built from transitions between heritage items and new development have been considered. Where possible and logical, pedestrian paths, parks and mixed use corners are collocated with heritage houses to promote adaptive reuse and activation along key desire lines.

KING GEORGE V PARK

2

2M

JOHN WHITTON BRIDGE CURTILAGE

st

or

s

m

in 2M

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 46

ey

m

in

UHRS POINT RESERVE


ROBERTS DAY | 47


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

Approximate Area (SQM)

CREATING THE STRUCTURE PLAN LAND USE DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY Land uses have been allocated across the Structure Plan to reflect technical advise provided by the Project Team and community views as documented in the Community Workshop Outcomes Report. A key principle is to encourage multi-purpose trips through the location and combination of land uses. The following land uses, yields and population reflect the ultimate development scenario subject to the realisation of transport improvements and interventions. The staging for this project is discussed in the final section of this report and reflects the development capacity that can be achieved with specific local interventions.

GATEWAY/STATION - BASED CONVENIENCE RETAIL

TOTAL: 6,00- 6,500 SQM

Potential uses may include: Supermarket Speciality Food Grocers/Liquor Restaurants and Fast Food Speciality and Personal Services Non-retail services

1,500 - 2,000m2 600m2 1,000 - 1,500m2 1,500m2 500 - 1,000m2

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE DESTINATION RETAIL

7,000 SQM (TBC)

Potential uses may include: Micro-Brewery Wine, cheese, olives Wine Bars, cafĂŠs Small gourmet supermarket such as a Thomas Dux

*See Note

Vertical Urban Primary School Potential for it to be delivered as part of a developer funded integrated mixed use development and collocated with multi-purpose community space. The building would need a 2,000 square metre floor plate and would have to have one floor internal play as well as roof top play. It would need to be 4 storeys in height to accommodate the free play and GFA required. The school would also need access to the existing public open space to meet the free play space metric.

School: 5,700 gross SQM/0.57ha/26 classrooms Integrated Community Space (part of the mixed use corner): 3 - 4,000 sqm

Concord Road Ground Floor: Mandatory Adaptive Ground Floor

380 lineal metres of Concord Road frontage Total: 2,900m2

Provision of small to medium office space of 50 - 250m2 located along Concord Road adjoining the Station or the Leeds Street Precinct Mixed Use Corners x 3 These provide community, cultural and/ or retail spaces collocated with intimate open spaces.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 48

Open Space: 100 sqm x 3= 300m2 Mixed Use Floorspace: 25 sqm x 3= 75m2


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point

INDICATIVE POPULATION (BASED ON 2.3 PEOPLE PER DWELLING)

794

1,826

Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct

1,355

3,117

The High Point

962

2,213

Concord Road Corridor

478

1,099

TOTAL

3,589

8,255

Bri

Residential Leeds St

Mixed Use including potential primary school

Cavell Ave

Rhodes East Gateway

e Ryd

Walker St

INDICATIVE DWELLING YIELD

Averill St

Destination Parramatta River Retail

(with residential above)

Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

Ben

nel ong

Pedestrian Link

Blaxland Rd

CHARACTER AREA

FIGURE 8 URBAN DESIGN PLAN dge

Bri

dge

Pedestrian Bridge

Cropley St

Potential Pedestrian Railway Overpass Location

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Conc ord R

d

Llewel

Rhodes East current population is 733 ‘ABS 2015’ quoted in ‘Demographic Profile’ (DPE 2015). The above calculations provide an early indication of the amount of residential GFA and yield that is required to make redevelopment feasible at Rhodes East based on the individual land values of each Character Area. Understanding the feasibility is critical to working towards a viable traffic and transport solution.

Land Bridge Site McIlwaine Park

Adaptive Ground Floor Priority (with residential above)

Rhodes Station

Mixed Use Corner Corner Plaza

Rhodes West

Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 49


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point

ge

rid

eB Ryd

N

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Walker St

RHODES EAST CHARACTER AREAS

Averill St

Parramatta River

OVERVIEW

e

Denham St

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc ord R d

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Four Character Areas have been identified and inform the creation of a series of distinct places that celebrate the existing community and identity. Character Area Intent Statements outline the way in which the built form, function and use, heritage items, landscape treatment, transport and key destination accessibility and user experience have been considered as part of the Urban Design Plan development.

Nina Gray Av

As the boundaries of the Character Areas are defined by the area’s attributes, often both sides of the existing streets are contained within the same Character Area. This results in a consistent character on both sides of the street, creating an attractive and legible environment.

McIlwaine Park Rhodes East Gateway

Rhodes Station

The High Point

The following sections demonstrate how an immersive environment is created through complimentary built form and public domain controls., reinforcing the Character Area intent.

Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct Brays Bay Concord Road Corridor

Rhodes West 0 URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 50

250

500m

Rhodes Corporate

Land to be Rezoned


MAXIMUM LOT SIZE & FRONTAGE + MAXIMUM HEIGHT OF BUILDING ENVELOPE + FLOOR SPACE RATIO + BUILDING TYPES & TERRACE FRONTAGE= BUILT FORM CHARACTER

BUILT FORM In order to establish a point of difference, promote commercially viable development diversity, and realise the Vision for Rhodes East as a fine grain, human scale, medium density development, a combination of LEP and DCP controls are required.

PUBLIC DOMAIN The following sections illustrate how a number of controls are required The Character Areas have been informed by existing landscape to work together in order to deliver the Rhodes East Vision and the character, and will be further reinforced in the landscape masterplan individual Character Area intent including the built from character. with paving treatments, street furniture, and a species palette unique to each precinct in key public spaces. In order for the intended character of each area to be realised, the

following combination of controls must be delivered: Maximum Lot Size The Character Areas established throughout Rhodes East will be & Frontage, Maximum Height of Building Envelope, Floor Space Ratio reinforced by the streetscape. The proposed landscape identity and Building Types & Terrace Frontage. for each street (as outlined within the Technical Section of this report and expanded upon within the Public Domain Report) will be responsive to the range of development types that are along It is the intent of the building typologies to guide a built form solution its length. throughout Rhodes East that provides a fine grain, 2 - 3 storey human scale experience at street level. Where density is appropriate and required in order to deliver commercial viability and public benefit, residential flat buildings can be located behind this active sleeve. Theses controls are generally consistent within the individual Character Areas. The exception is the allocation of heights. Because the focus is on the human experience at Rhodes East, view sharing and feasibility overlays have contributed to the height strategy.

ROBERTS DAY | 51


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

RHODES EAST GATEWAY

PEDESTRIAN RETAIL ARCADE AND TRANSIT CONNECTOR

CHARACTER AREA INTENT STATEMENT This Character Area will proudly announce arrival at Rhodes East from the south and guide people to the Station, McIlwaine Park and to the foreshore. The built form will reflect its location adjacent to the Station with increased density and encourage the use of public transport as opposed to the private vehicle.

STATION TO MCILWAINE PARK LAND BRIDGE

The proposed heights will allow views over McIlwaine Park and Parramatta River. The built form will provide an active, mixed used podium and street level frontage with formal landscaping that complements the character of McIlwaine Park. There will be street level activation and a safe, pedestrian friendly environment will be prioritised to promote connectivity between the Station, across Concord Road, into McIlwaine Park and link to Parramatta River. MIXED USE VERTICAL SCHOOL URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 52


RHODES EAST GATEWAY RETAIL WILL BE LOCATED AT THE CONVERGENCE OF MULTIPLE PUBLIC AND ACTIVE TRANSPORT ROUTES PROVIDING HIGH LEVELS OF ACCESSIBILITY WITHOUT CAR RELIANCE. ROBERTS DAY | 53


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

RHODES EAST GATEWAY BUILT FORM CHARACTER The maximum height of 38 storeys will contribute to the built form ‘gateway’ identity. The height capitalises on proximity to the Station and McIllwaine Park. It is below the 38 storey Rhodes West tower on the opposite side of the Station, which is the height equivalent of 40 storeys. Site specific FSRs between 3.3- 12.8:1 have been applied to ensure that a feasible outcome can be delivered whilst also being specific about the tower locations. The FSR supports the high-low model, creating opportunities for amenity, roof access and diversity. There is no maximum lot size or frontage applied to the Gateway Character Area in order to encourage the amalgamation of lots and encourage the delivery of convenience retail near the Station.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 54

RHODES EAST GATEWAY WILL PROUDLY ANNOUNCE ARRIVAL AT RHODES EAST FROM THE SOUTH AND GUIDE PEOPLE TO THE STATION, MCILWAINE PARK AND TO THE FORESHORE.


38 STOREYS 30 STOREYS 25 STOREYS

Rho

des

sta tion

15 STOREYS

MAXIMUM HEIGHT BUILDING ENVELOPE FSR - 12.8:1 FSR - 7.8:1

MIXED USE FSR - 3.3:1

Rho

des

FLOOR SPACE RATIO

Rho

des

sta tion

sta tion

BUILDING TYPES AND TERRACE FRONTAGE ROBERTS DAY | 55


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT

LEEDS STREET ‘SHARED STREET’ CHARACTER WATERFRONT PROMENADE AND WATER STAIRS

CHARACTER AREA INTENT STATEMENT This Character Area will provide a multi-modal, water-based destination. The Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct will introduce meaningful visual and physical connections to the water in addition to a vibrant mix of uses. The lifestyle and activities promoted within this Character Area will prioritise pedestrians and facilitate human interaction. Buildings will be flexible and multi-purpose and, whilst they may have larger floor plates, they will also have provide a fine grain frontage to public areas. The built form will respond to the northern aspect of the Character Area through the sensitive allocation of height combined with block permeability and building separation ensuring pedestrian level views of Parramatta River from the centre of Rhodes East. RIVER DESTINATION URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 56


CAVELL AVE IS EXTENDED TO THE WATER WITH A PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION LINKING THE STATION TO THE EXPERIENCE- BASED FORESHORE DESTINATION AND PLAZA, WATERFRONT PROMENADE AND NEW FERRY STOP

ROBERTS DAY | 57


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT BUILT FORM CHARACTER The waterfront parcels north of Leeds Street generally have a maximum height of 15 storeys with a landmark building of 25 storeys permitted. The heights provide north facing buildings fronting a public foreshore. In order to maximise view sharing across the precinct, pedestrian paths with no development potential have been identified along key pedestrian desire lines including Cavell Avenue. The height is limited to 9 storeys south of Leeds Street to provide a sensitive transition to the High Point Character Area. An FSR of 2.7:1, 2.2:1 and 1.5:1 will ensure a feasible outcome can be delivered whilst supporting a high-low model for the precinct. There is no maximum lot size or frontage within the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct Character Area as the existing industrial lots are already large and amalgamation is encouraged to deliver a mixed use experience precinct supported by a range of residential building types.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 58

THE LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT WILL INTRODUCE MEANINGFUL VISUAL AND PHYSICAL CONNECTIONS TO THE WATER IN ADDITION TO A VIBRANT MIX OF USES.


25 STOREYS

15 STOREYS

9 STOREYS

15 STOREYS

MAXIMUM HEIGHT BUILDING ENVELOPE

TERRACE DESTINATION RETAIL

FSR - 2.7:1

FSR - 1.5:1

Fer ry

FLOOR SPACE RATIO

FSR - 2.2:1

term

Fer ry

ina

l

term

ina

l

BUILDING TYPES AND TERRACE FRONTAGE ROBERTS DAY | 59


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

THE HIGH POINT

THE NATURE OF THE PUBLIC DOMAIN WILL ENCOURAGE WALKING AND CYCLING

CHARACTER AREA INTENT STATEMENT The High Point will largely consist of residential and community uses in the form of apartments and strata titled terraces that will deliver a diversity of heights and human scale built form creating a balance between increased housing, public/ private amenity and an active and safe pedestrian environment. Future development will facilitate enhanced connectivity between the east and west of the Peninsula, to public transport and will create localised ‘place’ features along key desire lines and view axis. BLAXLAND ROAD WILL BE AN ATTRACTIVE MULTI-MODAL COMMUTER STREET

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 60


VIEWS TO THE WATER ARE OPENED UP ALONG CAVELL AVENUETHE COMMUNITY SPINE, SUPPORTED BY PARKETS AND TERRACE FRONTAGES ROBERTS DAY | 61


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

THE HIGH POINT BUILT FORM CHARACTER In order to establish a fine grain, human scale pedestrian environment a 4,000 sqm maximum lot size and 60m maximum frontage have been applied to the High Point Character Area. This generally results in 4 or more lots per block. The High Point has a maximum height of 10 storeys before bonuses which provides an appropriate transition to the balance of Rhodes East and across the railway line to Rhodes West. An FSR of 1.5:1 results in a typical perimeter block height of 2 - 6 storeys with the ability to locate an 10 storey element in the southwest corner reducing overshadowing impacts. Certain areas of the Character Area are eligible for height and FSR bonuses to encourage timely delivery of new street connections.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 62

THE HIGH POINT WILL LARGELY CONSIST OF RESIDENTIAL AND COMMUNITY USES IN THE FORM OF APARTMENTS AND STRATA TITLED TERRACES THAT WILL DELIVER A DIVERSITY OF HEIGHTS AND A HUMAN SCALED BUILT FORM.


10 STOREYS

MAX FRONTAGE 60M

44

m

MAX LOT SIZE 4,000SQM

44. 3m

38.

4m

m 56.8

MAXIMUM LOT SIZE & FRONTAGE

MAXIMUM HEIGHT BUILDING ENVELOPE

TERRACE

FSR - 1.5:1

FLOOR SPACE RATIO

BUILDING TYPES AND TERRACE FRONTAGE ROBERTS DAY | 63


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR

BUILT FORM AND FRONTAGE CONTROLS WILL FACILITATE GROUND FLOOR MIXED USE IN THE FUTURE

CHARACTER AREA INTENT STATEMENT The Concord Road Character Area will build on its primary role as a transit-focused corridor. Increased walking, cycling and bus patronage will be promoted through combined public domain and built form frontage strategies. Landscaping along Concord Road will provide shade and pedestrian amenity whilst also screening residential development from the busy road. A combination of retail, residential and adaptable building frontages will activate and future-proof this Character Area.

FUTURE TRANSIT BOULEVARD URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 64

‘GREENWAY’SETBACK


IMPROVED CONNECTIONS ACROSS CONCORD ROAD WILL ENSURE THAT ALL RESIDENTS HAVE EQUITABLE ACCESS TO FUTURE AMENITY AND SERVICES.

ROBERTS DAY | 65


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR BUILT FORM CHARACTER A 4,000 sqm maximum lot size is applied to the Concord Road Corridor Character Area. The maximum frontage is 50m encouraging a fine grain rhythm along Concord Road whilst allowing amalgamation to occur to the east and west. The Concord Road Corridor has a maximum height of 9 storeys to provide flexibility in development types and configurations. An FSR of 1.18:1 facilitates commercial feasibility and also promotes a range of building types with adaptive ground floors along Concord Road with a upper limit height of 9 storeys. There is one location within the Character Area that is eligible for a height and FSR bonus to encourage timely delivery of a new street connection.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 66

INCREASED WALKING, CYCLING AND BUS PATRONAGE WILL BE PROMOTED ALONG CONCORD ROAD THROUGH COMBINED PUBLIC DOMAIN AND BUILT FORM FRONTAGE STRATEGIES.


MAX LOT SIZE 4,000SQM

m .3 40

6 STOREYS

MAX FRONTAGE 50M

45. 8m

45.7 m

Rd

d cor

d cor

n Co

n Co

9 STOREYS

Rd

46 m 39 m

MAX LOT SIZE & FRONTAGE

MAXIMUM HEIGHT BUILDING ENVELOPE

TERRACE

FSR - 1.18:1

Rd ord nc Co

Rd ord nc Co

FLOOR SPACE RATIO

BUILDING TYPES AND TERRACE FRONTAGE ROBERTS DAY | 67


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES AFFORDABLE HOUSING The NSW Government is committed to delivering Affordable Housing and it is a key objective of the redevelopment of Rhodes East. Affordable Housing is “Housing that leaves sufficient family household income to meet other household needs. This has become understood to mean housing that costs no more than 30% of a family’s gross income in rent or 35% in mortgage repayments. This is especially the case for those in the lowest 40% of Australian’s ranked by income” (Affordable Housing Policy, City of Canada Bay, August 2007 (revised April 2016)). Eligibility for Affordable Housing will be determined in line with the criteria set out in City of Canada Bay’s Affordable Housing Policy. This includes an assessment of income with priority given to applicants working in the City of Canada Bay LGA and who are permanently employed in health services, childcare, public primary and secondary education, emergency services, public transport, City of Canada Bay, retail, laboring, manufacturing and hospitality. A series of building typologies for each Character Area were developed to determine the scale of development required to provide a commercially acceptable return whilst contributing to Affordable Housing. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 68

The economic modeling concluded that a 5% Affordable Housing Contribution from residential redevelopment was viable across the entire precinct. Affordable Housing will be achieved through: • A mandatory 5% Affordable Housing contribution implemented through SIC contributions and amendments to the LEP • A flexible approach to the contributions • Dwellings and land to be contributed at zero cost to the Council • The appointment of a single registered Community Housing Provider • A suitable proportion of low to very low income households to be eligible for the affordable housing


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Conc ord R

d

Llewel

McIlwaine Park

FIGURE 9 AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Rhodes Station

Brays Bay

5% Affordable Housing contribution required

Rhodes West

Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 69


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES VIEW SHARING Key views have been identified from across, and within, Rhodes East as part of the Place Audit. These have been taken into account as part of the development of the Urban Design Plan. Overall, the Urban Design Plan has been designed to: • Celebrate the existing view axis to Mcllwaine Park and the Parramatta River • Create a northern water/foreshore view through a pedestrian extension of Cavell Avenue and new pedestrian connection leading to the proposed Ferry Wharf • Create strategic breaks in the redevelopment east of Concord Road to provide visual and physical connections to the water • Facilitate variable heights across the Urban Design Plan to achieve “value in depth” across the site by maximizing views to Parramatta River • Establish height limits within the identified view sheds that will ensure views from The High Point Character Area are preserved

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 70

• Respectfully consider the Rhodes West view impacts. Whilst the urban redevelopment of Rhodes East will change the built form landscape, a sensitive design response will facilitate view sharing through combined bulk, scale, height and view controls, in particular: • Fine-grain: smaller building footprints enable view corridors between upper levels to be maintained whilst also reducing overshadowing • Human scale: diverse building forms that provide medium density lifestyle choice in non-tower forms • Maximum heights have been determined as a base case to ensure view optimisation as far as is practical.

South of Averill Street has been identified as a View Setback. This setback opens views towards the proposed Ferry Wharf. This setback can be achieved a number of ways including: • Build-to-line setbacks • Ground level setbacks with cantilevering • Upper level Setbacks


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc ord R

d

FIGURE 10 VIEW SHARING

McIlwaine Park

Rhodes West Retained Public Views

Rhodes Station

Viewpoints Brays Bay

Proposed View Shed

Rhodes West

Visual Axis Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 71


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES HEIGHTS The height and FSR controls have been derived from rigorous commercial testing of a series of “base case” typologies to inform an understanding of the minimum scale of development required to provide commercially acceptable returns whilst contributing to the agreed suite of infrastructure necessary to support the new Rhodes East community. A key objective of the redevelopment of Rhodes East is to create a sustainable outcome that minimizes the impact on the road and rail network whilst still providing sufficient incentive for developers. The Height Plan proposes maximum heights based on the feasibility testing, Character Area intent and view sharing strategy. The “High Low Model” has been promoted as a mechanism to deliver high quality urban outcomes. This concept seeks to achieve a high quality, pedestrian friendly public realm and efficient housing solutions through a transformational approach that blends design principles from pre-war and current development models. FSR controls will ensure that, whilst the maximum heights cannot be achieved across an entire block , there is an opportunity to deliver strategically located taller elements in locations that will not overshadow adjoining development. URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 72

BONUSES It is proposed to incentivise developers, through height and FSR bonuses, to deliver the three new local streets within the Precinct. “Exception to Height of Buildings” and “Exception to FSR” clauses will be inserted in the LEP that clearly links the additional height and FSR to the delivery of above infrastructure. In addition, the LEP will clearly identify the maximum height and FSR increase that can be achieved through infrastructure delivery and where these bonuses can be achieved. Development that occurs under the above clauses will be required to demonstrate design excellence as outlined in the LEP. The Indicative Height Plan should be read in conjunction with the Control Plan that provides further guidance in relation to the locations where the landmark buildings may be located. The LEP Heights Map will also include these locations where the taller elements can be located.


Parramatta River

N

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River FIGURE 11 HEIGHTS EXCLUDING BONUS

Nina Gray Av

e

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Denham St

Bri

6 Storeys

dge

Cropley St

8 Storeys 9 Storeys

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc

ord R

d

11 Storeys 15 Storeys

McIlwaine Park

25 Storeys 30 storeys

Rhodes Station

38 Storeys Height FSR Bonus Eligibility (in additional to the above heights)

Brays Bay Rhodes West

View Shed Public Open Space River Activation

Rhodes Corporate Park 0

250

Ferry Wharf (proposed) Land to be Rezoned

500m

ROBERTS DAY | 73

Concord Hospital


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES MAXIMUM LOT SIZES AND FRONTAGES Maximum lot sizes and frontages have been established in accordance with the intent of the specific Character Areas to create a fine grain, activated and visually interesting built form and streetscape outcome. These controls will be included in the LEP and DCP and together will minimise the visual impact of new development on neighbouring properties and the public domain by limiting the bulk and scale of development. In addition, a diversity of lot sizes will attract a broader range of potential developers and therefore development outcomes. This reinforces the existing urban structure and character of Rhodes East and ensures choice across the Rhodes Peninsula. Maximum lot sizes and frontages have been prescribed for two of the four Character Areas. Rhodes East Gateway and the Leeds Street

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 74

Foreshore Precinct have been excluded in order to encourage urban development of a density that will achieve a commercially feasible outcome whilst contributing to the agreed suite of public benefits in these locations. As the Leeds Street Foreshore Character Area extends south of Leeds Street, a maximum frontage has been applied to recognize that the nature of development will be different to that on the northern waterfront and will be more consistent with The High Point Character Area.

MAX LOT AREA

MAX LOT FRONTAGE

RHODES EAST GATEWAY

NA

NA

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE

NA

NA

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR

4,000sqm

50m

THE HIGH POINT

4,000sqm

60m


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc

ord R

d

FIGURE 12 MAXIMUM LOT AREA & FRONTAGE

McIlwaine Park

High Point-Maximum Lot Area and Frontage

Rhodes Station

Concord Road- Maximum Lot Area and Frontage

Brays Bay Rhodes West

25m Minimum Lot Frontage Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Structure Plan Boundary ROBERTS DAY | 75


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES SETBACKS Rhodes East is an infill site with fragmented land ownership and therefore redevelopment is likely to occur gradually and incrementally. Consistent built form setbacks combined with street and public realm improvements will create an attractive and comfortable public realm, encouraging walking and promoting community pride.

The proposed front setbacks are designed to facilitate a sensitive transition from existing homes to future redevelopment based on the future identity of the Character Area. Site- specific design controls for heritage items, including appropriate setback controls, are outlined in the Heritage Design Strategy section of this report.

A range of front setbacks are proposed that are generally consistent with the existing setbacks, whilst also considering the future land use, These setbacks have been applied to the tested building typologies function and intended character. and will be included in the Rhodes East DCP.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 76


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

STREET Blaxland Road

RHODES EAST GATEWAY

EXISTING 0 - 1 .5m

PROPOSED

Walker St

CHARACTER AREA

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River

0-2m Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

Leeds Street

7m

1-2mBen

Blaxland Road

5m

1-2m

CONCORD ROAD CORRIDOR

Concord Road

THE HIGH POINT

Averill Street

5 - 6m

2-4m

Denham Street

5m

1m

New Street

-

1m

Blaxland Road

5m

2-4m

Cavell Avenue

5 - 7m

0.6-1m

Varies

nel ong

FIGURE 13 GROUND SETBACKS

Blaxland Rd

LEEDS STREET FORESHORE PRECINCT

Bri

dge

Cropley St

6m Street Greening

0.6-1 metres

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

N/S CONNECTION

Conc

ord R

d

1 metres 1-2 metres

McIlwaine Park

1-3 metres

Rhodes Station

2-4 metres Brays Bay

6 metres

Rhodes West

Pedestrian Link Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 77


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES HERITAGE LISTED HERITAGE ITEMS

As a result of the recommendations set out in the Heritage Assessment, the following design controls have been developed for each of the heritage items at Rhodes East.

DESIGN CONTROLS

INDIVIDUAL HOUSES 59 Blaxland Road 35 Cavell Avenue

*Future use to remain as residential or a use complimentary to the adjoining uses *Existing front lawn presentation to re-tained and/or upgraded *Future buildings are to have a 2 metre setback from the common boundary and limited to 2 storeys. An additional setback of 4 metres is re-quired for medium rise (5 - 8 storeys) or 6 metres for high rise building volumes (above 8 storeys) * Front setbacks for new developments are to be consistent with existing front set-backs. Potential to explore the redevelopment of land at the rear to provide opportunity for new low scale building.

INDIVIDUAL HOUSES NEAR EXISTING OR FUTURE ROADS 59 Blaxland Road 4A, 14, and 35 Cavell Avenue

Any development between the heritage item and existing or proposed streets, is to be consistent with these guidelines. Medium (5 - 8 storeys) to high rise (above 8 storeys) development, located to the rear, is to provide a suitable transition to the retained heritage item.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 78

63 Blaxland Road

Existing face brick to be retained and incorporated into any new development at the rear, or on adjoining sites. New development at the rear can abut the existing brick building, with the first saw tooth roofed portion retained at the same height as the brick building. Adjoining sites can be redeveloped with zero lot side setbacks but front setbacks are to be consistent with existing development.

The large trees located to the north of the site are to be retained. Consideration to future uses that complement the historic educational or community use The historic core of the old school building to be conserved and incorporated into the future developments on the site

PARKS & RESERVES King George Park Uhrs Point Reserve

Indigenous planting to be retained and protected. New landscaping is to reflect the established planting rhythm and tree species

STREET TREES Cavell Avenue

The heritage street trees are to be retained and protected. New landscaping to reflect the established planting rhythm and tree species

REMNANT TREES 4A Cavell Avenue

Existing trees to be retained and incorporated into residential development on the northern portion of the site.

NON HERITAGE LISTED ITEMS Coptic Church

WAREHOUSE 14 Cavell Avenue

DESIGN CONTROLS

FORMER SCHOOL BUILDING

INDIVIDUAL HOUSES ON CORNER LOTS 4A and 14 Cavell Avenue

LISTED HERITAGE ITEMS

The Coptic Church has a strong historical association with the community and is to be retained in situ.


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Conc ord R

d

Llewel

McIlwaine Park Rhodes Station

FIGURE 14 HERITAGE

Brays Bay Rhodes West

Heritage Item

Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 79


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS The principles of the Movement and Place Framework (TfNSW) have informed the Context Sensitive Streets Strategy. The primary aim of the Context Sensitive Streets Strategy is to integrate transport, urban design, landscape and place making to realise positive improvements to the public domain and to help facilitate a modal shift that will reduce private car reliance and use.

for all users, prioritizing pedestrians, cyclists, public transport and then vehicle infrastructure/investment in order to support a vibrant civic life. Movement is linked to land uses, desire lines and Character Area intent.

In order to achieve a fine grain outcome and a diverse built form consistent with the intent of the Character Areas, the Context Sensitive Streets Strategy proposes additional street types than The Rhodes East Context Sensitive Streets Strategy will create a street those within the Movement and Place Network. network where the key linkages will provide safe and efficient access CHARACTER AREA Concord Road Corridor

MOVEMENT & PLACE STREET TYPE Movement Corridors

Rhodes East Gateway

Places for People

Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct Places for People

The High Point

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 80

Local Streets

MOVEMENT & PLACE FUNCTION Main roads provide safe, reliable and efficient movement between regions and strategic centres. High demand for activities on or adjacent to the street and low-er levels of vehicle movement create places

The proposed street types generally reflect the intent, and support the land use, density and street function of the different Character Areas. However, the character of the north – south streets remains consistent across different Character Areas to ensure legibility and provide clear connections to the Station and the Parramatta River. The character of the Rhodes East Streets will be further reinforced through the facades of the buildings.

RHODES EAST STREET TYPE Greenway Boulevard

DESCRIPTION

Commuter Street

An important link between the Leeds Street Fore-shore Precinct and Rhodes East Gateway with a dedicated cycleway connecting commuters and residents to these two key destinations. New tree planting between parking bays will provide screening of the rail infrastructure and shade for pedestrians. A street designed to accommodate the higher traffic volumes with a public domain consistent with a shared street character where pedestrians have priority reflective of the intent to create an activated mixed use destination at the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct. Fine grain diverse streets that offer pedestrian amenity with landscaping that provides seasonal variation.

Destination Street

The streets that facilitate local Local Street access to communities

An arterial road with generous setbacks to allow for mature landscaping and wide footpaths creating a buffer between Concord Road and the adjacent development.


N

Parramatta River

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

FIGURE 15 CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River

Greenway Corridor

Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Commuter Street

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Destination Street

Cropley St

Community Spine lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc ord R

d

Local Street Pedestrian Link

McIlwaine Park

Foreshore Pedestrian Path Rhodes Station

Pedestrian Bridge Potential Pedestrian Railway Overpass Location

Brays Bay Rhodes West

Land Bridge Site Public Open Space

Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 81


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES TRANSPORT IMPROVEMENTS NEW STREETS New streets are proposed to improve connectivity and promote pedestrian activity across the precinct. Their addition also assists with encouraging a finer grain of development as smaller, more compact blocks are created to provide a human scaled environment that has the ability to accommodate a range of housing types and sizes. The three new streets shown on Figure X provide east to west connections between Cavell Street and Blaxland Road. It is proposed that these streets will be delivered as a bonus incentive to developers via new clauses in the Local Environmental Plan (LEP). These clauses will link the additional height and FSR to the delivery of the new streets and will clearly identify the maximum height and FSR increase that can be achieved.

PUBLIC AND ACTIVE TRANSPORT Aside from creating a local street network that is designed for people, a key transport objective of prioritising public and active transport is adopted as part of the draft Precinct Plan.

• Mass transit introduction by providing a new station and service at Rhodes or by allowing existing passengers to interchange and connect through to the Sydney or Parramatta and therefore alleviating congestion on the Northern Line.

Train

These options will require further investigation by TfNSW and will require significant government funding and approvals.

As identified in the Traffic and Transport Assessment, the existing rail network is already congested and approaching capacity at Rhodes Station during peak hours. With the additional demand anticipated from the additional population proposed at Rhodes East the Traffic and Transport Assessment identified that a further 1.1 southbound rail services are required in the one-hour morning peak. To provide these additional services, several options could be adopted: • Timetable adjustments to allow for additional services to stop at Rhodes or diversion onto Metro lines (such as at Epping) thereby increasing capacity further along the Northern Line at Rhodes; • Quadruplication of the Northern Line through Rhodes and north over the Parramatta River rail bridge, allowing more services to stop at Rhodes Station; and

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 82

Bus Opportunities for better bus services, improvements and upgrades within the local area and along Concord Road to address future growth challenges to meet customer demand in the long term have been identified, namely: • Increased frequency and span of hours of services using the Bennelong Bridge to connect to Wentworth Point and Sydney Olympic Park; • Improving frequency and span of hours of the M41 along Concord Road, consistent with Sydney’s Bus Future (TfNSW, 2013) to provide stronger connections to Ryde and Macquarie Park;


• Consider local bus network redesign opportunities to improve wayfinding and quality of services for customers; • Improved bus stop facilities and walking access to stops on Concord Road and linking to Rhodes Station; • Improving interchange facilities at Rhodes Station including high quality shelters and seating for waiting customers. These options will require further investigation by TfNSW including engineering design and will require significant government funding and approvals. New Ferry Wharf The new ferry wharf is proposed within the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct and will provide ferry users with access to the broader Rhodes Peninsula and train station, Parramatta and Sydney CBD. NSW Government have committed to the delivery of the Ferry Wharf as part of the Transport Access Program and this is anticipated to be delivered within the next 3-5 years. RMS and TfNSW will explore several options before finalising the location of a new Ferry Wharf. The location included within the draft Precinct Plan is tentative and will be finalised after adequate

engagement with the local community. The precinct planning process provides an opportunity to integrate the wharf into the overall plans for Rhodes East, removing any navigation issues raised.

As part of the consultation on the draft Precinct Plan, input from the local community is sought to determine the final location of a pedestrian bridge.

Station to McIlwaine Park Landbridge

Parking

As part of Rhodes East Gateway, a new land bridge is proposed which will provide a safe and convenient pedestrian connection between the station (and Rhodes West), the new community, and retail hub, and McIlwaine Park (including the river pool), crossing both Blaxland Road and Concord Road.

To assist in minimising the amount of vehicular traffic generated as a result of the development and to encourage the use of alternative types of transport, maximum off-street car parking rates are proposed at Rhodes East.

Pedestrian Rail Bridge A new pedestrian rail bridge is proposed linking Rhodes East to Rhodes West and, combined with the proposed land bridge within the Rhodes East Gateway, will increase connectivity within the peninsula whilst providing safe pedestrian access over major transport routes.

These rates are based on the proximity of the development to the train station and are supplemented by car share car parking provision and increased minimum bicycle parking rates.

Two potential locations for the new pedestrian rail bridges include: • Between Gauthorpe Street on the west and Blaxland Road / Llewelyn Street junction on the east; or • Between Nina Gray Avenue on the west and Blaxland Road / new street junction on the east. ROBERTS DAY | 83


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES TRANSPORT IMPROVEMENTS Maximum Car Parking Rates LAND USE Residential Visitor Commercial Retail Cafes & Restaurants Industrial

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 84

Minimum Bicycle Parking Rates WITHIN 400M OF STATION 0 space per dwelling 0 space per dwelling 1 space per 150m2 GFA 1 space per 100m2 GFA 1 space for every 150m² GFA or 1 space for every 6 seats (whichever is the lesser) 1 space per 150m2 GFA

OUTSIDE 400M OF STATION 0.5 space per dwelling 0.1 space per dwelling 1 space per 100m2 GFA 1 space per 70m2 GFA 1 space for every 100m² GFA or 1 space for every 4 seats (whichever is the lesser) 1 space per 120m2 GFA

LAND USE Residential Commercial Retail Industrial

RESIDENTIAL/STAFF 2 per dwelling 2 per 150m2 GFA 2 per 250m2 GFA 2 per 10 employees

VISITOR 2 per 10 dwellings 2 per 400m2 GFA 4+2 per 100m2 GFA 4+2 per 100m2 GFA

In addition, maximum car share rates (maximum 1 per 20 dwellings and 1 per 40 dwellings within and outside 400m of the station respectively) and minimum electric vehicle charging stations (1 per 20 dwellings / 1 per 40 dwellings within and outside of 400m of the station respectively) are proposed.


ROAD AND INTERSECTIONS UPGRADES Proposed improvements at key intersections have been identified within the Traffic and Transport Assessment to support the draft Precinct Plan, including: • Concord Road / Averill Street – extension of the southbound right hand turn bay, widening of Averill Street, additional left-turn lane on Averill Street and a new pedestrian bridge; • Cavell Avenue / Averill Street – new single lane roundabout; and • Cavell Avenue / Leeds Street – minor widening to the intersection. These upgrades will be implemented in line with development.

Continued growth in travel in and around Rhodes is anticipated regardless of the Rhodes East development. Therefore, In the wider area, the following intersections have been identified as requiring upgrading and improving: • Devlin Street / Victoria Road • Church Street / Morrison Road • Church Street / Junction Road • Concord Road / Homebush Bay Drive • Homebush Bay Drive / Rider Boulevard Further investigation by RMS into the detailed design and funding will be required regarding the above potential intersection upgrades.

ROBERTS DAY | 85


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS GREENWAY BOULEVARD (CONCORD ROAD) The Concord Road Corridor Character Area is defined by a major arterial road that bisects Rhodes East. The six-lane carriageway (21m wide) is a significant barrier to public domain connectivity, and minimal existing setbacks prevent the establishment of a landscape buffer appropriate to the scale of the roadway. The design of a Greenway Boulevard provides an adequate setback for large trees, meaningful understorey planting and wide pathways to be established; creating an important buffer of noise and air pollution for new development along Concord Road. The generous planting buffer between the shared path and vehicular traffic improves amenity and safety for active transport (walking/ cycling), and supports healthy growth of the existing large trees. Bus stop plazas at through-site links and key building entries create connection with Concord Road, and future transformation of the corridor, such as the creation of rapid bus lanes or light rail, can still be realised. Existing lighting to the road is to be retained in its current alignment.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 86


CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS COMMUTER STREET (BLAXLAND ROAD) Already functioning as an important north-south commuter street, Blaxland Road will become an important conduit between the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct and Rhodes East Gateway. The existing shared pedestrian / cycle path provision has ‘pinch points’, and is currently not sufficient to support active transport for the new development density. A dedicated cycleway will efficiently connect commuters and local residents to the two retail hubs of Rhodes East, and beyond to regional cycleway connections. New tree planting between parking bays provides screening of the rail infrastructure and shade for the footpaths/parking. In the Rhodes East Gateway (south of Llewellyn Street), the Blaxland Road paths will be increased to become the full width of the streetscape verge, with trees in grated tree pits to support active frontages.

ROBERTS DAY | 87


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS DESTINATION STREET (LEEDS STREET) The vision for the Leeds Street Foreshore as a highly activated mixed use destination requires an appropriate response in the streetscape design. The proposed flush transition between the roadway and pedestrian paths combines with the landscaping and built form interface to demonstrate pedestrian priority over the motorist. However, the street configuration ensures that traffic capacity is not negatively impacted where volumes are higher and movements more frequent. New planting in the roadway provides a buffer to new street furniture, improves amenity to new cafe breakout spaces, and incorporates Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) in the form of rain gardens.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 88


CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS COMMUNITY SPINE (CAVELL AVENUE) Cavell Avenue will become the lifeblood of the Rhodes East community; linking local streets of The High Point Character Area along the northsouth axis to key community infrastructure such as the Coptic Church. The public domain and fine grain built form frontage to Cavell Avenue creates a low design speed environment where pedestrians feel safe within a kind of linear green space. The environment is designed to naturally calm traffic without impacting traffic function and/ or flow. Proposed seating coves will support habitation of the streets and create visual thresholds at key community interfaces.

ROBERTS DAY | 89


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES CONTEXT SENSITIVE STREETS LOCAL STREET (MINOR ROADS) The design intent for the local streets is to create fine-grain, diverse streets that offer pedestrian amenity and exhibit seasonal variation. Rain gardens located between parking bays provide shade to the roadway and parking lanes. Proposed diversity in the tree canopy adds to the fine grain, whilst contributing variation in light and shade. The proposed ‘edible streetscapes’ will provide a mix of hardy, lowmaintenance perennials that have a culinary use, with enhancement of the diversity to take place over time.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 90


ROBERTS DAY | 91


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES PRIMARY AND SECONDARY STREETS A further mechanism to control the built form to ensure a quality public domain that supports and encourages pedestrian movement is the designation of Primary and Secondary Streets. A Primary Street presents as a principal pedestrian access road and the principal address for the residential development, whereas a Secondary Street provides vehicular access points. The Urban Design Plan aims to provide a finer grain, activated street edge and development that not only addresses the street, but is of an appropriate scale to the higher density residential on the balance of the site.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 92

In order to achieve this objective, in the R3 - Medium Density Residential and R4 - High Density Residential Zones the LEP requires Multi Dwelling Housing (terraces) on: • at least 85% of any Primary Street frontage of a development site; and • at least 60% of any Secondary Street frontage of a development site. Buildings north of Leeds Street and within the Rhodes East Gateway Character Area are exempt from this control in order to enable large floorplate non- residential uses.


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Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Conc

ord R

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Llewel

McIlwaine Park

FIGURE 16 PRIMARY & SECONDARY STREETS

Rhodes Station

Brays Bay

Primary Streets

Rhodes West

Secondary Streets Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 93


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DELIVERY STRATEGIES VIBRANT, FRIENDLY AND MIXED FACADES VIBRANT FACADES • Small units with many doors (approximately 15-20 doors per 100m) • Uses can be highly varied and include shops, cafes, bars, fruit/vegetable markets and community centres along primary desire lines • Visual richness in façade details to engage the pedestrian • Primarily vertical façade articulation • Ins and outs (horizontal and vertical articulation of façades) • Vehicle access and servicing zones prohibited • Integrate signage with unit design

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 94

FRIENDLY FACADES • Relatively small units (approximately 10-14 doors per 100m) • Predominantly allocated for the purpose of activation and surveillance • A less varied and concentrated mix of uses than ‘active façades’ and including ground floor residential entries and lobbies • Few blind and passive units • Facade relief • Limited vehicle access and servicing via tight, recessed openings • Integrate signage with unit design

MIXED FACADES • Large and small units (approximately 6-10 per 100m) • Some blank walls and passive units embellished with façade art or greenery • Modest facade relief • Vehicle access and servicing permitted and mixed in with large footprint active uses such as workshops, design studios and exhibition space • Integrate signage with unit design


VIBRANT, FRIENDLY AND MIXED FAÇADES HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED FOR EACH BLOCK EDGE TO ENCOURAGE THE DESIRED PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTS AND FUNCTION OF EACH OF THE DEVELOPMENT PARCELS.

VIBRANT FAÇADES IN ROUSE HILL

VIBRANT FACADES IN PALERMO, ARGENTINA

FRIENDLY FACADE DESIGN INTENT

FRIENDLY FACADES IN VANCOUVER

MIXED FAÇADES IN REDFERN, SYDNEY

MIXED FACADES IN CAIXAFORUM, MADRID ROBERTS DAY | 95


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DELIVERY STRATEGIES MIXED USE CORNERS AND CORNER PLAZAS In addition to designated and concentrated areas of retail and community space, it is proposed to embed future flexibility and opportunities for growth into the Urban Design Plan through a “Mixed Use Corner and Corner Plaza Strategy�. Key ground floor corners along important desire lines have been identified as potential locations for a small cafe, wine bar, art gallery, bike workshop or office space. Five Mixed Use Corners and Corner Plazas have been strategically located to promote the following: ACTIVITY The convenience retail has been concentrated in one location within the Rhodes East Gateway with additional destination based retail at the northern foreshore within the Leeds Street Foreshore. Mixed use corners and/or corner plazas at key locations and collocated with small pockets of open space create intimate, localized spaces and gathering points for the community reflective of the Character Areas and will activate areas outside of the Leeds Street and Gateway Character Areas.

in order to continue walking. The mixed use corners and plazas will provide frequent points of interest in between the other Rhodes East destinations. APPRECIATION One of the mixed use corners is proposed to be collocated with a heritage cottage adjacent to McIlwaine park. LEGIBILITY The mixed use corners and corner plazas are also used as wayfinding mechanisms. They terminate vistas, guide pedestrians to street crossings and key destinations FUTURE-PROOFING High residential development values tend to reduce the likelihood of developers voluntarily providing non-residential floorspace. It is therefore important to set aside space for community and public life. Small, flexible spaces that permit mixed uses enable a community to grow organically as the place matures.

SURRY HILLS, SYDNEY

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT It is responsible and sustainable to ensure that creative start-ups WALKING AND CYCLING and small, local vendors have financially accessible opportunities People generally require visual and/ or physical stimulation every 200m in any new community and contribute to employment, even in a small way.

PALERMO, ITALY URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 96


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Wentworth Point e Ryd

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Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc ord R

d

FIGURE 17 MIXED USE CORNERS & CORNER PLAZAS

McIlwaine Park

Mixed Use Corner

Rhodes Station

Corner Plaza

Brays Bay

Public Open Space

Rhodes West

Pedestrian Links Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 97


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES CONTROL PLAN The Control Plan identifies the following key built form elements that will collectively contribution to the creation of the unique identity of each Character Area: • The open space network provides context and logic for a number of regulated elements • The three Mixed Use Corners will require special attention to the built form and the open space/ public realm • View sharing is critical to ensure value in depth is delivered through the Height Plan and View Setbacks • View Sharing is further enhanced through Landmark Heights which will capture water and CBD views as well as terminating key vistas and offsetting public benefit contributions. The maximum landmark height is 38 storeys URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 98

• Architectural, landscape or cultural features provide legibility and function as gateway elements • Blocks fronting key connections have been categorised into an Vibrant , Friendly or Mixed Facade based on the intended function and pedestrian priority


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Leeds St

Walker St

Cavell Ave

FIGURE 18 CONTROL PLAN

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Vibrant Facade

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

Friendly Facade

dge

Cropley St

Mixed Facade lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Landmark Heights

ord R

d

Llewel

Conc

Public Art/Landscape Feature McIlwaine Park

Mixed Use Corner

Rhodes Station

Corner Plaza Public Open Space Brays Bay

Pedestrian Link

Rhodes West

Land Bridge Location View Setback

Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 99


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES RESIDENTIAL PARKING RATES Some of the key issues considered to determine appropriate parking rates include: • Consistent with best practice, Rhodes East should adopt maximum parking rates • The parking rates should reflect proximity to the train station • It is critical that people working and visiting Rhodes are encouraged to use active transit as the existing road network is close to capacity. • Bicycle parking rates should be increased and specific requirements for end of trip facilities considered • Increasing the provision of car share scheme spaces to encourage and support lower levels of car ownership

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 100

Whilst the ultimate parking rates will be determined in collaboration with Council, TfNSW and Jacobs, the feasibility testing has used the following assumptions for residential development:

A key consideration in determining the ultimate development capacity will be the ability of the transport network to cater for the additional population. There are ongoing discussions with Transport for NSW to identify ways to increase the rail capacity and deliver the modal shift • East of Llewellyn Street max 1 space/ unit, to reflect the building required to efficiently cater for the transit needs of the new Rhodes typology and resident expectation East community. • 400 metres of the station Zero, to reflect the proximity Rhodes East Train Station • Balance of Rhodes East 0.5 spaces/unit • Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct Limited parking for retail development


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Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Cropley St

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

Conc ord R

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FIGURE 19 RESIDENTIAL PARKING RATES

McIlwaine Park

Max. 0.5 Spaces / unit

Rhodes Station

Zero Spaces / unit

Brays Bay

400m radius

Rhodes West

Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 101


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

FIGURE 20 SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE Recycled Water Main Potential Locations for Recycled Water Plant Public Open Space River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Parramatta River

Land to be Rezoned

DESIGN STRATEGIES

Wentworth Point e Ryd

dge

Bri

Walker St

SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE

Denham St

Cropley St

3. Resources: A priority focus area to support the guiding principle of reducing water and energy use

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Llewel

d

“Prioritise walking, cycling and the use of public transport ahead of private vehicles.”

2. Community: Provision of shared facilities close to living and working areas to prioritise walking and cycling over private Ben nel ong vehicles and enable opportunities such as growing food and Bri dge promoting active lifestyles on site.

The Sustainability Strategy has focused on the following 6 key areas:

4. Greenhouse Gas: A priority focus area that combines the benefits of reduced resource

1. Built and Natural Ecology: Implementing passive design to create healthy buildings that minimise reliance on artificial systems and creating habitats for both people, plants and animals.

5. Connections: A priority focus area to support the guiding principal of prioritising walking, cycling and use of public transport

ord R

and

Parramatta Nina Gray Ave

Conc

“A high level of sustainability is to be achieved and tested”

Averill St

Blaxland Rd

Two key sustainability objectives, agreed at the Vision Workshop, have informed the Urban Design Plan:

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

McIlwaine Park Rhodes Station

6. Resilience: Ensuring development is adaptable and protected from future change including climate, economic and work practices

Brays Bay

Rhodes West

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 102

Rhodes Corporate Park


PRIVATE WIRE NETWORK

PLAN: SUSTAINABLE UTILITIES INFRASTRUCTURE STUDY

rk will provide the site’s electricity demand and enable renewable onsite via an 800kW solar array to be provided to buildings

y serving both commercial and residential customers.

INFRASTRUCTURE STUDY dESand initial network components would need to be operational in ompletion of the first building. PRIVATE WIRE NETWORK n and sub-stations would be added as build-out progresses rate a private wire network are granted by the Australian Energy provided through an exemption to the requirement to be a regulated

system within the public domain and private be directed to a central Recycling Water Plant ack the end users e oftoReturn (IRR - percentage earned eachwater dollar invested All developments will be rate required to provideon recycled pipelines and for easements to participate in the private wire network. vested) Sustained operations 8%. ises an for additional purple pipe throughout the For more information on the private wire and recycled water networks, please refer to the Sustainability Assessment (December 2016), prepared by Flux.

odes lief: West.

bility benefits from the implementation of a private wire network network acts as an enabler for onsite generation which provides a pproximately 810 tonnes CO2, equivalent to approximately 5% of the nable Utilities Infrastructure within Sydney tprint (full buildout) shade structures.

RECYCLED WATER NETWORK

FIGURE V. SCHEMATIC OF PRIVATE WIRE NETWORK

• For the case of a on-site renewable energy production from a single 800 kW photovoltaic panel array as enhancement to private wire network:

Private Wire Financial Results

Value

Gross Profit Margin

66.6%

Full capital cost for reference Discounted applied for plant replacement requirements

$200,000 90%

Acquisition and Establishment Cost

$20,000

Annual Revenue (or savings)

$136,371

Recycled Water Main

res

s (LEP/DCP)

rdarray as new

Location Options for Recycled Water Plant (800m2)

Value

800 buildings were constructed

specific DCP

5100

Units kW m2

Annual expenses (including finance) THE RECYCLED WATER NETWORK FIGURE I. SCHEMATIC Project IRROF RECYCLED WATER NETWORK AND PLANT Equity IRR

$135,265 8% ROBERTS DAY | 103

12%


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DESIGN STRATEGIES PUBLIC ART STRATEGY Public art strategies strengthen communities, provide opportunities to celebrate local history and culture, foster community dialogue, create place identities and provide a framework to support partnerships between artists, communities and the landscape. The City of Canada Bay developed the Rhodes Peninsula Arts Plan 2013 in consultation with the community. The plan outlines public art principles, themes and opportunities within the Peninsula. Council will build on this plan to incorporate opportunities for Rhodes East, subject to funding availability. The themes in this plan include: • Industrial Heritage: To build on the former industrial landscape of Rhodes and represent the storyline between nature and impact if industries on both the river and the Peninsula

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 104

• Remediation: Highlights the extraordinary environmental remediation that Rhodes underwent in the first decade of the 21st Century • Indigenous to Intercultural: Resonates the Aboriginal heritage in this locality, with Parramatta River as a source of food and transport as well as spiritual significance • The River and the Environment: Emphasises the beauty of the waterway, and the foreshore being a natural focus for walking, cycling, family outings and community events • The Designed Environment: The emergence of a high density built form in Rhodes has created a community environment different from other suburbs of Canda Bay, including spaces for public sharing and private reflection, and the recognition of design as a cultural statement.

Permanant public art could be integrated into the landscape as part of the foreshore access, in resting areas, corner plazas, pedestrian links, existing parks and reserves, and may include sculptural art, lighting, typography, and/or graphic in paving and interactive art.


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Bri

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Leeds St

Averill St

Parramatta River Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

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Cropley St

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Gauthorpe St

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Llewel

McIlwaine Park

FIGURE 21 PUBLIC ART

Rhodes Station

Brays Bay

Potential Public Art Location

Rhodes West

Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

Ferry Wharf (Existing) 0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Land to be Rezoned ROBERTS DAY | 105


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

STAGING The draft Precinct Plan represents the long term vision for the redevelopment of Rhodes East. It envisages that development will be delivered over a 15-20 year period; the overall effects on the precinct will therefore not be evident immediately. Also, the existing land ownership within the precinct means that land amalgamation is required in order to deliver the draft Precinct Plan. Some locations, particularly around the station and in the north around Leeds Street, may be redeveloped in the short-term following any rezoning.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 106


ROBERTS DAY | 107


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DELIVERY LEP CONTROLS To enable development to take place in line with the endorsed vision and objectives, amendments are required to City of Canada Bay Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013. At this time, the amended controls are limited to the zoned area west of Concord Road. The proposed draft LEP amendments seek to achieve the following: • Rezoning to a predominant area of R4 – High Density Residential within the central spine of the Peninsula. The extended Leeds Street industrial area is to be rezoned to B4 - Mixed Use, along with the area immediately surrounding the Rhodes Railway Station. A 20m wide foreshore RE1 – Public Recreation zone will extend from Uhrs Point Reserve to the termination of Blaxland Road. • New building height controls Concord Road will have heights of 20m and there will be heights of 27m-30m in the central spine and towards Blaxland Road. Spot heights of 35m are proposed along Blaxland Road with up to 77m in the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct and 116m in the Rhodes East Gateway. • New FSR controls – Generally ranging from 1.18:1 to 9.5:1 are proposed to facilitate the new fine grain and low rise higher density environment in tandem with the new height controls. • Provision of new roadways will be provided via a new bonus height and FSR provision.

URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 108

• New Active Street Frontages Proposed in the Rhodes East Gateway along Blaxland Road and within the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct. • Controls to help define a finer grain and human scaled development outcome to promote a more pedestrian friendly and activated urban form and community. This includes a Mixed Use Corners Strategy throughout the area and flexible planning provisions to ensure adaptable ground level floor space along Concord Road is available should the market decide retail and commercial uses are preferred. • New foreshore access and linkages through rezoning and other appropriate measures. • The aim is to secure a continuous publicly accessible link from McIlwaine Park to Blaxland Road. • Establishment of new built form controls to achieve improved outcomes adjacent to or near built items. • Additional land uses in selected locations to assist with the provision of local services, and to bring a new richness, diversity, vibrancy and vitality within key parts of the Peninsula for the local and wider community. This includes seeking to provide for destinations at the foreshore within the Leeds Street Foreshore Precinct tied to new ferry infrastructure and a walking/cycling environment; more shops, food and drink premises, services and community facilities and social infrastructure in pockets of the Peninsula, as well as potential for a new public river pool off

McIlwaine Park. • A targeted provision of 5% Affordable Housing through new development to assist key workers and lower income earners to live within the Rhodes East area. • Upgrading of the sustainability credentials of development at Rhodes East to achieve new higher water and energy savings targets under the BASIX SEPP process.


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FIGURE 23 LEP CONTROLS Residential

Leeds St

Walker St

Cavell Ave

Mixed Use including potential primary school

Averill St

Parramatta River Destination Retail

(with residential above)

Nina Gray Ave

Denham St

nel ong

Pedestrian Link

Blaxland Rd

Ben

Bri

dge

Pedestrian Bridge

Cropley St

Potential Pedestrian Railway Overpass Location

lyn St

Gauthorpe St

Conc ord R

d

Llewel

Land Bridge Site McIlwaine Park

Adaptive Ground Floor Priority (with residential above)

Rhodes Station

Mixed Use Corner Corner Plaza

Rhodes West

Public Open Space Rhodes Corporate Park

River Activation Ferry Wharf (proposed)

0

250

500m

Concord Hospital

Draft Precinct Boundary ROBERTS DAY | 109


RHODES EAST PRIORITY INVESTIGATION AREA

DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT

This document was prepared for the exclusive use of Department of Planning and Environment (NSW) (DPE) and Canada Bay Council (CBC) . RobertsDay acts in all professional matters as a faithful advisor to its clients and exercises all reasonable skill and care in the provision of its professional services. The information presented herein has been compiled from a number of sources using a variety of methods. RobertsDay does not attempt to verify the accuracy, validity or comprehensiveness of any information supplied to RobertsDay by third parties. The development parameters (dwelling numbers, stages etc.) referred to in this report may vary over time. The figures contained herein are estimates; they represent a good approximation of likely development outcomes to a sufficient level of accuracy for the purposes of this report. RobertsDay makes no warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, validity or comprehensiveness of this document, or the misapplication or misinterpretation by third parties of its contents. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favouring by RobertsDay. This document cannot be copied or reproduced in whole or part for any purpose without the prior written consent of RobertsDay. Š RobertsDay Pty Ltd, 2016

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URBAN DESIGN REPORT | 110

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Rhodes East was nominated as a potential Priority Precinct by the City of Canada Bay Council in November 2014. The Priority Precincts progra...

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Rhodes East was nominated as a potential Priority Precinct by the City of Canada Bay Council in November 2014. The Priority Precincts progra...