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Metropolitan Innovators | YMS-30306 Course guide November 2018 6 ECTS


Colophon Copyright © 2018 by Wageningen University & Delft University of Technology. Responsible chair groups: Cultural Geography (WUR) & Urbanism (TUD). Text by Clemens van Driesssen, Roberto Rocco and Marijke Rommelse, layed out by Nono Leermakers Version: November, 2018

Course coordinators

“We make our cities and then our cities make us”

dr. ir. Clemens Driessen

dr. Roberto Rocco

Cultural Geography group (WUR)

Urbanism (TUD)

(free adaptation of a quote from Winston Churchill) Additional lecturers dr. Aksel Ersoy Urban Development Management

dr. Iulian Barba Lata

(TUD)

Land Use Planning group (WUR)

Student-assistants

2

3

Marijke Rommelse

Nono Leermakers

MSc MADE

MSc MADE


Table of contents Course Introduction and Motivation

6

1.1 Profile of the course 1.2 Motivation of the course 1.3 Overlapping themes 1.4 Assumed prerequisite knowledge 1.5 Learning outcomes

Course Description

10

2.1 Educational activities 2.2 Course materials and resources

Assessment

12

Course Schedule

14

Contact Details

28

References

30

Annex

32

Annex 1: Questions that could guide your essay writing Annex 2: Assessment criteria final essay

4

5


Course Introduction and Motivation 1.1 Profile of the course

This course enables Metropolitan Innovators to

Contemporary metropolitan regions face a variety

identify and evaluate these claims from three

of complex challenges that concern large numbers

main perspectives: socio-technical, ecosystems

of stakeholders with often competing claims

and spatial justice. The course thereby offers the

originating from different world views. One of the

theoretical and conceptual tools to analyse and

major challenges faced by advanced metropolitan

discuss metropolitan challenges and the possible

regions like the AMA (Amsterdam Metropolitan

implications of proposed solutions.

from path dependency lock-ins.

sociology of innovation. Combining these into

The management of systems transitions to

interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary ways of

sustainability has several dimensions: cultural,

working is required to deal with urban development

political, technical and aesthetic, to cite but a few.

and innovation effectively.

This is because we assume sustainability can

Area) is how to manage transitions towards sustainability, in face of the high costs to break free

1.2 Motivation of the course

When we are seeking to innovate to attain the desired technological and societal transition, a

only happen when its three crucial dimensions

For any actor working to contribute to advanced

(social, economic and environmental) happen

metropolitan solutions towards sustainability it

simultaneously (Larsen, 2012). Hence, this

becomes crucial to be able to translate metropolitan

transition cannot be addressed by planners,

challenges into researchable questions and to

engineers and designers alone, as they require

be able to understand, communicate and co-

engagement with a multiplicity of actors holding

operate with other actors in order to integrate their

different perspectives necessary to understand and

knowledge about issues at hand and to understand

tackle all the dimensions involved.

different (and often conflicting) objectives.

The various disciplines that contribute to AMS and

Awareness of the socio-economic context, as well

the MADE program bring particular approaches to

as the implicit and explicit values and cultural norms

innovations towards sustainability: from engineering

operating in a specific place are essential to achieve

to entrepreneurship, from urban design to human

suitable solutions.

geography, from environmental sciences to

This course enables students to use, contrast,

number of questions are raised that are theoretical but at the same time deeply practical: How do we

like a relatively new aim, but is something the

optimize environmental impacts when systems

Dutch government has been pursuing since its

are connected in unexpected ways? How do

first Environmental Action Plan (1989), which

we understand knowledge when a multitude of

focused on closing production and consumption

disciplines claim to offer relevant insights? How can

loops, preventing degradation and exhaustion of

we understand the ways technological solutions

resources and harmful emissions. The plan also

relate to political questions of distributive justice and democracy?

In orange the courses

in society (public, private, and civic), to meet

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environmental targets. The envisioned transition is

These questions become extremely urgent in

characterised by a systems change, which means

view of the approaches developed to promote

that whole chains of production, consumption and

innovation: using big data, developing smart cities,

behaviour must change over a long period of time,

where experimentation occurs in living labs and

thus involving a large number of stakeholders with

space emerges for entrepreneurial interventions.

multiple worldviews and competing claims over

How do innovation, knowledge, politics and ethics

those systems.

play a role in these processes?

Metropolitan Challenges

MSc MADE overview. with overlapping themes in the 1st and

Metropol. Innovators

Data 2

Selected Electives

Metropolitan Solutions

at WUR/TUD

Entrepreneurship 1

Data 1

Entrepreneurship 2

2nd year of MSc MADE.

Living Lab Second year

emphasized the responsibility of different groups

Figure 1, First year

This transition towards sustainability may seem

7

joining research teams of AMS Institute, doing a professional internship, or working towards an own company

Thesis building a theoretical framework, advancing analytical methods, and explicating conceptual approaches

Profess.


discuss and integrate those various approaches to

students to reflect and situate their actions within

1.4 Assumed prerequisite knowledge

dynamics, communication and collaboration

engage with metropolitan innovations and potential

ideas of democracy and participation, for instance.

Relevant bachelor in a (socio)-technical discipline

skills]

solutions in a meaningful way, starting from three

related to the built environment. Basic knowledge

main perspectives: socio-technical, ecosystems

ethical dimensions of their own assumptions and

and skills in design and research methods.

of particular interventions in relation to the

and spatial justice. These perspectives contain

frameworks, and encourage students to consider,

Notions of different scientific research paradigms

three frameworks presented, including what

different normative and theoretical dimensions

evaluate and discuss these ethical and moral

and associated methods. Students in this course

interests are at stake, what stakeholders

that trigger different questions for metropolitan

dimensions

are assumed to have followed the MADE course

are involved, what subjects are produced,

“Metropolitan Challenges”.

groups configured, experiences generated and

All three perspectives examine the

innovators. These different questions require the use of different methods of research. These

1.3 Overlapping themes

perspectives, their questions and methods will be

This course complements and supports the

1.5 Learning outcomes

story-telling, visioning, planning, sketching,

explored in the course.

Metropolitan Challenges Course, which is given in

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

communicating graphically and orally]

the first quarter of the programme, and provides

1. Describe different logics of enquiry and the

scripted behaviour promoted [Skills: mapping,

5. Identify and discuss strategies for transition

Socio technical: in this perspective, students

a theoretical basis for the Metropolitan Solutions

suitability of methods derived from them.

towards sustainability from an ecosystems

understand metropolitan innovation and transition

Course, given later. It introduces and discusses

Logics of enquiry pertaining to the natural

point of view, including the understanding of

towards sustainability from the point of view of

tools and theoretical frameworks for unravelling

sciences (including environmental sciences),

metropolitan systems in interaction with one

debates on the relations between technology

complex metropolitan challenges and presents

applied sciences (engineering), the social

another

and society, as well as competing ideas on the

approaches from different areas of knowledge

sciences and design activities [Skills: literature

role of science and knowledge for sociotechnical

dealing with metropolitan innovation challenges.

research, critical thinking, research design] 2. Describe and interpret a variety of knowledge

innovation.

8

4. Identify and critically discuss the implicit values

6. Explain spatial justice as a framework and its implications for the governance of metropolitan systems and the management

Ecosystems: in this perspective, students

These areas of knowledge are primarily design

claims in three main axes proposed (socio-

of these systems towards sustainability,

understand metropolitan innovation and transition

(broadly conceived), planning, engineering and

technical/ eco-systemic / spatial justice). By

including notions of governance, citizenship,

towards sustainability from an ecosystems

urban studies. In short, those are disciplines that

‘knowledge claims’ we mean the connection

participation and democracy.

perspective. Framing urban areas as ecosystems

deal with the three main objects of a metropolitan

between research question, methods

makes it possible to model urban areas and

innovator: space, society and technology. It does

employed, expected outcome and deliverables

to reflect on ethical matters and professional

distinguish the different subsystems from which

so by promoting a discussion on metropolitan

according to different research traditions.

roles connected to the research and design

they are made.

transition to sustainability and the theoretical and

[Skills: research design, literature research,

activities. In doing so, students must be able to

Spatial Justice: in this perspective, students

practical frameworks and tools being used by

critical thinking]

reflect on and discuss how different worldviews

understand metropolitan innovation and transition

different disciplines via interactive lectures and

towards sustainability from a political point of

student workshops evaluating and acting upon the

of organizing, governing and discussing

formation and design interventions [Skills:

view, in which the governance and the social

issues being treated in the Metropolitan Challenges

metropolitan innovation: living labs, transition

writing, sketching, drawing, story-telling, critical

sustainability of systems is highlighted. This allows

Course.

towns, system innovations. [Skills: groups

thinking]

3. Describe the merits of various modes

9

7. Spell out values that support decisions and

impact problem identification, knowledge


Course Description 2.1 Educational activities

2.2 Course materials and resources

The core activity of the course is reading and

The lectures will be available on Blackboard.

reflecting on the three approaches to metropolitan

These are also available at https://www.

challenges. In the meetings we will discuss the

slideshare.net/robrocco/ and at https://

approaches and exercise with applying these to

amsmetropolitaninnovators.wordpress.com.

cases. The texts and papers used in this course are Students will be asked to select a particular

available from TU Delft and WUR libraries or from

metropolitan issue / site to engage with in an

the hyperlinks provided. Students must be on

individual essay. To prepare for that, students

campus or loggedin via VPN to access papers.

will develop concise evaluations of the issue/ challenge using the frameworks presented: sociotechnical,ecosystems and spatial justice. Each framework includes a theoretical dimension and an applied dimension, in which evaluationmethods are used. For each framework, students will be asked to discuss the theory in class, using literature and other materials provided to them, and to evaluate potential solutions to the challenges they encountered using the specific frameworks and associated conceptual tools for analysis. In intermediate assignments, students are asked to prepare a brief critical engagement with the literature and subsequently to respond to those of each other.

10

11


Assessment Students will be assessed on the base of:

the course (ecosystems, spatial justice,

Presence in sessions (10% of final grade): Each

sociotechnical) in relation to a metropolitan

presence means 1.25 points x 8 sessions = 10

case study of your own choice.

Active participation (10 % final grade): 10 points for in class participation awarded by

‘metropolitan challenge’ with a proposed

teachers

solution or intervention and should involve

Preparatory assignments (10%): submitting

some kind of sociotechnical transition.

preparatory assignments reflecting on the

2. An appropriate case study would be a

3. The case study does not have to be situated

reading, and peer feedback on the reflection of

in the Amsterdam Metropolitan region, but if it

a fellow student.

isn’t, this would require you to discuss how the

Individual Final Essay (70%)

context of your case study would translate to Amsterdam.

Final assigment

4. If it is hard to exactly define or delineate your

The final assignment consists of a 4000

case study, that is not a problem per se – that

(+/- 10%) word essay (around 10 pages of text).

is in fact one of the main issues to discuss in

In this, the student builds on the exercises made

your essay! (See annex 1, Socio-techincal)

previously during the course, in order to compare

5. In your essay you substantially discuss (at

the three frameworks, using the theory (referring to

least) one of each day’s readings, applying

the literature of the course) and the tools they used

or translating these readings to your case

previously, to elaborate a critique and a reflection

study: explain how the case you discuss can

of the chosen Metropolitan Challenge. This critique

be discussed in terms of these readings. In

and reflection need to engage both with the

addition you may also refer to the lectures

analysis and the possible solutions to the selected

(please do so clearly.) and feel free to find other

challenge, as well as with the three frameworks

relevant sources not mentioned in the course.

themselves. For questions that could guide your essay writing,

12

The assignment

see annex 1. For the assessment criteria, see

1. Discuss the three approaches outlined in

annex 2.

13


Course Schedule

Overview sessions and dates 1 - Intro

Thu 15 nov

The course will be lectured in 10 sessions, from Thursday November 15 until Monday December 17, from

2 - Sociotechnical

Mon 19 nov

11:00 to 16h00. Presence is mandatory for completion of the course.

3 - Spatial justice

Thu 22 nov

4 - Ecosystems

Mo 26 nov

Please note the first session is not at Marineterrein but in Amsterdam ZuidOost: Imagine IC (at

5 - Sociotechnical 2

Thu 29 nov

Public Library): Bijlmerplein 393, 1102 DK Amsterdam. Please be there at 11 sharp!

6 - Spatial justice 2

Mon 3 dec

7 - Ecosystem 2

Thu 6 dec

8 - Essay clinic Roberto + Aksel

Mon 10 dec

9 - Ethics debate + pecha kucha presentations

Thu 13 dec

10 - Essay clinic Clemens + Iulian

Mon 17 dec

A central part of this course is reading and reflecting on these readings. Before each session we ask you to submit a brief reflection on the readings and to respond to the reflection of one of your fellow students.

WEEK 1

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

November 12-16 S1

Guest

Location

Exercise

Skills

lectures

Roberto Rocco &

INTRO to the course:

Jules

Bijlmer,

Essential reading:

The Bijlmer as a ‘failure of

Observation/

15

Clemens Driessen

we will focus on 3

Rijssen

Amster-

Markard, J., Raven, R., & Truffer, B. (2012). Sustainability transitions: An emerging field of

high modernism’? compare

synthesis/ graphic

innovative perspectives

(ImagineIC)

dam Zuid

research and its prospects. Research Policy, 41, 955-967.

multiple explanations: Pruitt

communication

Healey, P. (1996). The Communicative Turn in Planning Theory and Its Implications for

Igoe

Oost,

on urban development

Learning outcome

THU Nov

Sofia

Imagine

Spatial Strategy Formation Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 23(1), 217-

Short intro intercultural

Koutsenko

IC (at

234.

attitudes to

(d-r-o-m

Public

metropolitan problems:

architects)

Library):

multi-culturalism/

Bijlmer-

migration/cultural shifts

plein 393, 1102 DK Amster-

14

Literature

dam

Scott, James C. (1998) Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed: chapter 2 and 3 [below]

L3


WEEK 2

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

November 19-23 S2

Location

Literature

Exercise

Skills

tures Disrupting the city exercise:

Understanding the

Geels, Frank (2005) The dynamics of transitions in socio-technical systems: A multi-level

total mobility theatre,

political nature of

politics of artefacts and

analysis of the transition pathway from horse-drawn carriages to automobiles (1860

imagining and playing out

technology; Actor

actor-network theory

–1930), Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 17:4, 445-476 http://www.

sociotechnical scenarios.

Network Theory

Latour, Bruno (1996) Aramis, or the Love of Technology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ.

Smaller exercises on

Analysing a transition

managing transitions to

Pres: Ch7 Aramis is Ready to Go (Away); Epilogue: Aramis Unloved. http://dss-edit.com/

sociotechnical analysis using

into separate factors

sustainability

plu/Latour-B_Aramis-or-Love-of-Technology_1996.pdf

Actor Network Theory: why do and their complex

Clemens Driessen

Socio-technical

19

& Iulian Barba Lata

perspective 1: the

AMS

tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09537320500357319 And the question of

some sociotechnical projects Extra reading:

Brand, Ralf (2005) ‘Urban infrastructures and sustainable social practices’, Journal of Urban Technology,12:2, 1 — 25 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/ full/10.1080/10630730500307128

16

Learning outcome

Essential reading:

MON Nov

Guest lec-

fail?

relations

L3, L4


WEEK 2

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

November 19-23 S3

THU

Roberto Rocco

Guest lec-

Location

Literature

Skills

tures Spatial Justice:

22

concepts of spatial

Nov

justice, social

tba

governance, Values for

Learning outcome

AMS

Essential reading:

Make a short movie (2 to

Critical thinking/

• •

Harvey, D. (2008). “The Right to the City.” New Left Review Sept/ Oct: 23-40.

3 minutes) in examples of

Governance analysis/

Marcuse, P. (2009). “From critical urban theory to the right to the city.” Ci ty 13(2-3): 185-

urban justice and injustice

SWOT analysis/

197.

in Amsterdam: upload to

Stakeholder analysis/

Hardin, G. (1968). The Tragedy of the Commons. Science, 162(3859), 1243-1248.

website/ Social sustainability

Strategy making/

index (formulation)

Policy formulation/

sustainability and

Urban development Extra reading:

Evaluative

frameworks

Healey, P. (1996). The Communicative Turn in Planning Theory and Its Implications for Spatial Strategy Formation Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 23(1), 217234.

Dietz, T., Ostrom, E., & Stern, P. C. (2003). The Struggle to Govern the Commons. Science, 302(5652), 1907-1912.

Ostrom, E. (2014). A polycentric approach for coping with climate change. Annals of Economics and Finance 15, 71-108. Retrieved from http://aeconf.com/articles/may2014/ aef150103.pdf

Seltzer, E. & Mahmoudi, D. (2012). “Citizen Participation, Open Innovation, and Crowdsourcing: Challenges and Opportunities for Planning.” Journal of Planning Literature 28(1): 3-18.

18

Exercise

L6. L7


WEEK 3

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

November 26-30 S4

Guest

Location

Literature

lectures Ecosystems approach:

Experiences AMS

Essential reading:

The texts present and discuss

26

Theory: Systems

of an

Yigitcanlar, T., Dizdaroglu, D. (2015). Ecological approaches in planning for sustainable

various figures with ecosystem

Nov

thinking: STS and

ecosystem

cities: A review of the literature. Global Journal of Environmental Science and

approaches.

Management, 1(2), 159-188. doi: 10.7508/gjesm.2015.02.008 (mandatory)

What are the similarities and

Van Bueren, E., van Bohemen, H., Itard, L., Visscher, H., (2012). An Ecosystems

differences?

MON

Aksel Ersoy

(tba)

Skills

Learning outcome

ecosystem approaches restorer

Approach. Dodrecht: Springer, 2012, Chapter 1 (Introduction) & Chapter 2 (Ecosystems Thinking: Ecological Principles for Buildings, Roads, and Industrial and Urban Areas), Ch. 11 (Environmental Strategies and Tools for Integrated Design)

Grimm, N.B., Grove Grove, J., Pickett, S.T.A., Redman, Ch.L. (2000). Integrated Approaches to Long-Term Studies of Urban Ecological Systems: Urban ecological systems present multiple challenges to ecologists—pervasive human impact and extreme heterogeneity of cities, and the need to integrate social and ecological approaches, concepts, and theory. BioScience, (50)7: 571–584, https://doi.org/10.1641/00063568(2000)050[0571:IATLTO]2.0.CO;2

Extra reading:

Heynen, N. (2014). Urban Political Ecology I: The urban century. Progress in Human Geography, 38(4) 598–604.

Angelo, H. and Wachsmuth, D. (2015), Urbanizing Urban Political Ecology: A Critique of Methodological Cityism. Int J Urban Regional, 39: 16–27. doi:10.1111/1468-2427.12105

20

Exercise

L5


WEEK 3

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

November 26-30 S5

Location

Literature

Exercise

Clemens Driessen

Socio-technical

29

& Iulian Barba Lata

perspective 2:

Learning outcome

AMS

Essential reading:

99% sustainable: making the

critical consultancy,

Calzada, I. & Cristobal C. (2015). “Unplugging: Deconstructing the Smart City.” Journal of

New Jersey Unilever HQ the

integrating technical

Urban Technology 22 (1): 23–43. https://doi.org/10.1080/10630732.2014.971535.

most sustainable building in

and social concerns

Foucault, M. (1977). “Discipline and Punish, Panopticism.” In Discipline & Punish:

the world. With developer

The Birth of the Prison, edited by Alan Sheridan, 195-228. New York: Vintage Books.

Sybrant van der Werf (Argo

http://foucault.info/doc/documents/disciplineandpunish/foucault-disciplineandpunish-

BV) and Erik Ubels (CTO Edge

panopticism-html

Technologies)

knowledge and the making of subjects

Scott, James C. (1998) Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed: chapter 10. [link in references]

Extra reading:

Klein, Julie (2015). ‘‘Discourses of transdisciplinarity: Looking back to the future”, Futures: 65, 10–16. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001632871500004X

22

Skills

lectures

THU Nov

Guest

23

L3, L4


WEEK 4

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

December 3-7 S6

MON

Roberto Rocco &

3 Dec

Clemens Driessen

Guest

Location

Literature

Exercise

Skills

lectures Spatial Justice

outcome Essential reading:

Stakeholder analysis in your

Critical thinking/

Larsen, G. L. (2012). An Inquiry into the Theoretical Basis of Sustainability. Understanding

project (graphic analysis)/

Governance analysis/

strategy

the Social Dimension of Sustainability. J. Dillard, V. Dujon and M. C. King. London,

Social sustainability index

SWOT analysis/

and alliance

Routledge.

score/ Values mapping

Stakeholder analysis/

Marcel

Learning

AMS

van Hest,

manager

innovations

Papadopoulos, Y. (2007). “Problems of Democratic Accountability in Network and

Strategy making/

Multilevel Governance.” European Law Journal 13(4): 469-486.

Policy formulation

L6, L7

at Alliander. Democracy

Extra reading:

by design.

Sehested, K. (2009). “Urban Planners as Network Managers and Metagovernors.” Planning Theory and Practice 10(2): 245-263.

S7

THU 6 Dec

Aksel Ersoy

Ecosystems approach:

Experiences AMS

Essential reading:

For a sustainable urban

Applied: Design and

of a met-

Davoudi, S., Sturzaker, J. (2017). Urban form, policy packaging and sustainable urban

innovation (pick one), identify

management of

ropolitan

metabolism. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 120: 55-64. (mandatory)

how socio-ecological

systems integration

innovator

(tba)

Lawhon, M., & Murphy, J. T. Socio-technical regimes and sustainability transitions: Insights systems are influenced from political ecology. Progress in Human Geography, 36(3), 354-378.

by this innovation, identify

Pesch, U., Vernay, A.L., van Bueren, E., Pandis Iverot, S. (2017). Niche entrepreneurs in

stakeholders and regulations,

urban systems integration: On the role of individuals in niche formation. Environment and

who could play an

Planning A, 49(8): 1922-1942.

entrepreneurial role? Why? With what resources?

Extra reading:

Klindworth K., Djurasovic A., Knieling J., Säwert K. (2017). From Linear to Circular— Challenges for Changing Urban Metabolism?! An Analysis of Local Energy Transition Activities in Four European Cities. In: Deppisch S. (eds) Urban Regions Now & Tomorrow. Studien zur Resilienzforschung. Springer, Wiesbaden

Voytenko, Y., McCormick, K., Evans, J., & Schliwa, G. (2016). Urban living labs for sustainability and low carbon cities in Europe: Towards a research agenda. Journal of Cleaner Production, 123, 45-54.

24

L5


WEEK 5

Session

Date

Tutors

Main subject

responsible

December 10-14 S8

MON

Roberto Rocco &

10

Aksel Ersoy

Guest

Location

Literature

Exercise

Skills

lectures Essay clinic

Learning outcome

AMS

Comparative analysis, L4 critical thinking

Dec S9

THU

Roberto Rocco &

13

Clemens Driessen

Data issues

tba

AMS

debate with data

Dec

course

Pecha Kucha

presentations on essay drafts

Townsend, Anthony (2013) Smart Cities: Big data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a

Debate on ethics and politics

Ethics, writing skills/

New Utopia. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. , Ch2: cybernetics redux, pp.57-92

of big data, algorithms,

literature review

Kitchin, Rob (2014) Big Data, new epistemologies and paradigm shifts, Big Data &

artificial intelligence and

Society, April–June: 1–12

platform capitalism:

Kitchin, Rob (2016) Reframing, reimagining and remaking smart cities. Programmable City

questioning the Smart City?

L6, L7

Working Paper 20, https://osf.io/cyjhg/

Lemov, Rebecca. 2016).. ‘Big data is people’. Aeon. June 16. Available: https://aeon.co/ essays/why-big-data-is-actually-small-personal-and-very-human

WEEK 6

Session

Date

Main subject

responsible

December 16-20 S10

MON

Clemens Driessen

17

& Iulian Barba Lata

Dec

26

Tutors

Guest lectures

Essay clinic

Location

Literature

Exercise

Skills

Learning outcome


Contact Details Course coordinators

Clemens Driessen clemens.driessen@wur.nl

Roberto Rocco r.c.rocco@tudelft.nl

When emailing, please start the subject line with ‘MADE’ Community Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ groups/1716225915068104/ Blog: https://amsmetropolitaninnovators.wordpress.com Twitter Hashtag: #metropolitaninnovators #AMS

28

29


References BRAND, R. (2005). ‘Urban infrastructures and sustainable social practices’, Journal of Urban Technology,12:2, 1 — 25

LATOUR, B. (1996) Aramis, or the Love of Technology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Pres: Ch7 Aramis is Ready to Go

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10630730500307128

(Away); Epilogue: Aramis Unloved. http://dss-edit.com/plu/Latour-B_Aramis-or-Love-of-Technology_1996.pdf LEMOV, R. (2016). ‘Big data is people’, Aeon, June 16. Available: https://aeon.co/essays/why-big-data-is-actually-

CALZADA, I. & CRISTOBAL, C. (2015). “Unplugging: Deconstructing the Smart City.” Journal of Urban Technology 22

small-personal-and-very-human

(1): 23–43. https://doi.org/10.1080/10630732.2014.971535.

MARCUSE, P. (2009). “From critical urban theory to the right to the city.” City 13(2-3): 185-197.

DIETZ, T., OSTROM, E., & STERN, P. C. (2003). The Struggle to Govern the Commons. Science, 302(5652), 19071912.

MARKARD, J., RAVEN, R., & TRUFFER, B. (2012). Sustainability transitions: An emerging field of research and its prospects. Research Policy, 41, 955-967.

FOUCAULT, M. (1977). “Discipline and Punish, Panopticism.” In Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison, edited by Alan Sheridan, 195-228. New York: Vintage Books. http://foucault.info/doc/documents/disciplineandpunish/fou-

OSTROM, E. A polycentric approach for coping with climate change. Annals of Economics and Finance 15, 71-108

cault-disciplineandpunish-panopticism-html

(2014). Retrieved from http://aeconf.com/articles/may2014/aef150103.pdf

GEELS ,F. (2005). The dynamics of transitions in socio-technical systems: A multi-level analysis of the transition pathway

PAPADOULOS, Y. (2007). “Problems of Democratic Accountability in Network and Multilevel Governance.” European

from horse-drawn carriages to automobiles (1860 –1930), Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 17:4, 445-476

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Annex Annex 1 Questions that could guide your essay

writing, in line with the content and logic of the

alternatives? (see ‘ethics debate’ assignment)

measuring the success of solutions?

Some more precise questions to guide your essay

course:

writing

What type of ‘subject’ is assumed/produced with a potential solution to a particular problem

own role as a ‘metropolitan innovator’ (or

definition?

another term you’d prefer!) in relation to the case study?

A) Ecosystems

Can you describe your case/project in terms

C) Spatial justice:

of the (environmental, production) systems it is

embedded in? What are (potential) reciprocal relationships between the urban system and

situated in the governance triangle?

Is there any sign of circularity or systems

these be? Why are they public goods?

Is there evidence of citizens’ participation? Is

outputs described?

the project/policy/intervention conducive to the

How would the project you describe respond

right to the city? Why?

‘resilient’? Is the project/proposed intervention

Is there evidence of the two kinds of spatial justice? (redistributive and/or procedural)?

Who are the stakeholders involved? What’s

‘sustainable’? (In it’s three crucial dimensions:

their role in the issue/project/intervention? Is

social, economic, environmental)

their participation “in balance”?

B) Socio-technical:

Finally, you can engage with these questions:

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Does the project/policy or action have the potential to create public goods? What would

to disturbances? Could you label it as

Where is this issue and potential solutions

ecosystems? thinking in your project? Are inputs and

What are different ways to define the problem,

Are solutions generalizable, or how can

when putting central ‘the social’ or ‘the

analyses and solutions be translated to other

technical’, and how are these entangled?

places?

What different ways of delineating the problem

MADE Innovator: How do you envision your

Values and ethics: what societal/ethical/

in scope exist? Can you imagine others?

political concerns could emerge around the

Do particular problem definitions involve

proposed solution? What terms would you

particular ways of knowing the problem and of

propose to voice critique and/or help construct

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Annex 2 Assessment criteria

Your essay will be evaluated using the following

academic writing skills are on point, the style

criteria:

of the text is fluent and clear.

final essay

9. Grammar, spelling and punctuation are 1. Relevance to the course: The main question being answered in the essay is relevant to the

10. The list of references is correctly put together.

core theme of understanding innovation and

These references are correctly cited in the text.

engages with the three approaches of the

Citations are used where relevant to support

course.

the argument and to acknowledge the origin of

2. Use of course materials (referring to at least two literature sources of each approach). 3. Acquisition of knowledge and understanding and integration with theory: The theories used in the text are explained clearly and are relevant to the main issue being explored. 4. Evidence of critical and analytical skills. 5. Integration: The three approaches mentioned in the course are successfully integrated and/ or their internal tensions are discussed. 6. Evidence of independent research and use of empirical material (based on the case chosen by the student). 7. Organisation of the essay (and the argument) into a coherent structure: introduction, argument and evidence, conclusion. The parts of the essay are further explained in a template provided.

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correct.

8. Style and communication: The language used in the essay is appropriate for a master course,

ideas and information. 11. There is a significant part of the text that addresses the values and ethical issues related to the topic at hand.


Address Amsterdam Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS) at Marineterrein Building 027W Kattenburgerstraat 5-7 1018 JA Amsterdam Address Wageningen Wageningen University & Research Droevendaalsesteeg 1 6708 BP Wageningen Address Delft Delft University of Technology Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft

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Profile for Roberto Rocco

Metropolitan Innovators (YMS 30306), Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions  

This is the course guide for Metropolitan Innovators, a course at AMS, the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions, located...

Metropolitan Innovators (YMS 30306), Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions  

This is the course guide for Metropolitan Innovators, a course at AMS, the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions, located...

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