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Portfolio Ketchen Industrial Design Robert Ketchen robert.ketchen@utoronto.ca 416-694-5102


Logos

Home Care Association, Canadian Federation of Podiatric Medicine, Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario and Ontario Hospital Association) • CAWC PEP Talk Peer Education Program • CAWC – Pressure Ulcer Awareness and Prevention Program • ESPACE Furniture Design

• Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC) • Diabetic Foot Canada (A multi-partner initiative working with several government bodies and not-for-profit organizations such as the Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian Diabetes Association, Canadian

2


pressure ulcer awareness and prevention

Logos

• Kartini International • Northdale Music Press Limited • eQuadra Solutions

• CAWC – Pressure Ulcer Awareness and Prevention Program • Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration • The 3R Company • Qijuk Design Innovations Inc.

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Logos

• Orchestras Canada – Ontario Youth Orchestra Festival 2000 • Phoenix Bicycle Logo • Susan B. Rosenthal, editor and writer

• Toronto Wind Orchestra • The Scarborough Philharmonic – Summer Symphony Series • Music Industries Association of Canada – Make Music For Life promotion • Close Enough folk trio

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Sue Rosenthal BA, MA Principal, eQuadra Solutions Inc. sue.rosenthal@equadra.ca 416-267-4267 www.equadra.ca

evolve 路 exceed 路 excel 路 endure

Business Cards

5


LIESEL DEPPE FLUTE

519·272·9633 liesel@lieseldeppe.ca www.lieseldeppe.ca

Paul Epp Creative Director

Paul Epp Creative Director

Fabre Exhibitry

Fabre Exhibitry

a : 8 Carlaw Avenue Toronto, Ontario Canada M4M 2R5

a : 8 Carlaw Avenue Toronto, Ontario Canada M4M 2R5

t : 416·461·6888 877·461·6888 f : 416·461·6222 e : pepp@fabre-x.com

t : 416·461·6888 877·461·6888 f : 416·461·6222 e : pepp@fabre-x.com

Paul Epp Creative Director

Paul Epp Creative Director

Fabre Exhibitry Qijuk Design Innovations Inc. One West a : 8Dundas CarlawStreet Avenue Suite 2500 Toronto, Ontario Toronto, ON M5G 1Z3 Canada M4M 2R5 Canada

Fabre Exhibitry

t : 416·461·6888 877·461·6888 洪跃洋 f : 416·461·6222 手机:(+1)416·998·8876 e : pepp@fabre-x.com

t : 416·461·6888 877·461·6888 f : 416·461·6222 e : pepp@fabre-x.com

公司:(+1)416·593·8021

a : 8 Carlaw Avenue Toronto, Ontario Canada M4M 2R5

rainman.hong@qijuk.com www.qijuk.com

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design D Qijuk Business Cards Rainman Hong v4.indd 2

santoni@pathcom.com

Business Cards

6

6/22/10 7:43:43 AM


Mozart?

1173-2

The Festival Winds play 18th century octets traditionally ascribed to Mozart

Dan Leeson HARMONIEMUSIK: An Austro-Hungarian Phenomenon raditional scholarship suggests that Mozart’s entire oeuvre contains only three compositions written for a Harmonie octet. They are the Serenade in E-flat, K. 375, the Serenade in C minor, K. 388 /384a, and an arrangement of music from his opera, The Abduction from the Seraglio, a work whose composition is documented in a Mozart letter but is not known to exist, this despite several eighteenth century transcriptions suggested to be Mozart’s lost arrangement. Both K. 375 and K. 388 /384a were scored for pairs of clarinets, oboes, French horns, and bassoons, while the instrumentation of the Seraglio suite is uncertain though presumed to have been for an octet of winds. All three compositions are examples of Harmoniemusik 1. The word Harmonie is more than a generic term for a wind band. Instead, it was a specific kind of wind band, one identified by certain operational characteristics: • Flutes were generally excluded; • Instruments were in pairs, with each performer having an independent musical line; • The typical size was eight players, though music for both smaller and larger groups may be found; • The usual instrumentation consisted of pairs of oboes, clarinets, French horns, and bassoons; • Harmonien served no military function, but were chamber ensembles used to play social music; and • The bulk of the repertoire consisted of arrangements of popular operatic and symphonic selections. By 1803, the Viennese-based Harmoniemusik movement was effectively over, and knowledge of its existence and importance to the social /musical life of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1782 until Napoleon’s rise was unknown until the 1960s.

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Harmoniemusik of Uncertain Authenticity attributed to Mozart Leaping in and out of the various editions of the Köchel catalogue are other compositions for Harmonie octet that have been attributed to Mozart in one generation, only to be declared spurious

65:10

20:44

This tally of Mozart wind octets does not include three very brief interludes found in the supper scene of the second act of Don Giovanni, and during which time, vocal participation takes place.

1

14:31

Comme les K. Anh. C 17.04, 17.05 et 17.07 n’ont encore jamais été publiés, c’est ici le premier enregistrement de la première publication de matériaux dont on peut retracer l’origine au mois qui suivit la mort de Mozart. C’est aussi le premier enregistrement complet de l’Harmoniemusik du K. Anh. C pour huit instruments à vent. Conformément aux méthodes d’exécution de la fin du XVIIIe siècle, les cadences et les matériaux thématiques répétés sont embellis au gré des solistes et nous avons ajouté à l’ensemble la contrebasse pour intensifier l’Harmonie. David Bourque Éditeur, K. Anh. C. First Editions Northdale Music Press Limited Toronto, ON le 17 octobre 2005

Les Festival Winds

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es Festival Winds sont, depuis de nombreuses années, l’ensemble en résidence du Festival of The Sound. Le Festival of The Sound, qui est l’un des principaux festivals d’été de musique au Canada, se tient annuellement à Parry Sound, en Ontario.

James Mason, hautbois James Mason est hautbois solo de l’Orchestre symphonique de Kitchener-Waterloo depuis 1979. Il s’est également produit comme soliste et chambriste au Canada, en Espagne, en Allemagne, au Japon et en Amérique du Sud. Il enseigne à l’Université Wilfrid Laurier. Brian James, hautbois Brian James a grandi à Washington. En 2005, il est devenu membre de Symphonie Nouvelle-Écosse. Il a joué régulièrement comme hautbois solo avec l’Orchestre symphonique de Kitchener-Waterloo, Opera Lyra d’Ottawa et l’Orchestre philharmonique de Buffalo, le Virginia Symphony et la Canadian Opera Company. James Campbell, clarinette James Campbell est le directeur artistique du Festival of the Sound depuis 1985. Il a joué comme soliste-vedette avec plus de cinquante orchestres, y compris le London Symphony, l’Orchestre sym-

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Point Pelee – Piano

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the demise of East Coast fisherman Jim Jones. Each of the four poco accelerando movements in this suite portrays a contrasting mood. Audiences v.5b tenuto will 40 appreciate the way the piece weaves prominent solo clarinet work and strong inner voices together with the entire ensemble to create a haunting aural tapestry. The suite of four movements may also be played separately. It has been recorded by the University of Toronto Wind Symphony on a CD entitled Wind Symphony (Arbordisc UTWS 9701). Nor thdale Music Pres Approximate duration 12′30″ (3′0″ + 4′0″ + 3′0″ + 2′30″) s gram is a great way Limited’s Donor Cer tificate Proto help bands incr Gradelibra 4.5ry ease their music holdings and prom ote Canadian music Score and parts $88.00 time! at the same Score only $19.00 Here’s how it wor ks: 1. Order one of Nor thdale’s pieces and indicate who is to receive it. NMPL114 for brass and percussion 2. We’ll send it dire ctly to the ensemble Louis Applebaum or to you, depending on whether you wan t to present it your Thevery Glorious self. slowly 100th fanfare was first played to launch the gala 3. The piece will be celebrations commemorating the 100th anniversary of Massey U acco mpanied by a beautifu 43 tificate listing the l Donation Hall, a venerable Toronto landmark in the Canadian musicalCer scene. composition, the reci donor. pient, and the Commissioned by The Founders’ Fund of the Corporation of Massey Hall/Roy Thomson Hall, Glorious 100th was performed at the June p gala evening by the brass and percussion playersIn ofthes 14, 1994, thee times of never-ending fundingfade cutbaway dale Don acks Toronto Symphony under the direction of Victor Feldbrill. and Flexible or Cert3ificate Program offers ever yone , the Nor thnon-musicians alike —musicians instrumentation. Canadian music scen —an opportunity to help keep the e thriving. Approximate duration 1′15″

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This Catalogue

• Pieces are listed alphabetically. • You may order any number of addition al instrumental part Piano adapt the standard s to instrumentation to your particular nee Prices for this serv 3 ds. ice vary, and are avai lable on request. ƒ • Packing and ship ping charges for full sets of scores and individual scores and parts, replacement parts ments within Canada are included for ship ; orders shipped to the territorial US sho add 12% and internat uld ional orders shipped and the US should outside of CanadaSolo Trumpet OFFICERS’ add 15%: see page 15 for details. • Sales tax, where applicable, is charged PROCESSIONAL extra. • Commercial reco NMPL111 for concert band rdings of the mus ic, where they exis indicated with each by John Wilson t, are piece. • In order to foster Dignitaries entered the stadium at the opening ceremonies of the growth of bras s bands in places where the 1994 Commonwealth Games to this Wilson composition. Aa brass band tradition doesn’t exis t, a supplemental alternate parts is set of fanfare-like beginning leads to a dignified, tuneful melody, with avai to facilitate the play lable for the brass band arrangemen jazz-based harmonies, and it finishes with a flourish. Perfect for ts ing of some of the treble clef parts by ers mor e accu stom playconvocations! ed to reading non -transposing bass (Baritone, Trombon clef e, Euphonium, and Approximate duration 3′15″ Tuba the use of F French Horn in place of Teno ), and to allow for Gradeset 4 of parts is avai Piano r Horn. The alternat lable separately. e • All information and Score and parts $61.00 prices in this catalogu e with are subject to change Score only $13.00 out notice. poco accelerando • n.a. = not available/not tenuto applicable. 40

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Conference Materials Canadian Association of Wound Care

• Conference syllabi, marketing flyers, registration forms, event singage, etc.

9


CAWC Fe b 2004 S3 CD la bel.ƒ

2004 02 26

08:49

Page 1

CAWC Quick ide Reference GuIONS FOR BEST

S3 Reflect ive

Learning & THE THIRD IN A THRE Practice Po E-PART ED Instructions rtfolio UCATIONAL for Use: SERIES You

will need on your com Acrobat Reader installe puter. If you d have Acroba do not t www.adobe.co Reader, go to readstep2.htm m/products/acrobat/ l to dow nlo most recent ad the version. At the time of CD was cert manufacture, this ified virus-fr ee.

FROM THE CAWC

3

OF & TREATM ENT PREVENTION ULC ERS Townsend, RN; VENOUS LEG FRCP (c); Debbie MD (c); BScN; Rob Miller, Cathy Burrows, RN BSc RVT; Gerald MacKean, MD FRCS FCFP MD Ritchie Bellefontaine, BN ET MSc; David H. Keast, MSc RN Heather L. Orsted,

4

DIAGNOSIS & PREVENTION, DIABETIC FOOT OF TREATM ENT , OD MD MSc FRCPC ULC ERS Gordon E. Searles RN BN ET MSc; RN MSN; Heather L. Orsted, (c); Leah Shapera, r Trowell, BSc OT FACP CCI; Heathe John Rahman, CO Pat Miiller, RN ET;

ions

No. Recommendat

the Cause h, diabetic OMMENDAT Identify and Treat mine general healt ions PROVIDES REC ul history to deter ctors that may cause skin No. Recommendat 1. Take a caref on ns and co-fa the Cause PRACTICES s Canadian Associati control, complicatio the healing of an ulcer. Identify and Treat determine the venou assess pain members of the covervascular status, down or affect careful history to les es a oses: break in artic includ diagn Obta OF The directors and four that t other 1. to rule out impair s physical assessmen footwear), and sensation. & TREATM ENT have updated the characteristics and mic and local factors that may 2. Complete a of Wound Care practice in the area PREVENTION mities (and syste ory to support ndations for best and identify the bony/structural defor into a risk categ PRESSU RE ULC ERS ing the recomme Wound Bed, (2) Pressure Ulcers, ral , RN ET; THEClassify persons with diabetes wound healing. include a bilate ING FCFP; Nancy Parslow , OT Reg (Ont); the will MD rs. PAR This MSc aring t. 3. Ulce Keast, PRE Prep smen H. Foot Norton David nce of (1) care. cal asses hial pressure r influe BScPT PhD; Linda co-ordination of rs, and (4) Diabetic 2. Perform a physi sment as well as an ankle-brac WO breakdown and/o Pamela E. Houghton, UN D BED (Med) help (Derm) (3) Venous Leg Ulce BSc RD e FRCPC rs ;that cause skin venous ulcers to lower limb asses fy facto BSc MD FRCPC 4. Modi s) are excerpts from to the team to ensur Chris Fraser, Coutts, RN; on all patients with se. R. Gary Sibbald, MSc; PatriciagM.and make referral(s) ence guides (QRG Canada and index (ABPI) test Orsted, RN BN ET healin Heathe nce of arterial disea These quick refer Care y r L. MD FCFP rule out the prese comprehensive care. David H. Keast, MSc ished in Wound is loss of protective ic venous insufficienc articles there chron plete if of ng or (s) com n, loadi the articles publ The cause uctio the ure down (reflux), obstr ion the permission. 3. Determine 5. Provide press abnormal valves No. Recommendat reprinted here with gh the CAWC Web site at based on etiology: the Cause sensation. cal throu p failure. tify and Treat ntred Concerns Idented neednt history and a targeted physi py. can be accessed calf-muscle-pum ndations by patientpatie ression thera Address Patient-ce risk factors as indica No. Recomme t. appropriate comp educa ic venous the Cause 1. Complete a general health and dualized y tion for chron www.cawc.ne indiviblood suppl 4. Implement de uate andyTreat Provi protocols tifywood py if indicatedIden 6. heal. is). ination to determine ulcer formation or that may affect plete Adeq thera fibros exam cal com be to medi ory. y , to ure bosis s the patient’s abilit by riskof categ intended 5. Implement other important and ction n and E rficial and deep throm may lead to press . entio Asses ficial or CTIC that corre prev 1. , PRA (supe the y The QRGs are not as Care nosis FOR icienc nd super insuff ng ulcers l Wou if significantmust be present as well aids in the diag RECOMMENDATIONS ure may be Prov healing of existi g. ide Loca al management of extensive deep rt healin ulceration(s). in themselves but wounds. ions where press ticsfoot of tissue 6. Consider surgic disease exists in the absence s diabe cause host factors to suppo s andnt,modify situat Assesble ific 7. fy treata Assesdeme nment: debri ct or modi treatment of spec um wound enviro 2. perforator vein Diagnose and corre Provide an optim increased.

QRG

nce Guide

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1

Quick Refere

For Window s

Users Insert the CD into you : r com It is progra mmed to run puter. automatically. If it does not, go to the My Computer ico n on the des ktop, double click to ope n. Find the CD-ROM ico My Comput n in the er window and the file ico n named She double-click. Double-cli llRun(.exe). ck Fo r Macintos

h Users Insert the CD into you : r computer. the CD icon Double-click on the des kstop. file named home.pdf to Double-click the launch Reader and view the con Acrobat tents of the CD.

www.cawc.net

E-mail: caw c@sympa tico.ca · ww w.cawc.net © CAWC 20 04

© CAWC 2006.

CAWC QRG

2006 FINAL.indd

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Printed in Canad

2

2. 8. is status. infection control. disease. if healin nutritgional damage. caregivers moisture balance, mize ns, reassess ntred Concerns ce. ss of interventio3. Maxi ntred Concerns mine effect y and the ivene Address Patient-ce ntred friction ure and incontinen Patient-ce nts, the famil Deter Addrgess nt of patient-ceexpec de 9. geme ing or eliminating 4. Manage moist te with the patie s for healin and provisuppo mana at g. ted rate. ctive therapies. and mobility, reduc 7. Communica and se. Thert the of life)not le healin enabring and adjun Assesss disea to occur tic expectation agents 5. Maximize activity ty gical quali biolo of and rence to establish realis and management3.of venou (pain the usese adhe conce to increa Consrtider care 10. suppo and shear. m isrnsimportanteducation and ort syste rt Supp information for l suppo l erns iona Conc patients de. patient with ce of a socia work toAddr 4.s legProvi ulcers Provide Organizat Patient-centred team a ess presence or absen wer venou of plan. empo and prevention to treatment control pain. 11. Establish, train for treatment and 6. Assess and Wound Care osocial needs. physical and tes. with ydiabe Wound Care Provide Local assist with psych d histor Provide Local 7. Assess and monitor the woun s and wound. d healing ion + MEASURE*). 5. Asses al wound Wound Care woun 8. Assess the (locat ize the local Provide Local d. Provide an optim cteris iable, chara and ce, tics wound care. Optim bacterial balan s and treat the wounprinciples of Preparing the by removing non-v al, autolytic, ds asses , nt, woun Stage 9. Provide local ble deme 8. healapies. surgic de thera gh debri Debri stent with the ctive 6. adjun ed tissue (through environment throu environment consi Consider appropriate contaminated or infect or larval [biologic] methods). Nonved; l d Bed. moisture balance. y active dressings remo anica Woun gicall tissue mech biolo ort or atic, iable non-v enzymindividualize ional Supp ctive modalities and ble wounds should have only is contraindicated. Provide Organizat to maximizeheala 9. Introduce adjun . priate disciplines ctors that may ulcers nt to bleeding tissue normal where appropriate 10. Consult appro plan to address factors and co-fa deep non-healing active debrideme solutions (such as reserved al intervention for ion). with low toxicity be the treatment 10. Consider surgicStage IV). mobility and nutrit7. Cleanse wounds solutions should Topical antiseptic those in which the local affect healing (e.g., (Stage III and saline or water). or le of l Support are non-healab needs of the than the stimulation Organizationa the rn for wounds that to ide fic conce Prov er speci team is of great interdisciplinary bacterial burden 11. Develop an rial burden ders on the healing. patient. for increased bacte healthcare provi n of nontreat the wound nts, caregivers, and tent inflammatio 8. Assess and 12. Educate patie treatment of pressure ulcers. guish from persis or infection (distin ntion and preve s of the bacterial origin). priate for the need appro is g. that ing al settin 5 AM 9. Select a dress nt and the caregiver or clinic 9/14/06 9:14:5 timal, wound, the patie d healing. If subop ted rate of woun 10. Evaluate expec mendations 1 to 9. ts, skin grafts, reassess recom (biological agen pies cted thera corre d woun factors have been 11. Use active pies) when other adjunctive thera does not progress. and healing still ional Support nce base must Provide Organizat education and evide mes, eration of outco ved s with the co-op 12. For impro rofessional team be tied to interp ms. syste e h-car healt rance, Suffering, Exudate, Appea ure, acronym for Meas * MEASURE is an aluate and Edge. Undermining, Re-ev

CAWC QRG

CAWC Wound Ruler 2006.indd 2

2006 FINAL.indd

1

7/27/06 7:46:34 AM

Point-of-purchase Products Canadian Association of Wound Care • CD-ROMs, diagnostic aids, etc.

10

4 AM 9/14/06 9:14:5


The Calf-muscle Pump

Varicose Veins 5 – 10 mm Hg

Deep vein Failed one-way valve Superficial vein which has become varicose

12 – 18 mm Hg Compression lessens gradually up the leg Compression is maximum at the ankles

Normal Veins

Normal Skin

15 – 20 mm Hg

One-way valve Muscle sheath Calf-muscle pump Perforating vein Normal superficial vein

Epidermis

20 – 30 mm Hg Dermis

Hair Subcutaneous Tissue (Hypodermis)

Sweat Gland

Vein

Artery

Illustration Canadian Association of Wound Care • Medical illustrations

11


WaveFlex 6000X Technical & Service Manual

C

Step 4 With the two Bridge Arms held firmly in the 0° position, insert each into the ends of the Actuator Housing, making sure the gears are properly meshed and the locating pins at each end of the Actuator Housing (see Figure 6) go into the corresponding holes in the Bridge Arms. Fasten the Bridge Arms with the two screws (10). Make sure that both Bridge Arms have remained at the 0° position.

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Step 5 Connect the Hand Controller to the Actuator and turn the power on. Make sure the Controller indicates 0°. Run unit from 0° to 270° and back to 0°. Stop the unit and make sure that both Bridge Arms assemblies have stopped at the 0° position. Figure 6 Reassembly of Bridge Arms

B Plan Do tar rsifl fle ex xion ion

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For Technical Service International: 905.420.3303 • US: 1.800.854-2216

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Illustration and Technical Writing Toronto Medical/OrthoLogic

• Servicing instructions for medical equipment

12

20

5 Volt DC Power Input Power Supply, 100 – 230 VAC, 5 VDC (part no. H6K001)

Battery Compartment

30

Power – On/Off Switch Key Pad

5 6

4

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WaveFlex 6000X Hand Controller

No. Includes 1 Liquid Crystal Display

80

WaveFlex 6000X Technical Drawing: Major Components Overview


4. Install Plastic Caps a. Press the plastic caps (key 8) over the ends of the ladder legs (key 2). Important: the plastic caps must be in place on the ends of the legs before placing the ladder into the pool to prevent possible damage to the liner.

8

4

5. Affix Safety Decal a. The enclosed safety warning label (key 9) must be applied to the outside of the pool wall. Position the decal between the ladder hand rails or beside the ladder so that it is clearly visible.

B. Installing the D-8 Series Skim Filter • See the drawings on the next page for overviews of all the parts used to assemble the skim filter and the inlet and outlet fittings. 1. Choose your Skim Filter Location a. For best results, the skimmer should be mounted directly across from the prevailing wind direction (for example, if the wind in your area usually blows out of the northwest, locate the skimmer on the southeast side of your pool).

! Important: As you tighten the body nut (key 27), make sure the rest of the assembly does not turn, or it may wrinkle and tear the liner. Teflon tape or paste must be used to seal the threads. Do not overtighten the body nut; hand tighten only.

3. Install the WindOutlet Fitting a. Cut a hole for the outlet fitting (similar to step 2(b)).

b. Thread the eye nut and eye Inside of Pool 27 (keys 22 and 23), body (key 24) 26 and hose adapter (key 25) together into one outlet fitting Locate the skimmer ! assembly. Teflon tape or paste on this side 5 must be used to seal the 26 Important: 2. Install the Inlet Fitting threads. Place one gasket (key Assemble the skim 25 Outside a. Fill the pool until the water level isfilter about 2" (5 cm) it before bolting 26) onto the outlet fitting . Work24 to the pool. below the inlet and outlet fitting locations. ing fromInside the inside of pool, 23 Pool Wall 22 insert the outlet fitting through b. Using the inlet fitting knock-out in the pool wall as a the hole in the liner and pool Pool Liner guide, carefully trim a hole in the vinyl liner with a wall. Fit another gasket onto the 8 razor knife. Cut the hole from the inside of the pool. outlet fitting until it rests against 6 the outside surface of the pool wall. Thread a body nut (key 27) onto the outlet fitting. For the best possible water circulation, make sure the c. Thread the elbow (key 28), body Inside of Pool eyeball of the outlet fitting tightens to an angle of 45 degrees downward (key 24) and hose adapter (key from the surface of the water. 25) together into one inlet fitting 27

1-3

assembly. Teflon tape or paste must be used to seal the threads. Place one gasket (key 26) onto the inlet fitting. Working from the inside of pool, insert the inlet fitting through the hole in the liner and pool wall. Fit another gasket onto the inlet fitting until it rests against the outside surface of the pool wall. Thread a body nut (key 27) onto the inlet fitting.

26

26 24

25

28

4. Assemble and Install the Skim Filter a. Slide the skimmer housing (key 14) onto the main bracket (key 15) (see diagram 9). b. Insert the chlorinator slide (key 16) down into the main bracket Pool Wall (see diagram 10).

16

15

14

Pool Liner

7

9

10

c. Attach the end of the 24" (61 cm) hose (key 29) to the the bottom of the skimmer housing (key 14). No Diving or Jumping. Observe all spout SafetyatRules.

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29

11 d. Lower the assembly into the pool and hang the lip 19 of the main bracket (key 15) on the top edge of the pool with the skimmer housing on the inside of the 17 pool wall. Line up the outer bracket (key 17), with the main bracket and press them together. The top rail of the pool should be tightly locked between the two brackets. Fasten the brackets together with two bracket nuts (key 18) and bolts (key 19). The bolts should be on the outside of the pool and the nuts on 12 the inside. Do not overtighten the bolts.

1-5

Illustration and Technical Writing Haughs/Cantar

• Assembly instructions for pool equipment

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No Diving or Jumping. Observe all Safety Rules.


Educational Material Canadian Association of Wound Care

• A comprehensive package of educational materials for the Pressure Ulcer Awareness and Prevention Program: training manuals, brochures, marketing materials, posters, diagnostic aids, labels, etc.

14


Module 14: Patient Visit/Intervention

At this stage, it is important to determine the presence and degree of inflammation or infection. Is the wound colonized, critically colonized or infected? Is the infection local or systemic? A colonized wound does not require a specific dressing based on infection control. Critically colonized or infected wounds may require an antimicrobial dressing. Systemic antibiotics may also be required.

Module 2: Trauma to the Skin

PRESSURE, FRICTION AND SHEAR

In comparing pressure, friction and shear, we see that pressure damage occurs due to capillary closure, friction causes an abrasion that is superficial, while shear results in a deep tissue injury.

Optimum moisture balance is a key for creating a healing wound environment, so the clinician must also determine whether the wound is too dry, too moist or maintaining a good moisture balance. Exudative wounds will need dressings such as calcium alginates, hydrophilic fibres, or foams that have moisture-wicking properties. Dry wounds will need dressings such as hydrogels, which donate moisture. Wound Bed Charactersitics Wound Depth

• superficial

Shear: Shear is often misunderstood and confused with friction. Shear is similar to friction but causes a different injury. Shear occurs when the skin is pulled in one direction but the supporting structures below, such as muscle and bone, either don’t move, or move in the opposite direction (see Fig. 2-3). Although friction is an integral part of shear, friction alone results in a shallow abrasion of the skin surface while shear injury is traumatic to deeper tissues and is usually confined to the sacrum or coccyx. Figure 2-2: Friction

• full thickness • cavity Quality of Wound Bed

• necrotic • sloughy

Skin moving over a surface

• granulating • epithelializing Infection/Inflammation

• colonized • critically colonized • infection (local)

Figure 2-3: Shear

• infection (systemic) Moisture Balance

• dry • moist • exudating • heavily exudating

Part D: Determine the needs of the peri-wound environment

Skin being pulled in one direction while bone and muscle move in the opposite direction

Although wound dressings provide some absorption, the peri-wound environment is still at risk for maceration and excoriation from wound exudate, or trauma related to dressing removal. Prevention of peri-wound trauma includes the selection of absorptive, low-tack and atraumatic dressing products. Barrier products come in the form of ointments, creams, liquids or solids, provide protection from wound exudates, and may also increase skin resistance to trauma. An alternative may be the newer dressings with the soft silicone low-tack contact layer, which reduce peri-wound trauma with dressing changes. Some soft silicone dressings have absorptive properties that prevent irritation from wound exudate. Caution should be taken when using fixatives and tapes around peri-wound skin (see Appendix P, Peri-wound Skin Protectors).

The Art and Science of Wound Care: The Fundamentals of Wound Management

MolnVideoWkBk FINAL.indd 5

Thermal damage: A number of physical conditions can be categorized as thermal damage, including frostbite or burns from fire, heat, or chemicals. Radiation: Radiation exposure can create an injury to the skin that mimics a thermal response. Iatrogenic factors: Iatrogenic factors include health-care provider activities that may contribute to the development of wounds, including inappropriate treatments, such as administering toxic cleansers; skin stripping, where skin cells are repeatedly stripped or lifted away through the use of aggressive tapes; frequent removal of a self-adhesive dressing; repeated changing of other traditional adhesives; or inappropriate dressing selection such as wet-to-dry dressings that cause trauma to the wound bed.

Caution should be taken when using fixatives and tapes around peri-wound skin.

PAGE 14-5

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MolnVideoWkBk FINAL.indd 2

Educational Material Mölnlycke Health Care

• Wound Care Educational Program – textbook design and production, photography

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The Art and Science of Wound Care: The Fundamentals of Wound Management

5/10/06 3:42:25 PM


Lesson 1

Canada’s First Peoples

Native Hunters Following Caribou

Video Summary

Episode 1: When the World Began > The Crossing (11:54-19:24)

Purpose Students will identify factors that affect migration and mobility; demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which cultures are affected by migration; describe patterns and trends in migration and their effects on Canada.

CAPH, Vol. One, book reference Chapter 1: The Centre of the World, pages 1-9

Aboriginal people have lived in North America for at least 12 000 years and possibly much longer. This video chapter recounts the rich and varied history of the first inhabitants of the territory that would become Canada. It offers viewers the commonly held theory of how the first occupants came from Asia—most likely crossing the land bridge that occasionally spanned the Bering Strait during the Ice Ages. This land bridge emerged and disappeared several times, opening North America to its earliest inhabitants. It is believed that its most recent surfacing came during the last Ice Age, about 14 000 years ago and that, at that time, Canada’s first occupants crossed this land bridge and made their way into North America.

Why Is This Important? • • • •

learn how North America’s First Peoples most likely came here learn why all Canadians are immigrants to this land learn why people move from one area to another find out how much people depend on nature and how the natural environment shapes our lives

GeoloGic Journey

Wow! I Didn’t Know That 1 2 3

the War of 1812. to occur. Have students prepare 4 In Bluefish Caves in northern Yukon, archaeologists have • found a few chipped stoneand deliver an oral presentation on the role of leadership as displayed by Brock and Tecumseh. artifacts, as well as the bones of extinct fossil animals. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the artifacts are 13 000 to 18 000 years old—the earliest evidence of people in the impact of the aftermath of the War of 1812 on various • Have students research North America. groups involved, such as Aboriginal people, soldiers, and so on.

Questions, Questions, Questions

keywords

introduction

erosion, clay, cap rock, Niagara Escarpment, Niagara Gorge, Niagara Falls, continental and oceanic crust, mantle, cavitation

Chapter 1 of The Great Lakes explores Niagara Falls—the “jewel in the Great Lakes crown.” Students learn about the erosion of the Niagara Gorge, the power of Niagara Falls, and the reasons why this area is considered to be the “birthplace of modern geology.”

chapter 1

Niagara Falls

• understand the factors determining the rates at which physical processes occur, e.g., erosion and differential weathering • evaluate the role of humans and technology in controlling erosion Materials Required • Geologic Journey: The Great Lakes video

curriculum objectives • describe the components of the internal structure of the Earth

Episode 6: The Pathfinders

Before Viewing

student activities 1.1.1 Initially, divide the class into two groups: those who have visited Niagara Falls, and those who have not; then, to facilitate the group work, divide these two groups into smaller groups of 4 or 5 students. Ask both groups of students to discuss and record responses (as a group) to the following questions.

Video Summary > The Selkirk Settlers 1 What stories do you know that explain the creation of Earth and humans? (hr. 2, 15:04-22:49) These video chapters focus on changes to the interior of Western Canada as the fur trade 2 Why do immigrants come to Canada? How > Seven Oaksdo they get here? nears the end of two centuries of dominance. They tell the story of the great fur-trading (hr. 2, 22:49-28:49)come from? 3 Where did Canada’s Aboriginal peoples originally How did they get here? empires—the Hudson’s Bay Company and the North West Company—and the Aboriginal people who were their indispensable allies and collaborators. They tell as well of the During Viewing birth of a new people, the Métis, and trace their tangled relations with the first Euro1 Recall two creation stories told by the First Peoples. What do agricultural these storiessettlers all havealong the Red River. pean in common? Activity Starters 2 How is the story of the Salish people different from the stories told by the other • Students can analyze the lifestyle of the Aboriginal people in Western Canada nations? (migration-based) before the arrival of the Selkirk Settlers. What impact would a permanent agricul3 What role did climate play in the Salish story? tural community have upon their lifestyle? 4 Name new empires or peoples that evolved in North America. • Have students debate the pros and cons of the Pemmican Proclamation. Students can consider various perspectives on the issue. After Viewing • Have students write a letter, in role, as someone who has just arrived in the Red 1 Tell one of the creation stories you heard. What makes it memorable for you? after long journey from Scotland. The letter should outline feelings 2 How did the climate change between 15 000 and 20 000 yearsRiver ago? Valley Explain thealink and include a description of the experience. between the glaciers and the arrival of the first occupants in upon Northarrival, America.

2

1

The Great Lakes

Video Summary > “A Mere Matter of Marching” These four video chapters chronicle the various elements of the War of 1812. The first (hr. 2, 7:50-12:58) outlines some of the reasons for the outbreak and the remainder recount the military > The Detriot Bluff elements of the various battles and campaigns. They highlight the roles and contribu12:58-19:24) Ice is one of the hardest substances (hr. on 2,Earth. It can crush steel change the tions of and many participants, particularly Sir Isaac Brock and Tecumseh. > Queenston Heights shape of the land. (hr. 2, 19:24-26:27) Glaciers form from snow, not from >ice. Activity Starters Tecumseh’s Last Stand 2, 26:27-34:51) • 4°C Students can complete Average yearly temperatures would (hr. only need to drop about for another ice age mapping and military tactic activities on the key battles of

• • • •

What do the Niagara Falls look and sound like? What is the economic significance of the Falls? What is the geologic significance of the Falls? In what ways are the Falls part of the Canadian identity?

1.1.2 Compare the responses from the “have visited” and the “have not visited” groups. You may find that even though some students have not visited Niagara Falls, they will have had exposure to video or pictures and may be able to respond to at least one or more of the questions. This prior knowledge attests to the significance of the Falls as part of Canada’s physical landscape. As students watch the footage in Geologic Journey they will be able to add more information regarding the economic and geologic significance of the Falls.

3 Explain how the first inhabitants depended on nature. Video Summary > The Gold Rush 4 Explain how the first inhabitants were vulnerable to nature. (hr. 2, 38:19-46:07) This chapter highlights the second force that complemented the fur trade in drawing settlers to the West. With the discovery of gold on the Fraser and Cariboo rivers in the Canada: A People’s History Lesson Plans interior on • the Western Cordillera, settlers and American prospectors began to stream into the Hudson’s Bay Company’s territory to stake their claim. The implications of this influx of settlers for the area’s British sovereignty were not lost on the local population. The Empire responded with the creation of a new colony—British Columbia.

Video review Watch Chapter 1 of the video with a focus on the “profound geologic significance” of Niagara Falls. Responses to the following questions will assist in an understanding of this statement. 1.1.3 What is the annual rate of retreat of the Falls? 1.1.4 In volume, how do Niagara Falls rate in terms of waterfalls of the world? 1.1.5 How fast does water fall over the Falls?

Activity Starters

• Have the students research and map the types of mineral formations found in this region. They can also research the processes for mining and extracting gold. • Students can investigate and present, orally or in writing, the economic implications of a gold rush. How does it affect an area in terms of secondary industries? What government support systems are required to make things work smoothly? What problems are created for an isolated and geographically large colony?

1.1.6 Why are Niagara Falls considered to be “the birthplace of modern geology”? 1.1.7 Time is an important concept in geology. Complete the following chart indicating various times mentioned in the video. Description

Time

British geologist Charles Lyell’s estimate (in the 19th century) of the number of years that the Falls had been eroding “backward” The

19th

century estimate of the age of the Earth

The current (21st century) scientific estimate of the age of the Earth

Canada: A People’s History • Additional Resources

1-2

ME-5

Educational Material CBC Educational Sales

• Canada: A People’s History video companion Teacher Resource Package – design and production

• Geologic Journey video companion Teacher Resource Package – design

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13

1

Developing a Developmental Bias, or a 3 a.m. Wake-up Call

Chapter Three

Although we seem to be pulling out threads, or hairs, people, settlers who of course also suited their political plan to trace “who was who” and lack individual stories from our to consolidate Russia’s hold on its new southern frontier. ancestors, we know a lot about these Mennonite great-great The Mennonites in return were loyal to their tsars. Many grandparents. In North America pioneers moved farther a Mennonite story was passed down the generations: Peter and farther west, but in the early 1800s in Russia a massive the Great had a Mennonite personal physician when he lived settler movement went south. Catherine the Great had invited a year in Saandam, Holland; Tsar Alexander I stopped for Mennonites from Prussia to a meal at a Mennonite her southern steppes, granted home in Lindenau in 1814; them free land and other so and so received a gold privileges and later Russian medallion from the Tsar. tsars brought in and similarly Most important was the granted aid and privileges Privilegium or “Pergament.” to Tatars, Greeks, Germans, Spoken of in hushed Rumanians and Bulgarians. and reverend tones, this The early settlers ran sheep or document, which outlined cattle on their grasslands, but the freedoms and conditions increasingly after the 1850s, of settlement granted to although some were always Mennonites in Russia, was in trades, most became grain issued in 1800 by Tsar Paul, farmers on the virgin soil. son of Catherine the Great. Each immigrant group was Kept in a special place encouraged to set up its own in the Old Colony in the villages and keep its own Khortitsa administration languages so that southern building, it guaranteed A zemlianka or dugout at Steinbach Mennonite museum, Russia became an area of religious freedom, exemption Manitoba visited by (L-R) Anne Konrad Dyck, Hilda Konrad many ethnic minorities living from military service, the (emerging), Irma Konrad, Bernard Konrad and Wesley Konrad among native Ukrainians. right not to have saloons in in 1990. Jews also flooded into their colonies, a ten-year southern Ukraine, some tax holiday, other privileges finding occupations in cities and others in villages or small and of course, land, up to 65 desiatines per family.1 Similar privileges were given to other settler groups. towns where their shtetls multiplied. Urban Jews entered They were hard-working, these Mennonite settlers. By trades, became storekeepers, merchants, bankers, factory the time Jakob Abraham (son of Knecht Abraham Abraham owners and business people, some rich, many poor. My Grandfather Konrad, a prosperous farmer in Spat, Crimea had Konrad and Catarina Woelk) was born in 1823 the primitive dugouts or zemlianki of the first pioneers had been replaced himself photographed with his Jewish lawyer (probably in by neat villages with broad main streets and Dutch-style Simferopol). buildings, house and barn under one roof, an architectural The Russian tsars had courted the Mennonites because tradition carried over from the Netherlands. These grandsons they saw them as model farmers, hard-working, honest 29

IgnitingTheThirdFactor FINAL-2.indd 143

Books • 500-page book; design and production

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The Beginnings Of Helenes And Jakobs

And in Their Silent Beauty Speak

Embrace Adversity

r. Dabrowski firmly believed there could be no authentic growth without adversity. He believed that it was adversity—a crisis—that created the inner turmoil of emotions that eventually led to engaging the Third Factor and moving to a higher level. In Dabrowski’s theory of Editor: So where to now? “positive disintegration,” adversity leads to the disintegration of the perAuthor: I thought I’d talk a bit about how this focus on developmental bias evolved and led to the five “rings” we’ll be discussing in the book, and whyson’s current inner milieu and the harnessing of “over-excitabilities”—a susceptibility to strong feelings, intense emotional reactions. The Third this is important in the business world. Factor eventually leads to reintegration at a higher level of moral and Editor: Hmm . . . I’ve been thinking . . . emotional growth. Author: Oh-oh! Every time Sandra, my wife, says “I’ve been thinking” I We will be looking at a “lighter” version of the theory here, but the know something is about to happen or change for me. same fundamental self-transformation is in action. Only when you fail Editor: That’s because wives often have a strong developmental bias as far or are challenged do you get to discover what you have, what you don’t as husbands are concerned, and that’s what I was going to point out. The wife thinks: “I see so clearly where he needs to get better. Why doesn’t hehave and how strong your own resources are. Ben Zander, conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, points out that for teachers, success get it?” and failure are equal, and it isn’t until we fail that we learn something. Author: I want to point out that getting married does not often lead to the type of developmental bias of which I’m speaking. Sandra, for example, has There are some very good outcomes when we embrace and overcome clearly identified countless ways for me to be better. Observing my manyadversity. It’s a tremendous confidence builder, and the confidence and obvious flaws, she sees my need to be better in an increasingly widebuilt is the real thing, not the sometimes phony, imitative, “talking-likevariety of settings. I would suggest, however, that most of it is more con-I-might-be-able-to” kind. The good (and bad) news is that in today’s nected to the fact that when we’re out in public together, she doesn’t want world we certainly have ample occasion to deal with adversity. in any way to be associated with, or embarrassed by, any quirky behavior In the work world, the history of the past few decades clearly indicates on my part. Apparently this is quite a common pattern. Peggy Baumgartner, head ofthat change, volatility, uncertainty and other adverse conditions are here our training division, recently asked her husband, Richard, to write a self-to stay. In other words, you can expect more of the same “weather” in the assessment, an exercise we use in many of our workshops. When Richardwork world that you have already been experiencing. So why not coach scored low on the “self-critical” scale, Peggy couldn’t understand, given hisand develop in others the attitudinal skills, attributes and competencies that will make them exceptional at quickly adjusting to and performing well in adverse conditions? Two years ago in a workshop I was conducting, I asked the class to generate a list of competencies that would best help people deal effectIgnitingTheThirdFactor FINAL-2.indd 13 12/23/08 6:00:09 PM ively with change. We were discussing the fact that there are those who seem much more able to adjust and adapt when change occurs, while others are still dragging their feet weeks later. Someone suggested that one of the primary reasons coaching was emerging as the “go-to” management style was that it was so effective at dealing with situations where

Igniting the Third Factor • Book design and production

17

3/17/10 10:46:21 AM


Instruction

The Secrets to a Big Serve

In our continuing series on the basics, Instruction Editor David Phillips describes how “serving ‘huge’” means “serving smart,” and how you can turn your serve into a smart weapon. by David Phillips, Instruction Editor

A

fter seeing the amazing serving demonstration by Pete Sampras at Wimbledon, one has to wonder at times why we spend so much time hitting groundstrokes. I am convinced that someone once told me they were the cornerstones of my game. However, with the improvements in racquets and physical training, serving has become a vital part of every player’s game. Now, how do I get myself one of those “huge” serves like Sampras’? The answer lies in analyzing why certain servers give you so much trouble. They offer you the solution to serves that win points easily. They have figured out that “hugeness” has nothing to do with power, but instead with your smarts.

Why Do We Do It? Determining the Real Reasons We Play Tennis

The Slice Serve

5. Have a plan. Serving rituals, like bouncing the ball or adjusting your feet or clothing, not only aid in relaxation and focus but also provide you with time to visualize how the point will unfold. Believe that you are in control of the flow of the point and you will be. Use your time wisely to force your opponent to hit the type of return you would like, allowing you to dictate the point with your next shot. For example, the illustration shows a wide serve to the deuce court pulling the returner outside the doubles alley (a). The server can then direct his/her second shot (b) into the open court (c).

Not only is this serve easy on the shoulder, but it is also useful as a can opener against any opponent (see illustration, below left). Placement and not pace is the key to this serve. In the photos of U14 tournament player Nicholas Brotman, you can see the edge of the racquet approaching the ball (Photo 1) as he brushes from 9 o’clock to 3 o’clock across the back of the ball. By the time his racquet has made contact (Photo 2), Nicholas’ arm is fully extended into the shot. He has tossed the ball in front and to the right of his body so his weight can transfer forward and up into the shot and his racquet can brush across the back of the ball at the appropriate angle to impart spin.

Most of us think we know why we play tennis. And we approach the game—who we play with, if and how we practise, how we play, and the types of games we enjoy—based on those beliefs. Instruction Editor Adrian Coles explains how closer examination of our real reasons for playing often reveals a deeper truth that can lead to increased success and satisfaction. by Adrian Coles, Instruction Editor

W

The two most important strokes in tennis, the serve and the return, are the ones we practise least. Set aside some time this winter to practise each stroke, even if it’s just 15 minutes before you start playing games. You’ll reap the rewards.

1

2

A Must:

pay attention to where serves land and where mistakes are made. The latter can be important; they can reveal the server’s intention and the price to be paid for poor placement. An example of this would be a slice first serve that misses wide vs. a slice serve that lands in but sits up into the receiver’s forehand. Which do you think is the better mistake?

Intelligent Spectating:

David Phillips is a certified Level 3 Coach (Level 4 candidate) and Pro/Manager at Richmond Hill Winter Tennis Club.

Seek out the advice of your tennis professional. The serve is probably the most complicated shot in tennis and it needs an expert’s eye to take care of the fine tuning and keep you on the right track. The next time you watch a tennis match,

Ontario Tennis 6 Fall 1997

Digital art ©Bill Chapman/PageWise®

Practise, Practise, Practise:

First, he said he liked tennis for the exercise; he said he has a very stressful job and he needed tennis to relieve the tension. He said he knew he felt relief from the stress at work when he left the court feeling pleasantly tired. Second, he said he liked tennis because he felt it helped him create a better rapport with his banker, his regular opponent on a Sunday morning. He said he felt he achieved this when the banker left the court with a smile on his face, having had a good workout. Third, he said he enjoyed tennis because it helped develop a greater bond between him, his wife, and two teenage sons. They played every Saturday together. He felt he achieved this bond when they walked off the court together, smiling and joking. These answers completely changed the focus of his game and the thrust of the lessons. Here’s how: To help him reduce his work stress, we worked on his ability to be consistent rather than to hit more forcing shots. The longer he was able to keep the ball in play, the more exercise he would have. This resulted in a better workout and a better sense of tired calmness. Trying to get him to hit more forcefully would have resulted in shortened rallies and many more errors. Naturally, because he is a perfectionist, this would have created extra tension rather than have reduced it.

Ontario Tennis 7 Fall 1997

Magazines Ontario Tennis Magazine • Design and production

18

1. Get a high percentage of first serves in. Achieving this keeps your confidence level high and saves wear and tear on your shoulder. It also keeps the door closed on an opponent who enjoys attacking a second serve. 2. You are only as good as your second serve. The adage is true. Depth on your second serve will push the returner back and keep the pressure on. Adding spin and placement are additional techniques to work on, turning your second serve into a weapon. 3. Change-up and move your serve around like a baseball pitcher. Using a variety of spins and placement can keep even the best of returners off-guard. The key is to not allow the returner to establish a rhythm. 4. Use the environment. As winter approaches and play moves indoors, take advantage of your surroundings. For example, court dividers make wide serves difficult to handle.

Photos by Jagdeep Gundu

Illustrations by Robert Ketchen

5 Steps to Serving Big:

e ask every new student right off the bat: “What is it about tennis that you like the most? What do you get out of playing? What is your main reason for playing? Over the years, we have had some very varied answers. Try to establish what exactly it is about tennis that attracts you because the answer will determine your whole approach to the game. And for instructors your reasons for playing will often completely alter the focus of the lessons. Here is one student’s story. I asked Sam what it was about tennis he liked the best and why he wanted to take tennis lessons. He said he liked winning and wanted to get better. An instructor’s usual response would be to work on the following: Hit the ball earlier and harder to put more pressure on opponents; hit the first serve harder to set up the next shot; probe opponents’ weaknesses and then exploit them; hit with more spin, add variety to your game to confuse opponents; win the points quicker and be more decisive! His had been standard answers, but I explored deeper by asking him: “What’s important to you in your tennis? And— “What has to happen for you to feel your goals have been achieved? So, with a little probing I found out his real reasons for playing.

see Reasons page 20 . . .


Wound Care fa l l 2 0 1 3 VOl.11 nO.2

C

A

N

A

D

A

T h e O f f i c i a l P u b l i c aT i O n O f T h e c a n a d i a n a s s O c i aT i O n O f W O u n d c a r e

A New Resource for Clinicians:

including Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE), several recently completed best practice guidelines for pressure ulcer treatment (RNAO, CAWC and EPUAP/NPUAP) and the previous document produced by the Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine in 2000.

Canadian Best Practice Guidelines Diabetic Foot Canada

for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers in People with Spinal Cord Injury

Addressing a Growing Issue

Additional copies of this publicatio Katika Integrated n can be obtained Communications from: 240 Brunel Inc. Rd. Mississau ga ON Canada 905 . 949 . 1020, L4Z 1T5 1.866.741.5807 info @ katika . com www. katika . com This publicatio n is also available online at: www.onf.org

ISBN 978-0-99 19094-0-7 This publicatio n is intended to be used widely, reproduction of the resource is encourage © Copyright d. 2013

10

als working with people who have SCI.

About the BPG

This BPG represents the culmination of over two years of work by an interprofessional team of authors that includes a physician, nurses, consumers, an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, registered dietitians, and an engineer. The authors have compiled information from several existing evidence-based sources

Canadian Be Practice Gu st ide for the Prev lines en Manageme tion and nt Ulcers in Pe of Pressure Spinal Cord ople with Injury A Resource Handbook for Clinicians

9 780991 909407

Houghton PE, Campbell KE and CPG Panel for the Preventi (2013). Canadia on and Manage A resource ment of Pressure n Best Practice handbook for Guidelines Ulcers in People Clinicians. with Accessed at http://www.onf.org Spinal Cord Injury.

Volume 11, Number 2 · Fall 2013

Magazines Wound Care Canada Magazine • Design and production

19

This BPG resource is meant to update SCI-specific guidelines related to pressure ulcers and to identify areas in existing guidelines in wound care that

Quick Facts on PUs in People with SCI › Pressure ulcers are one of the most common complications affecting people living with spinal cord injury.

› The impact on the quality of life of people who develop a pressure ulcer is substantial, significantly interfering with the ability to participate in daily activities and occupation.

ISBN 978-0-99 19094-07

Wound Care Canada

“We hope this guideline provides a comprehensive approach to skin and wound care for the SCI population and will ultimately help prevent and better manage pressure ulcers in this unique group of people.” — Project leaders Pamela Houghton, PT, PhD, and Karen Campbell, RN, MScN, PhD

› The majority of people with SCI will have at least one pressure ulcer at some point post-SCI injury.

Injury

Special pre-conference issue

T

he first-ever Canadianbased best practice guideline (BPG) for people with pressure ulcers and spinal cord injury (SCI) is now available online. There is a tremendous need to improve the care of these largely preventable complications of SCI so that fewer people are affected and those who are affected are impacted for the shortest time possible. The collation of the most recent information into a BPG provides one of the first comprehensive resources to serve a need for all profession-

Canadian Best Practice Manageme nt of Press Guidelines for the Preve ure Ulcers Handbook for in People with ntion and Clinicians Spinal Cord

CSWD Education for Frontline Nurses

A Resource

Prevention and Management of Intertrigo

can be applied to people with SCI. Where the authors felt the situation was unique for people with SCI, new sections have been written. In the new sections, the authors looked to the research evidence that was collated in SCIRE and added practices that are more empirically based.

› Some people with SCI have described the experience of a pressure ulcer as being as impactful on their lifestyle as was the original spinal cord injury.

Volume 11, Number 2 · Fall 2013

How to Get and Implement the BPG The guideline is available for free download from the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation at http://onf.org/system/attachments/168/original/Pressure_ Ulcers_Best_Practice_Guideline_ Final_web4.pdf. The authors recommend that clinicians select a section or a few recommendations (preferably the ones with a higher level of research evidence) and tailor them to the local setting for implementation. Doing so will support clinicians who choose to introduce best practices into their local practice setting.

Wound Care Canada

11


British Columbia British Columbia

Access to: Dermatological care

Grade Fail

Medical procedures

Needs improvement

Medications

Fail

Key issues

Skin Deep A Report Card on Access to Dermatological Care and Treatment in Canada – 2012

British Columbia

1. Patients experience long wait times for routine appointments with a dermatologist. The root cause of these delays may be related to the shortage of dermatologists in the province. 2. Lack of access to phototherapy. While the British Columbia government has succeeded in providing specialized dermatology treatments in tertiary care centres, a primary form of dermatological treatment—phototherapy—is rapidly disappearing. The situation is especially acute for British Columbians living outside urban centres. 3. Unreasonable and time-consuming restrictions placed on the use of newer drugs pose barriers to access and waste scarce dermatologist time. 4. Melanoma patients need access to all Health Canada-approved treatments in a timely manner. Currently British Columbia does not cover all treatments considered to be part of the standard of care. These and new treatments in the regulatory pipeline must be covered expeditiously to save lives. 5. British Columbians with rare skin diseases do not have access to necessary treatments. British Columbia lacks a policy on rare diseases that would fund promising medications for severely affected skin patients without other alternatives and it lacks an exemption application process that applies to those with rare skin conditions.

Recommendations The Canadian Skin Patient Alliance calls on the Government of British Columbia to achieve the following goals in collaboration with dermatology professionals and patients. 1. Improve access to dermatological care: a. Reduce wait times for routine dermatology consultations to five weeks within the next three years. Strategies may include: 1. Develop a plan to achieve a minimum ratio of one full-time medical dermatologist for every 65,000 people by recruiting 16 new dermatologists; 1. Creation of billing codes for the services of trained dermatology nurses working under the supervision of a dermatologist. b. Require that basic dermatological care is provided within reasonable commutCanadian Skin Patient Alliance · Skin Deep: Report Card on Access to Dermatological Care and Treatment in Canada 2012

Reports Canadian Skin Patient Association (CSPA) 2012 Skin Deep Report Card

An assessment of the performance of the Canadian health-care system • Design and production

20

BC-1


tiple benefits of

Discover the mul

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ssa Therapeutic Ma , BA, R MT AVINA SKOLN IK ge Therapist Registered Massa

Avina Brochure A 2004.ƒ4 2004 02 06 11:31 Page 2

What is massage therapy? MT origins date back 3,000 years to the ancient civilizations , BA, Rtherapy’s SKOLN IKMassage who used massage apist to improve health. Today, therapeutic massage is recoger Th ed Massage nized as a complementary form of health care used for achieving general

Who should have massage therapy?

Lifestyle and work habits directly affect the quality and quantity of health. Just about everyone—including people who work with computers, professionals, executives, health-care practitioners, frequent travellers, teachers, physical workers, ets Stre Bloor parents, students, athletes, performers—may experience physical or emotional at Bathurst andrelaxation or treating specific conditions. In Ontario, a registered massage therio is trained in Swedish Massage. stress. Stress is one of the most pervasive side-effects of our fast-paced 21st-century apist Toronto, Ontar 7 living. Prolonged stress has been documented as a significant, contributing factor 416-457-299 ik.com causing “dis-ease,” which is an expression of the body/mind out of balance. www.avinaskolnWhat is Swedish massage? and Bloor Streets rst thu Ba at ed Massage therapy is a highly effective complementary health-care tool proven to Locatconnective Swedish massage is the manipulation of soft tissue: muscles, skin, tario Toronto, Onhelp tissue, tendons and ligaments. Although this is the most common style used, 7 maintain good health, achieve a feeling of balance and well-being, assist in 416-457-299 the recovery from a specific illness or injury, or help prevent injury. my eclectic training allows me to apply a ik.com www.avinaskoln under the based variety of therapeutic techniques, io tar On of ists Therap Massage therapy effectively treats: lege of Massageupon your needs. fessions Act. • emotional stress resulting from busy lifestyle, grief, depression, abuse ulated Health Pro • physical pain What happens during a session? • back and neck tension Your first visit includes completing a confi• stiff and sore shoulders dential health history form and, if rele• migraines and headaches vant, checking range of motion, assessing • strains, sprains and muscle spasms posture and/or performing standard • whiplash orthopedic tests to determine your current • injuries—athletic or traumatic condition. • tendonitis and bursitis My therapeutic approach is client-focused. It is my job to be a catalyst for • constipation and digestive conditions achieving your optimum health. Your body has the capacity to heal itself and I • arthritis and degenerative disc disease encourage you to become part of that process. I explain the treatment plan so • sciatica and neuralgia the therapeutic partnership is one where you feel comfortable, safe and • circulatory problems informed and can modify the treatment. I augment the treatment by demon• carpal tunnel syndrome strating applicable stretches, or providing relaxation or nutritional suggestions. • discomfort from menstruation and pregnancy • chronic or palliative conditions • general relaxation needs

Marketing Material Therapeutic Massage

• A three-fold brochure, printed in two colours. • Design, layout and production using existing copy, photos and logo.

21

How much does it cost? Massage therapy is covered under most extended health-care plans and many private insurance companies provide full or partial coverage. In addition, no-fault automobile insurance coverage may apply. Your health-insurance provider may require a physician’s referral. All treatments are by appointment only. Fees are based on duration of treatment; sessions typically last 60 to 90 minutes. Please call to enquire.

What other therapeutic techniques are available? In addition to Swedish massage, the following therapeutic techniques may also be applied: Cranial Sacral Therapy, Trager™, Trigger Point Therapy, Matrix Repatterning, Touch for Health, Focusing Technique, chakra system and energy clearing/balancing.


Marketing Material Banff Designs

• Semi-annual reseller order book

22


Christine Card A finalOUTL.indd 1

1/5/07 12:04:48 PM

Christine Card A finalOUTL.indd 2

Marketing Material Devine Holistic Movement • Postcard design and production

23

1/5/07 12:04:34 PM


ctors

The Ultimate

Last Night of the

he Board of

mers

er

Conductor

esidence

Saturday, June 7, 2003, 8:00 p.m. • Cedarbrae Collegiate Institute Auditorium

eate

r

The Scarborough Philharmonic

ns Consultant esigner

2002–03

Season

h

al e

Your musical journey begins here . . .

23RD SEASON JEROME DAVID SUMMERS, MUSIC DIRECTOR

23RD SEASON Jerome David Summers, Music Director

Concert Programmes

SPO Programme 2002-2003.20a

1

2002 10 11, 10:42

Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra

• Design and production of season programmes and ticket brochures

24


Building Signage Unicell Trucks

25

Ketchen portfolio 03a  

Portfolio of work.

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