Issuu on Google+

rmsenior.com • WINTER 2012

Around town with guests Pedal power A Mature perspective on fiscal cliff Holiday helpings

SPECIAL SECTION:

Senior

DIRECTORY local resources for seniors living in northern Colorado


Having the family

“HEAR” for the Holidays

During the holidays it can become apparent to family when one of the family members is having difficulty hearing. Family members with hearing loss may require frequent repetition, have difficulty following conversations, think that people sound like they’re mumbling or have difficulty hearing in noisy situations. Emotionally they may be stressed out from straining to hear what others are saying; feel annoyed or embarrassed because they can’t hear or understand the conversation.

Susan D Baker, BS BC-HIS Board Certified Hearing Instrument Specialist

(970) 221-5249 2001 S. Shields Street, Bldg J2 • Fort Collins



| RMSENIOR


RMsenior

|




| RMSENIOR


C O NTE NTS

WINTER 2012

DEPARTMENTS

P6 • Out & About

Entertaining holiday company Try out some of these fun activities when guests arrive PUBLISHER Scott Titterington, 221-9210 scott.rmpublishing@gmail.com

P8 • Mind Body Spirit

Pedal power for fun and fitness Stay active, build relationships, and age gracefully

EDITOR Kristin Titterington, 221-9210 kristin.rmpublishing@gmail.com

P10 • Money Matters

The sky is falling...again A mature perspective of the impending fiscal cliff “disaster”

Calendar Editor Aly Titterington

P12 • Nutrition

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Emily Zaynard emily.rmpublishing@gmail.com

Holiday helpings Fortify your will power to resist compulsive overeating

P16 • Keep it Sharp

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Greg Hoffman, 689-6832 greg.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Sara Hansen, 310-9850 sara.rmpublishing@gmail.com

Puzzles to challenge your mind

P18 • Calendar

Check out these events and activities across northern Colorado

P26 • Senior Moment

The long view The bathroom window reveals more than meets the eye

ADVERTISING SALES Angela Isaac, 391-5212 angela.rmpublishing@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION Wendee Brungardt, Sharon Klahn, Rob’s Bike Courier Service COVER PHOTO iStockphoto.com

SPECIAL SECTION:

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bevin Barber-Campbell, Bear Jack Gebhardt, Lana Olsson, Linda Osmundson

2012-13 Use this resource to find programs, services, and products for you and your loved ones. Conveniently organized into broad topics, the guide makes it easy for you to discover activities, arts & entertainment, caregiving support, classes, food services, healthcare & fitness providers, housing, and other services.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING 825 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80521 Voice 221-9210 Fax 221-8556 editor@rockymountainpub.com www.RMParentMagazine.com Rocky Mountain Senior magazine is published five times a year by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. Publication of this paper does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. RMP reserves the right to refuse any advertisement for any reason. The opinions expressed by contributors or writers do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rocky Mountain Publishing. ©2012 Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without express written permission is prohibited.

RMsenior

|


out & about

Entertaining holiday company Try out some of these fun activities when guests arrive Linda L. Osmundson

W

hen we moved to Fort Collins seventeen years ago, a California friend commented that she had never heard of the city. She has visited many times since then and enjoyed the opportunities available in northern Colorado. Give your visitors a list of entertainment ideas, choose some favorites, and have a good time. For starters, take a drive to downtown Loveland, Fort Collins or Greeley to view Christmas and holiday decorations and enjoy dinner at your favorite restaurant. Here are other activities to consider. Fort Collins Many restaurants offer music, if not nightly, at least on the weekends. For a list of choices, log onto tinyurl.com/bg zggo8. One favorite is Avagadros Number, www.avogadros.com/. They bring in music from Bluegrass and Dixieland to Fort Collins Opera Guild’s arias. Some programs have a small cover charge. Check the website for listings and costs. Midtown Arts Center, www.adinner theatre.com, entertains with dinner and a play. The holiday show, Plaid Tidings, a Christmas version of Forever Plaid, runs through Dec. 31. Forever Plaid plays from January 4 to February 24. Legally Blond, the Musical, begins in March. CSU performing arts shows are listed at www.theatre.colostate.edu/. In December they present A Christmas Story, which is about a young boy who wants a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. The production’s cast consists of undergraduate students and local children. Performance dates and times are listed on this website, central.colostate. edu/news/11025/. Pick a warm day and do the self-guided Old Town Historic tour. Find it at www. downtownfortcollins.com/dba.php/tours/. For a list of museums, visit tinyurl. com/am2rm7j. You might take visitors to the new Museum of Discovery. In fact, a grandparent membership of $65 allows 

| RMSENIOR

two grandparents and grandchildren under 21 free access to the museum for a year. Otherwise, ticket prices are $9.50 for adults, $7.50 for seniors, $7.00 for students (with valid ID), $6 for children ages 3 – 12. Children 2 and under are free. Loveland The Budweiser event center provides something for everyone, including sports such as Eagles hockey and Harlem Globe Trotters, touring shows such as Sesame Street Live, December 7-9 and Hair, December 17, and other special events like Monster Truck Winter Nationals, Jan. 18-19 and the New Years Eve, Extreme Rodeo Challenge. Check their website for listings, www. budweisereventscenter.com/calendar. cfm?month=12&year=2012. Loveland Museum/Gallery presents prints by Dave Yust, former CSU art professor, through February 17 in the Main Gallery. The museum is free except for the $5 charge for Main Gallery exhibits. Free days are Saturday December 29, Sunday January 13, and Thursday February 7. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse in Johnstown performs Mame, now through-Jan 13 and The Unsinkable Molly Brown, Jan. 14 - March 30. Prices range from $47.50 to $57.50 for adults and $29.50 for children 5-18. www. coloradocandlelight.com/tickets.htm. Rialto Theater has a large list of Christmas performances. Check their website for programs, times and costs. www.ci.loveland.co.us/index. aspx?page=1682. If the day is warm, take a walk through Benson Sculpture Park. Greeley Union Colony Center as well as UNC present performances throughout the holidays. Log onto http://ucstars.com/

shows.php?page=2 for more information and entertainment opportunities. Visit the Greeley History Museum, 714 8th Street and/or the Meeker Museum, 1324 9th Avenue. A day in Denver A trip to Denver might include the Denver Art Museum, lunch, History Colorado Museum, and culminate with a stop at Civic Center Plaza to view the City and County Building’s light display. The lights are also lit during the Stock Show in January. Becoming Van Gogh at the art museum is a Denver exclusive exhibit put together by curator Timothy J. Standring over a seven-year period. It closes January 20th. Order tickets online before visiting www.denverartmuseum.org/exhibitions/ becoming-van-gogh. The History Colorado Museum across the street tenders interactive activities such as the Steamboat Springs ski jump and history via a floor map and robots. Lunch nearby at the new restaurant, Fired Up, 1135 Bannock, which is about a two-and-a-half-block walk. This new restaurant serves wonderful “not your average pizzas”, salads, soups, and sandwiches. Or, lunch at Mad Greens across from the art museum’s Hamilton Building.


RMsenior

|


mind, body, spirit

Pedal power for fun and fitness Stay active, build relationships, and age gracefully

W

hen I met my great grandfather, he was 90 years old and still riding a bicycle. His son, my grandfather, was equally spry and active at that age. Naturally, my father followed in their footsteps: When he was 55 years old, he competed in his first Ironman, and in his 60s, he learned to telemark ski and started doing Xterra mountain bike triathlons. Now in his 70s, he is still racing, skiing, and bike touring with his wife, and using his bicycle for transportation. With all this generational modeling, the message was made clear to me: Stay active, live longer and age well with greater ease, stamina and agility. Pure and simple: don’t stop moving! In Colorado, we are fortunate to have lots of examples of people living by this principle. Why ride a bicycle? Cycling is a wonderful physical activity at any age, so why stop in your 70s? For seniors, cycling is ideal for several reasons: It’s low impact, it’s accessible and challenging for people of all fitness levels, physical abilities and sizes, and it can be combined with other fun activities (e.g., a lunch date, travel, or being with family). Bottom line, cycling is good for you. Even just bicycling for transportation has significant health benefits. Average adults lose 13 lbs in their first year of commuting by bicycle. Cycling just three hours per week can reduce the risk of heart disease by 50 percent. Bicycling can improve balance, which is important for seniors in preventing falls and injuries. While biking, you are engaging your core and strengthening leg and back muscles, which will help you off the bicycle. Like other forms of exercise, cycling can elevate your mood. Cycling helps release those endorphins that give us a sense of well being, and can 

| RMSENIOR

B e v i n B a r b e r - C a m p b e ll

help us beat the winter blues by getting you outdoors. Repetitive movements, like turning the pedals, increase levels of serotonin. And bicycling with your spouse can strengthen your relationship, according to my father. Having a shared activity can increase your feelings of connection and attraction. Having a shared goal, such as training for a charity ride or a tour in New Zealand, can provide mutual motivation. Cycling doesn’t require a matched skill level and is likely something you can both do, even after injuries or operations (like double-knee replacements!). My dad likes to ride behind my mom and let her set the pace. My mom loves the bike ride even more if it includes an adventure, like exploring a new town

ences. I know my son talks nonstop the minute he gets on a bicycle; riding together could be a way to get to know each other better. Also, if you live in the same town, you could give a grandchild the chance to bike to school when his parents might be too rushed to allow for this activity. Most importantly, like in my family, you will be modeling healthy habits and what it means to be an active older person.

or getting to eat the artichoke soup for which she is willing to bike long miles. My father also believes that the bicycle is a great way to connect with his grandkids. Helping a grandchild learn to ride a bike or going on a ride together can provide wonderful shared experi-

errands (another excellent modeling opportunity to your grandchildren: Taking care of the earth by using your bicycle). Fear and trepidation are potential barriers for someone who has not been on a bike for some time. A great way to increase one’s confidence is to take a

Start small and get educated If you have taken a hiatus from the bicycle, start small as you get reacquainted. Short rides into Old Town for lunch will be invigorating. Soon you might find yourself experimenting more with tours of our city or using your bicycle for


bicycle traffic skills class like the TS101 class offered by the city of Fort Collins (contact the city’s Bike Program to register). TS101 will teach you the rules of the road and bike handling skills. In the past, the city has also offered bicycling classes specifically for seniors. Getting the right gear Owning the right bicycle is important. This could be a deal breaker for your spouse, so put some time into this. There are many options to choose from: A mountain bike, road bike, cross or touring bike, a town bike or cruiser, tandem, recumbent or tricycle. For many women, it can be helpful if you purchase a women’s-specific bicycle. I recommend finding a bike shop that you feel comfortable in and allowing them to help you investigate your options. A recumbent tricycle, for example, could be best for someone who has issues with balance. A tandem can help equalize ability levels, but can also feel like too much togetherness for some couples. The accessories are equally important. For most women, it is critical that

they have a women’s saddle (I like the ones with holes in the middle). Also, you can find plenty of great women’s cycling apparel out there and several companies that sell plus-sized clothing (check out Terry Bicycles and Junonia). For cold-weather cycling, dressing can be as simple as using the outdoor clothing you already have for other winter activities. Bicycle commuting In addition to Sunday bike rides, using your bicycle for transportation is a great way to get into cycling or to simply squeeze in that daily exercise requirement. There are no special requirements here: All you need is a bike and a way to carry your stuff or purchases. Most bikes can accommodate a rack and panniers, which is more comfortable than wearing a backpack. Again, I would recommend enlisting the help of a local bike shop to assist you with this modification. BICYCLING in northern Colorado You probably already know about our amazing network of bike paths, which

are an ideal option for people who are road leery (and luckily, these paths are plowed in the winter). And our drier climate often affords us clear roads in all seasons. Finally, if you are single and looking for riding companions, there are several cycling clubs to choose from. If they do not already have a group for seniors, you could always start one. Or inquire with the cities’ Senior Centers for similar options. It is never too late to become a cyclist (or a competitive triathlete, if you are someone like my father). People like my dad demonstrate that you can be fit and try new physical activities at any age. And most importantly, don’t stop moving! Bevin Barber-Campbell is a bike advocate and safe cycling instructor in Fort Collins. In her past life, she managed the apparel business for Terry Bicycles. Her father, Craig Barber, is one of Minneapolis’ original bike commuters and now lives in Montana. His insights— and modeling—were instrumental in writing this article.

Get back on your feet. Our short-term and outpatient rehab programs are designed to speed healing and improve quality of life. Our speciality programs include balance training, vestibular therapy and biofeedback for incontinence.

Pa i d A d v e rt i s e m e n t

RMsenior

|


money matters

The sky is falling...again

A mature perspective of the impending fiscal cliff “disaster”

“A

billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking real money.” – Everett Dirksen One comforting advantage of maturity is perspective. Most seniors don’t get too worked up about Chicken Little’s crazed warnings about the sky falling. They’ve heard it too many times before. “But this time it’s true, it’s really, really true,” Chicken Little insists. “We’re all doomed.” So once again, a little investigation is called for. The “Fiscal Cliff ” that is looming, (or perhaps, by the time this is published, was looming,) is the media’s term for a January 1 convergence of two economic events that would, on the one hand, slightly modify a portion of the federal tax structure and, on the other hand, allow for a series of what some say are much needed federal spending cuts. Seniors can rest assured that the Fiscal Cliff does not endanger regular Social Security benefits nor full Medicare coverage, although some payments to physicians billing Medicare for particular issues will be lowered. The vast majority of Medicare services will continue as usual. One of the most likely scenarios is that some time in December the lameduck Congress will agree to postpone the Fiscal Cliff for a year or so, which will give the media and Chicken Little more time to squawk. However, another, scenario, though somewhat less likely, is that the bitterness of the recent election will carry over to the Congress and that both sides will continue to refuse to talk with each other, and instead talk at each other. In such a case, both the tax changes and the spending cuts would begin. “Bring on the fiscal cliff,” wrote John Cassidy in a recent issue of Fortune Magazine, arguing that for the health of the country the tax code needs to be revised and federal spending needs to be curtailed. He points out that rather than putting the Federal Government in danger, the actions involved with the 10

| RMSENIOR

Bear Jack Gebhardt

“cliff ” would slow the rise in government spending and generate approximately $2.8 trillion of additional federal revenues to help decrease the federal deficit. “In a dysfunctional system such as ours,” Cassidy wrote, ”it sometimes takes unorthodox tactics to get important things done.” The ‘unorthodox tactics’ he refers to in this case would entail simply allowing the “fixes” to take place that were agreed upon by previous Congresses. These fixes include allowing the tax breaks to expire on January 1 that were given to the top five percent of income earners during the Bush administration. The ongoing tax breaks were implemented, along with relatively small one-time rebates for middle-income people, with the assumption that this untaxed personal

These tax increases would primarily affect the top five percent of income earners, which means those with an annual income of over $250,000. An “alternative minimum tax” would begin again for those who are earning $75,000 or more per year. Relative to federal spending cuts, one of the targeted areas is the budget for the Department of Defense, which currently receives over $700 billion a year. This is more than the next seventeen counties combined spend on defense. “We are the world’s munitions depot,” one analyst suggested. “And we give away much of our weapons for free.” What some see as a Fiscal Cliff, others recognize as one more speed bump. It may indeed slow the economy

income would “trickle down” to nourish the wider economy. According to the Government Accounting Office, the current tax rate for upper income households is lower now than it has been for over sixty years, since the early 1950s. Even with the expiration of the Bush Tax Cuts, the tax rate on the upper classes would remain significantly lower than the tax rates of any other industrialized nation.

for a bit, but even still the economy plugs on as the great majority of people continue to warm and maintain their homes and feed their kids and wish each other a “good day” when they meet at the market. And this is what makes up the real economy, which, like the Big Wheel, simply keeps on rolling. Again, one of the comforting advantages of maturity is perspective.


Trust and experience go a long way when you are dealing with people’s hard-earned money.�

Kevin Dunnigan,

MBA, CFPŽ CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional Presents:

Let Me teLL You MY StorY By Natalie Shamley

I

would like to tell you a story.... I grew up in northeast Montana. 90 miles from Canada and 90 miles from North Dakota. We used to joke that it was not the end of the world but‌.we could see it from there!! I was blessed with a wonderful family. I always felt loved and supported by my grandparents and had wonderful parents. My 3 children were also very close to their grandparents and also their great grandparents. It was a wonderful life for all of us. My Grandpa passed away in 1991 and left my Grandma in a deep depression that she could never come out of. She lived with my mom and dad and my uncle and his wife for an additional 13 years but we actually lost Grandma when we lost Grandpa. During those 13 years, my father passed away on his tractor of a heart attack when he was 63 years old. My wonderful family was disappearing very quickly. Shortly after Dad passed, Kevin Dunnigan spoke with my Mom about purchasing Long-Term Care insurance. Grandma was still living with Mom most of the time and this was a very stressful situation. Grandma was not able to communicate so the days were

very quiet and lonely for my Mom. My Mom knew that she did not want to live with me or my brother and she wanted to purchase the insurance for her and for us. She applied and was approved for long-term care insurance. Eighteen months after my Dad passed; my Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer. She recovered very well from surgery but had side effects from the chemo. One year later, she has surgery again. Soon after the second surgery, Mom started repeating herself over and over again. At this point she was 64 years old. Grandma was still living with her. Grandma was getting close to 90 years old at this point and her memory was better than Mom’s. My brother and I were concerned but could not get a diagnosis. Grandma passed away in 2006 at the age of 96. We were sorry to lose Grandma but felt that Mom could move on and take care of herself. Well that was not to be. Mom had 2 strokes the day after the funeral. I took her to see a neurologist. I was told that she would never be able to live on her own. He showed me the MRI results that showed several spots on her brain that were small strokes that she had

been having over the years. Each stroke took more of her memory. Finally we had the diagnosis that we had been looking for but dreading to hear – Mom had dementia. I moved her to Colorado to live close to me. She currently is living in an assisted living facility in Loveland, only about 7 blocks from my home. We try to keep her life very stress free to slow the process of the dementia. She is doing great and loves where she is living. She is the crossword champion of the home!!! We were very fortunate that she purchased the long-term care policy while she was healthy. I hope this story will encourage you to look at long-term care insurance for you and your loved ones. Mom now lives where she can get the best care and we do not need to worry about how to pay for it. We were very fortunate that she purchased the long-term care policy while she was healthy. If she would have waited just 6 months longer to purchase, she would not have been insurable because of the cancer. If you would like to discuss longterm care insurance and get a quote, please feel free to contact Kevin Dunnigan at 970-622-2366.

>/72/2D3@B7A3;3<B Paid advertisement

RMsenior

| 11


nutrition • 1 /2-oz. fruitcake for 50 calories • 12 oz. diet iced tea for 0 calories Scenario three: • S andwich with 2 slices whole-grain bread,

• • • •

Holiday helpings

Fortify your will power to resist compulsive overeating

D

Lana Olsson

o you ever worry that a holiday party will be one big nutrition booby trap with unhealthy consequences? Are your plans to eat carefully over the holidays squashed by fragrant, buttery hors d’oevres and tempting bowls of chips, nuts and candies? The big nutritional pitfall is compulsive and mindless eating. This state of mind leads to haphazard choices and overeating. Although there are no laser weapons or mini-drones available to vaporize these high-calorie treats; certain stealth behaviors have been proven to fortify will power and control and help to eliminate compulsive eating. Read on for five critical tools to use for enhanced control over holiday eating.

• E xercise daily for 20-30 minutes or more: Any aerobic continuous movement that elevates heart rate and breathing (dancing, walking, bike riding….) benefits you. • Breathe deeply and stretch out tense muscles (neck, shoulders, back, legs) every hour: Take 1-2 minutes to realign your body and improve circulation, concentration and well-being. • Make and take time for meals: A day of working, shopping, cleaning, cooking and

12

| RMSENIOR

running errands requires fuel. A bean, cheese and vegetable burrito makes a quick meal and so does a bowl of wholegrain cereal with nuts, fruit and milk. Avoid fasting for more than three to four hours. • Chew food slowly, take smaller bites and savor the flavor: Allow your brain to understand that you are getting full and satisfied. The stomach is not a food grinder; it’s a mixer! • Drink one cup of water for each serving of alcoholic or sweetened beverage that you consume: Stay well-hydrated with water, and slow down your alcohol consumption.

Let’s look at what you get and at what you are missing, in the following three meal scenarios. Each scenario adds up to 700 calories, or approximately one-third of 2000 calories. Scenario one • 4 shortbread cookies (4 oz.) for 560 calories • 4 oz. non-alcoholic eggnog for 130 calories • 1 cup black coffee with 1 tsp. sugar for 16 calories

Scenario two: • Sandwich with 2 slices white bread, 6 oz.

sliced turkey, 2 Tbsp. mayonnaise for 660 calories

3 oz. sliced turkey, 1 Tbsp mayonnaise, lettuce, sliced tomato & onion for 450 calories. C  abbage, raisin & carrot slaw (vinaigrette) - 2/3 cup for 75 calories S weet pickles- 2 small for 30 calories 1 .3 oz. piece fruitcake for 135 calories 1 2 oz Seltzer water, 8 oz. coffee

Scenario one provides inadequate fiber, protein, fruit, vegetable, and water and provides a lot of sugar and carbohydrate. This might give you instant energy, but you’ll feel let down before your next meal. Scenario two provides a more balanced meal, but is low on healthy components, such as fiber, fruits and vegetables with important antioxidants. Two also provides more fat and protein than needed at the meal. Scenario three provides adequate protein, fat, fiber, water and more vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and variety than the other choices. Three is the winner for the best-balanced nutrition. Eating this lunch will give you what your body needs and better control over the choices at your next meal. When you enjoy holiday foods and beverages in satisfying quantities and in their appropriate proportion, you will feel well nourished and remain in control. There are many ways to bring balance to holiday eating. Good nutrition need not be sacrificed. In the event that you need a personalized approach to staying healthy or have difficult dietary restrictions, contact a registered dietitian (R.D.) for sound, evidence-based advice. An R.D. will help you to exercise your best eating options. Visit the Northern Colorado Dietetic Association website at www.eat rightcolorado.org This article was written by Lana L. Olsson, M.S., R.D. C.S.G. who is board certified in gerontological nutrition and is serving as President of the Northern Colorado Dietetic Assn. 2012-2013.


Affordable Senior Housing Community

Got Grandkids? Harvest Pointe Visit rmparent.com for family-friendly activities in northern Colorado.

facebook.com/RockyMountainParent

To Schedule a Tour Please Call:

970-622-9907 4895 Lucerne Ave. Loveland, CO â&#x20AC;˘ 80538 Harvest Pointe is an 80-unit affordable apartment community for adults 62 years of age and older. Harvest pointe is a non-smoking community. Each unit features one bedroom, a fully-equipped kitchen, living room, bathroom and dining area. There is a communal multi-purpose room with kitchen, craft room and library. Residents have ample parking and enjoy the close proximity to shopping restautants, public transportation, and medical facilities. Some apartments are specially equipped for mobility impared persons. Applicants must be at least 62 years of age with an annual income of below $27,200 for one person or $31,100 for two people. Harvest Pointe is a non-smoking community. Section 504 Coordinator: Stuart Hartman,VP - Operations, FPM, Inc. 911 N Studebaker Road, Long Beach CA 90815, 562-275-5100 TDD 800-545-1833 x 359

RMsenior

| 13


• On-site Nurse and Physical and Occupational Therapy • Wander Protection • Unique Activities Program • Delicious Home-cooked Meals • Short-Term Respite Care • Local owners for over 20 years

Our smaller facility offers a comfortable home environment

970-667-3342 605 California Ave. www. CourtyardofLoveland.com

Private, Medicaid, Respite Care Community

we have over 30 campground sites! Book yours today!

ver Meadows has a e B l l a e r o to offe Expl r

www.BEavErMEadows.coM • 970-881-2450 14

| RMSENIOR


keep it sharp

Senior Directory word search

Search the Senior Directory Special Section to find the answers to these clues. Then find the words in the puzzle

Clues: 1. Museums: Fort Collins Museum of ________ just re-opened 2. Performance venues: _________ Center re-opened in Fort Collins 3. Libraries: Library district in Greeley. 4. Dental: He does dentures 5. Health promotion: The ________ Club at McKee Medical Center 6. End-of-life care service 7. Places where senior’s gather 8. Housing with some support: ___________ living 9. Clothing & accessories: place to buy and sell gently used clothes 10. Knitting & Fiber Arts: what My Sister does 11. Wine: Where you bottle your own wine 12. Family services: this “way” provides all kinds of help

1.Discovery, 2. Lincoln, 3. HighPlains, 4. McCall, 5. Seasons, 6. Hospice, 7. SeniorCenters 8. Assisted, 9. ClothesMentor, 10. Knits, 11. Vintages, 12. United RMsenior

| 15


16

| RMSENIOR


RMsenior

| 17


WINTER 2012 ONGOING Through December 24 Santa Claus in Downtown Fort Collins! Kids can come visit Santa in his log cabin workshop any time Wednesdays through Sundays. Old Town Square, FC. Noon-6pm. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com. Through December 30 Almost, Maine Open your heart to things unseen in these humorous yet compelling stories of life and love in a small Maine town. Bas Bleu Theatre Company, 401 Pine St., FC. www.basbleu.org. Through December 31 Plaid Tidings Laugh and celebrate with the Plaid boys as they continue their supernatural saga, returning from the afterlife. Midtown Arts Center, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970225-2555. www.MidtownArtsCenter.com Through January 13 Mame Follow Mame as she leads her young nephew through life in New York during the jazz era, traveling and growing into a young man. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 970-744-3747 or www. coloradocandlelight.com. December 1-31 Horse Drawn Carriage Rides Old Town Square, FC. 970-484-6500 or www.DowntownFortCollins.com. December 2-8 Shooting Star Snowed in at an airport. Someone sees you. Someone from your past. Someone who has your secret, because they once had your heart. A touching, tender and bittersweet Valentine to middle age. Bas Bleu Theatre Company, 401 Pine St., FC. www.basbleu.org.

18

| RMSENIOR

December 6-9 The Nutcracker Performed by the Canyon Concert Ballet. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com or www.ccballet.org. December 7-8 Fine and Funky Art Show Opera Galleria, 123 N. College Ave., FC. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com. December 13-15 Festival of Lights A Christmas production featuring an adult choir, a children’s choir, actors, and an orchestra. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. December 21-23 A Musical Christmas Carol Presented by la-de-da. An adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic tale A Christmas Carol with Scrooge and the Spirits that haunt him. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com.

Saturday, December 1 Nutcracker with a Twist: Clara and the Gift of Dance Presented by Mountain Dance at Mountain Kids. Join us for a family holiday tradition of the Nutcracker where a new and special twist is added to the story line each year. Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia Ave., FC. 2pm & 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com.

Sunday, December 2 Nutcracker with a Twist: Clara and the Gift of Dance Presented by Mountain Dance at Mountain Kids. Join us for a family holiday tradition of the Nutcracker where a new and special twist is added to the story line each year. Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia Ave., FC. 2pm. 970221-6730 or www.lctix.com. Monday, December 3 Laughter for Laughter Sake Benefits of laughter will be shared, but truly, get ready to get up and laugh with some creative laughter exercises developed by the World Laughter Tour. Greeley Medical Center, 1900 16th St., GR. 2-3pm. 970-495-8560 or www. pvhs.org. USAF Holiday Concert Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 2pm & 7pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com.

Thursday, December 6 Opera Lecture: The Gift of the Magi This lecture is about this well known O. Henry story. Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 3pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Cheryl Wheeler A solo guitarist and vocalist in the folk genre, Wheeler will be joined by special guests Moors and McCumber. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.


RMsenior

| 19


Story time with Santa Santa will read fun holiday stories! Clothes Pony & Dandelion Toys Store, 111 N. College Ave., FC. 11:30. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com.

Friday, December 7 Scrabble @ Your Library Players of all ability and experience levels are welcome. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Visual Artist of the Year Reception Larimer County Department of Natural Resources will be celebrating the work of nature photographer David Clack. Please join us. The Illustrated Light Gallery, #1 Old Town Square, Suite 103, FC. 6-9pm. 970-493-4673 or www. larimer.org/naturalresources. CarolFest Caroling begins at the Opera Galleria and ends at Oak Street Plaza. Opera Galleria, 123 N. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com. First Friday Gallery Walk Experience Fort Collins arts. Old Town, FC. 6-9pm. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com.

Saturday, December 8 Chess @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 11am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Winter Wonderland: An Andrew Sisters Holiday Concert with Reveille 3 Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 11am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Infant CPR Participants will learn infant/child CPR and how to treat choking. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 1-3:30pm. 970-3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu Hearthside Holiday The Greeley Chorale will present. Enjoy the holiday cheer this evening. First Methopdist Church, 917 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-673-8916. www. GreeleyChorale.org.

Sunday, December 9 Genealogy Program: Military Records Instructor Bob Larson will tell about the different military records available from the Revolutionary War through World War II and beyond. Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 3pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Monday, December 10 Wishes and Dreams Holiday Concert The Blend Chorus, a women’s a cappella chorus presents a mix of traditional and modern holiday favorites sung in barbershop style. Bas Bleu Theatre Company, 401 Pine St., 7pm. FC. www. basbleu.org. Tuesday, December 11 Kevin Cook: At Home in the Trees Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. Noon. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Christmas with The Celts A combination of Irish born and Nashville based Irish-American musicians. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-2216730 or www.LCTIX.com. International Night: High School in the Land of Smiles Maike Prewett will discuss her experiences as a Rotary Youth Exchange student in Bangkok, Thailand. Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Ethnically Diverse Holiday Cuisine Learn about traditional holiday foods eaten in different cultures, and find out what ones are healthiest and how to tweak the less-healthy foods. Greeley Medical Center, 1900 16th St., GR. 5:307:30pm. 970-495-8560 or www.pvhs.org.

Wednesday, December 12 Holiday Talent Show You will be entertained with Christmas music favorites, comedy, good cheer and holiday snacks. Chilson Senior Center, 700 E 4th St., LV. 1:30-3pm. 970-4958560 or www.pvhs.org. Thursday, December 13 The “Gift” of Information Organize all your financial, legal and other personal information that your family will need to know in the future. Fort Collins Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Drive, FC. 9:30-11am. 970-495-8560 or www.pvhs.org.

20

| RMSENIOR


YOU HAVEN”T SEEN A RESALE STORE

LIKE THIS! WE PAY

CA$H

For Gently-Used Clothing, Sizes 0-26

Misses• Womens • Maternity Designer Purses • Accessories

Mon. - Sat. 9am-7pm •Sundays 10am- 6pm

970-223-6636

4519 S. College • Fort Collins

RMsenior

| 21


Nutrition Series: Healthy Weight Control This presentation will move beyond the “food-in, food-out” theory of weight loss and look at some surprising and effective ways to influence your metabolism and reach your healthy weight. Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Friday, December 14 Clara and the Nutcracker Presented by Contemporary Dance Academy. Kick off the holiday season with the most famous ballet adventure in the world! The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Gift of the Magi A beautiful, lyric setting of O. Henry’s moving story of self-sacrifice. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com. Craig Morgan & Phil Vassar: Acoustic Christmas Tour Celebrate a down-home country Christmas. Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-3509451 or www.greeleygov.com/festivals.

Saturday, December 15 Jeff Wahl: Acoustic Guitarist His repertoire encompasses jazz, new age, folk, and classical. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Clara and the Nutcracker Presented by Contemporary Dance Academy. Kick off the holiday season with the most famous ballet adventure in the world! The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 2pm & 7pm. 970-2216730 or www.LCTIX.com. Know the “10” Signs: Early Detection Matters Learn warning signs that may be symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. Poudre Valley Hospital, Cafe F, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 9-10:30am. 970-495-8560 or www. pvhs.org.

22

| RMSENIOR

Gift of the Magi A beautiful, lyric setting of O. Henry’s moving story of self-sacrifice. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. A Candlelight Christmas Presented by Larimer Chorale. Join us for our traditional candlelight “surroundsound” presentation of holiday pageantry and wonder. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.

Sunday, December 16 Game Day @ Your Library Old Town Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 11am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. A Candlelight Christmas Presented by Larimer Chorale. Join us for our traditional candlelight “surroundsound” presentation of holiday pageantry and wonder. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 3pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Eagle Watch Join a volunteer Master Naturalist to look for the bald eagles that make Fort Collins their winter home. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, CO. 34pm. 970-221-6311 or www.fcgov.com/ naturalareas

Monday, December 17 Holiday Stocking Enjoy a 90-minute collage of holiday music performed by Rocky Mountain High School musicians. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Learn About the Mason Corridor This 5-mile corridor extends from downtown, south to Harmony. Poudre Valley Hospital, Cafe F, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 2-3pm. 970495-8560 or www.pvhs.org.

Friday, December 21 Skygazing Volunteers from the Northern Colorado Astronomical Society provide telescopes for public sky viewing. See and discover fun facts about planets, stars, constellations, galaxies and other celestial wonders. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, CO. 7-10pm. 970-221-6311 or www.fcgov.com/ naturalareas Sunday, December 23 Eagle Watch Join a volunteer Master Naturalist to look for the bald eagles that make Fort Collins their winter home. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, CO. 34pm. 970-221-6311 or www.fcgov.com/ naturalareas Tuesday, December 25 Merry Christmas! Eagle Watch Join a volunteer Master Naturalist to look for the bald eagles that make Fort Collins their winter home. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, CO. 9:3011:30am. 970-221-6311 or www.fcgov. com/naturalareas


What is LenSx? Dr Karl Olsen, M.D

T

here is a new technology that applies to cataract surgery that is changing the standard for what is the safest, most up to date procedure, and with the best outcome for vision correction. That technology is LenSx Femto-Phaco cataract surgery. Traditional cataract surgery utilizes knives made out of steel or diamonds to make incisions in the side of the eye. Through these incisions, a forceps is inserted into the eye and a circular tear is created with the forceps in the membrane that surrounds the cataract (think of a pillow case which surrounds a pillow). Then a probe is inserted into they eye which utilizes ultrasound to break up the cataract and subsequently remove the resulting debris. The surgeon then places a new acrylic intraocular lens into the eye in order to correct the vision. Any residual astigmatism is then corrected with glasses. This process has been the gold standard for the last twenty years… until now! LenSx Femto-Phaco surgery has been available at the Eye Center of

Northern Colorado since August of 2011. The surgeons at the Eye Center who were among the very first in the United States and even the world to utilize the bladeless technology, and as of November, 2012, have performed more than 1,000 LenSx cases. This technology is available exclusively at the Eye Center of Northern Colorado and the University of Colorado Health. The LenSx technology treats the patient’s astigmatism on the surface of the eye. The surgeon then utilizes LenSx lasers to create the incisions required to enter the eye without the need for knives or scalpels. The surgeon the uses the LenSx laser to create the opening through the lens capsule with a roundness, centration, and precision that no human hand can generate. The Laser then breaks up the cataract so that less ultrasound energy and time is required to fully remove the cataract. This results in more gentle treatment for the fragile inner surfaces of the eye. The most critical steps of cataract surgery are optimized with LenSx laser technology in order to provide the best possible outcomes available with cataract surgery today. Dr. Karl Olsen, surgeon at the Eye Center of Northern Colorado who has performed more than 400 LenSx assisted cataract surgeries, states, “LenSx Femto-as-

sisted cataract surgery is a gamechanger for patient outcomes. We can now provide a new level of safety and precision in cataract surgery in order to give our patients results that were only dreamed about before. I recommend this technology to all my patients who have astigmatism and desire the very best outcomes achievable.” LenSx Femto-assisted bladeless cataract surgery is available exclusively in northern Colorado with the surgeons at the Eye Center of Northern Colorado. Inquire today if LenSx cataract surgery is right for you.

For additional information on the LenSx procedure and the Eye Center of Northern Colorado, please visit us online at www.eyecenternoco.com.

Karl Olsen M.D. Specializing in Cataract Surgery and LASIK procedures at the Eye Center of Northern Colorado.

-PAI D ADVERTISEMENTRMsenior

| 23


Affordable Senior Housing Community

Harvest Pointe To Schedule a Tour Please Call:

Featuring

970-622-9907

Eminence Organic Skin Care Products

Specializing in:

Microdermabraison • Facials LED Therapy • Waxing Enjoy a complimentary skin-care analysis

Carly Vittorio 219.775-6274 • 970.669.8003 Carly Vittorio is an Esthetician and a Registered Nurse

4895 Lucerne Ave. Loveland, CO • 80538 Harvest Pointe is an 80-unit affordable apartment community for adults 62 years of age and older. Harvest pointe is a non-smoking community. Each unit features one bedroom, a fully-equipped kitchen, living room, bathroom and dining area. There is a communal multi-purpose room with kitchen, craft room and library. Residents have ample parking and enjoy the close proximity to shopping restautants, public transportation, and medical facilities. Some apartments are specially equipped for mobility impared persons. Applicants must be at least 62 years of age with an annual income of below $27,200 for one person or $31,100 for two people. Harvest Pointe is a non-smoking community. Section 504 Coordinator: Stuart Hartman,VP - Operations, FPM, Inc. 911 N Studebaker Road, Long Beach CA 90815, 562-275-5100 TDD 800-545-1833 x 359

Get your FREE issue today!

Northern Colorado’s

FAVORITE Senior Magazine. visit us online:

rmsenior.com 24

| RMSENIOR

Like us on facebook: facebook.com/RMSeniorMagazine


RMsenior

| 25


senior moment

The long view

The bathroom window reveals more than meets the eye

T

he view from our small second story bathroom window (covered with a half-curtain to insure modesty) is nothing special. And yet it is. Standing at the window, just my head above the curtain, I can see through our honey locust tree to our front driveway, our sidewalk and street, parked cars (and trash cans on trash pick-up days), several large neighborhood cottonwood trees, eight or nine different homes, (if I crane my head both ways) and, in winter when the leaves are off the trees, in the far distance the stately Grey Rock Mountain. Again, nothing special, and yet it’s a view of life I’ve seen in passing, and sometimes in dawdling, just checking out the neighborhood, and the neighbors, for over 30 years. The view is comfortable, familiar, home. We all have such views, be they modest or large. I was reminded of this recently when my artist wife and I were tickled to be invited to spend a few days in Texas with her somewhat distant, yet genuinely loving (and senior) cousin and his wife. The overt excuse for the visit was that his wife had been instrumental in assembling an exhibit for their local art museum of the works of a prominent national artist. They knew both my wife and I would be interested. A more subtle motivation was the earnest desire, on all of our parts, to spend a little more time together and maybe get to know each other better before the years totally slipped away. Although my wife and her cousin had grandparents in common (their fathers were siblings), both personal destiny and geography had led in previous decades to only a few brief visits, for lunch or dinner and once a year or so phone calls and thirty years of Christmas card exchanges. (Such is this modern mobile life.) The cousin insisted that, since they lived on a ranch far in the country and 26

| RMSENIOR

Bear Jack Gebhardt

had plenty of room, we stay at their home for the nights we would be there. With the ordinary hesitation that comes to a long-married couple accustomed to their own space and nightly routines, we accepted their kind offer. We need not have worried.

lake. Geese, ducks and white herons. (Compliments of Mother Nature.) Their cattle grazing in the green pastures on the far side of the lake. We heard coyotes at night. The difference between the two views—the view from the country Texas

Upon arrival at their spacious home, we were shown to the “guest wing”— three bedrooms, each seemingly with its own bath and shower, and on the opposite side of the kitchen and dining rooms from their own master suites. We were their only guests, so we had the end room, furnished with elegant antiques, a king size bed, a walk-out patio and a view of their lake. (My wife’s cousin’s wife’s father had made money in the traditional Texas fashion: in land, oil and cattle.) It was a wonderful weekend. We laughed much, told family stories, learned what fears and passions we shared (and which we didn’t), and the art exhibit was breathtaking. We were made to feel at home. And the view from our guest room bathroom window? Tall pines and old oaks on the green grasses sloping down to their

bathroom and the view from our own Colorado suburban bathroom—is, again, mostly a difference in personal destiny and geography. The view from the Texas bathroom window was pristine, pastorally panoramic and deeply peaceable. I’m grateful to have experienced it. The view from our own bathroom window is obviously much different, neither pristine nor pastoral, yet the same deep peace is there, here, as we experience the changes in familiar trees, the coming and going of neighborhood kids, and simply being part of ordinary folks in an ordinary neighborhood going about their ordinary business. With maturity, and the help of cousins, we come to recognize that the peaceable view from the window rests as much on the viewer as it does on what is viewed. Though still, I’d quickly trade our squirrels for his white herons.


RMsenior

| 27



2012 RM SENIOR