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OCTOBER 2013 • RMPARENT.COM

Fun Fall FESTIVALS Disaster relief

for families

A day at

the museum

Healthy

chocolate

Electronics overload

Address stress

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OCTOBER 2013

Departments

Special Sections

Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

FUN & FIT

AS WE GROW . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Explore the possibilities for the season and see what programs these providers have for your families.

The sky is falling...what good may come

When to media, when to not—ground rules for managing your kids’ electronic devices

FUN &FIT

ADVERTISIN SUPPLEMENG T

Family activities . . . . . . . 10 A day at the museum—engage your family with hands-on learning

Healthy living . . . . . . . . . 12 Getting your garden winter-ready—clean , compost, prep and plan for next year

Community news . . . . . . 14 NoCo works together to rebuild A healthy community serves, gives and stays informed; when disaster strikes; NoCo districts in line with national trends

Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Unwrap a bar of chocolaty health—discover the benefits of that come from the cocoa bean

Safe kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Dealing with disaster—how to help kids cope when tragedy is all around

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 Events and activities for parents, kids and families

Time out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 8

Playing. Just playing—stop tasking and enjoy some time with the kids

School District News Thompson School District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Playtime at B.F. Kitchen, four schools receive “ASAP” grants, district completes record-setting year in volunteerism, 2013 “Help Kids Succeed” school supply drive benefits students

Poudre School District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Coordinator impressed with enthusiastic volunteers, 2013 summer bond projects update, calendar of events, PSD awarded several grants to support student success

Features 20

 arvest a bushel of H fun this season

Check out the Halloween happenings, corn mazes, pumpkin patches and more. Find out what is going on in our area this fall season. Discover something for everyone in the family!

24

Calm down

Changing behaviors in pre-teens and teens can indicate that your child might be suffering from stress. Find out what’s bothering your child. Help him to de-stress by finding out what helps burn off stress. Learn how to treat headaches and stomachaches caused by stress.

Greeley-Evans District 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Students honored for achievement on TCAP, District 6 to host fourth annual Citizens Academy

Lunchbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

ABOUT THE COVER: Victor, 7, from Wellington likes to dance, swim, draw and play basketball. Photo by Cheri Schonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com.

School menus for Poudre, Thompson, Greeley-Evans and Windsor

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perspective The sky is falling... What good may come

D

rought, fires, floods...what’s next? Locusts? The natural disasters we’re seeing are starting to feel biblical in scope and frequency! And it’s getting to all of us. I think, by now, we all know someone who has been directly effected in the past few years by drought, fire or flood...from inconveniences such as not being able to get to the airport to life-changing destruction such as the loss of a home. I’m that guy who always finds the positive that comes from a bad thing. And what I’ve seen during the past couple of years is that when things are going badly, people stop worrying about their differences and start just caring for and helping the people around them. I guess that could be thought of as the upside...that people work together in difficult circumstances. I’m thinking that if we could carry that way of working together beyond the disaster into our everyday lives, then we might be able to create a more civil society. It’s not that any single one of us has to do anything that spectacular. We need to do something that is simple...and also very difficult. And that is to try maintain that sense of kindness, compassion and empathy we felt and feel for the victims of these disasters, and to feel that way for everyone, every day. No small thing! But if we can put aside our anger and need to take care of just ourselves, I think we’ll all feel better. As the saying goes, if you want to be unhappy do something for yourself; if you want to be happy do something for someone else. And I think we all feel this sense of goodness when we think about others. Sometimes we don’t even have to do anything. We just have to wish them well and we feel better. In one sense, it can be easy. We just go about our day being that positive force in our regular interactions. And the more we do it, the more natural it becomes. And the more we do it, the more the people around will pick up on it and start doing it. Just be the pebble cast into the pond, creating small ripples that break on distant shores. We have a couple of stories this month that fit this theme. Kim Sharpe (page 18) put together a timely story about how to help your family cope when tragedy is all around them. Also, Lynn UtzmanNichols offers a more general story (page 24) about stress and how to help support your child. Sometimes it just takes a little outing to get our minds off our problems, and we have a whole bunch of ideas (yes, ideas do actually grow in bunches) for you. Katie Harris has a cornucopia full of ideas for fall festivals (page 22) and Linda Osmundson has a list of hands-on museums for you to check out. Finally, we hit two other things that help with stress: gardening (page 12) and chocolate (page 16). Don’t stress about de-stressing, but do take a moment. Thanks for reading, Scott Titterington, Publisher

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OCTOBR 2013 • Volume 18, Issue 5 PUBLISHER Scott Titterington, (970)221-9210 scott.rmpublishing@gmail.com EDITOR Kristin Titterington, (970)221-9210 kristin.rmpublishing@gmail.com Calendar editor Aly Titterington calendar@rockymountainpub.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Emily Zaynard emily.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Greg Hoffman, (970)689-6832 greg.rmpublishing@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION Wendee Brungardt, Sharon Klahn, Cherese Macy, Rob’s Bike Courier Service COVER PHOTO Cheri Shonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lea Hanson, Katie Harris, Richard Keller, Kim Sharpe, Lynn Utzman-Nichols

ROCKY MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING 825 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80521 Voice 221-9210 Fax 221-8556 editor@rockymountainpub.com www.RMParent.com Rocky Mountain Parent magazine is published monthly by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. Publication of this paper does not consitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. RMP reserves the right to refuse any advertisement for any reason. The opinions expressed by contributors or writers do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rocky Mountain Publishing. ©2013 Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without express written permission is prohibited.

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as we grow

When to media, when to not Ground rules for managing your kids’ electronic devices L y nn U t z m a n N i c h ols

H

ow many electronic devices do you have in your home? Count every computer, television, tablet, music player, gaming device and phone. I’m at 14, with eight that can connect to the Internet. That’s a lot of devices to manage. According to a recent study published on MSN Money, 58 percent of 13- to 17-year olds have smartphones. Also, a 2011 study by Bridgewater State University found that close to 20 percent of third graders in Massachusetts had cell phones with the number growing to nearly 40 percent by fifth grade. That’s just phones. Consider gaming devices—Wii, PS3, Nintendo DS, iPods, tablets, computers—and you understand how the NPD Group, a national market research company, found that 91 percent of children ages 2 to 17 play video games in the U.S. And more and more so, it’s online and interactive. For parents, managing our kids’ electronic devices and screen time can be overwhelming. Yet it must be done, considering the safety risks that these devices pose. The best approach is coming up with a list of house rules around devices. Take your pick, but focus on safety and limiting the amount of time your child sits in front of a screen. Cell Phones A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that the average teen sends 60 texts a day—that’s one every 15 minutes. If you are getting your child a phone, save yourself the headache of unexpected charges and get unlimited texting—it doesn’t mean you still can’t set limits yourself, it just means you won’t be surprised by a $500 phone bill when her relationship with her boyfriend turns sour. Regardless of when you choose to

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get your child a cell phone, start with a boring one. For example, get a phone that only allows a certain number of call minutes a month—such as a payper-use phone. Or, forego texting, downloads and Internet access, at least for a set period of time. Know that smartphones have been named the number one risk factor for opening kids up to cyber bullying and pornography. That also applies to tablets without parental controls. Along with limiting a cell phone’s capabilities, parents should set limits around how the phone is to be used— determining when, for what and for how long a child can use the phone. As children grow and show responsibility with their phones, parents can choose to expand their use. Social media sites If your child has a social media site, monitor it. If you see something that raises your eyebrows, explore it with your child. Make sure your child’s Facebook page is not open to all and that she’s not publishing her cell phone number or address online. Make a rule against bad language, name-calling and snarky responses. Explain that if you wouldn’t say something to someone’s face, you shouldn’t say it online or via a text. Discuss consequences if the rules are not followed, e.g. loss of the device. Also, talk about how postings live forever in cyberspace, and that inappropriate photos can get kids into real trouble with the law. Computers and gaming Set limits on time and use. Keep the computer in a public place. Discuss what sites your child can and cannot visit. Consider adding parental controls. If your child plays games online, make sure it’s limited to friends and people he

knows and not a public setting, where adults can pose as kids and “talk” with them as a game character. Random rules from those who know I’ve heard a lot of suggestions from parents and adolescent counselors over the years about how to manage devices and limit screen time. Here are some random ideas—use what works and leave the rest: • All electronic devices, especially cell phones, must be “put to bed” on the kitchen table each night. • No cell phone until such-and-such an age, such as 7th grade. • No media use after 8pm (or whenever) at night. • Your child can only visit preapproved sites and play preapproved games. If he wants to add a new one, you will review it first. • If your teen gives you a reason to look, you can look (and read his texts, Facebook entries, etc.). • No televisions in bedrooms. • Computer and tablets are used in the living room or family room (public area) only. • No texting during conversations, or at the dinner table. • Mandatory periods of “unplugged” time—daily or entire weekends. • No gaming during the school week. • No media before homework/chores are done and then only for an hour. • Kids must mark their media time in a notebook each day to monitor use. • If driving, cell phones are turned off and left in the glove box or trunk. • Teens must sign a driving contract that includes no cell phone use while driving or they lose the car. While technology has brought some wonderful opportunities, it has also opened doors to danger and misuse. Help your kids use it thoughtfully.


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family activities

A day at the museum

Engage your family with hands-on learning L i nd a L . O s m undson

H

ow do you make a children’s museum visit interesting rather than boring? First, choose age-appropriate exhibits and a docent tour if possible. Use your imagination and ask lots of questions. Many small museums located in and around northern Colorado offer a wealth of exhibits for children. Here are just a few. Although admission is free to the Timberlane Farm Museum, 2306 E. First Street, Loveland, donations are accepted. The Fall Harvest Fest ends October 3; however, visitors can experience the blacksmith shop and barnyard and learn about weaving, milking, butter churning, and doll making and tour two original homes seven days a week, 9am-4pm. Find more information at www.timber lanefarmmuseum.org/. The Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave, is free except for the main gallery’s special exhibits, which require a $5 admission. After the Green Room’s If Chairs Could Talk free exhibit through October 13, view its room-sized Jade Boat exhibit and several smaller jade pieces from the collection of Walter Huang October 26– February 16. Consider enrolling your children in Wednesday’s Wild World of Art classes beginning October 2, 3:30-4:30pm. Topics include Collage Design, Brilliant Pumpkins, Sea Sand paintings, Mini Food Sculptures, Printmaking, Christmas Creations, Luminaries, and Psychedelic Snowflakes. Twenty dollars includes an artwork to take home. Other classes for tots with an adult are October 18, November 15, and December 20. Topics include Story in a Picture, Harvest Painting, and Keepsake Ornaments. Halloween Family Fun Festival happens October 26, 10am-2pm at Peters Park and 5th Street. Participate in the annual Downtown Trick-or-Treating, wear a cos10

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tume, and register to win prizes. Check the website for more event information such as the Holiday Community Tree Lighting Ceremony - www.ci.love land.co.us/index.aspx?page=117. Bee Family Centennial Farm, 4320 E. County Road 58, Fort Collins, looks at farm activities of the past. Only open on Friday and Saturday, admission is $7 adult, $6 Senior, and $3 children 3-12. Enjoy children’s activities and animals, www.beefamilyfarm.com/.

day the museum presents Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Universe at 2:30pm. Enjoy other Digital Dome showings on specific days. Each event is free with museum admission of $9.50 adult, $7 Senior, $7 student, $6 for children 3-12, free for children 3 and under. Watch the website calendar for free days. For more information go to www.fcmod.org/. Wow! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave, Lafayette, is dedicated to educational, interactive exhibits, programs and activities for children ages 15 months to 11 years. This World of Wonder provides a wide variety of programs from art and science to role-playing and music. All day admission is $8 children with adults and infants 14 months and younger free. Bring snacks or lunch and enjoy indoor or outdoor picnic areas, then return to the many activities – www.wowchildrensmuseum.org/. The two-year-old Greeley Freight Station Museum, 680 10th Street, houses a 5,500-square-foot world-class model railroad through which visitors can walk. Editor of Modern Railroader Magazine says, “The finest model railroad I’ve ever seen.” View over 600 railroad-related artifacts including a wooden caboose available for touring both inside and out. Fall/ winter hours are Friday through Sunday with admission of $8 adult, $6 senior 65 or older, $4 for ages 4-12 years, and ages 3 and under free. The website lists other discounts, www.gfsm.org/.

The Longmont Museum and Cultural Center presents several programs Fort Collins Museum of Discovery,

408 Mason Ct., holds “Meet the Animals” every Sunday, 2:30-3:30pm, and Tuesday, 1:30-2:30pm. Visitors interact with the museum’s live animal collection. Or, on Saturday, at 2:30pm, visitors watch the ferret feeding, but be sure you have a strong stomach. Every Thurs-

and exhibits on Mexican Halloween and Day of the Dead celebrations. At the November 2 Dia de los Muertos Family Celebration, 10am-5pm, enjoy entertainment of music and dance, face painting, decorating a sugar skull, paper flower making, food, altars, and more. Log on to www.longmontmuseum.org/ events/programs/ for more information.


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healthy living

Getting your garden winter-ready Clean, compost, prep and plan for next year

L e a H a nson

F

or months, you’ve tilled, planted, watered, weeded, and now finally harvested. Reaping the benefits of what you’ve sown into your family garden all summer long is one of the best reasons to welcome fall. When the last few weeks of the gardening season unfold with the promise of an imminent frost, gardens are at their most fertile points. After harvesting plentiful fruits and vegetables, it feels as though it’s finally time to exhale. But, don’t be hasty; your work is not yet complete. There is much to be done in the garden once the harvest has ended including clean-up, fall planting, and preparation for winter. A little TLC in the fall can help your garden be better prepared to nourish seeds and fight pests when planting season comes around again. Clean up Remove all annuals including fruit and vegetable plants from the root before the seeds drop. Allowing plants to go to seed can be a bonus if you want to grow the same plant in the same location year after year, but in most family-sized vegetable gardens, it’s best to rearrange the plants each year for optimal growth. If you’re not a master composter, it’s best to double-bag plant debris and put it in the trash rather than the compost pile. Unless you’re very good at getting good high temperatures in the compost pile, you’ll be more likely to end up with volunteer plants than nourishing compost food for next year’s sowing. Cut back perennials by removing everything on the plant save for a few inches above the dirt. Divide spring-blooming plants such as iris, dianthus, and primrose and later bloomers such as black-eyed Susans, geraniums, and daylilies. Leaving some certain arugulas or brassica veggies in the ground, such

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as kale, radishes, and cabbages, can attract, then kill off harmful pests. As these types of plants decompose, they release cyanide compounds that kill most types of worms. Before the ground gets too hard, remove all weeds and debris and eliminate overwintering sites for insects and disease. Gently tilling the areas adds an extra protection.

Check out clearance prices for potting soil, fertilizers, soil amendments, tools, and other supplies to stock up for spring while saving money.

Compost Dead, dried leaves and stems are perfect for the compost bin. Anything that is dead will be a great addition to the pile. Any diseased or rotten tomato, potato, or squash foliage should be discarded, not composted, to prevent the spread of disease in compost. Late blight spores cannot continue to reproduce throughout winter unless there is live tissue from these plants.

begin growing roots right away and will grow again in the spring when the soil temperatures reach about 40 degrees F. Most bulbs do well in full sun (six hours per day) and well-drained soil. Get the right depth. Most bulbs should be planted in a hole that is about two to three times deeper than the height of the bulb. Plant them pointy side up.

Prep for winter Mulch the garden with a blanket of chopped-up leaves and grass clippings. Clean tool blades with vegetable oil and handles with sandpaper for rustfree winter storing. Detach garden hoses and blow out sprinkler systems; drain and store hoses in a sheltered area such as a shed or garage.

Plant spring bulbs Garlic is a common favorite; for the best results, plant garlic any time from the first frost (mid-October in northern Colorado) up until early November. The bulbs will

Plan for Next Year While the information is fresh in your mind, start a plan for next year’s approach. Note what worked and didn’t work with detail. Which plants grew well? Which areas didn’t get the sun (or shade) you thought they would? Did your plants use the room they had or did they need more? Which variety of tomatoes grew best and were the most delicious?


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community news

NoCo works together to rebuild A healthy community serves, gives and stays informed B y K IM S HA R P E

H

ow quickly life can change. This news column was planned to feature recent developments in Estes Park to establish a state-of-the art community center. Given the floods that ravaged northern Colorado last month, it is safe to say the Estes community center will not be a high priority for some time. Restoring and rebuilding basic infrastructure will trump other building projects for weeks, months and perhaps years to come. When disaster strikes Northern Colorado is blessed with an abundance of natural beauty, outdoor recreation opportunities, culture, art and caring people who pull together when disaster strikes. The outpouring of support for victims of last year’s High Park Fire and now the floods continues to be amazing and necessary. In Larimer County, a relatively new NoCo non-profit, SERVE 6.8, has been collaborating with key community partners to assist those affected by the flood. Because long term clean-up and reconstruction needs are expected, a fund has been set up at Community Funded to assist in covering related expenses to assist those affected in our community. Contributions can be made at www.community funded.com; search for “Northern Colorado Flood Relief.” Contact Serve 6.8 (www. serve68.org or 970-231-6445) to learn of other ways to help flood victims. The Community Foundation Serving Greeley and Weld County (www.cfsgwc. org or 970-304-9970) and the United Way of Weld County (www.unitedwayweld.org or 970-353-4300) have teamed together to help with long-term recovery efforts in Greeley and Evans. “It is great for these two organizations to collaborate to help the community in a time of need,” says Jeannine Truswell, president and CEO of United Way of

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Weld County. “Both organizations work daily to make our community a better place for all, so when a disaster occurs, it is only natural for us to work together.” To make a contribution to the Weld County Flood Relief Fund, please call either organization during business hours or go to either of their websites to make a donation at any time.

activities through initiatives such as ‘Let’s Move,’ and campuses that are completely tobacco free.” Key findings include: • Nutrition—The percentage of school districts that allowed soft drink companies to advertise soft drinks on school grounds decreased from 46.6 percent in 2006 to 33.5 percent in 2012.

NoCo districts in line with national trends School districts nationwide and locally are showing improvements in measures related to nutritional policies, physical education and tobacco policies, according to the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS), the largest and most comprehensive survey to assess school health policies. “Schools play a critical role in the health and well-being of our youth,” says CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Good news for students and parents – more students have access to healthy food, better physical fitness

Between 2006 and 2012, the percentage of districts that required schools to prohibit offering junk food in vending machines increased from 29.8 percent to 43.4 percent. Between 2006 and 2012, the percentage of districts with food procurement contracts that addressed nutritional standards for foods that can be purchased separately from the school breakfast or lunch increased from 55.1 percent to 73.5 percent. Between 2000 and 2012, the percentage of districts that made information available to families on the nutrition and caloric content of foods available to students increased from 35.3


percent to 52.7 percent.

•Physical education/physical activity—The percentage of school dis-

tricts that required elementary schools to teach physical education increased from 82.6 percent in 2000 to 93.6 percent in 2012. More than half of school districts (61.6 percent) had a formal agreement, such as a memorandum of agreement or understanding, between the school district and another public or private entity for shared use of school or community property. Among those districts, more than half had agreements with a local youth organization (e.g., the YMCA, Boys or Girls Clubs, or the Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts) or a local parks or recreation department. •Tobacco—The percentage of districts with policies that prohibited all tobacco use during any school-related activity increased from 46.7 percent in 2000 to 67.5 percent in 2012. SHPPS is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and practices at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. SHPPS assesses the characteristics of eight components of school health: health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services, healthy and safe school environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement. SHPPS was conducted at all levels in 1994, 2000 and 2006. The 2012 study collected data at the state and district levels only. The school- and classroom-level data from SHPPS will be collected in 2014 and released in 2015. (To read the full SHPPS report, visit www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/shpps/ index.htm.) Northern Colorado school districts all implement wellness policies that produce similar results. They also have wellness coordinators and committees specifically focused on improving the health and well being of students. Wellness policies and information can be found on individual school district websites: •Estes Park R-3 School District, www. psdr3.k12.co.us •Poudre School District, www.poudre

schools.org •Thompson School District, www. thompson.k12.co.us •Weld County 6 School District, www. greeleyschools.org

Synthetic marijuana products linked to illness The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s (CDPHE) initial investigation of an outbreak of illnesses tied to use of synthetic marijuana has identified nearly a dozen product names as possible sources of the synthetic marijuana that sent dozens to hospitals beginning in August. Dr. Tista Ghosh, interim chief medical officer for the state, says, “While these products were identified in the investigation, synthetic marijuana products can be repackaged and sold under many names. The safe thing for people to do is not use any synthetic marijuana. No brand is safe.” Product names identified in the investigation are: Black Mamba, Crazy Monkey, Crazy Clown, Dead Man Walking, Funky Monkey, Sexy Monkey, SinX, Spice, TenX, Twilight and 3X. Patients being interviewed as part of this outbreak include those who were suffering one or more symptoms such as disorientation, delirium, confusion, anxiety, lethargy, agitation, paranoia, hallucinations and seizures, as well as some patients who were violent, unresponsive or even comatose. As of September 10, approximately 150 emergency department patient encounters potentially associated with synthetic marijuana use have been reported. As part of the initial investigation, 58 detailed patient chart reviews have been completed for patients from five different hospitals. Among patients in the initial chart review, the age range is 13-55 years old. Forty-four percent of reported patients are 20-29 years old and another 19 percent are 13-19 years old. Approximately 81 percent of the patients are male. Dr. Ghosh says, “With one patient as young as 13 years old, I would urge parents and teachers to please talk to teenagers about drugs like these. The education community, including middle and high schools, universities, and tech-

nical colleges should spread the word to their students, given the affected age groups we are seeing. Let them know that synthetic marijuana is not safe and can seriously hurt them.” Ashley Kasprzak, executive director of Team Fort Collins, reacted: “Three local happenings in the last month prove to me that all of us should be concerned about synthetic marijuana in our town. First, in June, I read reports of the arrests of a father and son making synthetic marijuana in Fort Collins. Second, I talked with a group of students last week about a variety of drugs and one young man really perked up as I talked about synthetic marijuana. He rattled off countless street names for it. Third, I recently talked with volunteers connected to the juvenile justice system and they shared that they have seen numerous cases involving synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana is a real problem in our community right now. Additionally, driving to work today, I saw a large, yellow billboard promoting marijuana as a ‘kind’ drug. Synthetic marijuana is not a ‘kind’ drug. There is no quality oversight and it often has chemicals that cause terrible outcomes. For youth who use synthetic marijuana repeatedly, there can be serious dependence and mental health problems. That is the opposite of a ‘kind’.” The CDPHE continues to receive reports of new cases daily, and the investigation is far from complete. At the writing of this column, all reported patient encounters are from the Denver metro area and Colorado Springs. As the investigation proceeds, the department will work to identify the specific chemical make-up of the products that have caused adverse health reactions. Necessary laboratory testing will take weeks. Team Fort Collins (www.team fortcollins.org or 970-224-9931), a local nonprofit since 1989, provides alcohol and drug prevention education to middle and high school students, makes presentations for parents on topics related to youth substance use, convenes community groups, provides opportunities for youth activities in safe, substance-free environments, and is available as a community partner. RMPARENT

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nutrition Sweet, chocolaty health It turns out that chocolate is good for you

R i c h a rd K eller

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alloween is upon us. This means a return of sugary candies to a house you’ve worked hard to purge of those types of treats. It also means staring at the enticing bars of chocolate your children leave in their Halloween bags, ready to eat when they come back from school. You wish you could just peel off a wrapper on one of them, breathe in the cocoa goodness, and let it melt in your mouth. Instead, you walk away in search of something healthy and crunchy to take your mind off of it. Don’t worry, you can have a piece of chocolate – just as long as you ask your kids first. Despite what you’ve read in your lifetime, chocolate in small doses is good for both your mental and physical health. Here are some facts about this delectable treat in its many varieties. Milk chocolate Removing the other flavorings and fillings that come in your children’s snacksized Halloween candy, a standard milk chocolate bar isn’t too bad for you, as long as you don’t eat several in one sitting. On the positive side, milk chocolate is low in sodium and cholesterol and contains approximately 10 percent of the daily calcium intake. A standard bar contains Vitamin A as well as Choline, which helps to prevent liver damage in some cases. On the down side, a milk chocolate bar is high in saturated fats and most of its calories come in the form of sugars. Many chocolate bars utilize soy lecithin in their ingredients, making it a possible inflammatory food for those allergic to that particular product. Chocolate bar manufacturers, at least in the United States, use paraffin wax to give their candies a shiny and glossy look. Don’t worry, the wax is edible, but you may be turned off by its use.

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Dark chocolate It may taste bitter to some, but dark chocolate offers more health benefits than its milky cousin, and it gets healthier the darker it gets. An ounce of this product contains a similar amount of trans fats and sugars as an ounce of milk chocolate. In addition, the glycemic load, the level a person’s blood sugar rises after eating a certain food, is pretty low. That’s where the similarities between the two end. Instead of being higher in calcium, dark chocolate’s claim to fame is the large of amounts of Potassium, Phosphorous, and Magnesium it contains. Combined, these minerals give some indulgers the benefits of lower blood pressure and increased cognitive function. The natural flavonoids within dark chocolate help control blood sugars and can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes while theobromine works to strengthen tooth enamel, making it unique within the candy world. Finally, dark chocolate is full of the cancer-preventing antioxidants. All of these elements get more powerful the darker the chocolate. The caveat – the darker the chocolate, the

harsher it can taste due to the lack of natural sugars. Raw chocolate A recent trend in the natural/organic food world is raw chocolate. The stripped down version of the processed cocoa beans used in other chocolate candies, the raw cacao pellets are chock full of health benefits. The theobromine contained in this food not only strengthens enamel but also provides a mild stimulant that can help ease the effects of depression. Fatty acids within the beans may assist in raising good cholesterol and lowering its evil brother. Raw chocolate also contains the minerals, flavonoids, and antioxidants that dark chocolate does. Unlike dark or milk chocolate, raw cacao is low in sugars and trans fats. The chocolate you decide to indulge in depends on the tastes of you and your family. Milk chocolate is certainly the sweetest and creamiest of the three but also has the fewest health benefits. In the end, read product labels carefully to make the right decision for you and your children.


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Garbage Garage Larimer County’s waste & recycling education center at the Larimer County Landfill in Fort Collins

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safe kids Dealing with disaster

How to help kids cope when tragedy is all around K i m S h a rpe

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ornadoes, hail storms, wildfires and floods. Northern Colorado has been home to many natural disasters in recent times. Unfortunately, these events cause more than the loss of property and life. They also can cause individuals to feel helpless and insecure, especially children and youth. Since disasters happen, regardless of best laid avoidance plans and preparedness measures, it is important to know how to recognize if children are having difficulty dealing with the emergency and what to do to help them. The signs and symptoms children exhibit when they are trying to cope with the aftermath of a disaster vary by age, and children who tend to be more withdrawn seem more susceptible to experiencing trauma-related stress versus their more outgoing counterparts. Dr. Brian Mesinger, pediatric psychologist with The Youth Clinic, says younger children may become clingy and have regressive behaviors, like ignoring toilet training practices. Schoolage children often become very talkative and ask a lot of questions. They also may “play” disaster with their toys. Teens tend to display more adult-like reactions, like talking less, having trouble concentrating in school and not sleeping well. Parents can help their children deal with disasters in many ways. First and foremost, let them talk and express their feelings. “It’s important for adults to acknowledge how kids are feeling and what has happened. Don’t minimize it; call it like it is without overdoing it. Also make sure to emphasize resilience and the need to hang in there,” Mesinger recommends. Let them know everything will be all right. Life may not be exactly how it was before the disaster, but together you will get through it. Allowing children and youth to be part of the recovery process can be very therapeutic for them. Let them help with 18

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clean up and repairs when and where appropriate. Make sure everyone takes proper safety precautions, however, such as having up-to-date tetanus vaccinations and wearing protective clothing. Do not let children play in storm or floodwater as it could be contaminated. Re-establish and keep routines as normal as possible. “Our lives hinge on regularity, routine and structure,” says Mesinger. All three provide people with a sense of assurance and normalcy. Limit access to media coverage. Too much information or continually viewing images of or hearing about disaster damage can be overwhelming even for the most stalwart adult. Anticipate that certain conditions

may trigger fears to resurface, such as during wildfire season or a severe storm. Remind children that there will always be adverse weather and most of the time, it is simply that. Establish an emergency preparedness plan with your children. It can be comforting to know plans have been made to keep your family safe when necessary. Seek professional consultation or counseling if necessary. Mesinger says, “Don’t hesitate to ask your family doctor or the school counselor if a behavior you’re seeing in your child is normal or deserving of more attention.” And make sure to let your child’s teacher or caregiver know that they may need a little extra TLC to help them navigate stormy emotions.

Read away the worry

Books may provide education and comfort to children and youth about inclement weather and rescue operations. The High Plains Library District in Weld County compiled the following list.

For children • Disaster Relief by Nick Hunter • Natural Disasters by Claire Watts • Surviving a Flood by Heather Adamson • Inundaciones/Floods by Matt Doeden • Catastrophic Weather by Sarah Levete • How to Survive a Flood by Matt Doeden • What to Do When Your Family Loses Its Home by Rachel Lynette • Preparing For Disasters by Bobbie Kalman & Kelley MacAulay • Ways to Help After a Natural Disaster by Laya Saul. • Search and Rescue Specialists by Lissette Gonzalez. • Fire Safety by Lisa M. Herrington. • What If There Is A Fire? by Anara Guard • Firefighters to the Rescue by Meish Goldish. • Molly, Golly! The Legend of Molly Williams, America’s First Female Firefighter by Dianne Ochiltree • Cómo contener el fuego = Contain the Flame by Jill Urban Donahue • Firefighters to the Rescue by Wendy Clemson • Staying Safe Around Fire by Lucia Raatma • In an Emergency by Neil Champion

•W  ildfire Alert! by Lynn Peppas •W  ildfires by Susan Ring • Hotshots! by Chris L. Demarest •E  rased by a Tornado! by Jessica Rudolph •H  ow to Survive a Tornado by Michael Martin. •H  ow Do Tornadoes Form? by Renee C. Rebman •E  xtreme Weather by John Farndon • I’ll Know What To Do: A Kid’s Guide to Natural Disasters by Bonnie S. Mark • Thunderstorms by Matt Doeden •W  ild Weather Days by Katie Marsico •E  arth’s Wild Winds by Sandra Friend • Snowstorms by Jim Mezzanotte •W  hiteout! A Book about Blizzards by Rick Thomas

For teens and young adults • Coping With Natural Disasters by Allison Stark Draper • Devastation! The World’s Worst Natural Disasters by Lesley Newson • Windswept: The Story of Wind and Weather by Marq de Villiers • Weather: A Visual Guide by Bruce Buckley


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Harvest a bushel of fun this season Halloween happenings, corn mazes, pumpkin patches and more katie harris

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ll of our favorite northern Colorado Halloween events are back with a bang this year, ready to fright and delight kids of all ages! Below you’ll find everything from safe trick-or-treat options to some of the scariest haunted mazes around. With so many great local Halloween happenings, you’ll be sure to get some wear out of those costumes this year! Halloween Events Community Halloween Party Community Recreation Center, 250 N. 11th St, Windsor Thursday, Oct. 31, 6-8pm The Windsor Optimist Club and Windsor Police Department are sponsoring this event, featuring fun games and treats for all! No cost. 970674-3500 or www.windsorgov.com. Halloween Enchanted Garden The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave, FC Saturday, Oct. 26, 10am-2pm Kids ages 2 to 8 can enjoy Halloween stories, games, crafts and activities, plus appearances by the Halloween magician and legendary “Talking Pumpkin!” $5/child. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens/ programsspecial-events/special-events/ halloween-enchanted-garden Halloween on the Promenade Next to Rock Bottom Brewery at Centerra, LV Sunday, Oct. 27, noon-3pm This free event includes goody bags and snacks, horse-drawn hayrides, a pumpkin patch, a photo area, games, music and prizes! No cost. 970-461-1285 or www.theprom enadeshopsatcenterra.com/event/ halloween-on-the-promenade/2145421994. Haunted House at the CRC Community Recreation Center, 250 N. 11th

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St, Windsor Friday, Oct. 25, 6-7pm The Student Advisory Leadership Team presents this family-friendly haunted house. $2/person. 970-674-3500 or www.windsorgov.com.

Trick-or-Treating Halloween Family Fun Festival and downtown trick-or-treat Peters Park and 5th Street and throughout downtown Loveland Saturday, Oct. 26, 10am-2pm Trick-or-treat at the shops of downtown Loveland, and then meet in front of the museum for a costume contest, vendor booths, activities for kids and entertainment. (Register for costume contest in front of museum no later than 12:15pm.) No cost. 970-962-2000 or www.ci.loveland.co.us/index.aspx?page=739. Howl-O-Ween Trick-or-Treat Centennial Village Museum, 1475 A St, GR Saturday, Oct. 26 and Sunday, Oct. 27, 4-8pm Enjoy trick-or-treating and refreshments, plus Halloween-themed activities such as candle dipping, cornhusk dolls, pumpkin picks and hay rides! No cost. 970-350-9220 or www.greeleymuseums.com. Safe Trick-or-Treat Outlets at Loveland Thursday, Oct. 31, 5-8pm. Stay safe this year and take the kids sidewalk trick-or-treating at the outlets at Loveland. A kids’ costume contest will also be held at 6pm. No cost. 970-663-1916 or www.outlets atloveland.com. Tiny Tot Trick-or-Treat Old Town Fort Collins Thursday, Oct. 31, 10am. Come in costume and meet downtown at 10am for large group trick-or-treating at the shops of Old Town. No cost. 970-484-6500 or www.downtownfortcollins.com.

Treatsylvania Trick-or-Treat Street The Farm at Lee Martinez Park, 600 N. Sherwood, FC Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25-26, 6-8pm; Sunday, Oct. 27, 1-3pm and 5-7pm Children of all ages and their families are invited to trick-or-treat, explore the notso-scary barn, and go on a Halloween hayride! $5/child admission, adults free. Purchase tickets at The Farm, Northside Aztlan Community Center, or EPIC. 970-221-6665 or www.fcgov.com.

Halloween Hauntings Fear at the Farm 7755 Greenstone Trail, FC Open through Oct. 31, 7pm. Terrifying scenes and characters lurk in the corn maze after dark, so beware! Also, if you’re brave enough, embark on a haunted hayride through the farm. Haunted maze: $17; Haunted hayride: $12; or $25 for both. 970221-3276 or www.somethingfromthefarm.com. Haunted House at the CRC Community Recreation Center, 250 N. 11th St, Windsor Friday, Oct. 25, 7-9pm This community haunted house will scare even the bravest visitors—it’s not recommended for young children. $2/person. 970674-3500 or www.windsorgov.com. Miller Farms Haunted Adventure 13912 CR 19, Platteville Oct. 10-Oct. 31, dusk Each night a group will be taken out to the field to open a pod-shaped UFO that has been discovered at the farm. Be ready to run! $7/person. 970-785-6133 or www.millerfarms.net. Northern Colorado Corn Maze, haunted maze 2318 S. CR 5, FC Open at dusk, Th-Su, through Oct. 31.


Hold onto your soul—monsters of all kinds await you at this year’s haunted maze! $16/person. 970-308-5843 or www.nococornmaze.com. Scream Acres 20861 CR 33, LaSalle Select nights through Nov. 3 Special effects, eerie sounds, and gruesome characters await you at this year’s haunted maze! While visiting, you may also want to board the bus and take part in the Zombie Slayer paintball adventure, or visit a ghost town for the interactive ghost haunt! Tickets are sold in a variety of combo packages, prices vary. 970-737-2129 or www.fritzlermaze.com.

Pumpkin Patches and Other Fall Fun Bartels Farm 3424 E. Douglas Rd, FC Open daily in October, 10am-6pm Activities include free Punkin Chunkin and farm animal visits, $2 hayrides, $6/$8 corn maze, and a pumpkin patch and fall market. Parking and admission are free. 970-4933853 or www.thebartelsfarm.com. Fritzler Maze 20861 CR 33, LaSalle Open Through Nov. 3, hours vary. Journey through corn mazes, watch a pig race, try your hand at the hay climb, or have fun on the jumping pillow! Tickets are sold in a variety of combo packages, prices vary. 970-737-2129 or www.fritzlermaze.com. Harvest Farm 4240 E. CR 66, Wellington Oct. 4-Oct. 27, Fridays and Saturdays, 10am-9pm; Sundays, noon-7pm; Closed M-Th. Enjoy a huge selection of activities, including a petting zoo, pumpkin patch, nonscary, 10-acre, themed corn maze, corn cannons, hay rides, Pumpkin Smash, hay bale maze, and much more! Adults: $15; Children and seniors: $10; Ages 3 and under: Free. 970-568-9803 or www.harvestfarm.net. Miller Farms 13912 CR 19, Platteville Open daily October through mid-November, 9am-6pm. Experience the unique opportunity to ride on a tractor-drawn wagon through the fields,

picking your own veggies as you go! You’ll also visit farm animals, explore a corn maze, play on a jumping pillow and a real fire truck! $15/person or $55/family of 4 includes all veggies and activities. 970-785-6133 or www.millerfarms.net. Northern Colorado Corn Maze 2318 S. CR 5, FC Open through Oct. 31, Su and Th: 11am10pm; F-Sa: 11am-midnight Corn Chuckers, a corn maze, petting zoo, pumpkin patch, pedal car races, and a giant catapult await you at this year’s farm! Adults: $10; Children and seniors: $8; Ages 3 and under: Free. 970-308-5843 or www.noco cornmaze.com.

Osborn Farm 1230 S. Boise Ave, LV Open everyday in October, 10am-6pm, weather permitting. Choose from a large section of pumpkins, gourds, Indian corn, corn stalks and straw bales for purchase. www.osbornfarm.com. Something From the Farm 7755 Greenstone Trail, FC Open through Oct. 31, hours vary. Explore three miles of trails in three different themed corn mazes, visit a pumpkin patch, take a hayride, play on the hayground, or stop for a snack at the concession stand. Adults: $10; Kids and seniors: $8; Ages 4 and under: Free. 970-221-3276 or www.somethingfrom thefarm.com.

Don’t let cars and kids go bump in the night Before your witches, skeletons, and Iron Man look-alikes roam the streets on Halloween, have a discussion with your children about how to trick-or-treat safely. Safe Kids Larimer County and the University of Colorado Health would like to remind you that Halloween does not have to be a scary night for parents if everyone (trick-or-treaters and drivers) obeys some safety rules. • Children under the age of 10 should trick-or-treat with an adult. Their little brains have not developed enough to understand the potential dangers around them. • Cross the street at corners. Do not zigzag across the street. Kids forget that cars are still allowed to drive down the street and don’t always remember to stop and look both ways. • Stay on the sidewalk. Many homeowners decorate their lawns with tripping hazards for trick-ortreaters and it’s the neighborly thing to do. • Children should not enter anybody’s house without your permission, even for a minute or to warm up. • Make sure the costume fits. Avoid any baggy or flimsy costumes that could pose a tripping hazard. Choose to use face paint over facemasks to ensure your child can see their surroundings. If it’s expected to be cold, consider buying a costume a size or two bigger to fit over a coat.

Be Seen.

• Carry a flashlight or glow sticks so other trick-ortreaters and drivers can see you. Put reflective items on your costume. • Drivers can do their part to keep from bumping

into the trick-or-treaters. The best way to do this is to avoid driving during trick-or-treat hours, but we know that is not always realistic. So, here are some tips for you: • Be alert. Trick-or-treat hours normally run between 5:30 and 9:30pm. Keep your eyes open for little ones darting across the street. • Slow down. While this is true of all residential streets, remember when you were that age and how excited you were to get to the next house. Kids’ peripheral vision is limited and they cannot tell the distance or speed of your car. • Drive with your lights on. This will allow others to see you and for you to see kids easier. • If you are supervising your children from your vehicle, Safe Kids recommends you park your car in the middle of the block and turn off the engine. • Do not drive up and down the street while you are trying to watch your children as your attention will not be on the road. • Do not back up if you can avoid it. • Once everyone gets home safely go through the treats with your child and dispose of any that are not in original, sealed packages. Decide together the rules on enjoying the treats or talk to your dentist who might have a buy-back program.

For more information on Halloween Safety Tips, visit www.safekids.org. Here you can also find a 2011 study entitled “Halloween Safety: A National Survey of Parents’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors”. The findings might shock you. Don’t delay. Talk to your kids today! Provided by Janet Werst, Injury Prevention Coordinator at UCHealth.

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Calm

down

Helping kids cope with stress

Lynn Utzman-Nichols

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s your pre-teen or teen extra irritable these days? Before you blame it on changing hormones, consider what’s going on in his life or the rest of your family’s lives. It might be stress. With school, sports, extra-curriculars and a social life, kids have a lot to juggle. “Irritability, disruptive behavior at home or school, trouble sleeping, and changes in appetite are all signs of stress in kids,” says Lisa Whittaker, PA-C, at Colorado Health Medical Group’s Family Health Care of the Rockies. Other tell-tale signs that stress might be getting the best of your kids are poor grades or changes in their social lives. “If you see grades decline from their usual baseline, that’s a sign that something stressful might be going on in their lives,” Whittaker adds.

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What’s eating at your child? The first step in helping your child relax is identifying what’s causing stress in her life. Step back and take an honest look at your home life. Are you going through a hard time financially? Have you recently moved, or are you and your spouse experiencing conflicts? “Teens may not admit or show that they are stressed by marital discord

or financial problems, but they are,” Whittaker says. That’s because teens are highly invested in being calm, collected and projecting the image that their lives are normal and ordinary, just like everyone else’s. “But financial problems might mean that a teen doesn’t get a car like other teens or he has to work a job while going to school to pay for car insurance, a phone, or new clothes,” adds

Healthy Families Program keeps families well UCHealth’s Poudre Valley Hospital invites families in our community to join Healthy Families, a program that provides easy access to health, fitness, safety and parenting information and services. Whether you’re expecting your first child or are already busy raising a family, Healthy Families is a great way to maintain healthy living habits. It’s free to join and you’ll receive access to pertinent health information, a bi-monthly newsletter, discounts on wellness classes and a gift. To join, visit www.pvhs.org/healthyfamilies or call 970-495-7500.


Whittaker. That’s not saying you have to run out and buy a car for your teen, but do acknowledge that financial hardship is difficult for all family members and get your teen’s input on the situation. Simply acknowledging financial stress, even if it can’t be easily remedied, goes a long way in reassuring your teen. If you notice grades are slipping, consider the causes. “Maybe bullying is happening at school. If so, contact the school and figure out a plan to address it. Perhaps a learning disability is emerging or becoming more apparent as your child moves to a higher grade—if so, consider getting some psychological testing done,” Whittaker advises. Kids with undiagnosed ADHD experience more generalized anxiety as they grow older and expectations increase, especially in middle and high school. If you suspect your child has attention issues, look in to it sooner rather than later—solutions can be put in place, like more time on tests and extra cues from teachers. “With ADHD, kids are more distractible. During class or tests they hear the clock ticking or someone tapping a pencil and they get pulled off task. This affects their test performance,” Whittaker says. She advises parents continue getting their kids annual well-child checks even in later years. Doctors and physician assistants explore emotional, social and academic issues with pre-teens and teens and can catch signs of stress or learning disabilities before they become problematic. They also watch for an onset of mental health conditions, such as panic attacks and anxiety in older teens. Granted, life carries its own level of stress. As kids grow, so do their responsibilities. “There is a heightened level of pressure today for kids to not only achieve good grades but also be involved in lots of activities, sports, and volunteer work so they can get into a good college. Yet it’s a balance—some of these outside groups also offer support for kids,” Whittaker adds. Take a look at your child’s schedule. Is there a balance between activities and down time? Does she ever have time to relax? If not, it might be time to help her prioritize her activities and drop ones that are no

longer enjoyable or valuable. Kids also feel stress with changes in friendships and social circles. Feeling disjointed from peers on and off for a bit is okay, but when you see your child isolating from his regular friends, always wanting to be alone and often seeming upset, it may be time to request help from the school counselor or another professional. Helping kids de-stress One of the best ways to ease your child’s mind is making it a point to check in with her every day. When kids know someone cares, whether they are stressed, happy, sad or struggling with grades, they do better. A teen may brush you off in her quest for independence, but sending the message that you care, and that you are always there for her to talk, is something she will carry with her like a badge of courage as she moves through her day. “Check in daily to see where your child is emotionally and academically. Kids with good parental support have better self-esteem and achieve more,” Whittaker adds. Another way to cut kids’ stress is to encourage activities that are solely for fun and relaxation. Help your child

figure out what burns off stress—sometimes it’s a sport like skateboarding, running or basketball, and sometimes it’s a quiet activity like reading. Send the message that it’s just as important to fit in time to relax as it is to fit in daily obligations, like studying, volunteering and working. We all do better when we know what to expect. Especially for younger kids, routines are calming. “Kids with structure are generally less stressed,” Whittaker adds. Try to build in regular bedtimes and bedtime routines, eat dinner together as a family and review weekly schedules so kids know what’s coming. Finally, be aware of your own stress. Make a conscious effort to take a deep breath before entering the house and imagine leaving your bundle of stress at the door. Whether you try to hide it or not, your kids will pick up on your stress and may take responsibility for it where none is due. Take care of yourself and find your calm. After all, as parents we are always teaching and watching you navigate stress is a powerful lesson for your kids. UCHealth sponsored this article.

​ reating headaches and stomachaches T caused by stress Dr. Emily Anderson-Elder, a family medicine physician with the Windsor Medical Clinic describes a teen patient who came in complaining of chronic stomachaches: “She was having trouble at school, experimenting with drugs and was feeling depressed. Her stress showed itself as stomach pain.” Anxiety and depression are known producers of stomach pain. “When kids come in with stomach pain I encourage the parents to chat with them and explore areas of stress in their lives. I recommend behavioral therapy if kids are experiencing a lot of stress,” Anderson-Elder says. Learning to manage stress can calm down their lives and hence, their stomachs. ​A child’s stress can also show up in her head as real, physical pain. Tension headaches are a dull pain versus a throbbing one, like with migraines. There’s a pressing tension on both sides of the head or in the forehead. According to familydoctor.org, tension headaches often begin slowly and gradually, and they often start in the middle of the day. “If kids carry stress in their necks they might feel a tension headache at the base of the neck,” adds Anderson-Elder who likes to treat tension headaches with relaxation and not medicine, when possible. Stretching to loosen neck muscles can help. So can a heat pad at the back of the neck and a hot shower. With headaches, rest is best. Offer a cool, wet washcloth for your child’s forehead.  Encourage him to sleep as this often alleviates a headache. If he hasn’t eaten recently, get him a healthy snack. Make sure he’s getting lots of liquids as dehydration can cause headaches, too. When administering over-the-counter pain medicine for headaches, the Mayo Clinic advises to not go over the recommended dose and to not give it more than three days a week. Doing so more frequently can trigger rebound headaches.​

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thompson school district news

Playtime at B.F. Kitchen

On August 27, students, parents, staff and community members celebrated the grand opening of a new playground at B.F. Kitchen Elementary School. Held in conjunction with the first day of school for students, the celebration consisted of a “grab-n-go” breakfast, a welcome from school principal Justin Blick, and an inaugural walk around the brand new track that was installed at the school. Thompson School District and the entire B.F. Kitchen Elementary community extends its sincerest thanks to The Colorado Health Foundation, which provided over $256,000 in support of the project.   schools receive “ASAP” grants Four elementary schools in Thompson School District—Big Thompson, Ivy Stockwell, Mary Blair and Van Buren— have received Active Schools Acceleration Project (ASAP) grants for the 2013-2014 school year. ASAP’s Acceleration Grants campaign is empowering 1,000 schools across America to deploy one of three innovative program models (“100-mile club,” “BOKS” and “Just Move”) to em-

brace and encourage physical activity before, during and after the school day. The schools will receive program materials, technical support, and a $1,000 financial kick-start to launch the program. Congratulations to all of the winners and thank you for your support of healthy schools in Thompson!   District completes record-setting year in volunteerism  Thompson School District has completed an annual audit of its volunteer program and is pleased to report that it was yet another extraordinarily strong year for volunteerism within the district. A total of 4,341 people registered as authorized volunteers during the 2012-2013 school year, a record number for the district.  Overall, Thompson volunteers donated 112,667 hours of their time to classroom and district activities.  As a result, it is estimated that volunteers completed the equivalent of over $1.25 million in paid paraprofessional help. “We are very happy with our volunteer efforts from this past year,” says Chris Ingold, Thompson’s volunteers

and community events specialist. “This was the first full year that we implemented the new policy that mandates a background check for all potential authorized volunteers.  We worked very hard to make the process as simple and intuitive as possible.  It’s great to know that even with those few extra steps, not only did we grow the volunteer program for the district, we also set a new record for active volunteers.” Thompson School District offers a variety of volunteer opportunities at each of its schools and Early Childhood centers throughout the year.  For registration information, please visit www.thompson schools.org and click the “Volunteer” link under the heading “Community.”   2013 “Help Kids Succeed” school supply drive benefits students This July, Thompson Education Foundation volunteers gathered to stuff backpacks full of the school supplies necessary to help disadvantaged students be successful from the moment they enter the classroom. A total of 1,500 backpacks were created to help with these vital supplies. The stuffed backpacks were delivered to Thompson School District schools for distribution to students during each school’s registration in August. The Help Kids Succeed program recognizes how important school supplies are to the success and well being of a student. Not only does it give the student an immediate avenue of response to the classroom curriculum, but also the feeling of being fully prepared to learn inspires confidence, ability and self-worth in students throughout their school day. A backpack filled with new supplies for a K-12 student costs, on average, $75. By working closely with its purchasing partners, TEF was able to provide the same backpack for $20, allowing more students to benefit from program donations. RMPARENT

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poudre school district news Preston coordinator impressed by enthusiastic volunteers of active volunteers,” says Balzer.

Volunteer Josh Balzer enjoys the parks and mountains with his family.

Poudre School District has over 18,000 volunteers, consisting of parents, grandparents, seniors and community members. Managing that many volunteers in 48 schools is quite a feat! Helping the PSD’s Volunteers and Partnerships office manage the multitude of volunteers at each school site is a Volunteer Building Coordinator (VBC). These dedicated volunteers donate many hours to ensure the volunteer program at their school is a success. Some have done it for many years, starting in elementary schools, and continuing in this volunteer position even after their children move on to middle school and even high school! Josh Balzer was very active with the Werner Elementary PTA, and when his eldest son began middle school last year, he decided to remain involved and took over the VBC position at Preston three months later. “What stands out to me is the enthusiasm of our volunteers. Everyone looks for those little extra things they can do to help out. There is a high level of mutual respect between the students, staff, and volunteers,” says Balzer. At the first Preston event he volunteered for, which was being in charge of the concessions, none of the other regular PPO members were there, and he did not know where anything was. Balzer says, “Other folks stepped up, showed me where things were kept, explained to me how the events usually ran, and where to put the money at the end of the night. The evening 28

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went very smoothly and we ended up with more than enough help!” Balzer is a student and teacher, himself. He is finishing up graduate school, teaching at a local business college, and runs a small business. He and his family enjoy the parks, mountains, outdoor festivals, and live music in Old Town. “Poudre School District is the most amazing district we have been a part of, and a huge reason for that is the number

2013 bond projects update This summer Poudre School District focused on improving security and safety systems at schools. In an effort to provide greater security to schools until all bond-funded entry modifications are complete, camera/intercom systems were installed at the main entries of 19 schools. Elementary school video security systems were also upgraded. Twentyone schools also received either new or upgraded fire alarm systems that meet or exceed the current fire code. Overall, 106 bond-funded projects, valued at nearly $19 million, were completed at 35 sites. Major renovation projects were completed at Bauder, Linton, Lopez, and Olander schools. In addition, phase two of the major remodel begun in 2012 at Poudre High School was completed. To date, 508 line items totaling $64 million, funded by the 2010 Bond Fund, have been completed or are in progress.

A Kruse Elementary early childhood education teacher welcomes a student on the first day of classes.


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For more information about bond projects at schools and other PSD sites, visit the 2010 Building Fund web pages. PSD awarded several grants to support student success Congratulations to Poudre School District staff, schools and departments that were recently awarded grants to help students be successful! PSD thanks those agencies, foundations, and organizations for their generosity and dedication to students and education especially the McCarthyDressman Foundation, Hewlett Packard Foundation, Colorado Department of Education, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Rocky Mountain Center for Health Promotion, Colorado Health Foundation and Centennial BOCES (Board of Cooperative Educational Services). The following grants were awarded:

• Poudre High School Principal Kathy Mackay was awarded a $10,000 grant from the McCarthy-Dressman Foundation for math professional development.

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• Tavelli Elementary and Principal Christine Hendricks received a $5,000 grant from the Hewlett Packard Foundation for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education materials and professional development. • PSD Professional Development Director Kate Canine received a $5,000 grant from the Colorado Department of Education for Multi-tiered Systems of Support (PBIS/RTI). • Centennial High School’s Health Center via PSD was awarded $50,000 from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. • PSD District Suspension and Expulsion Program Director Troy Krotz received a $470,520 (over 4 years) grant from the CDE for PSD’s Truancy program. • Ashley Schwader, PSD district wellness coordinator, received a $173,720 Healthy Schools Grant from the Rocky Mountain Center for Health Promotion and the Colorado Health Foundation. • PSD Student Services received a $36,000 grant from the CDE McKinney-Vento Homeless Students grant program. • PSD Student Services was awarded a

$57,395 Migrant Education Grant from Centennial BOCES. • PSD Curriculum Facilitator DeeDee Wright was awarded a $119,734 (over 3 years) grant from the CDE for comprehensive school health.

Calendar of Events Oct. 8 .... 6 :30pm, Board of Education business meeting, JSSC, 2407 LaPorte Ave. Oct. 8 .... 6 to 8pm, Out-of-State College Fair, Poudre High School, 201 Impala Drive. Oct. 14 .. 6 to 8:30pm, Family Financial Aid College Night (Post-Secondary Planning Night), Fort Collins High School, 3400 Lambkin Way. Oct. 17 .. K  -5 Parent/Teacher Conferences; no school for K-5 students; teachers on duty Oct. 18 .. K  -12 Parent/Teacher Conferences; K-12 schools closed; teachers on duty Oct. 22 .. 6 :30pm, Board of Education business meeting and work session, JSSC, 2407 LaPorte Ave.


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greeley-evans district 6 news Students honored for achievement on TCAP Three Greeley-Evans School District 6 students were honored at the Sept. 9 Board of Education meeting for having scored advanced on every TCAP/CSAP they have taken in their K-12 career. Those students are Geny Varghese, Greeley Central High School, Nathaniel Gorsline, Greeley West High School and Victoria Palmer, Frontier Charter Academy. In addition, 25 students will also be honored as TCAP Platinum Award winners for scoring perfect in at least one content area on last year’s exam. Of those, four students scored perfect in two content areas. These students were honored for their perfect score in at least one content area last year:

Casbah Parlin, Chappelow K-8; Brian Davis, Chappelow K-8 (formerly McAuliffe Elementary); Indigo Parlin, Chappelow K-8; Saul Nabor, Dos Rios; Connor Phillips, Frontier Academy; Brenden Folsom, Heimen Elementary; Lincoln Severt, Jackson Elementary; Alexis Irizarry, Martinez Elementary; Braeden Freir, McAuliffe Elementary; Timber Gulkin, McAuliffe Elementary; Isabelle Kleinsmith, McAuliffe Elementary; Savana Long, McAuliffe Elementary; LiLi Luo, McAuliffe Elementary; Lauryn Tharp, McAuliffe Elementary; Chloe Young, McAuliffe Elementary; Rudi Herrig, Meeker Elementary; Isaac Lundstrom, Monfort Elementary; Zoey Douglass, Winograd K-8; Charlotte Mick, Winograd K-8; Maya Pfeiler, Winograd K-8; Alaina Row, Winograd K-8.

Three students who have moved out of District 6 also received the Platinum Award: Andrew Kanettta, Tyler Ward and Braedon McGuire, all of whom attended McAuliffe Elementary last year. “We are very proud what these incredible students have accomplished,” says Superintendent Dr. Ranelle Lang. “It takes hard work and a dedication to learning to achieve all that they have.” In addition, 199 District 6 students received the TCAP Gold Award for scoring advanced on their reading, writing and math assessments; 3,305 received the TCAP Silver Award for scoring proficient 32

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or above on their reading, writing and math assessments; and 2,873 received the Bronze Award for improving in at least one proficiency level in one of the content areas of reading, writing or math. The number of District 6 students receiving these honors increased significantly over last year. In 2012, one student received the Diamond Award; 15 received Platinum Awards; 186 received Gold Awards; 3,085 received Silver Awards and 1,776 received Bronze Awards. District 6 to host fourth annual Citizens Academy Greeley-Evans School District 6 is inviting residents of Greeley and Evans to attend its fourth annual Citizens Academy. The Citizens Academy is for those residents who are interested in learning more about how our schools and district operate. There are six, two-hour sessions throughout the school year, beginning Oct. 7. Academy participants will tour elementary, middle and high schools, the administration building and other support service offices. Topics will include overviews of school finance and administration, curriculum and instruction, facility maintenance, school safety and discipline, student achievement results, school bus services and student nutrition. The Academy will meet from 11am to 1pm on the first Monday of the month from October through April. Our nationally recognized nutrition services department will provide lunch. Here is a schedule of Academy dates and locations: • Monday, Oct. 7, 2013: District 6 Administration Building, 1025 9th Ave., GR • Monday, Nov. 4, 2013: Maplewood Elementary School, 1201 21st Ave., GR • Monday, Dec. 2, 2013: Brentwood Middle School, 2600 24th Ave. Court, GR • Monday, Feb. 3: GR West High School, 2401 35th Ave., GR • Monday, Mar. 3: Transportation Office, 155 E. 27th St., GR • Monday, Apr. 7: District 6 Service Center,

2508 4th Ave., GR

There is no cost to attend the Academy. The class size will be small in order to allow in-depth conversations. There will be time allotted each session for questions and answers. To register for the Academy, please contact Theresa Myers, director of communications for District 6, at 348-6003 or at tmyers@GRschools.org. District 6 workplace-wellness program receives gold award The Wellness Council of America has given its gold award to the Greeley-Evans School District 6 Worksite Wellness program. District 6 is the only organization or business in Colorado to receive the gold rating this year, and one of 33 gold winners nationwide. The gold award recognizes organizations developing comprehensive programs that are producing positive results for employees. These programs must be strategic and an integral part of the organization. To be considered for a WELCOA award, organizations are rated based on how well they meet seven benchmarks of creating a healthy workforce. The benchmarks WELCOA monitors are: CEO support, creating cohesive wellness teams, collecting data to drive health efforts, crafting an operation plan, choosing appropriate interventions, creating a supportive environment and evaluating outcomes. Through grant funding, District 6 has implemented a comprehensive Worksite Wellness program over the past several years. This program includes events such as flu shot clinics, a wellness fair, healthy eating challenges, a stress management program, health risk appraisals and a 5K run/walk every spring. The goal of the program is to improve the health of all District 6 employees, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce health-care and disability costs, and promote good health throughout the system.


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lunchbox Poudre School District— Elementary student lunches are $2.25, secondary student lunches are $2.50 and reduced lunches

are $0.40. Entrees offered daily: Elementary—a variety of fruits and vegetables, milk and juices; Secondary--hot and cold sandwiches, fruits and vegetables, deli salad and pizza. Elementary schoolS 1 Yogurt & fruit box; mac n’cheese; chicken enchilada bake 2 Chicken Caesar salad; vegetable paella; cheeseburger 3 PBJ; Orange chicken; hot dog 4 Mediterranean wrap; pepperoni pizza; cheese raviolis 7 Hummus & veggies; grilled cheese w/ tomato soup; grilled chicken sandwich 8 PBJ; lasagna; chicken nuggets 9 Veggie wrap; BBQ chicken sandwich; cheese pizza 10 Chef salad; chicken broccoli Alfredo; beef tacos 11 Turkey & cheese deli; sloppy Joe; chicken bites

14 Yogurt & fruit box; chili & cinnamon roll, chicken patty sandwich 15 Madarin chicken salad, mac n’cheese, pig in a blanket 16 PBJ; cheeseburger; turkey & mashed potatoes 17 & 18 No school 21 Hummus & veggies; Italian spaghetti; corn dog 22 Turkey & cheese wrap; veggie lasagna; cheeseburger 23 Chef salad; Asian rice bowl; cheese pizza 24 PBJ; chicken drumbstick w/biscuit; burrito 25 Tuna sandwich; mac n’cheese; beef tamale bake 28 Yogurt & fruit box; Chinese American

rice; chicken quesadilla 29 PBJ; Spanish chicken; pepperoni pizza 30 Chef salad; potato bar w/chili; grilled chicken sandwich 31 Turkey & cheese wrap; burrito; chicken nuggets Secondary schools 1 Spaghetti; tostada 2 Chicken bites and biscuit 3 Potato bar w/chili; Spanish chicken 4 Turkey gravy/potato; Asian rice bowl 7 Chicken nuggets w/mashed potatoes; beef taco 8 Lasagna; chicken noodle & grilled ham 9 Baked chicken; burrito 10 Vegetable paella; chicken fajita 11 Beef Szechwan; chicken taco

14 Mac n’cheese; Chinese American rice 15 Chicken bites w/mashed potatoes beef tamale bake 16 Penne pasta w/sauce; pigs in a blanket 17 Cheese raviolis; turkey pot pie 18 No school! 21 Veggie lasagna; chicken nuggets 22 Burrito; fruit & yogurt 23 Baked chicken & biscuit; spaghetti & meatballs 24 Chicken broccoli Alfredo; beef taco 25 Asian rice bowl; Potato w/turkey gravy 28 Nachos; Penne pasta w/sauce 29 Teriyaki chicken; beef tacos 30 Chicken nuggets w/mashed potatoes; grilled cheese w/tomato soup Orange chicken w/rice; Philly cheesesteak 31 

Thompson R2J School District — Elementary lunches are $2.50. Secondary school lunches are $2.75. Reduced lunches are

$0.40. Offered daily: PBJs & fruit. 1 Pizza stick; chicken tender day 2 Hamburger; chef salad 3 Nachos; turkey sandwich 4 Fish taco; garden entrée salad 7 Mac n’cheese; Caesar salad 8 Variety pizza; salad of the day 9 Chicken breast strips; fruit & yogurt plate 10 Chicken burrito bowl; ham & cheese 11 Ham & cheese rollup; turkey sandwich 14 Grilled chicken sandwich; fruit

& yogurt plate 15 Pesto pasta; chicken tender salad 16 BBQ pork sliders; fruit & yogurt plate 17 Beef & bean tostada; taco salad 18 Orange chicken; turkey sandwich 21 Chicken nuggets; Caesar salad 22 French bread boat; chicken tender salad 23 BBQ chicken breast; fruit & yogurt plate 24 & 25 No school!

28 Mini pancakes w/sausage; Caesar salad Pizza stick; chicken tender salad 29  30 Hamburger; chef salad 31 Nachos w/meat; taco salad Secondary schools 1 Tuscan pasta salad; chicken patty 2 Burger bar; salad of the day 3 Nachos; Lasagna w/beef 4 Baja fish taco; grilled chicken sandwich 7 Mac & cheese; vegetable

quesadilla 8 Cheese pizza; chicken fajita wrap 9 Fiesta bar; salad of the day 10 Chicken burrito bowl; meatball sandwich 11 Ham & cheese pocket; French bread boat 14 Grilled chicken sandwich; nachos 15 Pesto pasta; burger 16 Pizza bar 17 Beef and bean tostada; chicken nuggets

18 Orange chicken; salad of the day 21 Chicken nuggets; sloppy Joe 22 French bread boat; hot ham & cheese 23 Pick two: sandwich and salad 24 & 25 No school! 28 Chicken & waffles; BBQ pulled pork sandwich 29 Tuscan pasta salad; spicy chicken patty 30 Hamburger; salad of the day 31 Nachos w/meat; lasagna w/ beef

Greeley District 6 —To obtain a complete meal, student gets an entrée and can select 1-3 sides. Elementary lunches are $2.25, and middle school lunches are $2.50, reduced-price lunches are $.40. Offered daily: PBJ. Elementary schoolS 1 Chili w/cinnamon roll; turkey & cheese wrap 2 Chicken Alfredo pasta; PBJ 3 Turkey pot pie; ham & cheese hoagie 4 Hawaiian or cheese pizza; PBJ 7 Pork carnitas w/tortilla; chicken salad sandwich 8 Chicken cordon bleu sandwich; turkey & cheese wrap 9 Lasagna w/breadstick; PBJ 10 BBQ chicken w/roll; ham & cheese hoaie 11 Veggie pizza or cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich

14 BBQ pork sandwich; chicken salad sandwich 15 Teriyaki chicken w/brown rice; turkey & cheese wrap 16 Toasted cheese sandwich w/ tomato soup; PBJ 17 Buffalo chicken sandwich; ham & cheese hoagie 18 No school! 21 Hamburger/cheeseburger; chicken salad sandwich 22 Burrito; turkey & cheese wrap 23 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 24 Turkey w/roll; ham & cheese hoagie 25 Cheese pizza or taco pizza;

tuna salad sandwich 28 Mac n’cheese; chicken salad sandwich 29 Chili w/cinnamon roll; turkey & cheese wrap 30 Chicken Alfredo pasta; PBJ 31 Turkey pot pie; ham & cheese hoagie Secondary schools Chili w/cinnamon roll; club 1  hoagie 2 Chicken Alfredo pasta; PBJ 3 Turkey pot pie; ham & cheese hoagie 4 Hawaiian or cheese pizza; PBJ 7 Pork carnitas w/tortilla; chick-

en salad sandwich 8 Chicken cordon bleu sandwich; turkey & cheese wrap 9 Lasagna w/breadstick; PBJ 10 BBQ chicken w/roll; Italian hoagie 11 Veggie pizza or cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich 14 BBQ pork sandwich; chicken fajita wrap 15 Teriyaki chicken w/brown rice; club hoagie 16 Toasted cheese sandwich w/ tomato soup; PBJ 17 Buffalo chicken sandwich; ham & cheese hoagie

18 No school! 21 Hamburger/cheeseburger; chicken salad sandwich 22 Burrito; turkey & cheese wrap 23 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 24 Turkey w/roll; Italian hoagie 25 Cheese pizza or taco pizza; tuna salad sandwich 28 Mac n’cheese; chicken fajita wrap 29 Chili w/cinnamon roll; club hoagie 30 Chicken Alfredo pasta; PBJ 31 Turkey pot pie; ham & cheese hoagie

Windsor School District — Price for elementary lunch is $2.30, for middle school students, $2.50. Reduced lunches are

$0.40. Salad bar is served daily with entrees. Offered daily: PBJ and yogurt.

Elementary schoolS 1 Hot dog 2 Bean & cheese burrito 3 Spaghetti 4 Big Daddy pizza 7 Chicken sandwich 8 Cream turkey noodle soup 9 Pancakes w/sausage 10 Crispy chicken wrap 11 Cheese or pepperoni pizza

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14 Fish & chips 15 BBQ 16 Asian bowl 17 Chili w/cinnamon roll 18 No school! 21 No school! 22 Chicken nuggets 23 Cheesy nachos 24 Mini ravioli 25 Cheese or veggie pizza

28 Taco 29 Burger 30 Chicken tenders 31 Mac n’cheese Secondary 1 Weiner wrap 2 Bean & cheese burrito 3 Spaghetti 4 Steak & cheese sandwich 7 Chicken sandwich

8 Cream turkey noodle soup 9 Pancakes w/sausage 10 Crispy chicken wrap 11 Cheeseburger 14 Fish & chips 15 BBQ 16 Asian bowl 17 Chili w/cinnamon roll 18 No school! 21 Pepperoni pizza

22 Chicken nuggets 23 Cheesy nachos 24 Lasagna 25 Hot & spicy chicken sandwich 28 Taco 29 Cheeseburger 30 Chicken tenders 31 Mac n’cheese


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OCTOBER 2013 ONGOING Through October 13 Our Town by Thornton Wilder It is the quintessential American play that touches far beyond a slice of idyllic small town life. Bas Bleu Theatre Company, 401 Pine St., FC. 970-4988949 or www.basbleu.org. Through November 3 She Loves Me George and Amalia are two feuding clerks in a European parfumerie during the 1930’s who secretly find solace in their anonymous romantic pen-pals, little knowing their respective correspondents are none other than each other. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 970-744-3747 or www.coloradocandlelight.com. Through November 23 Les Miserables This global stage sensation makes its Northern Colorado debut at MAC! Midtown Arts Center, 3750 S. Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555 or www. midtownartscenter.com. October 4-5 Colorado Mission of Mercy (COMOM) The COMOM is a large-scale dental clinic that is held annually. Dental services are provided to all who cannot afford dental care. Event Center, 425 N. 15th Ave., GR. 970-304-6410 or www. comom.org. October 10-12 Elvis Lives: The Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Event The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com.

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October 11-12 Change Presented by High Performance Dance Theatre. Experience this fun, sassy, entertaining evening of dance and music. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com. October 11-13 Magnificent Seven: The Last Round-Up Presented by the Loveland Choral Society. The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 5pm. 970-962-2120 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. October 11-13 JUNGAL BOOK Presented by the Stampede Troupe. Based on “The Jungle Book.” Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com. October 18-26 Little Women Presented by Debut Theatre Company. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX. com. October 21-27 Make a Difference Day A national day of helping others by volunteering in communities across the country. Volunteers needed. United Way of Larimer County, 424 Pine St., FC. 970-407-7008 or www. unitedwayoflarimercounty.org.

Tuesday, October 1 PowerPoint Basics Learn to prepare excellent presentations. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Great Decisions: TBA Great Decisions is America’s largest discussion program on world affairs. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Page to Screen Film Discussion: Bless Me Ultima! Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 6-8pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Word 101 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Excel 101 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 12:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. UNC Bands Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7pm. 970-356-5000 or www. ucstars.com.

Wednesday, October 2 Symphony Composer Talks Learn about the Best of Romanticism with Dr. William Runyan. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. Noon-1pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.


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Eracism Film and Discussion Learn about COINTELPRO 101 (Counter Intelligence Program). This film exposes illegal surveillance, disruption, and outright murder committed by the US government in the 1950s, ‘60s, and ‘70s. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Nature Notes Club Interact with nature while expressing your artistic side through journaling, photography, painting, and any other creative means. Time and location TBD. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/naturalresources. Homework Help Night For 5th-12th grade students. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-7pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Smokey Bear Join Smokey and friends as they teach us about fire safety. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-5pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. Noontime Nature with Kevin Cook Master of survival, house spatsy. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Wednesdays Wild World of Art Class: Collage Designs Children learn about a new art medium in each class to create fun and fabulous projects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3:30-4:30pm. 970962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. UNC Orchestra Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com. Depression and Stress: Can Happiness Be Learned? Learn how depression and stress are related, how we can learn to identify it and what we can do to move beyond these feelings towards a happier life. Greeley Medical Clinic, 1900 16th St., GR. 11amNoon. 970-313-2796 or www.pvhs.org.

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Thursday, October 3 Genealogy Society Meeting Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 6:30-8:45pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Word Basics Learn how to use Microsoft Word to write letters, papers, resumes, and much more. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Jack 1939 Author Francine Matthews will visit and tell the tale of Jack Kennedy let loose in Europe of FDR’s personal spy. Hilton, 425 W Prospect Rd., FC. 7-9:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Introduction to Computers Learn the basic skills you need to use a computer. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 3-5pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Genealogy Help @ Your Library Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. iLearn Technology: Computer Basics 101 (Windows 7) This class is for true beginners. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Nighttime Nature with Kevin Cook Master of survival, house spatsy. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 6pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Wednesdays Wild World of Art Class: Collage Designs Children learn about a new art medium in each class to create fun and fabulous projects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 4-6pm. 970-9622410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Friday, October 4 First Friday Gallery Walk Featuring over 20 galleries and special exhibits! Old Town, FC. 6-9pm. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com. Scrabble @ Your Library Players of all ability and experience levels are welcome. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am Noon. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Noches en Familia Come and enjoy a time of stories, crafts, puppets, and songs in Spanish. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 5-6pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Community Health Talk Chiropractic and nutrition, your solution to better health. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 10-11:30am. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Great Ideas Discussion Group Join this group for a stimulating and fun discussion of the great philosophical questions. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 2-3:30pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Saturday, October 5 Computer Comfort This class offers the basics and handson training on computers. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10am-Noon. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Fort Collins Symphony: The Best of Romanticism Brahms, Dvorak, and Rachmaninoff: three composers synonymous with all that the Romantic and Post-Romantic periods have to offer. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Drop-in Sewing Session Windsor-Severance Library, Clearview Library District, 720 3rd St., Windsor. 10am-2pm. 970-686-5603 or www. clearviewlibrary.org.


Picnic on the Poudre Bring the whole family and learn about activities in nature. Magpie Meander Natural Area, 520 Hickory St., FC. Noon. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer. org/naturalresources.

Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 3-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Go Beyond Tulips: Unusual Bulbs for Our Area The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Eracism Film and Discussion Learn about COINTELPRO 101 (Counter Intelligence Program). This film exposes illegal surveillance, disruption, and outright murder committed by the US government in the 1950s, ‘60s, and ‘70s. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

English Hour This English lesson for new learners includes conversation, new vocabulary and grammar practice. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 2-3pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Star Wars Reads Day Celebrate with a variety of Star Wars themed games and crafts. Dress as your favorite Star Wars character, prizes awarded for best costumes. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 2-4pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Loveland Loves Origami Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 11am-1pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Loveland Opera Theatre: Viva Verdi The spectacular evening features superb internationally renowned artists singing arias, duets, and ensembles as well as the LOT chorus singing excerpts from Verdi’s greatest operas. The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 5pm. 970962-2120 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Ring of Fire Witness this journey through Johnny Cash’s life. Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com.

Monday, October 7 iLearn Technology: Computer Basics 201 (Windows 7): Next Steps Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30-11:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Kindle & Library eBooks Learn how to check out and download eBooks. This class is also for iPad, smartphone, and other mobile device users who want to use the Kindle app for their library eBooks. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 5:30-7pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Read & Seed: Nature Crowns Story time plus an educational and fun hands-on activity. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 1010:45am & 11-11:45am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Katharine McPhee Since her national debut on season 5 of American Idol in 2006, she has stunned the music world with her sensational vocal talent. Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-3565000 or www.ucstars.com.

Tuesday, October 8 Messy Hands Art for Preschoolers: Colored Paper Collage Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10:30-11:30am. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Sunday, October 6 Oktoberpops Presented by Foothills Pops Band. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com.

Kevin Cook Colorado birds, great stories of life and living. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. Noon-1pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Anime Club Teens gather together after school to watch anime favorites, chat about manga, and munch some yummy snacks. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 4-5:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. PowerPoint Beyond Basics Free class. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. International Night: Berlin Join Klaus Lorenz on a trip to Germany’s capital Berlin, where he was born and lived through WW II before emigrating to the USA. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Design Your Own Mini Terrarium Learn the basics so you can make one for every season! Windsor-Severance Library, Clearview Library District, 720 3rd St., Windsor. 6:30-8pm. 970-686-5603 or www.clearviewlibrary.org. Digital Library 101 Join on for this intro on free library digital resources. Farr Regional Library, High Plains Library District, 1939 61st Ave., GR. 11am-Noon. 970-506-8500 or www.mylibrary.us. Bridging Cultures Muslim Journeys, Let’s Talk About It! Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 6-8pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us.

Wednesday, October 9 Eracism Film and Discussion Harvest of Empire: The untold story of Latinos in America. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Rocky Mountain Raptors: Owloween! Come see some of the great raptors of the area. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6:30-7:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

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Homework Help Night For 5th-12th grade students. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-7pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Vickie’s Knitting Loom Group Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Wednesdays Wild World of Art Class: Doodle Drawing Children learn about a new art medium in each class to create fun and fabulous projects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3:30-4:30pm. 970962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Catalyst: A Science Club for Teens Explore some wild, wacky and mad science activities. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 4:30-5:30pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us.

Adult Art Class: Steam Punk Mixed Media Explore fun mixed media techniques while creating funky canvases embellished with gears and found objects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 4-6pm. 970-9622410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Excel 201 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30-11:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Word 201 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 12:30-2:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Genealogy Help @ Your Library Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1-5pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Thursday, October 10 Word Beyond Basics Go beyond the basics of word processing. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Master of Longevity: Sandhill Crane Presented by the Colorado Birds Series. Farr Regional Library, High Plains Library District, 1939 61st Ave., GR. Noon-1pm. 970-506-8500 or www. mylibrary.us.

Vibrant Health Education: Amino Acids Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Introduction to Microsoft Word Learn how to create letter, professional resumes, essays and more. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 3-5pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us.

Keeping Your Belly Healthy Through Good Nutrition Learn about how whole grains and legumes may enhance your gut health. Poudre Valley Hospital, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 5:30-7pm. 970-495-8560 or www.pvhs.org. Kids Create: Halloween Create your own spooky Halloween garlands, lollipop spiders and creepy pet rocks. Windsor-Severance Library, Clearview Library District, 720 3rd St., Windsor. 3:30-4:30pm. 970-686-5603 or www.clearviewlibrary.org.

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Friday, October 11 Harmony in the Round with Front Range Chamber Players Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Perspectives: The Paintings of Joellyn Duesberry Noon tour. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. Noon. 970962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Meet the Artists Celebration Enjoy this Loveland art studio tour. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 6pm. 970-962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Saturday, October 12 Hogbacks and Backbones Take a short hike through millions of years of geologic history. Devil’s Backbone Open Space, W. of Loveland off Hwy 34, LV. 10am. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/naturalresources. Get Wild at the Larimer County Landfill Learn about the wildlife that call this place home, as well as some fun landfill facts. Larimer County Landfill, 5887 S. Taft Hill Rd., FC. 10am. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/naturalresources. Plant an Herb Garden The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 10-11:30am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. Internet Searching Let the pros teach you how to use subject directories and search engines to search more easily and effectively. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10am-Noon. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Chess @ Your Library Players of all ages and skill levels are welcome to join us for these informal dropin chess games. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 11am-1pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Teen IRS: Interesting Reader Society Meeting Join this special group of young adults in grades 6-12 who meet monthly to talk books, movies, music, and other topics of interest to teens. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 11am-1pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Children’s Concert: Emperor and the Nightingale Presented by the Front Range Chamber Players. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 11:30am12:30pm & 4-5pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Concert: Soul Sacrifice Tribute to Santana Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 2-3pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.


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Make Art @ the Library: Drawing with Pencil, Charcoal & Conte Crayon Tweens and teens sign up for a handson art class. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 2-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Eracism Film and Discussion Harvest of Empire: The untold story of Latinos in America. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

iLearn Technology: Internet 101 Learn about web browsers, search engines, webpages and more! Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 5:30-7:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

English Hour This English lesson for new learners includes conversation, new vocabulary and grammar practice. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 2-3pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us.

Sternwheeling Up Alaska’s Inside Passage Escape into this beautiful slideshow. Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 2pm. 970-356-5000 or www. ucstars.com.

Presentation is Everything with Philipp Mayer Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:15am-12:15pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Monday, October 14 South Pole: Now & Then Presented as part of the Antarctic Lecture Series. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Charged Up About Electric Vehicles Learn about the purchase price, rebates, operating expenses, maintenance costs, resale value, all of the money questions that go with buying and owning an EV. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 6:30-7:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

iLearn Technology: Gmail 101 Create your own email account with Gmail, view emails, add contacts and download attachments, compose, send and reply to messages, and more. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 10-11:30am. 970962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Read & Seed: Birdfeeder Story time plus an educational and fun hands-on activity. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 1010:45am & 11-11:45am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Knitting Club Come work on a project or learn to knit with our instructors. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1011:30am. Ages 4-18. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Tuesday, October 15 Messy Hands Art for Preschoolers: Craypas and Marker Drawing Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10:30-11:30am. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Pastels on 5th Join this benefit for Alternative to Violence and the Southern Larimer County Safehouse Project. 5th Street will be turning into a spectacular sidewalk gallery. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10am-5pm. 970-962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Answer Cache: Databases for Adults This class will introduce you to the world of “databases,” and enable you to expertly find information on topics ranging from Art to Zoology from online journals, newspapers and reference books! Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Sunday, October 13 Genealogy Learn how to research your family history using newspapers and obituaries. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 2-3pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 3-4pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

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The Dirty 30’s: A Panel Discussion A look at life and politics in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the U.S. during the decade leading up to World War II. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Soup’s On Learn how to make a delicious, healthy soup. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 6-7pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. Online Job Hunting Learn today’s job-searching strategies. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. Infant Care Classes McKee Medical Center, 2000 Boise Ave., LV. 5-9pm. 970-669-4640 or www. BannerHealth.com.

Wednesday, October 16 Eracism Film and Discussion Broken on All Sides: Race, Mass Incarceration & New Visions for Criminal Justice in the U.S. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Money Matters: Charged Up About Electric Vehicles Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Nature Notes Club Interact with nature while expressing your artistic side through journaling, photography, painting, and any other creative means. Time and location TBD. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/ naturalresources.


Homework Help Night For 5th-12th grade students. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-7pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Pet Seniorhood Class: Understanding Your Aging Pet Learn how to help your pet age gracefully and empower your family to provide much of the care in your own home. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 6:30-7:30pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Wednesdays Wild World of Art Class: Brilliant Pumpkins Children learn about a new art medium in each class to create fun and fabulous projects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3:30-4:30pm. 970962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Thursday, October 17 School’s Out Movie: Shrek Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 2-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Genealogy Program: Germans from Russia Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6:30-8:45pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Genealogy Help @ Your Library Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1-5pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. iLearn Technology: Computer Basics 101 (Windows 7) This class is for beginners. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 5:30-7:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. The Art of PechaKucha Style Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 7pm. 970-962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Introduction to the Internet Learn the basics of surfing the web. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 3-5pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us.

Friday, October 18 Foodie Walk Enjoy a self-guided tour of fantastic spice, specialty & culinary-oriented shops. Old Town, FC. 5-8pm. 970-484-6500 or www.DowntownFortCollins.com. School’s Out Movie: Hocus Pocus Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10:30am-Noon. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Mummies Learn about mummies, listen to a story, and make your own mummy. WindsorSeverance Library, Clearview Library District, 720 3rd St., Windsor. 2pm & 3:30pm. 970-686-5603 or www. clearviewlibrary.org. Family Night Get active with your family while enjoying a movie on the ice! Greeley Ice Haus, 900 8th Ave., GR. 6-7pm. www. greeleyicehaus.com. Meet FDR The former president, who will be portrayed by Richard Marold, will discuss his role during the first half of the 20th century. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Great Ideas Discussion Group Join this group for a stimulating and fun discussion of the great philosophical questions. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 2-3:30pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Tot Art Class: Story in a Picture Create a drawing that tells the story of a snowstorm and snowman! Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10:30-11:30am. 970-962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Zombie Movie Night Creepy Cocktails and Shaun of the Dead. The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 7pm. 970-962-2120 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Weld Project Connect This annual one-day event provides numerous on-site services directly to individuals and households struggling

and in need due to foreclosure, job loss, age, health problems, and other issues that can interrupt life. Event Center, 425 N. 15th Ave., GR. 12-4pm. 970-3046192 or www.unitedway-weld.org.

Saturday, October 19 Golden Dragon Acrobats See this combination of award-winning acrobatics, traditional dance, spectacular costumes, ancient and contemporary music and theatrical techniques to present a show of breathtaking skill and spellbinding beauty. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 2pm & 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Zombie Crawl! They’re everywhere! Old Town, FC. 5-10pm. 970-484-6500 or www. DowntownFortCollins.com. Project Noah Hike Buff up on your nature knowledge with this app that lets you be the scientist. Devil’s Backbone Open Space, W. of Loveland off Hwy 34, LV. 10am. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/ naturalresources. Lauren Myracle Book Event Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 2-3:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Make Art @ the Library: Painting with Acrylics Tweens and teens sign up for this handson art series. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 2-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Author Craig Johnson Visits Author of eight novels in the Walt Longmire mystery series. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 2-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. English Hour This English lesson for new learners includes conversation, new vocabulary and grammar practice. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 2-3pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us.

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Storytime with Greeley Fire Department Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 10:30-11:30am. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. iLearn Technology: Gmail 201 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 2-3:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Brickmasters: Come Build with LEGOS Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 10am-Noon & 1-3pm. Ages 5+. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Dr. Derek’s Monthly Health Talks Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 10:30am-Noon. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Madi White CD Release Party The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 5:30pm. 970-962-2120 or www. ci.loveland.co.us. GPO Connoisseur Concert #2 Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com. Jackie Evancho This soprano prodigy brings her angelic voice to the stage. She’ll perform with the Fort Collins Symphony. Budweiser Event Center, 5290 Arena Circle, LV. 7:30pm. 970-619-4100 or www. budweisereventcenter.com.

Sunday, October 20 Immortal Beloved Beethoven Presented by the Larimer Chorale. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Game Day @ Your Library Play a board or card game from our collection or bring a favorite from home. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 1-5pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

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Eracism Film and Discussion Broken on All Sides: Race, Mass Incarceration & New Visions for Criminal Justice in the U.S. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 1-5pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Harvest of Harmony Enjoy listening to the barbershop chords presented by The Blend Chorus. The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 2pm. 970-962-2120 or www. ci.loveland.co.us.

Monday, October 21 Money Matters: Charged Up About Electric Vehicles Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7-8pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Read & Seed: Spider Webs Story time plus an educational and fun hands-on activity. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 1010:45am & 11-11:45am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. iLearn Technology: Computer Basics 201 (Windows 7): Next Steps Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30-11:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Nook & Library eBooks This class will demonstrate how to check out and download eBooks. This class is also for iPad, smartphone, and other mobile device users who want to use the Kindle app for their library eBooks. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 5:30-7pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Tuesday, October 22 Capture the Magic Presented by BYU Ballroom Dance Company. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Messy Hands Art for Preschoolers: Tempera Painting Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10:30-11:30am. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

How Healthy Are Your Lungs? Poudre Valley Hospital, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 9:30am-12:30pm. 970-4958560 or www.pvhs.org. Breast-Feeding Classes Mothers will receive information on positioning and latch-on, pumping, storage and more. McKee Medical Center, 2000 Boise Ave., LV. 6:30-9pm. 970-6694640 or www.BannerHealth.com. Publisher Basics Learn the basics of Publisher to help you easily create, customize, and publish materials such as newsletters, brochures, flyers and catalogs. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Bridging Cultures Muslim Journeys, Let’s Talk About It! Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 6-8pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Word 101 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Wednesday, October 23 Eracism Film and Discussion Abused: The Postville Raid. The film presents the devastating effects of U.S. immigration enforcement policies on communities. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Homework Help Night For 5th-12th grade students. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-7pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Catalyst: A Science Club for Teens Explore some wild, wacky and mad science activities. Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 4:30-5:30pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us.


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So You Want to Start a Business Presented by Robin D. Shukle, LCBD Executive Director. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 5:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Vickie’s Knitting Loom Group Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Wednesdays Wild World of Art Class: Sea Sand Paintings Children learn about a new art medium in each class to create fun and fabulous projects. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3:30-4:30pm. 970962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. Loneliest Planet (Film) Presented by The Phyllis Walbye Film Series. The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 7pm. 970-962-2120 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. UNC Jazz Bands Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7pm. 970-356-5000 or www. ucstars.com.

Thursday, October 24 REEL ROCK 8 This film tour brings the best climbing and adventure films of the year to live audiences throughout the world. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX. com. Blogging Basics with WordPress You will learn what a blog is, how to create and maintain a blog, how to post text and images, how to link to other people’s blogs and more. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Kindles @ Your Library Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Straight No Chaser: Influence Presented by M & M Group Entertainment. Experience this 10-member a capella group. Budweiser

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Event Center, 5290 Arena Circle, LV. 7:30pm. 970-619-4100 or www. budweisereventcenter.com. Introduction to Email Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 3-5pm. 970-506-8622 or www. mylibrary.us. Paws to Read Dogs will curl up on the floor to share stories with anyone who wants to read them. Farr Regional Library, High Plains Library District, 1939 61st Ave., GR. 6:30-7:30pm. 970-506-8500 or www.mylibrary.us. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Excel 101 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30pm. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Genealogy Help @ Your Library Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. School Out Science Join the hands-on science for schoolaged kids. Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Adult Art Class: Fall Harvest Use pumpkins and gourds as inspiration to capture the colors and textures of Autumn. Use acrylic paint and palette knives on canvas to create impressionistic swirls and strokes. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 4-6pm. 970-962-2410 or www.ci.loveland.co.us. History Brown Bag: Weld County Citizens of Note 1830-1870 Greeley History Museum, 714 8th St., GR. Noon-1pm. 970-350-9220 or www. greeleygov.com.

Friday, October 25 SOLAS: Shamrock City Tour Presented by Celtic Events & The Celtic Connection. Irish America’s most influential band hits the stage! The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 7pm. 970-962-2120 or www.ci.loveland.co.us.

Halloween Haunting Come dressed in your best costume for some after-hours fun! Centennial Park Library, High Plains Library District, 2227 23rd Ave., GR. 6-8pm. 970-5068622 or www.mylibrary.us. Excel Basics Excel is a spreadsheet program used for automating calculations, creating charts, forms, and more. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 9-11am. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Library eBooks on Your iPads, iPhones, Smartphones and Tablets Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10:30am-Noon. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Spooky Stories in Library Park Join us under the moon for a night filled with stories from near and far designed to give you chills. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6:30-8pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Saturday, October 26 Halloween Family Fun Festival Dress up the family and head into town for some Halloween fun! Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10am-2pm. 970-962-2410 or www. ci.loveland.co.us. Pinterest Basics Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10am-Noon. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Writing Workshop: 5 Tricks to Enliven Your Scenes Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 1-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Make Art @ the Library: Multi-color Printmaking Tweens and teens sign up for this handson art class. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 2-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Movie Night: The Birds Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-9pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.


Map and Compass Orientation Learn how to navigate, triangulate and more. Red Mountain Open Space, 25 miles N. of Fort Collin off of CR 15, Larimer County. 9am. 970-679-4489 or www.larimer.org/naturalresources. Reading and Signs: Animal Tracks and Scats of the Front Range Become a wildlife detective! Horsetooth Mountain Open Space, W. of Fort Collins off CR 38E, Larimer County. 10am. 970-6794489 or www.larimer.org/naturalresources. English Hour This English lesson for new learners includes conversation, new vocabulary and grammar practice. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 2-3pm. 970-506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Intermediate Genealogy with Pat Johnson Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:15am-12:15pm. 970-9622665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Is Tatting a Lost Art? Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 10am-Noon. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Joy, Dance, Music: A Night at the Cabaret The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 7:30pm. 970-962-2120 or www. ci.loveland.co.us. World Premiere of ‘Stonewall’ An opera by David Conte. Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 2pm & 7:30pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com. Howl-O-Ween Trick-Or-Treat Bring your little ghost or goblin for a full night of spooky activities. Centennial Village Museum, 1475 A St., GR. 4-8pm. 970-350-9406 or www.greeleygov.com.

Sunday, October 27 Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 3-4pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Eracism Film and Discussion Abused: The Postville Raid. The film presents the devastating effects of U.S. immigration enforcement policies on communities. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 6-8:30pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Masquerade The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 2pm & 6pm. 970-962-2120 or www. ci.loveland.co.us. Monday, October 28 Read & Seed: Owls Story time plus an educational and fun hands-on activity. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. 1010:45am & 11-11:45am. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Excel 201 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 9:30am. 970-962-2665 or www.lovelandpubliclibrary.org.

Tuesday, October 29 Messy Hands Art for Preschoolers: Styrofoam Printmaking Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10:30-11:30am. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Publisher Beyond Basics Go beyond the basics in Publisher to create, customize, and publish materials such as newsletters, brochures, flyers and catalogs. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Nooks @ Your Library In this class we will show you how to download library eBooks to your Nook from home anytime. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Pacific Mambo Orchestra featuring Tito Puente Jr. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.

iLearn Technology: PowerPoint 101 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 2pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. UNC Choirs Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., GR. 7:30pm. 970-356-5000 or www.ucstars.com. Wednesday, October 30 Symphony Composer Talks Learn about Beethoven, Haydn and more, before the Masterworks concert. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. Noon-1pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Hard Travelin’: The Life and Songs of Woody Guthrie This unique one hour lecture/miniconcert includes Woody’s Dust Ballads, his songs of the West, and his tributes to American farmers, factory workers and service men. Old Town Public Library, 201 Peterson St., FC. 7-8pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Homework Help Night For 5th-12th grade students. Lincoln Park Library, High Plains Library District, 919 7th St., GR. 4-7pm. 970506-8622 or www.mylibrary.us. Thursday, October 31 Happy Halloween! Genealogy Help @ Your Library Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 1pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. iLearn Technology: Microsoft Word 201 Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., LV. 2pm. 970-962-2665 or www. lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger with Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra The Rialto Theatre Center, 228 E. 4th St., LV. 7pm. 970-962-2120 or www. ci.loveland.co.us.

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time out

Playing. Just playing

Stop tasking and enjoy some time with the kids L e a H a nson

I

n more ways than one, I am slowly but surely turning into my mother. I find myself striking up conversations with strangers, oversharing in a general sense, telling an increasing number of drawn-out stories (that, for the record, eventually come around to make perfect sense), and what I believe to be my mother’s defining characteristic: I am always doing something. My mother, although retired for some time, is always busy volunteering, gardening, substitute teaching, and serving on community boards. When she’s not, she’s either baking 50 loaves of almond bread for a church bazaar that’s happening next month or knitting baby blankets for babies who have yet to be conceived. It’s not that I can’t sit still. I’m not really a leg-shaker or a toe-tapper or even a poor listener. I don’t have any actual, physiological or neurological conditions that make it difficult for me to focus or be still. I’m not jittery. I’m (we’re) just so…. tasky. It seems there is always something to do. Not in the, “I’m so busy” kind of way, but in the “It would only take ten seconds to squeeze in this one last tiny project” kind of way. Maybe I’ve always been this way but I don’t think I have. I’ve always been able to get a lot done in a small amount of time, but I’m pretty sure this has changed since I’ve become a parent. I recently read an article by Rachel Macy Stafford titled, “The Day I stopped Saying ‘Hurry Up.’ She wrote, “When you’re living a distracted life, every minute must be accounted for. You feel like you must be checking something off the list or rushing off to the next destination. And no matter how many ways you divide your time and attention, no matter how

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many duties you try and multi-task, there’s never enough time in a day to ever catch up.” Stafford is specifically discussing learning to relax and not to rush her carefree child. While I’m not generally in a rush, these words resonated with me in a similar way. I’m often doing other things when I ought to be just playing. Instead of just sitting and playing trains, I find myself organizing the books. Instead of just playing in the sandbox, I find myself picking the dead leaves and rocks out of the sand. And, if I had a dollar for every time I said, “As soon as I [do this other thing for three min-

a minute, it’s more important to send this email than to play.” Or worse, “It’s more important for things to be perfectly organized than to have fun.” What am I afraid of ? Too much dog hair on the rug isn’t going to hurt anyone. Maybe I think I’ll forget to do these minimal tasks if I don’t do them right then and there. The reality is, I probably would most of the time. But, how bad would that be? Stafford wrote, “I was a bully who pushed and pressured and hurried a small child who simply wanted to enjoy life.” I know I’m no bully to my child, nor was my mother to me, but

utes] I’ll come up and read to you.” Well, you get the idea. I realized, like Stafford, I’m too often distracted. I’m a working mom, so those precious hours I get to spend with my child should be just that— precious. I want my child to have fond memories of me being fun to be with, not obsessive or constantly distracted. Not to mention the non-verbal messages I must be communicating: “Just

pressure comes from a lot of places. And, I can already see some of these ‘commitments to things being right’ in my child. Certainly a little of that won’t hurt her. On the contrary, I’ll be proud if she turns into a doer who completes tasks and meets deadlines. But for now, I’m going to challenge myself to just focus on the most important task at hand: playing. Just playing.


Follow us on: Facebook | Our Blog | Twitter | Ravelry

Open Knitting every Tuesday night Come to the shop from 6-8pm and work on a current project or get started on a new one. Join us for some casual social knitting.

Shop hours are Tuesday 10 am to 8 pm , Wednesday- Saturday 10 am to 5 pm . We are closed Sunday and Monday. 1408 WEST MOUNTAIN AVENUE FORT COLLINS, CO 80521 • 970.407.1451

mysisterknits.com

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Octobr RMParent 2013  

RM Parent magazine is read by parents and educators across northern Colorado. Our content is written locally and focuses on information and...

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