Issuu on Google+

MAY 2012 • rmparent.com

farm From

to family

Eating disorders Toxin-free living SPECIAL SECTION:

summertime aDVertising supplement

Get fit together Trash into treasure MyPlate guidelines r m pa r ent

|




CA$H

I love you Mom

for your kids’gently-used stuff : COMING SOON

Moonlight Madness Sale 2

June 9th, 201

quipmeTnCt. E ll a r o f r a ll o s, E Paying Top D s, Highchair ack & Play Strollers, P

llege 451ge9andSHa. rmConoy next to McDonald’s) (Colle



ing up fo

Now stock

| rmparent

266r-S9u9m9m9er!

Clothes Pony & Dandelion Toys •111 North College • 224-2866


Challenges with your

Child? Tantrums Arguing Dawdling Fighting Whining

FREE

phone or in-person AssessmenT

(970)472-1207 The Parent-Child Interaction Center, LLC

We Can Help.

mosT insUrAnCe ACCepTeD

Find out more at: www.p-cic.com 1027 W. horsetooth • Fort Collins

FREE Diagnostic testing Bring JOY back into Learning! Reading • Math • Homework Personalized Learning Programs ACT/SAT test preparation Call today to schedule your child:

970-481-7853 access4knowledgemary@gmail.com

www.access4knowledge.com r m pa r ent

|




CA$H for your

CLOSET Gently Used Clothing, Sizes 0-26 Misses • Womens • Maternity Designer Purses • Accessories

We also carry top designers: ann taylor • j jill • pea & the pod coldwater creek • lane bryant motherhood • coach • louis vuitton chico’s • white house black market

Now paying Cold Cash for

Hot Summer 970-223-6636

4519 S. College • Fort Collins



| rmparent

Fashion

d d n n a a l R e l l RRo L es ROL m i t good Colorado’s e h t . whereCome experiePnacretynPlay area! Ultimate

482-0497 • 324 S. Link Lane www.rollerlandskatecenter.com

$20 OFF Free Pass Any Public or Private Birthday Party Package

Buy one Pass to any Public Session, Get one free

REGISTRATION REQUIRED. with coupon only. 1 coupon per event. Not valid with other offers expires 5/31/12

Not valid for friday nights or for private parties, fundraisers, school-out skates or special events. with coupon only. 1 coupon per person per visit. not valid with other offers expires 5/31/12


MAY 2012

Departments P e r specti v e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Time for play—being active as a family is fun

W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H . . . . . . . . . . 8 Clean living—Make your home a toxin-free zone

Family acti v ities . . . . . . . .10 Playful families=healthy families—Get fit together this spring and summer

Special Section SUMMERTIME

Explore the possibilities for this summer and see what programs these providers have for your families.

H E A LT H Y li v in g . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Trash into treasure—redirect items into the craft supply stream

N U T R I T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 What’s on my plate—Breaking down the USDA’s MyPlate guidelines

C ommunit y news . . . .16

Tires-n-Tennies Tuesdays • Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado hosts family-friendly volunteer day • Poudre Valley Hospital named one of nation’s 100 Top Hospitals • DBA Great Plates collects money for Food Bank

C alen d a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Events and activities for parents, kids and families

T ime out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Cherishing the moments—Pause to appreciate the time you spend together

School District News Poudre School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Volunteering shows students school is important to parents, calendar of events, PSD teacher selected as physical activity champion, Tavelli students make learning discoveries in new science lab

Greeley-Evans District 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Frontier Academy Charter School student named as a Boettcher Scholar, Dream Team announces student scholarships

Thompson School District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 In for the Night, all-digital math program for middle-schoolers

Lunchbox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 School menus for Poudre, Thompson, Greeley-Evans, and Windsor

summertime ADVERTIS

ING SUPPL EME

Camp SaFETRY

page 6

LiST oF advERTiSERS page 26 MAY 2011

WWW.RMPARE NT.COM

Features

20 From farm to family

Fortune shines on those of us who live in northern Colorado, in the form of active Farmer’s Markets and local farms. Community Supported Agricultural (CSA) and Farmers’ Markets bring local farmers and community members together to grow, reap and share the harvest. Support your family’s health and local business this summer.

24 E ating disorders...

who gets them and why

So your 12-year-old daughter came home from dance class and announced that she’s fat, or your teenage son refuses to eat breads and carbohydrates since he heard too much is bad for him in health class. Should you be concerned? Read on to learn about early signs of eating disorders and what you can do to intervene before it becomes a real concern.

ABOUT THE COVER

Jesse, 11, poses with his mom Kellly Trevena on this month’s Mother’s Day cover. Jesse, a Fort Collins native, is also a gifted competitive performer. Photo by Cheri Schonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com.

r m pa r ent

|



NT


perspective

Time for play

Being active as a family is fun

S

pring has definitely sprung...early! And that means more bicycles on the roads. Time to slow down and be on the look out for big and little pedalers alike. Kindergarten rules apply: Share everything— including the road. We just published Ride magazine last week. It comes out every year about this time, and it’s always a fun project. We worked closely with the Interim Bicycle Coordinator for the City of Fort Collins, Molly North. This year, Molly suggested putting teacher Chris West and some of his students on the cover. Chris has been a physical education teacher at Bauder Elementary for the past 15 years. He has been co-leader of the Bauder Elementary Wellness team since 2006. What got Molly’s attention, though, was that while she was attending a national cycling conference in DC, Chris was there to receive a Champions of Change award from the White House. The program’s focus was Let’s Move, which honors leaders who are helping kids lead healthy, active lifestyles. View the presentation of the award at www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBj4LBwJHm0. For more about Chris, check PSD news on page 28. Oh, and pick up a Ride magazine around town—probably right next to where you grabbed this RMParent magazine. Or go to www.RMParent. com and look for the digital version (of both this issue and Ride.) Kim Sharpe advocates being active with your kids in her story Playful families=Healthy families. I couldn’t agree more with the idea. One of the ideas is to make time for just playing, you know unstructured fun. Another concept is that parents need to be active themselves. Sitting in front of the tube munching on some chips might be a nice way to wind down after a day at work, but the kids are noticing. We’re all role models. I like to ride my bike instead of driving whenever I can. It’s not a principle thing for me. It’s just what I like to do. I feel more connected and alive. The kids, though older now, have picked up on that. Aly rides her bike most places (to be honest though, that might be related to the fact that her timing belt went out on the highway and her car was pronounced DOA). Andy would ride a bike more, but he keeps destroying them. So he walks, because he never really got that Jeep running. I was psyched when Andy and his girlfriend flew in and joined Aly and me to run the Horsetooth Half Marathon last Sunday. Uncle Kevin joined us too. We had a great carbo-loading dinner the night before (I made it and I’m writing this, so I get to tell you how it was, which is great.) The weather was perfect on race day. We all had fun and we all finished. As Chris West says (well close anyway), physical activity makes your brain develop, not just your body. So have an active spring and summer. It does a body and a brain good. —Scott Titterington, publisher



| rmparent

MAY 2012 • VOLUME 16, NUMBER 12 PUBLISHER Scott Titterington, (970)221-9210 scott.rmpublishing@gmail.com EDITOR Kristin Titterington, (970)221-9210 kristin.rmpublishing@gmail.com Calendar editor Aly Titterington calendar@rockymountainpub.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Emily Zaynard emily.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Greg Hoffman, (970)689-6832 greg.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Sara Hansen, (970)310-9850 sara.rmpublishing@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION Wendee Brungardt, Sharon Klahn, Rob’s Bike Courier Service COVER PHOTO Cheri Shonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Shelley Aschenbrenner; Katie Harris; Richard Keller; Ann Schmike; Kim Sharpe; Lynn Utzman-Nichols ROCKY MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING 825 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80521 Voice 221-9210 Fax 221-8556 editor@rockymountainpub.com www.RMParent.com Rocky Mountain Parent magazine is published monthly by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. Publication of this paper does not consitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. RMP reserves the right to refuse any advertisement for any reason. The opinions expressed by contributors or writers do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rocky Mountain Publishing. ©2012 Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without express written permission is prohibited. OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS:


Milnor ORTHODONTICS

Creating beautiful smiles

Without even saying a word, your child’s smile can express so many different things. At Milnor Orthodontics we want your child to have a smile that makes them feel great about themselves!

FREE EXAMINATION Dr. Milnor would like to invite you and your child for a FREE EXAMINATION. Your Child’s needs will be evaluated and explained. Dr. Milnor’s office also offers discounts of up to 10% OFF and reasonable payment plans to fit your budget. Please call for an appointment.

milnororthodontics.com

Laura D. Milnor DDS, MS

970-484-3214

1103 S. Shields St. • Fort Collins

r m pa r ent

|




women’s health

Clean living

Make your home a toxin-free zone l y n n u t z ma n - n i c h o l s

G

oing down the path toward clean, chemical-free living can feel like an endless maze, with more being revealed at each turn. The more you know the more you realize you still need to learn. You go one direction and learn that heavy metals disrupt hormones and damage brains. This leads to the realization that your makeup contains lead and your deodorant aluminum. You go another way and learn that the ammonia product you use to clean your shower can trigger asthma attacks. Soon you are tired and want to stop and return to your ignorant ways. Take heed! Stay on the path toward pure living—your health and future welfare depend on it. The trick is keeping it simple. Here are a three, easy ways to get started and lower household toxins: Buy fragrance-free products Synthetic fragrances contain many toxic chemicals. For example, dryer sheets and laundry detergents are laden with known carcinogens and endocrine disruptors. When you put on these fresh-smelling, “clean” clothes your body creates moisture making it easy for your skin to directly absorb chemicals. Commit to buying items that say fragrancefree or unscented that have organic or natural (pronounceable!) ingredients including laundry supplies, cleaning supplies, dish detergent, body products such as soaps, shampoos and perfumes, candles, air fresheners and more. Avoid products containing heavy metals Did you know that our bodies store and build up heavy metals and their presence can lead to symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, allergies, muscular sclerosis, and other ailments, such as leaky gut and general fatigue? The most common metals we encounter are arsenic (pesticides), lead (old paint, PVC plastic toys, cosmet

| rmparent

ics), mercury (old fillings), and cadmium (fertilizers). While some of these we ingest through our water and air, make it a practice to buy products free of metals such as cosmetics and aluminum-free deodorant. Do your research, as heavy metals do not have to be listed on many labels (go to www.environmentaldefence.ca to research specific products). Buy or make natural cleaning products for your home We’ve been sold the idea that only chemicals really get our houses and bodies clean. Yet natural substances can disinfect just as well. Did you know that white vinegar kills 90 percent of all types of bacteria? It’s also a natural antifungal. Toxins are everywhere. There are about 80,000 synthetic chemicals registered for use in the U.S. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer have concluded that 80 percent of all cancers are due to environmental factors such as chemical exposure. Cleaning products are riddled with chemicals; some so harsh they cause immediate breathing problems, like oven cleaners. Even the more mild-looking ones, like window cleaners with ammonia,

have harmful effects. It’s easy and cheap to mix up your own cleaners. Vinegar and water (1:10) can be used to wash and disinfect in several places, including floors and counters. It’s safe for all surfaces and is often recommended for hardwood floors. Use it in a stronger ratio (1:3) as a window cleaner. If you want some fragrance, squeeze in a half of a lemon or a few drops of an essential oil, such as lavender. It can even remove toilet rings and lime when used full strength (1:1) and left overnight. Other good natural cleaners include borax and baking soda. Baking soda can clean a drain—pour in 300ml baking soda followed by 1 L boiling water and 300 ml of white vinegar. According to Sally Bevan, author of Pure Living - How to Detox Your Home, the chemical reaction will foam and go to work on the inside of the pipes. Finally, Bevan suggests using borax to scrub and sanitize your bath. Mix 300 ml borax with 300 ml salt and two tablespoons dried rosemary or lavender. Get a few squirt bottles and labels and mix up the above cleaners so they’re on hand when you need them. Making a few, new habits and conscious shopping choices will go a long way in keeping your home truly clean.


Peanut Butter (PBJR) Jam Revue

and

A Six-Week Summer Workshop brought to

you by the:

For young performers ages 10 to 14 (as of June 4, 2012)

Spaces are limited, register now! Rehearsals: June 4th-July 11th • Mon. through Fri. 9:00-12:00 (AM Cast) OR 1:00-4:00 (PM Cast) Performances: July 12th-15th in the Lincoln Center Magnolia Theater For More Information and to Download an Application, please visit: fortcollinschildrenstheatre.org Or Contact Becky Troutman at (970)282-0585 or email her at BRTroutman@comcast.net

r m pa r ent

|




family activities prescription for combating the obesity epidemic,” says Green Hearts, a nonprofit organization that promotes getting kids outdoors. The Children & Nature Connection Northern Colorado (CNC) offers parents many tips on how to get their families back outdoors. Recommendations include visiting nearby parks, open lands and one’s own backyard. CNC’s website says the easiest way to engage with nature is “to just open your door and go outside!…Kids see even small areas as the great wild outdoors!”

Playful families = Healthy families Get fit together this spring and summer K I M SH A R P E

“P

orkie.” “Tubby.” “Sir Eatsalot.” With more of Colorado’s kids gaining weight at alarming rates (the 2011 Colorado Health Report Card released by the Colorado Health Foundation says 14.2 percent of our state’s children and youth are obese), these names are heard more often where they play and hang out. In addition to being called names and of a more serious nature, children and youth are experiencing health issues that only used to be associated with older adults, such as high blood pressure and heart disease. No parent wants their child to be called hurtful names or battle serious medical conditions. To combat both, parents can help their children lose weight, or better yet, avoid gaining it to begin with. And summertime is the perfect time to initiate or increase healthy, active family fun. Simply play In our rushed society, neither children 10

| rmparent

nor adults have or make enough time to just to play. If we did, we’d find ourselves getting more of the physical activity our bodies and minds crave. “Play is rapidly disappearing from our homes, our schools and our neighborhoods,” says David Elkind, Ph.D., professor emeritus of child development at Tufts University. “Over the last two decades alone, children have lost 8 hours of free, unstructured, and spontaneous play a week…[yet] research has shown that play is crucial to physical, intellectual and social- emotional development at all ages.” To foster health in all family members, parents can give their children and themselves the gift of space in their busy schedules for, well, nothing. Imaginations soar when allowed to roam. If the roaming takes place outdoors–another deficit from which our society suffers–all kinds of active adventures can occur. “Regular habits of active play during childhood are one of the best predictors of active adulthoods–a perfect

Family fitness & fun One of the best ways parents can help kids get active is to be active themselves. There’s nothing like a good role model. Mary L. Gavin, MD, “Kids Health” medical editor, tells parents, “Be active yourself and support your kids’ interests. If you start this early enough, they’ll come to regard activity as a normal—and fun— part of your family’s everyday routine.” Healthy Kids Club, a program of northern Colorado’s Poudre Valley Health System, helps parents get active with their kids. Each summer, the Club organizes “Fit Families on the Move!” Families registered in the program receive a Fit Families all-access pass for over 90 free or reduced-cost activities in Loveland, Fort Collins, Windsor, Berthoud and Greeley. Families can enjoy swimming, hiking mini-golf, bowling and more. Registration for the summer 2012 program begins on May 1. Visit www.pvhs.org/fitfamilies for more information. Community centers throughout the region offer a lot of family activities, too. The Family FunPlex in Greeley features a warm-water pool, mini-golf, gym, playground, and quick access to biking and walking trails. The City’s of Fort Collins and Loveland, and the Town of Estes Park also have recreation centers where families can swim, play sports and get fit together. “This is a great time of year to start getting fit,” says Bob Adams, City of Fort Collins recreation director. “Take advantage of the variety of fitness programs for all levels of abilities.”


HAND-PEELED ELEGANCE Straightforward craftsmanship transforms lodgepole, fir, and ponderosa pine into beautiful furniture ✦ Handcrafted in Fort Collins ✦ Earth-friendly ✦ Local tree thinnings ✦ Naturally beautiful

Free design consultation Clinton L. Wood 970-402-3077 www.clintonlwood.com

r m pa r e nt

|

11


healthy living

Trash into treasure

Redirecting items into the craft supply stream A n N S c h i mke

I

recently cleaned out one of my kitchen drawers and found, mounded in the back, 108 bread bag tags, those little square tabs used to hold plastic bags closed. They seemed like handy doo-dads to have on hand, but clearly weren’t doing much good in the kitchen. I decided to repurpose these brightly colored tags for crafts. While I was at it, I set aside a small section of cupboard to collect other items that could be redirected into the craft supply stream instead of the recycling or garbage stream. These included egg cartons, toilet paper tubes, oatmeal canisters, twisty ties, corks, cereal boxes and cereal bags. Here are several craft ideas using repurposed household items. Egg-carton stamps This stamping project is fun for children and adults and can be used to make cards or gift-wrap. You will need: • Egg carton • Scissors • Paint • Paintbrushes • Paper Directions: Cut off the egg carton lid and cut the rest down to a manageable size. (I used a square section measuring two by two egg cubbies) Paint the bottom pads of the cubbies and stamp onto the paper, pressing your fingers firmly into the egg wells for the most thorough coverage. Egg-carton creatures Create whimsical spiders, caterpillars or centipedes with this easy project. You will need: • Egg carton • Scissors • Paint • Twisty ties or pipe cleaners Directions: Cut off the egg carton lid 12

| rmparent

and cut the bottom portion in half lengthwise. You can use any number of cubbies for your bug. (One makes a good spider and three or more work well as centipedes or caterpillars.) Paint the outside of your carton segment. Use scissors to poke small holes on both sides of the each egg cubbie. Insert twisty ties or pipe cleaners for legs. (You can make antennas this way too.) Use markers or paint for the face.

Bread-tag jewelry This is an easy beading activity for little fingers that produces quick, colorful bracelets and necklaces. You will need: • A dozen or more bread tags • A 24-inch length of string or shoelace (shorter for a bracelet) • Tape Directions: Wrap a small piece of tape around the end of the string to make the end stiff. Knot the other end of the string a few times to keep the bread tags from falling off the other side and thread the bread tags onto the string one by one. When finished tie the ends of the string together.

Toilet-paper-tube binoculars My 3-year-old made these at preschool and they turned out to be a hit with my 5-year-old too. You will need: • 2 empty cardboard toilet paper rolls • Paint (or construction paper) • Glue or stapler • Hole punch • 30-inch string Directions: Paint or otherwise decorate the outside of each toilet paper roll. Glue or staple them together so they are side by side. Punch a hole on the outside of each tube near the top end. Tie a string through each hole to create a strap. Cereal-bag window decorations This takeoff on the traditional translucent crayon-and-wax-paper window decorations achieves the same effect using empty cereal bags. You will need: • Cereal bag • 2-4 stubby crayons • Warm iron • 2 rags • Scissors Directions: Cut off the bottom inch of the cereal bag and refold so the seam running down the middle of the bag is now along the side. Shave the crayons with scissors or chop in very small pieces with a sharp knife. Put the crayon shavings inside the cereal bag and place on the ironing board on top of a rag to protect the board. Place another rag on top of the bag and then use the warm iron to melt the crayon shavings inside the bag. When the shavings are melted, use the iron to gently spread out the liquid crayon. When finished, let the crayons harden back up and cut into the desired shape. (We made trucks.) If desired, punch a hole in the cutout and hang on a string in front of a sunny window.


r m pa r e nt

|

13


nutrition

What’s on my plate?

Breaking Down the USDA’s MyPlate Guidelines R ICH A R D K E LL E R

I

n 1992, the U.S. Department of Agriculture introduced the nation to the Food Pyramid. Taken from a concept developed by the Danish back in 1970s, the American version of the Pyramid broke the recommended servings of the four food groups into layered blocks. The items with the highest serving amounts, grains, served as the diagram’s wide base while the small apex was taken up with sugars and fats, deemed to be of less importance. As time went on adjustments were made to the Pyramid. In 2005 its hierarchical layers were replaced by a series of colorful vertical lines. In 2011, the Pyramid was scrapped altogether in favor of a new guideline called MyPlate. Instead of a four-stage description of the recommended healthiest food groups, the plate contained four wedges of differing size. To help families understand these guidelines, here’s a breakdown of the MyPlate system. Grains Grains make up 30 percent of MyPlate and are broken down into two subsets. Whole grains, which contain the entire contents of the grain kernel, are found in whole-wheat flour, oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, popcorn, and the cracked wheat known as bulgur. The other subset, refined grains, contains those products milled to provide extended shelf life and finer texture. These grains may also be enriched with minerals such as riboflavin, folic acid, and iron. Examples of refined grains include white flour, breads and rice, pretzels, enriched pastas, and boxed cereals such as corn flakes. Vegetables Once on par with fruits on the Food Pyramid, vegetables are now a larger section on MyPlate. Taking up another 30 percent, the vegetable category is split into five subgroups. Dark green vegetables cover leafy products such as collard greens, 14

| rmparent

kale, romaine lettuce, and the Chinese cabbage known as bok choy. Red and orange vegetables, those with flavonoids like beta-carotene, are made up of carrots, peppers and sweet potatoes. Tomatoes, pumpkins and squash, although part of the fruit family, are added in this list due to their lower sugar contents. Among the list of starchy vegetables are corn, white potatoes, taro, and plantains, while the list of beans features most of the common known products – navy, kidney, black and lentil. The last category details vegetables and fruits

and plums; berries such as blueberries and strawberries; and melons like cantaloupe and honeydew. Also allowed are canned fruits in light syrup, such as sliced peaches, and 100-percent fruit juices.

that don’t fit into the other subsets. These include avocados, beets, celery, regular cabbage, and iceberg lettuce.

Dairy Once part of the Food Pyramid, dairy has been removed from the MyPlate wedges and placed in a group all its own; however, with a caveat. Though items such as whole milk, ice cream, and puddings are listed, the USDA recommends consumers choose the low-fat or fat-free versions of these products. They also ask people to consider the amount of empty calories in flavored milks, yogurts and desserts when choosing a product right for them. For more information on MyPlate and the recommended serving amounts for your family, visit www.choosemyplate.gov.

Fruits During the era of the Food Pyramid, the USDA recommended equal servings of fruits and vegetables on a daily basis. While these seed-bearing foods are still an important part of MyPlate, fruits take up a smaller wedge, about 20 percent. But thanks to their natural sugars, vitamins and minerals, fruits are still an important part of an average diet. Included on the list are apples, bananas, oranges, peaches

Protein In addition to the meat, fish and poultry people tend to associate with this category, the MyPlate protein wedge also contains eggs and processed soy products such as tofu and tempeh. The protein wedge also lists legumes such as beans, which are also included under the vegetable wedge, and peas.


JOHN M. JAMES, M.D.

Certified by the American Board of Allergy & Immunology and The American Board of Pediatrics

Specializing in: ASTHMA ALLERGIES ECZEMA 1136 E. Stuart St. Bldg. 3, Suite 3200 • Fort Collins, CO 80525 • (970)221-1681 7251 W. 20th St., Building N, Suite 1 • Greeley, CO 80634 • (970)356-3907

or call 1-800-735-1434 • www.coloradoallergy.com

4 V Q F S J P S  1 F SGP S N B O D F 0QFSB(BMMFSJB /$PMMFHF4VJUF 'PSU$PMMJOT $0  .PO4BUÂ…4VO

Â? Âœ ĂŒ Â… ˆ ˜ } ĂŠ  Âœ Ă€ \ ĂŠ  ĂŠ U ĂŠ 9 "  ĂŠ ĂŠ *   / - ĂŠ U ĂŠ   / - - ĂŠ U ĂŠ  9   - /  -

777°*, " 97 ,° "

Get WOWED this summer!

See our schedules at www.youngpeoplesLC.com

r m pa r e nt

|

15


community news

Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado hosts family-friendly volunteer day

For the fourth year in a row, VOC is working with the High Plains Environmental Center to host a family-friendly volunteer day, May 5. This year, families with children ages 8 and up are invited to help construct a new native-plant nursery at the center. The work will involve everything from transplanting seedlings and planting hedges to constructing a greenhouse and nursery beds. Volunteers are welcome for just the morning, just the afternoon, or the full day. VOC will provide lunch. The HPEC is located in Loveland at 1854 Piney River Dr., 622-9676. www.suburbitat.org. Also, contact Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado at 303715-1010, ext. 111. www.voc.org.   Poudre Valley Hospital one of nation’s 100 Top Hospitals Poudre Valley Hospital was named one of 100 Top Hospitals in the U.S. by Thomson Reuters, the nation’s leading independent organization that annually evaluates the performance of 3,000 healthcare companies. The 241-bed PVH, a regional fullservice hospital in Fort Collins, was the only Colorado hospital to make the 100 Top Hospital list. This was the seventh time since 2001 that PVH 16

| rmparent

received the annual award. In making the announcement, Thomson Reuters said if inpatients across the nation received the same level of care as those treated in the 100 Top Hospitals more than 186,000 additional lives could be saved, 56,000 additional patients could be complication free, more than $4.3 billion could be saved, and the average patient stay would decrease by nearly a half day. “This prestigious honor reflects the excellence of our staff members, volunteers and physicians,” said Kevin Unger, PVH president and CEO. “Their caring, compassion and commitment to quality help set us above other hospitals.” Donna Poduska, PVH’s chief nursing officer, said PVH’s success can also be attributed to the hospital’s commitment to patient safety. “Patient safety is woven tightly into the fabric of our organization,” she said. “We encourage employees, volunteers and doctors to identify areas where safety can be improved and to take the lead in making improvements.” DBA raises cash for Food Bank The Downtown Business Association announced that more than $20,800 was

collected for the Food Bank for Larimer County during the 6th Annual Great Plates of Downtown event. The event provided the public with opportunities to support the Food Bank for Larimer County for a fourth year by encouraging attendees to leave their change after enjoying the great dinner specials during the two-week event. This donation means that over 83,200 meals will be provided through the Food Bank’s services within the county. The partnership developed when local restaurant owners expressed interest in giving back to the community following the overwhelming success of Great Plates. During the five years of this donation program, Great Plates restaurants have raised over $138,600 for our local Food Bank. Congratulations to Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar for raising $4,000 during Great Plates. They collected the largest amount of donations for the Food Bank of Larimer County during this year’s event. Other top collectors were LuLu Asian Bistro, Bisetti’s Ristorante, The Melting Pot, and Rodizio Grill. Downtown servers who went above and beyond in helping collect this year’s donations will be recognized and photographed as a group and given restaurant gift cards. The giving keeps coming; Jax Fish House will continue their fundraising effort for the Food Bank for Larimer County throughout the month. They are also joined by two of the event’s sponsoring breweries, Stella Artois and Samuel Adams Boston Lager, who donated $.50 for every case bought in northern Colorado in the month of March. The Food Bank for Larimer County is the only food bank serving the county. For every dollar donated, the Food Bank will provide enough food for four meals to members of our community. For more information on the Food Bank for Larimer County visit www. foodbanklarimer.org.


-/Ê-1 ,Ê ÊÊEvEr! and

Ê , O/! RatEs tO

224-CLUB (2582) 1307 East Prospect Road Fort Collins, CO 80525

www.fortcollinsclub.net

r m pa r e nt

|

17


community news

Tires-n-Tennies Tuesdays

Safe Routes to School program funding helps enable Loveland students to bike and walk to school S h e l l ey A s c h e n b re n n er

S

afe Routes to School (SRTS) program funding in the Loveland community has allowed the City’s Public Works and Engineering Department to address transportation issues that had previously gone unaddressed: enabling students and parents to walk and bike to schools in their neighborhoods. Through the efforts of dedicated employees and parents, we have been able to evaluate and appreciate the issues facing families in their efforts to lead healthy active lives and teach their children to do the same. The City has established a SRTS program that encompasses the 5-E’s (Encouragement, Education, Enforcement, Evaluation and Engineering), and promotes safe travel to and from school by encouraging walking, biking, carpooling and safe driving. The program also has helped the Public Works and Engineering Department connect with school administrators, health advocates, parents and students to better understand the barriers to walking and bicycling in our community. Programs developed by 18

| rmparent

these efforts include:

• T-n-T Tuesdays encourage kids to walk and bike to school at least one day each week •B  ike Skills Safety Rodeos teach safe bicycling skills • Helmet safety education and outreach work to keep young minds safe

A collection of parental safety concerns and observations provides a resource

for strategic transportation planning. “As school district funding cuts remove transportation alternatives such as busing, it is critical that we maintain healthy alternatives, such as walking and biking to school,” said Tom Knostman, profession engineer with the City of Loveland, Public Works and Engineering Department. “We hope the cooperative efforts that have been established between Public Works and the Thompson School District through this grant opportunity will continue to flourish so that we can continue to move forward with these important and worthwhile efforts.” There have been challenges along the way to building our successful SRTS program, not the least of which has been continuous funding. Each school year brings a new group of students that will need to be educated on safe travel. “Stranger Danger” also is a huge concern for families. We are encouraging group riding and walking school buses to increase student safety. Having more families on foot instead of focused on driving in congested conditions make for more eyes on the street therefore increasing safety of students who have no other travel choices except walking or biking. Shelley Aschenbrenner is an Engineering Technician with the City of Loveland Public Works/Project Engineering Department and coordinates the City’s Safe Routes to School program.

Take action in your community Steps other communities can take to implement this type of project include: • Seek out alternative revenue sources or grant opportunities. •D  evelop a school-by-school inventory of conditions, obstacles and unsafe habits to use when tailoring infrastructure projects and educational outreach specific to each school.

•O  rganize a task force with members representing the “5-E’s” to ensure efficient solutions.

• Identify a liaison at each school site to address each school’s individual trends and issues.

•B  uild strong partnerships to complement and overlap the educational aspects of the school.


e t e C w S u � pcake B “

s

Buy one cupcake get one FREE, or 10% OFF any order!

970-532-2680

425 E. 4th St. Loveland Follow us on: b.sweet.cupcakes

Across from Anthology

online at:

www.bsweetcupcakes.com

Place an order any day of the week!

Open for walk-Ins on Thursdays and Fridays from 2-6pm Saturdays 11am-2pm

Now enjoy RMParent magazine at your leisure or on the go with our new digital flip issues. Our digital monthly issues bring you all the information you expect from RMParent Magazine in an easy-to-navigate and fun format!

.com r m pa r e nt

|

19


From farm to family Community Supported Agriculture brings local farmers and community members together to grow, reap and share the harvest

By Joannah Merriman

W

hen I was a child, my best memories were of wandering across my back yard in the late mornings. We lived on nearly an acre outside a large city in northwestern Ohio, and in the northeast corner of our land, just before the split-rail fenced border of the property, I could gather and make my lunch. My small hand clutched a wire colander, and I eagerly filled it with new lettuce leaves, fresh red and white radishes, and baby carrots. The best part of the summer arrived with the ripening of sweet corn and our tomatoes on the vine. My homegrown lunch collection at least partially disappeared before I even made it through the screened-in patio door to the kitchen to wash my colorful cache of fresh food. And those late July and August lunches often promised heaping plates, rich slabs of ripe tomatoes, along with a salt shaker, a fork, and a washcloth to stop the juices from running down my chin. “Organic” wasn’t even a term we considered, because in those days, most family gardens were organic without 20

| rmparent

question, that is, grown with rich soil, and without pesticides. My grandfather owned a fruit and vegetable company, and my childhood food bounty included crates of luscious black cherries, juicy peaches, and crunchy-crisp apples, flats of raspberries, blueberries, grapes. What we couldn’t grow in our own garden, we brought home from Grandpa’s store. I moved to Colorado after my college graduation and marriage, longing for my own growing experience, but my little Denver duplex had no backyard for a vegetable garden. In early 1974, we moved to Fort Collins, and except for the first summer when we lived in a drafty, hired-hand farmhouse just out of town, we had no land and no time to garden. We opened a local business, which became a chain of retail stores. I was a new mother who made my own baby food, didn’t let soda pop touch my children’s lips, bought individual cans of pure fruit juice by the dozen cases, trying to promote healthy eating habits in my family. But I just didn’t have the energy to add a garden to my repertoire of

responsibilities. By the time I had three children under the age of 5, I also had eight record and tape stores in Colorado and Iowa, and absolutely no time to do anything but grab groceries from the local chain stores on my way home, trying valiantly to avoid the Wendy’s or McDonald’s drive-up window, a much easier option for an exhausted mom. In the last 30 years, more family budgets require both parents to work, and single-parent families have even fewer choices about where to spend their time. For these parents, backyard gardens are nearly as obsolete as the crank automobile. Along with lost garden time, and lost time in general, the fast and faster food trend has left children’s health in the lurch. According to the Centers for Disease Control, childhood obesity has more than tripled in the last 30 years, and drags along with it greater rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and pre-diabetic conditions in children and young adults. Unless we are living in a cave, we’ve at least heard bits about the push by the Physicians Commit-


tee for Responsible Medicine to put fresher foods into school cafeterias, removing vending machines chocked full of empty-calorie snacks. The Healthy Lunch Campaign’s program educates government and school officials, cafeteria workers and parents, and attempts to reach the children as well. New directions in school lunch programs may eventually insure healthier food choices at school, promoting better short- and long-term health for the next generation. Unfortunately, these changes take a long time and vary greatly depending on which part of the country one inhabits. Your children don’t like vegetables, you say? How can parents with young children nurture a love of more nutritious foods, learning easy ways to incorporate healthy eating habits, bringing fresh, delicious produce to their table without the work of growing the crops themselves? Take them to a local vegetable farm or farmer’s market, and let them pick a few lettuce or spinach leaves, a zucchini or tomato. Bring children into the experience of knowing how their food gets to the table, and their enthusiasm for veggies might just go up a notch when they understand that the freshest food doesn’t come from factories. Fortune shines on those of us who live in northern Colorado, in the form of active Farmer’s Markets and local farms. Two very dedicated sets of area farmers were pioneers on the path of organic farming and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in northern Colorado. First introduced to North America from Europe in 1984, CSAs bring local farmers and community members together, growing, reaping and sharing the harvest. Grant Family Farms (GFF) began in Wellington in the 60s, owned by Lewis Grant, a professor at CSU, and his young son Andy. By 1974, Andy committed to using organic growing methods, a revolutionary endeavor at the time. Lewis, though skeptical, gave Andy a field with which to experiment, but it didn’t take long for Lewis to come on board, converting completely to the organic methods. Grant Farms became the first in the state obtain an organic certification in 1988, and helped Colorado set the standard for organic farming. In 1983, a young Fort Collins couple, Bailey and Dennis Stenson,

founded Happy Heart Farm (HHF) after helping to start the original Fort Collins Farmer’s Market. They had owned the country’s first mountain bike touring business, but when their second child was born, they settled down and become “home insteaders”. In 1989, they were introduced to the CSA concept at a conference in Santa Fe. “The fit was perfect,” says Bailey. HHF became the first CSA in Colorado, and their membership has grown from 15 to 150 shares. Dennis has trained over 55 apprentices in 29 years; some have begun their own farms. By 2007, Andy Grant reduced the reach of his international wholesale distribution and focused on communities along the Front Range, using the CSA model. These two farms and their owners share a common goal: to get the freshest vegetables to area residents. Each of them networks with other local farmers in order to distribute consciously produced food: vegetables, chickens, eggs, bread, cheese, fruit. HHF is small but mighty, and their members come out to the farm each week to pick up their distributions. Since GFF serves over 5000 member families, their regional representatives must effectively reach out to the communities along the Front Range, from Casper to Colorado Springs. And they do. Their members collect weekly shares at various drop-off points in each community. In addition, GFF still provides produce to local grocery stores such as King Soopers and Whole Foods. The pioneer farm owners cooperate, keeping their common goal in mind. In 2010, when hail wiped out much of HHF’s early crops, GFF offered replacement crops for HHF members at no cost. Both organizations educate future farmers, offer delicious recipes, hold special events and donate fresh produce within their membership communities. Last year, GFF donated 300,000 pounds of food to Colorado and Wyoming food banks. HHF’s Feeding The Families program sponsored 18 families (106 people) in need. As a CSA member, you support local farms, reaping the rewards of a harvest grown in local fields. Because the membership cost is fixed upfront, much of your family food-shopping budget is

already paid for the season. You eat more delicious meals, perhaps even enjoying cooking more than you usually do. Seeing firsthand what your share provides you each week helps you to be more connected to the seasons, eating greens in the spring, more tomatoes and squash as the summer draws to an end. And you might enjoy some new veggies you haven’t had the opportunity to taste in the past. Spinach might just turn out to be exciting fare when your 6-year-old gathers it himself, puts it in a bag that belongs to your family, and brings it home for everyone to enjoy. Whether it’s coloring Easter eggs, helping decorate the Christmas tree, lighting the Hanukah candles or harvesting vegetables from the garden, interactive learning better anchors family tradition and some of life’s important lessons. Joannah Merriman, M.A. is a Fort Collins writer, community educator and psychotherapist. You can reach her at Joannah. merriman@colostate.edu. Go to www.woods woman.wordpress.com and follow her “dirt therapy” experiences at Happy Heart Farm.

Join a CSA

More than 20 CSAs operate in the Fort Collins area, double that number in the surrounding towns in northern Colorado. Your lunch might not come from your own back yard, but joining a CSA brings you closer to that ideal. Explore these local opportunities. Eat fresh this season. Happy Heart Farm www.happyheartfarmcsa.com Feeding The Families program www.happyheartfriends.org Grant Family Farms www.GrantFarms.com

Additional resources: • www.healthyschoollunches.org •w  ww.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/ facts.htm • www.localharvest.org an extensive resource for healthy options in Northern Colorado.

r m pa r e nt

|

21


22

| rmparent


r m pa r e nt

|

23


eating disorders Who gets them and why By Lynn Utzman-Nichols

S

o your 12-year-old daughter came home from dance class and announced that she’s fat, or your teenage son refuses to eat breads and carbohydrates since he heard too much is bad for him in health class. Should you be concerned? Read on to learn about early signs of eating disorders and what you can do to intervene before it becomes a real concern. What triggers eating disorders? “The biggest factors that make kids susceptible to eating disorders are poor selfimage and low self-esteem. They simply don’t feel great about who they are,” says Dr. Julie Brockway, a pediatrician with The Youth Clinic with offices in Fort Collins and Loveland. Yet there’s a lot more that goes into it, such as personality, external messages from the media, school, friends and family and possibly genetics. “The most common scenario I see is 24

| rmparent

young women who seem healthy, happy and active and something stressful happens that keeps them from doing their routine—they get injured, become sick, move, etc.—and their life gets out of control. They try to regain control by regulating their eating,” explains Brockway. Eating disorders are more about wanting control than about wanting to be thin. Brockway notices that kids who have Type A personalities where they want everything to be flawless are more susceptible to eating disorders. “These are the kids who like to be in control at school, home, physically and emotionally. If one thing gets out of control they feel bad and want to get it back,” says Brockway. Type A kids are often perfectionists and put a lot of pressure on themselves to always succeed and never make mistakes. Hence, they experience stress and anxiety. “If you have a child like this, talk to her about it. Let her know it is okay

not to be perfect all the time and that she might even want to practice making mistakes, like not getting perfect grades on every homework assignment,” suggests Brockway. Dr. Brockway also sees eating disorders triggered by, of all things, discussions on healthy eating in nutrition class at school. “Kids can get the message that some foods are bad and occasionally go to the extreme and never eat a certain food, such as fat. The truth is our brains need fat so some is good.” Puberty itself can trigger an eating disorder. According to the National Eating Disorders Association, NEDA, (which has a Parent Tool Kit and lots of other information at www.nationaleating disorders.org), eating disorders rarely occur before puberty. They report that 17 is the average age of diagnosis for anorexia. Brockway sees a fair number of teens with eating disorders or issues around eating, most between the ages of


12 and 16. Body changes can bring up body image issues. Natural changes like getting breasts or more weight on the hips can make a girl feel fat. Finally, genetics might play into who gets an eating disorder: “It’s not strong, but some research shows eating disorders run in families. Sometimes it’s diagnosed alongside anxiety or depression, but most kids with eating disorders don’t have these elements in their family backgrounds—it’s just an added risk factor,” adds Brockway. What are the signs? “The first place parents notice a change is around food and eating,” says Brockway. Maybe your daughter avoids family meals or when she does eat, she simply moves her food around the plate. Or maybe you often find hidden food in your son’s room. Here are signs that your child might have an issue with food: • Won’t take a lunch to school • Goes to the bathroom right after meals • Refuses to eat in front of friends • Avoids family meals • Sneaks food • Moves food around the plate • Eats food in a set order, only eats certain things • Skips meals • Counts calories, diets • Secretly binges

Other signs of eating disorders, according to NEDA, include: • Dramatic weight loss • Dressing in layers or baggy clothes • Always saying they are not hungry • Fear of getting fat • Strong need for control • Inflexible thinking • Excessive exercise • Discolored teeth • Withdraw from friends and favorite activities • Worried about looks and physical appearance

Interestingly, it’s not often the eating disorder that brings teens into her office, says Brockway. “It’s usually physical complaints such as fatigue, trouble getting up in the morning, difficulty concentrating, stomach pain and constipation. Eating disorders is a diagnosis that

usually comes over time. No one wants to believe that it’s happening.” Recognize your child? What you can do to help If you notice a few of these traits in your teen or pre-teen, the best thing you can do is keep a watchful eye. “Notice how he eats and what he says about his body. Check in with him and make sure he feels okay about himself,” says Brockway. You can also watch yourself and what you say about beauty, your own body and food. Be mindful of the comments you make about yourself, weight and food. “No matter how hard you’re trying to fill up your child’s self-esteem, if you’re tearing down your own, it won’t matter,” says Brockway. When kids constantly hear Mom say she needs to lose 10 pounds or that she hates her belly, they get the message that what we look like from the outside is really important. “They get enough of this message from the media and from friends, the only message they need from home is that internal beauty is most important and that they have a lot of that. And of course that you love them know matter how they look or how well they are doing.” She advises that we give kids good role models of healthy, successful people that come in all shapes and sizes. When it comes to food, follow this advice: Don’t use food as a reward or force kids to eat when they are not hun-

gry. Lose the old idea of cleaning a plate and making kids eat everything they are served. Your job is to offer healthy food, not control whether or not your kids eat it. Encourage kids to eat when they are hungry so they can tune in to their body’s natural cues. Finally, don’t make any food off limits. This feeds a desire to have what they can’t, and to see food as taboo. Finally, teach moderation. “It’s also important to help your teen find a few niches—activities or interests that they enjoy and feel good about. That way, if something isn’t going well in their lives they have a few positive things to fall back on,” suggests Brockway. Feeling skilled at something helps kids feel in control. Finally, talk to your kids a lot and let them know you are always available to listen. “I have three teenage daughters at the moment who don’t always want to talk, but we talk anyway,” says Brockway who sees annual visits as a great time to check in with your doctor on any concerns around eating or weight. “Also, if your pre-teen or teen seems constantly sad, doesn’t enjoy activities –including food, is losing weight and not fitting her clothes or is changing friends and the way she dresses, it’s time to get things checked out,” concludes Brockway. For more information, visit Poudre Valley Health System’s online library at healthlibrary.pvhs.org for access to dozens of articles on eating disorders.

Do you think I’m fat? The question every parent hates to answer

Your first impulse is to say, “Of course not!” Resist. “The problem with saying no is that your daughter already believes she’s fat and will think you’re lying—that shuts the door, fast,” says Brockway. She describes it as a no-win question, akin to asking your husband if you look pretty in a certain dress. “You’re in trouble no matter what you say so you are better off asking a question in return,” she suggests. For example, ask: ‘Why, do you think you’re fat?’ Or, ‘Is this coming from something that happened or something someone said?’ “It’s easier to deal with if you know the source of the question,” says Brockway. That way, you can dig deeper and explore the issue further, even asking questions like, ‘Why do you think she said that to you?’ or ‘What do you think it looks like to be healthy?’ or ‘Do you think everyone needs to look the same, or be super skinny, and is super skinny healthy?’ “My youngest daughter recently asked me this question and we got into a discussion about her thighs. Someone said she had big thighs and we talked about how her strong thighs made her the fastest runner in the class. It flipped it around for her,” concludes Brockway.

r m pa r e nt

|

25


• •• • • • •this• Fall •at•• • • • • Join us • • •• • • •our• new • location • • • • • • • • • •on • • •Harmony•Avenue as• • • • •• • • • •we• ••celebrate our • • • • • offi •new • •• • central ce! • • • • • • • ••• ••• •• •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • Specializing • • in Dentistry • • • Teens • • • Children, • • • for Toddlers, • • •••• • &•Special Needs Patients. • • •• • • •• • • • www.RockiesKidsDds.com • •••• •••• •FOR 50% • DISCOUNT • • • • PATIENTS NEW (East of Starbucks and next to Cool Cuts in the Harmony Timberline Center)

Includes exam, cleaning, x-rays and fluoride. This ad can be used as a credit to your account if you don’t have insurance or to cover any costs that your insurance may not cover for your initial appointment. Please mention this as when calling.

NEW LOCATION: 4609 S. Timberline Rd. Suite 103B, 80528 • (970) 484-4104

Visit Our Web Site for all of your Camp information needs!

June 10-15 June 17-22 June 25-27

26

| rmparent

Baseball • Boys Basketball • Boys Lacrosse • Cheerleading Fencing • Football (no contact) Girl’s Basketball • Girls Lacrosse • Girls Softball • Golf Gymnastics • Ice Hockey • Soccer • Strength & Conditioning Tennis • Volleyball • Wrestling (ages 10-18) RegisteR ONLiNe at:

www.goairForceFalcons.com OR caLL: 1-719-333-2116


r m pa r e nt

|

27


poudre school district news

Volunteering shows students school is important to parents

Joy Miller with her children.

Poudre School District has over 15,000 volunteers, consisting of parents, grandparents, seniors and community members. Managing that many volunteers in 48 schools is quite a feat! Helping the PSD’s Volunteers & Partnerships office manage the multitude of volunteers at each school site is a Volunteer Building Coordinator (VBC). These dedicated volunteers donate many hours to ensure the volunteer program at their school is a success. Some have done it for many years, starting in elementary schools, and continuing in this volunteer position even after their children move on to junior high and even high school! Joy Miller, Shepardson Elementary Volunteer Building Coordinator, began this position in Fall 2011 when her youngest began kindergarten. She also has a son in second grade. Although she was working part time, she wanted to find a way to get more involved at her children’s school. She plans to remain in this position for next year. She has enjoyed getting to know the other parents, as well as to help those who are new to the school find a way to become involved. Miller believes that parent in28

| rmparent

volvement in the day-to-day school activities is key to having an excellent educational experience for the students. Not only does it provide additional helpers for more one-on-one learning, but it also shows students that their parents value education. And, there are so many ways to volunteer at the schools, through field trips, media center, office helper, or serving on the PTO. “The staff at Shepardson,” says Miller, “is wonderful! They are all so supportive of each individual child.” Whenever there is a concern, the teachers, counselor, and even the principal have all been available and ready to help. All staff are extremely accessible and wanting to help in whatever way is best for the child. “With the fabulous staff, the STEM program, and all of the parent support at Shepardson I feel it is one of the best schools my kids could go to,” Miller says. One volunteer in particular stands out to Miller. Jean Johnson volunteers in the Media Center repairing books. Miller says, “She is one of the most interesting people I have ever met. She was telling us one day that one of her teachers was Margaret Shepardson, the woman whom Shepardson Elementary was named after.” In her spare time, Miller enjoys spending time with her children, reading, gardening, and all types of exercise. Miller and her husband just recently joined a kickball team, which is a lot of fun. Miller says, “I like volunteering with my kids’ classes because I get to meet all of their classmates and see how my children interact with others. I have learned so much about my kids from volunteering. And, I have made some great

friendships through PTO and volunteering, as well!” PSD teacher selected as physical activity champion Chris West, physical education teacher at Bauder Elementary, has been selected as a “Let’s Move! Physical Activity Champion of Change” as part of President Obama’s “Winning the Future” initiative.  West and other selected physical activity leaders were recently honored at the White House.  Each week, different groups of Americans, businesses or organizations that embody ‘Innovate, Educate, and Build’ are recognized. For this event, the Office of Public Engagement is partnering with the First Lady’s Let’s Move! team to host an event at the White House to honor those who are “Winning the Future” by empowering and inspiring the youth in their communities to lead active, healthy lifestyles.  West says the award acknowledges the partnerships that have been created over the past eight years. “Although this award was given to me, it validates all of the people who have helped me reach some of my goals, and I am excited that this award will be instrumental in creating new partnerships to increase physical activity for our youth,” says West. “I also hope this national stage will give me an opportunity to talk about how exercise grows brain cells and how health is academics. The real news is that exercise is not only essential for health, but also that it is essential for learning; we exercise for survival and the positive side effects of exercise are the fundamental building blocks to learning. The brain is primed for academic


we have over 30 campground sites! Book yours today!

Beaver l l a e r o l Exp

Meadows has

to offe

r

www.BEavErMEadows.coM • 970-881-2450 r m pa r e nt

|

29


PSD Calendar of Events May 7-11 May 8

T eacher Appreciation Week 6 :30pm, Board of Education business meeting, Johannsen Support Services Complex, 2407 LaPorte Ave May 11 K - 8, Teacher Work Day, no school for K-8 students May 22 6 :30pm, Board of Education business meeting and work session, Johannsen Support Services Complex, 2407 LaPorte Ave. May 24-26 P SD High School Graduations–check PSD website (www.psdschools.org) for more information. May 28 Memorial Day, No School June 1 K -12 half day of school, Last day of classes for the 201112 school year Tavelli Elementary students learn about fossils by making their own with the help of Tavelli science teacher Sherilyn Galeener. Tavelli has dedicated one of its classrooms as a science lab. SPIE grant money helped equip the lab with items like beakers, microscopes and other necessities.

success when exercise is a part of the learning environment. It is a partner in academic achievement.” Agency representatives and White House Offices will participate in a discussion with the Champions to hear about the work they are doing. The Champions will also be featured on the White House website. Tavelli students make learning discoveries in new science lab Tavelli Elementary students are discovering a newfound interest in science through hands-on, engaging projects such as making fossils and raising chickens in the school’s new science lab. “The kids love it and are discovering that science is fun,” says Sherilyn Galeener, Tavelli’s new science teacher. The new science lab and teacher go hand-in-hand with Tavelli’s new science focus. Kindergartners through 5th-graders at Tavelli now attend weekly or regularly scheduled science classes throughout the year like they do with music, art, technology and physical education “specials” classes. Previously the school, like many PSD elementary schools, focused on sci30

| rmparent

ence units at specific times during the school year, instead of year-round. With the new science focus, Tavelli has dedicated one of its classrooms as a science lab where students study topics in earth, life and physical sciences. Thanks to a $3,975 SPIE (Supporting Partnerships in Innovation Education) grant from the PSD Foundation, Tavelli has equipped the lab with items like beakers, hot plates, microscopes, slides, stopwatches, and fossil kits. “I am grateful for the members of the Fort Collins community who donate money for SPIE grants and the to the SPIE grant committee members who donate their time to the program.  They have made it possible for me to “dream big” this year while planning Tavelli’s science curriculum,” says Galeener, who authored the grant. Since Tavelli began the new science initiative last fall, Galeener says student scores on annual assessment tests, like MAPS (Measures of Academic Progress), have increased. While she is happy about the improvement in test scores, Galeener is also pleased with the students’ new attitude toward science.

“Part of my goal is to change the kids’ perception of what science is and get them excited about it,” she says. Recently students learned about fossils by creating their own out of plaster and molds. “This shows them what paleontologists in the field do,” says Galeener. “The students often don’t really understand that the animal itself is not preserved in a fossil. I’m hoping this makes it more tangible.” The learning activity was certainly a big hit with Tavelli 4th-graders Meghan McMorrow, Brandon Cates and Cassidy Jackson, who agreed that they learned a lot about fossils while having fun together. “I like it because it’s hands-on,” says Meghan, while they poured plaster into a mold. “And it’s a team effort,” agrees Cassidy. “And it’s gooey,” adds Brandon. This spring, Tavelli 3rd-graders will learn about the life cycle by raising chickens from eggs in an incubator. “I want them to be able to apply what they learn about the cycles of life to other animals and learn that all animals and plants have a life cycle,” Galeener says.


Cribs

Here comes

Cradles

Dressers Toddler Beds Glider Rockers

FUN

tHe

Bassinets

Strollers

cHildreN’s coNsiGNmeNt FUrNitUre aNd eqUipmeNt 970-682-2250 1606 S. Lemay & Prospect

Best Selection of Gently-Worn Children’s Items

(Corner of Lemay & Prospect)

Monday-Saturday 10-5 Sunday Closed

r m pa r e nt

|

31


greeley-evans district 6 news

Frontier Academy Charter School student named as a Boettcher Scholar Frontier Academy Charter School has its first ever Boettcher Scholar this year, with senior Mckenzie Ramirez earning the prestigious offer from the Boettcher Foundation. Mckenzie is the second Greeley-Evans student to receive a 2012 Boettcher Scholarship offer, along with Alexis Gerk from Northridge High School. The Boettcher Foundation’s Scholars program recognizes scholastics and leadership, rewarding outstanding high school seniors who demonstrate the potential to make significant contributions to Colorado. Only 40 scholarships are awarded each year across the entire state, out of more than 1,300 applicants. The foundation provides a fouryear scholarship to attend colleges or universities in Colorado, including full tuition, fees, and books, plus a stipend to help cover living expenses. Students are selected for the Boettcher Scholarship based on superior academic achievement, commitment to school and community activities, and strength of character. Boettcher Scholars must be among the top 5 percent of their graduating class, and have an SAT score of at least 1,200 or an ACT score of at least 27. According to the Boettcher Foundation, Scholars share two overriding characteristics: an intense intellectual curiosity and a passion for involvement. Dream Team announces student scholarships A Dream Team of students made significant headway in getting ready for life after high school—a life that includes a stop at college for a reduced price. The Greeley Dream Team awarded 18 students in its Educational Talent Search program with scholarships to higher education institutions across the nation at its annual awards banquet on March 20. The Greeley Dream Team’s Educational Talent Search Program provides services to over 700 students in District 32

| rmparent

6 from grades 6-12. Two-thirds of the students qualify as low-income and will be first-generation college students. Educational Talent Search Advisors have worked with the students over the years to encourage, assist and engage them in rigorous academics, help them acquire study skills and technology skills, and prepare them for college level course work. The advisors also help the students complete financial-aid applications, and enroll in an institution of post-secondary education. The Greeley Dream Team Board of Directors and staff announced a total of $25,500 in scholarships this year. Individual students earned scholarships ranging from $500 to $1,500. The 2012 Dream Team Honors Scholars are:   Greeley Central High School • Juan Flores, college area of study/career goal: recreation and tourism, wilderness guide • Lezbeth Garcia, college area of study/ career goal: nursing, neonatal nurse practitioner • Kayla Grange, college area of study/career goal: law • Humberto Hernandez, college area of study/career goal: undeclared • Stephani Ronquillo, college area of study/ career goal: pre-med

 

Northridge High School • Kendra Aragon, college area of study/career goal: registered nurse, physician assistant • Eric Andres Garcia-Trujillo, college area of study/career goal: architecture, environmental science • Tanisha Gutierrez, college area of study/ career goal: nursing, • Eunice Mendoza, college area of study/career goal: nursing, registered nurse • Jesus Ojeda, college area of study/career goal: automotive services • Fabio Vasquez, college area of study/career goal: criminal justice • George Velasquez, college area of study/ career goal: automotive services

Greeley West High School • A raceli Garcia, college area of study/career goal: criminal justice, law • K evin Grossaint, college area of study/career goal: political science, public policy • A ngelica Guiterrez, college area of study/ career goal: culinary arts, business • C innamon Martinez, college area of study/ career goal: undeclared • E sequiel Morales, college area of study/career goal: undeclared Jefferson High School • K asey Ramirez, college area of study/career goal: business

“This is a great opportunity for me because it will help cover tuition costs and give me a chance to succeed in life with an education,” says Humberto Hernandez, one of the scholarship recipients from Greeley Central High School. The Greeley Dream Team also named Chris Ingram, principal of Jefferson High School, as the 2012 Outstanding Dream Team Supporter of the Year. “Chris is very passionate about her job and incredibly selfless when it comes to her students,” says Elizabeth Barber, executive director of the Greeley Dream Team. “She always puts the best interest of others before herself, and continues to look for more ways to bring extended opportunities and programs to the students.” The Dream Team also congratulated and extended appreciation to Supporter of the Year semifinalists Jonathan Payne, librarian at John Evans Middle School; Jesse Tijerina, assistant principal at Greeley Central High School; Pat Trujillo, librarian at Franklin Middle School; and Cindy York, office manager at Northridge High School. The Greeley Dream Team is a nonprofit organization that has worked collaboratively with School District 6 since 1986. The agency serves a diverse population of over 850 students through programs sponsored by federal, state and local grants.


Accepting new

patients

• Free consultation • Invisalign® provider • No interest financing available • Flexible payment options & insurance accepted

970-674-0717 1295 Main Street, #4,Windsor Jill K. Mioduski DDS, MS, Prof. LLC

nocoortho.com

Byte Size An eNewsletter from Rocky Mountain Parent Magazine

To join our mailing list, visit our NEW website:

rmparent.com

r m pa r e nt

|

33


thompson school district news

McGraw-Hill Education’s program makes it personal

Principal Traci Gile stands with students Zach and Payton Rechkemmer in front of In for the Night, an oil painting by the late Lu Haskew, an artist and teacher in the district. The painting is one of 32 donated by Lu’s son, Denny Haskew, to the schools. The Rechkemmer family sponsors it and Edward Jones Investments through the Thompson Education Foundation on behalf of the Legacy for Lu fund for arts programs and materials.  So far, 13 paintings have been sponsored. For more information about the sponsorships, visit www.thetef.org or call 970-613-5074.

McGraw-Hill Education’s Revolutionary Power of U program uses an adaptive assessment for a learning platform to create specific learning roadmaps for each student While many middle-schoolers cringe at the thought of math, 210 6th- and 7th-grade students at Conrad Ball Middle School in Loveland, Colo. are eager to dive into their lessons. That’s because they’re taking part in McGraw-Hill Education’s 34

| rmparent

revolutionary Power of U, an alldigital learning program that uses Promethean ActivProgress to create an adaptive, personalized learning environment for students. The program’s success to date demonstrates that students can improve their grades and test scores and increase their confidence in math when they have the opportunity to take more control of their own learning. “We were looking for a program

that would optimize personalization and provide individual learning roadmaps to drive student success in math, no matter their proficiency level,” says Scott Elias, principal of Conrad Ball Middle School. “We’ve already witnessed how the adaptive nature of Power of U, which offers real-time, prescriptive feedback after each lesson, motivates students. It allows them to play a more active role in their own learning process and helps them make connections between what they’re learning today and what they’ll need to know tomorrow.” Administrators in Loveland’s Thompson School District wanted to pilot Power of U because of the program’s proven track record, the district’s desire to introduce personalized learning programs through its “Vision 2020” plan, and a need to improve students’ stagnant Colorado State Assessment Program scores in math. Power of U also addresses math achievement at a critical juncture in students’ academic careers: middle school, a time when many students begin to struggle as the coursework increases in complexity. Says Travis Hamilton, a director at McGraw-Hill Education; the program “is about putting the ‘you’ in learning.” Hamilton’s team developed the Power of U with partners CTB/McGraw-Hill and Promethean, launching the pilot program in Indiana in 2010 after extensive field research and testing. “Research shows that the closer teaching comes to a one-on-one interaction, the more effective it is. By using technology that recognizes and adapts to individual learning needs, innovative programs like the Power of U create a ‘class of one’—an experience that is personalized, customized and mobile, that can extend learning well beyond the classroom.” “Learning beyond the classroom is key,” says Jim Marshal, president of Promethean North America. “By focusing on the learning needs and


READY, sEt,

ROLLER DERBY! FOCO

JUNIOR ROLLER DERBY FOR ALL GIRLs AGEs: 7-11 & 12-17

PRACtICEs ARE hELD @

ROLLERLAND sKAtE CENtER 324 s. LINK LANE • Ft. COLLINs sEND AN EmAIL tO:

JUNIORDERBY @

FOCOGIRLs GO NE DERBY .COm

get on board to learn more about Reducing, Reusing, Recycling and the Larimer County Landfill!

Waste RangeR Camps Ages 8 to 12. Wednesday, June 13, July 11 or August 1, 2012 8:30am-2:30pm. Registration is required. Tours, activities, behind the scenes at the Landfill, zero waste lunch, “found art,” edible landfill and much more! to register email: mmcarthy@larimer.org or call: 970-498-5772

FOR mORE INFORmAtION!

r m pa r e nt

|

35


objectives, we are helping schools create 21st-century learning environments. In this program, the students are not limited and are challenged to continually strive to higher levels of mastery. It also gives teachers access to critical student progress data with the tools to help them build collaborative learning opportunities for all students.” In January, Colorado became the latest school district to pilot Power of U, which has already shown to improve student achievement in other schools. The program, which runs on Promethean’s web-based data management and social learning solution to provide real-time feedback to the student, empowers them to learn at their own pace, in their own way, using the method of instruction that works best for them. As a result, teachers have been able to focus less on administrative tasks and more on what matters most: teaching. Every day, the data-driven Power of U program groups students according to their skill or content mastery, rather than using traditional class

structures that are fixed at the beginning of the school year. The platform, which adapts to students’ progress daily, also matches students with the most appropriate instructional method, whether its teacher-led instruction, small group instruction, one-onone tutoring or independent study. “We are proud to partner with the Thompson School District and excited to see that Power of U is making its way into classrooms across the country,” says Hamilton. “The ‘one size fits all’ approach to learning no longer addresses the range of student needs found in the diverse 21st-century classroom. Thanks to technology and programs like Power of U, we are able to personalize both instruction and learning, which benefits teachers and students alike.” Power of U, which is available via subscription, was introduced in summer 2010 to 26 sixth-graders in Perry Township, Ind., all of whom were struggling in math during the regular school year and saw improvements in their grades after participating in the

program. Power of U was officially adopted as the math curriculum in two Perry Township Middle schools and is now rolling out to school districts in other states. McGraw-Hill Education plans to extend the program to different grades across several disciplines. About McGraw-Hill Education McGraw-Hill Education is a content, software and services-based education company that draws on its more than 100 years of educational expertise to offer solutions, which improve learning outcomes around the world. McGraw-Hill is the adaptive education technology leader with the vision for creating a highly personalized learning experience that prepares students of all ages for the world. The company has offices across North America, India, China, Europe, the Middle East and South America, and makes its learning solutions available in more than 65 languages. For additional information, visit www.mh education.com.

Visit us at: www.rmparent.com

follow us on facebook.com/RockyMountainParent

36

| rmparent


Cribs

Here comes

Cradles

Dressers Toddler Beds Glider Rockers

FUN

tHe

Bassinets

Strollers

cHildreN’s coNsiGNmeNt FUrNitUre aNd eqUipmeNt 970-682-2250 1606 S. Lemay & Prospect

Best Selection of Gently-Worn Children’s Items

(Corner of Lemay & Prospect)

Monday-Saturday 10-5 Sunday Closed

r m pa r e nt

|

37


lunch box Poudre School District: Elementary student lunches are $2.O5, secondary student lunches are $2.30 and reduced lunches are $0.40. Entrees offered daily: Elementary—a variety of fruits and vegetables, milk and juices; Secondary--hot and cold sandwiches, fruits and vegetables, deli salad and pizza. .

Elementary school 1 Yogurt, cheese & fruit; mac n’cheese; hot dog 2 Chicken quesadilla; cheeseburger; PBJ 3 Enchilada bake; ham & cheese deli; chicken nuggets 4 Veggie wrap; pepperoni pizza; cheese raviolis 7 Beef & bean burrito; yogurt, cheese & fruit; pancake & sausage wrap 8 Grilled cheese sandwich; chicken patty sandwich; chef salad 9 Chicken & broccoli Alfredo; PBJ; chicken nuggets 10 Veggie wrap; BBQ chicken sandwich; cheese pizza 11 No school! 14 Sloppy Joe; turkey & cheese deli;

chicken nuggets 15 Yogurt, cheese & fruit; chili & cinnamon roll; cheeseburger 16 Mac n’cheese; pig in a blanket; PBJ 17 Turkey, gravy & potatoes; chef salad; chicken patty sandwich 18 Spaghetti; turkey & cheese wrap; pepperoni pizza 21 Cheese pizza; meatball deli; PBJ 22 Veg lasagna; cheeseburger; chef salad 23 Chicken rice bowl; chicken patty sandwich; hummus & veggies 24 Baked chicken; beef & bean burrito; veggie wrap 25 Mac n’cheese; French toast sticks; tuna salad sandwich 28 No school!

29 Beef & bean burrito; chicken nuggets; PBJ 30 Chef salad; cheeseburger; corn dog 31 Veggie wrap; Teriyaki chicken dippers; chicken patty sandwich Secondary SCHOOLS 1 Chicken nuggets; green chile smothered burrito 2 Enchilada bake; pasta w/sauces 3 Baked potato bar; yogurt, cheese & fruit 4 Turkey gravy & potatoes; chicken taco 7 Spaghetti; chicken quesadilla 8 Chicken nuggets; beef tacos 9 Italian lasagna; nachos 10 Green chile burrito; baked chicken 11 Chili w/cinnamon roll; chicken fajita w/rice

14 Mac n’cheese; chicken rice bowl 15 Chili cheese fries; chicken taco 16 Pig in a blanket; pasta w/sauces 17 Chicken nuggets; grilled ham & cheese 18 Cheese raviolis; baked chicken 21 Mac n’cheese; chicken rice bowl 22 Chicken nuggets; green chile burrito 23 Veggie lasagna; pasta w/sauces 24 Baked chicken; yogurt , cheese & fruit 25 Chicken & broccoli Alfredo; chicken taco 28 No school! 29 Teriyaki chicken dippers; beef tacos 30 Chicken nuggets; chili w/cinn. roll 31 Philly cheesesteak sandwich; orange chicken w/rice

Thompson School District: Elementary lunches are $2.25. Secondary school lunches are $2.50. Reduced lunches are $0.40. Offered daily: PBJs & fruit. Elementary schools 2 Turkey hot dog; burrito 3 Farmer’s basket pasta; baked potato 4 Fish fillet; fruit & yogurt plate 7 Roasted chicken; grilled cheese sandwich 8 Jumbo stuffed pasta; baked potato 9 Sloppy Joe; burrito

10 Nachos; baked potato 11 Orange chicken; fruit & yogurt plate 14 Mac n’cheese; grilled cheese sandwich 15 Pizza stick; baked potato 16 Chicken patty sandwich; rice & bean burrito 17 Chicken quesadilla; Santa Fe

brown rice 21-24 Manager’s choice Secondary schools 1 Chicken parmesan w/pasta; spicy chicken patty sandwich 2 Turkey hot dog; burger 3 Farmer’s basket pasta; grilled cheese sandwich 4 Fish fillet sandwich; spicy chicken

patty sandwich 7 Roasted chicken; sloppy Joe 8 Jumbo stuffed pasta; grilled cheese sandwich 9 Pork rib patty sandwich; burger 10 Nachos; lasagna 11 Orange chicken; fruit & yogurt plate 14-24 Manager’s choice

Greeley - Evans District 6: To obtain a complete meal, student gets an entrée and can select 1-3 sides. Elementary lunches are $2.15, and middle school lunches are $2.40, reduced-price lunches are $.40. Offered daily: PBJ.

Elementary schools 1 Bean burrito; chicken salad sandwich 2 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 3 Roast turkey; ham & cheese hoagie 4 Taco pizza; tuna salad sandwich 7 Hamburger; turkey & cheese sandwich 8 Taquito pie; chicken salad sandwich 9 Spanish chicken; PBJ 10 BBQ chicken; ham & cheese hoagie 11 Pepperoni pizza; tuna salad

sandwich 14 Chili w/tortilla; turkey & cheese hoagie 15 Chicken quesadilla; chicken salad sandwich 16 Baked ziti; PBJ 17 Herb chicken; ham & cheese hoagie 18 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich 21 Roast pork; turkey & cheese hoagie 22 Tacos; chicken salad sandwich 23-24 Manager’s choice

Middle school 1 Bean burrito; chicken fajita ranch 2 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 3 Roast turkey; Tuscan bagel sandwich 4 Taco pizza; tuna salad sandwich 7 Hamburger; club wrap 8 Taquito pie; chicken salad sandwich 9 Spanish chicken; PBJ 10 BBQ chicken; turkey & cheese hoagie 11 Pepperoni pizza; Italian wrap

14 Chili w/tortilla; ham & cheese hoagie 15 Chicken quesadilla; chicken fajita wrap 16 Baked ziti; PBJ 17 Herb chicken; Tuscan bagel sandwich 18 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich 21 Roast pork; club wrap 22 Tacos; chicken salad sandwich 23-24 Manager’s choice

Windsor School District: Price for elementary lunch is $2.25, for middle school students, $2.30. Reduced lunches are $0.40. Salad bar is served daily with entrees. Offered daily: PBJ and yogurt.

Elementary schools 1 Pancakes, sausage 2 Taco 3 Chicken patty sandwich 4 Cheese pizza 7 Hamburger

38

| rmparent

8 Chicken Alfredo 9 Bean & cheese burrito 10 Garden chicken wraps 11 Pizza dippers 14 Chicken strips 15 Mac n’cheese 16 Nachos

17 Fiesta pork wrap 18 Big daddy pizza 21 Chicken nuggets 22 Chicken patty sandwich Secondary Schools 1 Pancakes, sausage 2 Taco

3 Chicken patty sandwich 4 Spicy veggie quesadilla 7 Hamburger 8 Chicken Alfredo 9 Bean & cheese burrito 10 Garden chicken wraps 11 Meatball sub

14 Chicken strips 15 Mac n’cheese 16 Nachos 17 Fiesta pork wrap 18 Steak & cheese sub 21 Chicken nuggets 22 Chicken patty sandwich


Buy one cupcake Get one

FREE! SW corner of Horsetooth & College, west of Albertson’s,

970-225-1040 1 Old Town Square next to Ben & Jerry’s

970-482-2505

buttercreamcupcakery.com

r m pa r e nt

|

39


MAY 2012 Ongoing Through May 18 The Dinner Detective Carousel Dinner Theatre, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555. www. MidtownArtsCenter.com Through June 2 The Sound of Music Carousel Dinner Theatre, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555. www. MidtownArtsCenter.com Through June 3 Oklahoma! The Musical Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 970-744-3747 or www. coloradocandlelight.com. May 4-12 Tales from The Arabian Nights The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. lctix.com. June 6-September 1 Hairspray the Musical Carousel Dinner Theatre, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555. www. MidtownArtsCenter.com June 14-August 4 Godspell A timeless tale of friendship, loyalty and love. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 970-744-3747 or www. coloradocandlelight.com.

40

| rmparent

calendar Tuesday, May 1

Ready, Set, Grow! Seed Chart An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens.

Wednesday, May 2

Scrabble @ Your Library Players of all ability and experience levels are welcome. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

An Evening with Vanessa Diffenbaugh Author of The Language of Flowers. The Hilton, 425 W. Prospect Rd., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Noches en Familia: Family Nights ¡Ven y disfruta un tiempo de cuentos, manualidades, canciones y películas en español! Come and enjoy a time of stories, crafts, puppets, and songs in Spanish. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 5pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Great Discussions: Exit From Afghanistan and Iraq Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Wild World of Art Sand Sculpting. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www. cityofloveland.org/museum.

Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-495-7528 or www. pvhs.org.

Thursday, May 3

Bike Maintenance Basics REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:308pm. 970-221-0123 or www.REI.com.

Friday, May 4

Drop in Art: Mother’s Day Keepsake Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/ museum.

Script Frenzy Awards and Screen Reading Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Childbirth (Fast Track Option) Condensed class to help prepare mother and labor coach for birth experience. Westbridge Medical Suites, 1107 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 5-6:30pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Saturday, May 5

Kids on Broadway The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com.


r m pa r e nt

|

41


Cinco De Mayo Skate Greeley Recreation Center, 651 10th Ave., GR. 12-1:30pm. 970-350-9400. Spring Warm-Up Ride REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 9am2:30pm. 970-221-0123 or www.REI.com.

Tuesday, May 8

Hall Ranch Open Space Senior Hike Moderate level hiking. Meet at the Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Dr., FC. 8am-2:30pm. 970-221-6644 or www. fcgov/recreation/seniorcenter.php.

Boot Camp for New Dads For men, taught by men! North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-Noon. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Labor and Birth for Teens North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 4-6pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Wednesday, May 9

Breastfeeding: Off to a Good Start Designed for expectant parents who are considering breastfeeding. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-Noon. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Wild World of Art Watercolor: Butterflies and Blossoms. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum. Breastfeeding Basics Topics include the process of breastfeeding and ways to prevent and care for problems. Poudre Valley Hospital, Indian Paintbrush Room, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Growing Up Healthy and Happy Johnstown Community Center, 101 Charlotte St., Johnstown. 9:30-11:30am. 970-392-2222 or www.BannerHealth. com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. Noon. 970-4957528 or www.pvhs.org.

Sunday, May 6

John McCutcheon Presented by Quantum Arts. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com. Platinum Pops Season Finale Enjoy the Foothills Pops Band. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com.

Monday, May 7

Read and Seed: Pressed Flower Cards The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

42

| rmparent

Marily McCoo and Billy Davis Jr. Original members of the 5th Dimension and seven-time Grammy winners in Up, Up and Away. An evening of their greatest hits. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 6pm. 970-744-3747 or www.coloradocandlelight.com.

Kevin Cook: At Home in the Trees, Pinton Cottage Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. Noon. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Bright Beginnings for One-Year-Olds Explore how thinking and interactions change as your infant becomes a toddler on the go. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Rocky Mountain Raptors Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

International Night: Middle East People and Places Elizabeth Stanley will discuss her experiences in new universities for women in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Marily McCoo and Billy Davis Jr. Original members of the 5th Dimension and seven-time Grammy winners in Up, Up and Away. An evening of their greatest hits. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown, CO. 6pm. 970-744-3747 or www.coloradocandlelight.com.

Baby Care 101 Prepares expectant parents in the basic care of newborns for the first few months. Poudre Valley Hospital, Indian Paintbrush Room, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 6-9pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Thursday, May 10

Watercolors: Fresh Florals Teens can expand their artistic horizons. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 4-6pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.


r m pa r e nt

|

43


Jump Into Kindergarten Poudre Valley Hospital, Café F, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 6-9pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Kindles @ Your Library Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Friday, May 11

Harmony in the Round with Sista Suz and the Groove Doodz Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Drop in Art: Touch and Feel Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/ museum. Ready, Set, Grow! Mother’s Day Craft An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens.

Saturday, May 12

Chess @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Interesting Reader Society Meeting Young adults meet monthly to talk mainly about teen stuff. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 11am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Fantasy Role-Playing Games for Teens Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 1:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Green Adventures: Planting Day! Loveland Youth Gardeners, 1854 Piney River Dr., LV. 9am-Noon. Ages 5-12. 970-669-7182 or www. lovelandyouthgardeners.org. Human Bowling on Ice Greeley Recreation Center, 651 10th Ave., GR. 2pm. 970-350-9400. Spanish Prepared Childbirth To receive a flyer printed in Spanish, call 970-378-6709. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-1pm. 970‑378-4044 or www.BannerHealth. com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Survival Skills for New Parents North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-1pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Infant Massage North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9-10am. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Sunday, May 13

Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 3pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

44

| rmparent

Mother’s Day Skate Greeley Recreation Center, 651 10th Ave., GR. 12-1:30pm. 970-350-9400.

Monday, May 14

Read and Seed: Garden Makers The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. Money Matters: Free Yourself Steps to Financial Freedom. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Bright Beginnings for One-Year-Olds Explore how thinking and interactions change as your infant becomes a toddler on the go. Loveland Library, 300 N. Adams, LV. 9-10am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Bright Beginnings for Two-Year-Olds Learn how to promote early literacy, brain development, and a healthy and safe environment for the active twos. Loveland Library, 300 N. Adams, LV. 910-11am. 970-495-7528 or www. pvhs.org. Nourishing Stewardship: Bee Keeping Loveland Youth Gardeners, 1854 Piney River Dr., LV. 6:30-8pm. 970-669-7182 or www.lovelandyouthgardeners.org.

Tuesday, May 15

Breast-Feeding Class McKee Medical Center, 2000 N. Boise Ave., LV. 6:30-9pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. What Doctors Wished Their Patients Knew Learn the results from a survey that asked over 600 primary care physicians what they could do to maximize and enhance the doctor/patient relationship. Poudre Valley Hospital, Café F, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 5:30-6:30pm. 970495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Labor and Birth for Teens North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 4-6pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.


4 V Q F S J P S  1 F SGP S N B O D F

suMMER cAMps

0QFSB(BMMFSJB /$PMMFHF4VJUF 'PSU$PMMJOT $0  .PO4BUÂ…4VO 777°*, " 97 ,° "

Healthy Expression & Exercise

Â? Âœ ĂŒ Â… ˆ ˜ } ĂŠ  Âœ Ă€ \ ĂŠ  ĂŠ U ĂŠ 9 "  ĂŠ ĂŠ *   / - ĂŠ U ĂŠ   / - - ĂŠ U ĂŠ  9   - /  -

Ages 11-18 • June 4-21 Mon-Thurs. 9a-4:30p Register by April 15th for early bird special Ages 5-10 • July 9-26 Mon-Thurs. 9a-4:30p Register by May 15th for early bird special 10% sibling

discounT

check website for class info, birthday parties, & other fun events

campers will explore their creativity through acting, dancing, singing, drawing, painting, craft making, songwriting, creative writing, speech, improvisation, and other fun theatre games. campers will also get a steady dose of fun sports and exercise opportunities. performances at the end of the session!

Register now for your summer camp online at

harringtonartsacademy.com

970-232-8410 • 575 n. denver Ave. loveland • FAMily discounTs!

r m pa r e nt

|

45


Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. 12-1pm. 970-4957528 or www.pvhs.org.

Friday, May 18

Wednesday, May 16

Drop in Art: Magical Dots Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970962-2562 or www.cityofloveland. org/museum.

Money Matters: Free Yourself Steps to Financial Freedom. City Community Room, 215 Mason St., FC. Noon. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Maya Program: La Ruta Maya #3 Maya culture, archaeology and travel in Mexico and Guatemala. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10am. 970-4957528 or www.pvhs.org. Happiest Baby on the Block Poudre Valley Hospital, Indian Paintbrush Room, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 6:30-8:30pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Wild World of Art Painted Flower Pots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www. cityofloveland.org/museum.

History Comes Alive: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Ready, Set, Grow! Caterpillar Turned Butterfly and Yarn Chrysalis An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov. com/gardens. Childbirth (Fast Track Option) Condensed class to help prepare mother and labor coach for birth experience. Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. 5-6:30pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Infant Massage North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9-10am. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Thursday, May 17

Tail Tale Story Time Read books, make crafts and meet animals all in the name of compassion. Larimer Humane Society Shelter, 6317 Kyle Ave., FC. 10-11am. Ages 3-6. 970226-3647 or www.larimerhumane.org. Prepared Childbirth Ask questions and make informed decisions about issues surrounding the birth of your baby. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 7-9pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. 46

| rmparent

Saturday, May 19

Asian Festival Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 10am. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Mountain Dance: Dance Like Everyone is Watching The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com. Masterworks #5: Russian Masterpieces The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. lctix.com. Nooks @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 4:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Introduction to Camping REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 9:3011:30am. 970-221-0123 or www.REI.com. Labor Techniques and Comfort Measures Strategies for labor and delivery to include relaxation, breathing, visualization, movement, or massage and use of tools such as birthing balls, aromatherapy, or rebozos. Westbridge Medical Suites, 1107 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 1-3pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Sunday, May 20

Game Day @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 2pm. 970-2216740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.


FURNITURE

CONSIGNMENTS BY KRISTYNN

FaMIlY FURNITURE aT aFFORdaBlE PRICES

www.ConsignMyFurniture.com 970.282.1816

SWALLOW RD.

COLLEGE

2834 South College Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80525

HARVARD RD.

r m pa r e nt

|

47


Friday, May 25

Ready, Set, Grow! Sandy Footprints and the Cuckoo An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens.

Saturday, May 26

We’re having a Baby: A Class for Siblings Kids will learn what a new baby looks like, how to become a “big helper,” and how to make friends with the new baby. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9:30-10:30am. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Masterworks #5: Russian Masterpieces The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia, FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www. lctix.com.

Monday, May 21

Read and Seed: Marigold Planting The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. McKee Medical Center, 2000 N. Boise Ave., LV. 11:15am-12:15pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Tuesday, May 22

Labor and Birth for Teens North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 4-6pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Wednesday, May 23

Bright Beginnings for Two-Year-Olds Learn how to promote early literacy, brain development, and a healthy and safe environment for the active twos. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-4957528 or www.pvhs.org.

48

| rmparent

Thursday, May 24

Library eBooks on your iPad/iPhone and Android Devices Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. International Night: Middle East People and Places Elizabeth Stanley will discuss her experiences in new universities for women in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Labor Techniques and Comfort Measures Strategies for labor and delivery to include relaxation, breathing, visualization, movement, or massage and use of tools such as birthing balls, aromatherapy, or rebozos. Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. 7-9pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. American Southwest Travel Show Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. 5:30-7pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Fort Collins’ Children’s Triathalon REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 8-11:30am. 970-221-0123 or www.REI.com.

Sunday, May 27

Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 3pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Monday, May 28

Read and Seed: Sit Upon The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Tuesday, May 29

Eldorado Canyon State Park Senior Hike Moderate level hiking. Meet at the Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Dr., FC. 8am-3pm. 970-221-6644 or www.fcgov/ recreation/seniorcenter.php.

Thursday, May 31

What Activities are Good for the Brain? Fort Collins Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Dr., FC. 9-10:30am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.


Follow us on ☞Facebook

r m pa r e nt

|

49


time out

Cherishing the moments Pause to appreciate the time you spend together K A TI E H A R R IS

W

hen my oldest was a toddler, I often tried to imagine what our lives would be like when she started school. For her, new friends and experiences, a transition to being away from me all day, and countless new facts and ideas to learn and explore. For me, a tempting break from caring for a small child all day, but also a bittersweet end to the baby years. Time passed quickly, as time tends to do, and here my firstborn is, looking forward to each new day of school, spent doing whatever it is that preschoolers do. I catch glimpses of the learning, the friendships, and the new sense of maturity and responsibility growing in my child, even if I no longer know just what she’s up to all day. My daughter loves school. She loves her teacher and friends. Her face lights up at the end of each day as she pulls the latest stack of crafts out of her backpack to show me, or as she teaches her 50

| rmparent

younger brother a new song they sang in class. I know that her two days a week there are infinitely beneficial. But our preschool experience has evoked something else in me too. It’s served as a reminder of the preciousness of my time with my kids. As important as school is, the time spent away from my little girl has reminded me that sometimes time spent as a family can be even more powerful. This spring, for our family’s first experience with having an actual spring break, the kids and I traveled to Arizona to visit my side of the family. Though we’ve made the trip an annual tradition, this year seemed somehow different, more special, because it was one of the first weeks since my daughter started school that we spent each day together, from the time we woke until bedtime. While in Arizona the kids had many firsts, including my daughter

trotting on a horse for the first time and discovering that she loved going underwater in the pool. We also enjoyed exploring the desert and hunting for lizards and javelinas, picnicking and gazing at Arizona sunsets framed by giant Saguaro cactuses. The week was one-of-a-kind, a field trip you’d never get to experience in a Colorado school, and a reminder of how valuable family vacations can be. Opportunities like these don’t come along everyday for us, but the trip was also a reminder that we don’t have to be traveling to spend quality time together. Now that my daughter’s in school part time, I’ve realized how important it is to make the most of the time we have together when she’s home, and what a short time I do have with my children before they’re grown. I’m realizing now more than ever how crucial it is to make the most of every moment I have with them as little kids, and how much I have to show and teach them. The days seem to go by much more quickly lately. After school, lunch and naps, it seems that dinner and bedtime are right around the corner, and I find myself wondering where our day went. These days, I have to jot down activities on the calendar such as reading together, taking bike rides, and having playtime, just to find time for them. I pack the alone time I have with my youngest full of fun activities and snuggles, because I know my time with him home all day is slipping through my fingers. Next fall I’ll send both my babies off to preschool. I know school is important, and I know by the smile on my daughter’s face each time I pick her up that school makes her happy, and that’s what really matters. Still, I plan to make the most of every moment I have with my children from this day forward. Time spent together, whether it’s spent learning to ride a horse hundreds of miles from home or turning on music and dancing together in your living room, is increasingly hard to come by. Sometimes it takes a nudge in the right direction to remind us to cherish the moments while we have them.


Northern Colorado’s Parent-Teacher Store Huge selection!

Toys • Games Resource Books Dramatic Play Bulletin Boards Butcher Paper Arts & Crafts Borders • Stickers Unique Gifts Educational Toys and More!

Junior Golf Camps 1:6 Instructor to Student Ratio

BEGINNER CAMP SESSIONS

Monday-Thursday 9:30-12:30 $195/week, includes lunch

Jun 11-14 • Jun 25-28 • July 9-12 July 23-26 • July 30-Aug 2

Over 5,000 sq ft!

Intermediate & Advanced Junior Golf Programs

1290 Main Street • Windsor

970-674-2997 knowledgebound.net

Call for Details

Just 5 minutes east of I-25 at exit 262 and centrally located for the convenience of all our northern Colorado, Wyoming, & Nebraska customers!

Save 20% on Summer Bridge Activity Books With this coupon. Expires 5/31/12, RM0512

970.204.4653(GOLF) Paul McQuade

coach@HighlandMeadows.com

www.HighlandMeadowsGolfCourse.com A general dentistry practice that’s all about kids and young adults, Ages 0-20!

Dreaming of Ponies? Gargot Farms Riding Academy is now accepting students of all ages and abilities 2012 Camp Dates Ages 6-10: June 4 - 8, June 11-15 Ages 11-14: June 25-29 • Individual instruction and small group activities • After school and Saturday lessons available • Safe, trained horses and ponies • Indoor and outdoor arenas • Equine-assisted psychotherapy with Dr. Margot Nacy (for children and teens) • NEW! Ponies for Preschoolers! with instructor, Dana Lessie

Free exam

for children under 2! 970-635-4353

126 E. 29th St. • Loveland www.kindergrins.com Mon. - Thurs. 8-5

$75 New Patient Exam

Receive a $10 Walmart Gift Card

One coupon per patient. New patients only and without insurance. Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon at visit. Expires 6/15/12 RMP 0612

One coupon per patient. New patients only. Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon at visit. Expires 6/15/12 RMP 0612

Includes Exam, Cleaning, Fluoride, X-Rays.

gargotfarms.com

gargotfarms.com

for each New Patient Visit.

r m pa r e nt

|

51


52

| rmparent


0512 RM Parent