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MARCH 2012 • rmparent.com

fashion rules! Breathe easy about asthma Sprouting seeds indoors Little pearly whites Spring break ideas Amazing apples

SPECIAL SECTION:

SUMMER

CAMP

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MARCH 2012

Departments Perspective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Fashion schmasion—I’m like an onion when it comes to dressing

F IRST YEARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Little pearly whites—caring for your infant’s teeth

Fa m i ly a c t i v i t i e s . . . . . . . .10 Get away on a spring break holiday—for a day, a weekend, or the entire week

HEALTHY l i v i n g . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Planting the seed—start your garden inside this spring

C o m m u n i t y n e w s . . .14

Micro-grant pilot project for better air quality • Plug in to Nature study results • PVHS CEO and president blogs • PVH receives award for lactation program • Great Plates support the Food Bank of Larimer County

NUTRITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

The amazing, versatile apple—use this ancient fruit as a snack and in salads, desserts and main dishes

C a l e n d a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Events and activities for parents, kids and families

T i m e o u t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 The embarrassment theorem—calculations that lead to the Dramatic Teen Eye Roll

School District News Poudre School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Werner coordinator happy to pitch in, PSD calendar of events, Riffenburgh newscasters rock Channel 10 studio, climbing wall gives students confidence

Greeley-Evans District 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Wildcat artists bring home statewide awards, high school students create solutions to environmental concerns, district news, district seeks grant to expand before- and after-school program,

Thompson School District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 BHS students impress CSU dean, Colorado Integration Project kicks off, TVHS students earn state art awards

Lunchbox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 School menus for Poudre, Thompson, Greeley-Evans, and Windsor

Special Section Summer Camp Guide and Directory Pick from the many opportunities: day or residential, animal adventures, tech topics, academics, nutrition, athletics, arts, special needs and more.

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ABOUT THE COVER

Monica, 10, gives her horse a pat at Hearts and Horses Day Camp. Photo courtesy Hearts and Horses.

Features

16 Breathe easy

Managing your child’s asthma can become second-nature, but when you first hear it can be stunning. Diagnosing asthma can be tricky, too. Managing asthma can be a challenge, but asthma doesn’t have to limit life. The first step is to learn everything you can about it and then follow a four-step process for daily control.

20 T here are no

fashion rules

It’s a new era in fashion and there are no rules. It’s all about individual and personal style. Here in northern Colorado, it’s casual and functional. It’s all about fashionable and functional layers. And finding it all at a price to fit your budget. Dressing “green” is in, too: eco-friendly fabrics and processes.

ABOUT THE COVER Fort Collins native Patrick Weber is six years old and fast becoming an expert on trains. Photo by Cheri Schonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com. r m pa r ent

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perspective

Fashion schmasion

I’m like an onion when it comes to dressing

A

lthough people have repeatedly come to me over the years to write a fashion column, I have been steadfast in my resistance. I know that my sartorial sense has a certain je ne sais quoi about it, but I’m not sure that I can put it into words. Even I don’t know what it is that I don’t know...that would be your unknown unknown, I believe. The key to my success so far has been this simple rule: Kristin buys all my clothes...except for specialty items such as my running or fishing outfits. And, come to think about it, she buys a bit of those too. Now, Kim Sharpe has come to the rescue, on the heels of the NYC Fashion Show, to help us understand where Front Range fashion is headed (p20). I’d been waiting all month to see her story, to get some personal direction of my own...and then she led with something like this: There are no rules! I spun around facing the ceiling screaming “Nooooooo.” Turns out that there are some guidelines and concepts to work with—layering for example. I can do that. My basic technique is to start picking things off the hooks (that’s where I keep clothes that I’ve worn but aren’t dirty enough to go in the laundry. This is a somewhat contested concept in our house) and putting them on until I’m warm. You see, Kristin actually has a well-developed sense of style and dresses nicely, which must make it even harder to watch me ruin any hope she had when she bought those clothes. So I continued through the layering section with its cute little ideas about fashionable ways to layer and then hit the section on how to find clothes to fit your budget. But since I don’t buy my clothes, I highlighted this section for Kristin and moved right on to the “green” clothing section. That was cool. This issue is packed with other good stuff. We have the amazing apple story (p22)...things you can do with an apple and still eat it. Then there’s the sprout story (p12), which almost made me think I should garden. For health this month we have Breath easy (p16) about learning to manage your child’s asthma and Little pearly whites (p8) about managing your child’s new teeth. And turn to page 10, for some great ideas about what to do over spring break. And finally, our annual Summer Camp Guide is stitched into the middle of this issue. It is packed with opportunities and ideas. Use the hard-copy here to browse through, then go to RMParent.com and check out the electronic version. All the links to websites in our listings are live, so you can just click through. It has to be the easiest way to check out summer fun and enrichment for your children ever thought of in the history of humankind, or at least it’s better than anything we’ve seen around here before. Thanks for reading and parenting well, —Scott Titterington, publisher



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MARCH 2012 • VOLUME 16, NUMBER 10 PUBLISHER Scott Titterington, (970)221-9210 scott.rmpublishing@gmail.com EDITOR Kristin Titterington, (970)221-9210 kristin.rmpublishing@gmail.com Calendar editor Aly Titterington calendar@rockymountainpub.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Emily Zaynard emily.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Greg Hoffman, (970)689-6832 greg.rmpublishing@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Sara Hansen, (970)310-9850 sara.rmpublishing@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION Wendee Brungardt, Sharon Klahn, Rob’s Bike Courier Service COVER PHOTO Cheri Shonfeld, schonfeldphotography.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Katie Harris; Richard Keller; Ann Schmike; Kim Sharpe; Lynn Utzman-Nichols ROCKY MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING 825 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80521 Voice 221-9210 Fax 221-8556 editor@rockymountainpub.com www.RMParent.com Rocky Mountain Parent magazine is published monthly by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. Publication of this paper does not consitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. RMP reserves the right to refuse any advertisement for any reason. The opinions expressed by contributors or writers do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rocky Mountain Publishing. ©2012 Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without express written permission is prohibited. OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS:


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first years

Little pearly whites Caring for your infant’s teeth

l y n n u t z ma n - n i ch o l s

Y

ou love your baby’s smile, so here’s how to take care of it. Follow these tips on teething, thumb-sucking, pacifiers and brushing your young child’s teeth. Soothing a teething baby Is your baby drooling a lot and seem to be in a perpetual bad mood? She’s probably teething. A baby’s bottom, front teeth usually come in first, around four to eight months of age. Besides being fussy, having swollen or bloody gums and not being able to sleep, babies can get low-grade fevers with teething, even up to 101 degrees. If your baby is experiencing these symptoms you need solutions fast. Otherwise you may not get any sleep tonight. Here are some ideas to try: • R ub your baby’s gums. Use your fingers or a damp washcloth to massage her gums. • Let her chew. Teething babies like to chew on hard objects. Try a chilled (not frozen) teething ring or a bottle filled with cold water. But don’t let her suck on a bottle of formula, milk or juice for hours or at bedtime as this can cause tooth decay. You can also give her chilled applesauce, slushy juice, a cold spoon to suck on, or even a popsicle. • Wipe his chin. Drool can cause skin irritation so keep a towel handy. •G  ive a pain killer when he’s especially cranky. Try baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen but never aspirin. Avoid numbing medication for your baby’s gums. Often saliva washes it away quickly and it may numb your baby’s throat, affecting his natural gag reflex.

Pacifiers and thumb sucking— are they bad for teeth? Having a little thumb sucker or pacifier muncher has stressed parents out for generations. Dentists don’t love thumb 

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sucking or pacifier use because doing so can sometimes damage your child’s teeth. The American Dental Association (www.ada.org ) says that children usually stop sucking their thumb or using a pacifier between ages 2 and 4. Others don’t stop until they enter kindergarten, when peer pressure and teasing makes them quit in a jiffy. While sucking isn’t usually a serious problem, it can be. Especially for those intense little ones who suck with great oomph and passion. The harder a child sucks, the more chance she could damage her primary or permanent teeth. If your child is 4 or under, you can relax a bit. The ADA says that your child can safely suck her thumb or pacifier through age 4 or 5 without causing damage to her teeth or jaw. Dentists get especially nervous when permanent teeth start coming in—around age 6 or 7. Kids can then end up with an overbite, crooked teeth or even changes to the roof of the mouth. Yet some dentists worry earlier—figuring if primary teeth are pushed and forced to protrude, permanent teeth will follow suit. Thankfully, kids who seem to lightly suck or rest their thumb or pacifier in their mouth often don’t

experience dental problems. If you’ve noticed changes in your child’s teeth from sucking, see a pediatric dentist. If changes are taking place, a dentist might suggest using a mouth appliance or reminder bar that interferes with sucking. Brushing your young child’s teeth When you spot the first tooth or even before, get in the habit of wiping your baby’s gums with a damp washcloth. When teeth emerge, use a small, soft toothbrush twice a day. Until age 2, use a very tiny amount of toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice. After that, use a pea size amount until the age of 5. This helps avoid your toddler getting too much fluoride. Don’t forget to brush both the inside and outside of the teeth, plus the tongue. If your child shows interest, let her take a turn brushing but she probably won’t be good enough to do it alone until close to age 7. As she grows older, tell her you’ll simply get the spots she misses. Do you have a child who resists brushing? Let him pick out his own toothbrush. Cartoon characters can work wonders.


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family activities

Get away on a holiday

For a day, a weekend or the entire week... K A TI E H A R R IS

W

hether you have a whole week, a weekend, or just a day to get away, make the most of your family time this spring break with a Colorado getaway the whole family can enjoy. If you have a day: Downtown Denver ($$): Spend the morning at the Children’s Museum of Denver (www.mychildsmuseum.org, 303-4337444) where kids can learn through hands-on exploration and role-play. Then head next door to the Downtown Aquarium (www.aquariumrestaurants. com/downtownaquariumdenver/default. asp, 303- 561-4450) where you’ll encounter a huge variety of fish and other aquatic life as well as Sumatran tigers and even a mermaid or two! Enjoy a meal tank-side before heading home. North Denver area ($$): Head to the But-

terfly Pavilion in Westminster (www. butterflies.org, 303-469-5441) for a one-of-a-kind butterfly viewing experience, and even a chance to hold Rosie the tarantula! Then, drive the short distance to the WOW Children’s Museum in Lafayette (www.wowchild rensmuseum.org/, 303-604-2424) for role-playing, grocery store and pirate ship fun. Or, if you have older kids, stay right in the neighborhood and head to Dave and Buster’s (www.wow childrensmuseum.org/, 303-604-2424) for an evening of arcade games, food, and table games. If you have a weekend: Mountain resort towns ($$$): Spend a weekend at one of Colorado’s famed ski resorts. Most offer children’s programs such as ski and snowboard lessons for kids of all ages, plus many resort towns offer additional attractions such as shopping, dining, hot springs and ice-skating. Con10

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tact information for some of the larger ski areas in Colorado are: • Aspen, www.aspensnowmass. com, 800-525-6200 • Breckenridge, www.breckenridge.com, 970-453-5000 • Steamboat, www.steamboat.com, 970-879-6111 • Vail, www.vail.com, 970-754-8245 Estes Park ($$): Spend a day hiking and

exploring Rocky Mountain National Park (www.nps.gov/romo/index.htm, 970-586-1206), then head into town to browse the local shops, ride Go Karts or challenge your family to a round of mini-golf at one of the local entertainment centers (Fun City: www.funcity ofestes.com, 970-586-2828 or Ride-AKart: www.rideakart.com/, 970-5866495), and take a boat out for an hour or two from the Lake Estes Marina (www. estesvalleyrecreation.com/marina/ marina-info, 970-586-2011). Great Sand Dunes ($): Climb, slide and

play on the tallest dunes on the continent located just outside of Alamosa, CO (www.nps.gov/grsa/index.htm, 719-3786399). Activities can include playing in shallow Medano Creek, sand sledding, hiking, backpacking, guided nature walks and a junior ranger program for kids. Campsites and restroom facilities are located on site, as well as a visitor’s center. If you have a week: Colorado Springs ($$): Take the familyfriendly Discovery Tour through Cave of the Winds (www.caveofthewinds.com, 719-685-5444), followed by on-site gemstone panning, then enjoy free access to scenic Garden of the Gods (www. gardenofgods.com/home/index.cfm, 719-634-6666), where kids and grown ups alike can enjoy easy to moderate hiking trails, rock climbing and educational

videos and lectures. Next, take a trip to the North Pole (www.santas-colo.com, 719-684-9432), where kids can have pictures taken with Santa; enjoy amusement park rides and shop at Christmas-themed stores. Finally, stroll through Cheyenne Mountain Zoo (www.cmzoo.org, 719-633-9925) where you’ll experience a unique opportunity to get up close and personal with a herd of giraffes. Glenwood Springs ($$$): Visit Glenwood

Caverns Adventure Park and Historic Fairy Caves for a cave tour (www.glenwood caverns.com, 800-530-1635), along with a host of on-site activities such as laser tag, alpine coaster and a tramway. Take a dip in the Hot Springs Pool (www.hotsprings pool.com, 970-947-2955), which remains at a comfortable 90 to 93 degrees year round, then take kids 48 inches and up to experience the thrill of zip lining over Glenwood on their own or through a halfday family challenge course (www.glen woodcanyonzipline.com, 888-494-7386). Try a scenic ATV tour through Glenwood’s trails (www.glenwood adventure.com/atv-tours, 970-945-7529), where kids 8 and up can drive their own ATV, and younger kids are free passengers. Glenwood Springs also offers a plethora of bike trails for all ability levels. Bring your bike or rent one and enjoy a ride along the Roaring Fork River or down Glenwood Canyon (www.canyon bikes.com/, 800-439-3043).


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11


healthy living

Planting the seed

Start your garden inside this spring A n N Sch i mke

I

t may still be winter, but at our house it’s time to play in the dirt. A few years ago, my husband began starting seeds for our vegetable garden inside the house and that summer we enjoyed some of the tastiest tomatoes and most beautiful basil we’d ever eaten. Since then, seed-starting has become a late winter tradition that transforms our small basement utility room into a forest of tiny seedlings with names like “Nebraska Wedding,” “Snow White” and “Lollipop.” It’s not Martha Stewart pretty. There’s usually a layer of dirt on the counter, some potting soil ground into the carpet and a small graveyard of seedlings that got hit with a fungus or knocked over by our 3- and 5-year-old sons. Still, when it comes time to transplant outside in May, we usually have enough healthy plants for our garden and any friends or family members who want some. In the last year or so, our boys have joined the seed-starting effort with gusto, if not precision. It plays to their natural interest in burying things in dirt and squirting water all over the place. But the 12

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best part comes in July and August when they start popping cherry tomatoes and sugar snap peas into their mouths right off the vines. It’s like poetic justice after a winter of aggressive vegetable-pushing that involves my husband and I saying things like, “C’mon, just be a giant and eat your broccoli trees.” Although our seed-starting operation gradually evolved from egg cartons on sunny window sills to peat pots under a bank of shop lights, it doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive if you’re just starting out. What you need • Cardboard egg carton (or empty milk or juice cartons cut half way down) • Potting soil mix (labeled “seed-starting” or “germination”) • Seeds (tomatoes, peppers, basil, parsley, marigolds and sunflowers are good initial choices) • Plastic bags or plastic wrap • A sunny south-facing window sill

Fill your egg (or other) cartons with soil and poke a seed about a quarter inch down in each cavity. Water the seed so

the soil is moist but not drenched. Cover the carton with plastic wrap or enclose it in a plastic bag and place on a sunny window sill. (Don’t forget to label the cartons so you know what you planted.) Keep the soil moist and the plastic on until the seeds sprout, which could take three to 10 days, or even longer if temperatures are cool. Once the seeds have sprouted remove the plastic, but keep them on the sunny sill with regular watering. (If your seedlings are leggy, with long, thin stems that won’t support the plant, they aren’t getting enough light. Move them to a sunnier spot.) If using egg cartons, transplant the seedlings into milk cartons when they’re two to three inches tall. As the plants grow bigger and the weather grows warmer, place them outside for part of the day to “harden them off,” which helps them adjust to the sun and wind. Do this for a week or two. About six to seven weeks after planting the seeds, somewhere around Mothers Day, your seedlings should be ready to transplant into the garden. (Check the seed packets for specific outside planting timelines.) Dig generous holes and mix compost into the soil if possible. Place the plants in the holes, water well and cover with loose soil. A hard frost is one of the biggest enemies of warm-weather vegetables so cover your plants with a flat sheet on cold nights. Ultimately, it’s important to leave lots of room for trial and error. Not every seed you plant will grow. Some may start out looking great only to succumb to a mystery disease later on. And, if you’re a little haphazard with your labeling like we’ve often been, you might be surprised by giant red beefsteak tomatoes when you were expecting tiny yellow cherry tomatoes. Resources • The New Seed-Starters Handbook by Nancy Bubel • iVillage GardenWeb • www.gardenweb.com • National Gardening Association • www.garden.org


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13


community news

Micro-grant pilot project for better air quality

A community micro-grant pilot program for projects by local organizations that improve air quality and raise awareness about air pollution is available again by the City of Fort Collins’ Environmental Services Department. COMMUNITY AIR (CAIR) grants are open to nonprofits in Fort Collins, including Home Owner Associations, schools, faith-based communities, and other nonprofits. Grant allotments range from $500 to $2,000 per organization, and they must be completed in 2012. Applications are due by Mar. 29. Activities that involve political campaigning, lobbying, or alcohol purchases are ineligible. Projects will be evaluated based on the following criteria: • Air pollution reduction potential and/or ability to raise awareness about airquality issues and actions that improve air quality • Ability and commitment to track quantifiable benefits • Other environmental, social, and/or economic benefits • Matching donations and volunteer hours contributed to project • Likelihood of completion • Innovation

Examples of what might qualify as an eligible project for a CAIR grant include: 14

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• Lead a neighborhood radon test campaign • Implement a “Thank you for not Idling” campaign or adopt the City’s “Breathe Easy” anti-idling campaign and promote the materials in a neighborhood, schools, kids’ sports group, or church • Develop and stage a school/neighborhood play or video on the need for air and/or climate protection • Engage Spanish-speaking citizens to translate air-quality materials into Spanish and distribute to Latino neighborhoods • Conduct tree planting in neighborhoods, schools, churches • Distribute household spruce-up kits (CFLs, clotheslines, etc.) • Develop and distribute a low-carbon/ local-food cookbook • Initiate a bus- or bike-rider mentor program (escort students/new riders on bus or bike rides)

For more details and the application package, visit http://fcgov.com/CAIR. If you have questions after reviewing the information, please contact Lucinda Smith at lsmtih@fcgov.com Plug in to Nature study results Come and hear the outcomes of Plug in to Nature, Larimer County’s study of Youth, Families and the Outdoors

on behalf of Great Outdoors Colorado. Plug in to Nature is culminating in exciting recommendations for improving the access families have to the outdoors, increasing the coordination and efficiency of nature program providers and so much more. In addition to providing information about the study and discussing how the movement will continue there will be ample time for you to comment on the future of the initiative, and ask questions. Wednesday, Mar. 7, 5:30-7pm., first floor hearing room, Larimer County Courthouse, 200 W. Oak St., FC. A presentation of results will be followed by discussion and a reception where light appetizers will be served. Additional information about the project and project documents can be found at www.larimer.org/ plugintonature. For questions regarding this project, contact Rob Novak at 970-679-4561, or rnovak@larimer.org. PVHS CEO and president blogs Rulon Stacey, president and CEO of Poudre Valley Health System, writes about healthcare issues facing our region, the nation and the world in his blog. You can subscribe in the right column of his blog. One of Stacey’s blogs focuses on how two Medical Center of the Rockies clinicians have taken some temporary time away from their positions at the regional hospital in Loveland to volunteer on a medical mission to perform open-heart surgery on severely ill patients in Rwanda, one of the poorest countries in the world. To read his blog, go to visionary. pvhs.org. PVH receives award for lactation program Poudre Valley Hospital announced that it has received an international award for excellence in the way the hospital’s lactation program encourages and helps


new mothers with breastfeeding their infants. The International Board of Lactation Consult Examiners and International Lactation Consulting Association presented the Fort Collins hospital with the Care Award. The award recognizes the way the hospital maintains a well-trained staff that promotes and encourages breastfeeding to mothers. The hospital also received the honor for offering a lactation program, WeeSteps, which is instrumental in helping new mothers start and maintain breastfeeding. Karen More, PVH clinical nurse specialist, said the award demonstrates the commitment of the hospital’s lactation team to help new mothers learn and use breastfeeding techniques. Moore said PVH’s lactation specialists passed a rigorous examination that demonstrates their ability to provide competent, comprehensive lactation and breastfeeding care. They are required to keep their skills current, and must recertify every five years through continuing education and re-examination.

Exclusive breastfeeding is a highly effective public health intervention to prevent ear, gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, obesity, diabetes and cancer. It’s also environmentally friendly, eliminating the need to purchase prepackaged containers of formula. Great Plates supports the Food Bank of Larimer County The Downtown Business Association and member businesses have worked together to bring a new dining tradition to our community for its sixth year. March 1-14, Dining enthusiasts will be encouraged to celebrate the authenticity, quality and diversity found only in Downtown Fort Collins, at Great Plates of Downtown 2012. During Great Plates, thirty downtown restaurants will offer dinner specials at a price of $25. The Downtown Business Association is partnering with the Food Bank for Larimer County for the fifth year. Patrons can make contributions to support the Food Bank for Larimer County. The Food Bank for Larimer County

can provide a meal for a member of our community for as little as $0.25. So after diners enjoy their meal, they can help give a meal. For more information on the Food Bank for Larimer County visit www.foodbanklarimer.org. Also as a part of Great Plates 2012, breakfast and lunch specials will be available at participating restaurants for $2.50. Participating Restaurants Include: Austin’s American Grill Downtown, Beach House Grill, Beau Jo’s Pizza, Big Al’s Burger and Dogs, Bisetti’s Ristorante, Canyon Chop House, CooperSmith’s Pubside & Poolside, The Crown Pub, Enzio’s Italian Kitchen, Fish, Ingredient, Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar, Jay’s American Bistro, Lucky Joe’s Sidewalk Saloon, LuLu Asian Bistro, The Melting Pot, Moe’s Original Bar B Que, Mugs Coffee Lounge, Old Chicago, Pueblo Viejo, The Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant, Rodizio Grill, The Silver Grill Café, Snooze, Sonny Lubick Steakhouse, Spoons, Taj Mahal, Tasty Harmony, and Washington’s Sport Bar & Grill.

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15


Breathe

easy

asthma can become second-nature

By Lynn Utzman-Nichols

C

indy Coopersmith, Asthma Educator with Poudre Valley Health System (PVHS), not only teaches about asthma—she lives it. And so does her daughter. “When the doctor used the word asthma to describe my toddler’s wheezing, I cried. Psychologically, I didn’t want to believe it because I had it myself. I knew how hard it can be.” Every month, Cindy offers the “Taming the Tiger” class through PVHS in Fort Collins—a class designed for kids with asthma and their parents. The class is full of great tips and tools to help families manage asthma. Here, Cindy shares information on how to determine if your child has asthma and how to maintain daily control over symptoms. “It’s hard for parents to hear that their child has a chronic condition, might have to take medicines daily and that those medicines contain ‘scary’ steroids,” says Coopersmith. The good news is that once control is achieved, asthma doesn’t have to limit a child’s life or activity level. “Plus, the amount of steroids in daily medicine is too small to be dangerous. There are several studies that show it is safe, even for very young children,” adds Coopersmith. 16

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Is it asthma? Diagnosing asthma can be tricky. Sometimes kids only have symptoms during certain times of year, say soccer season or during peak pollen days. Other times parents notice their child tends to have a semi-regular cough, or seems to get wheezy quickly with colds. “I often ask parents, ‘how are they when they run?’ Being wheezy during exercise is common with asthma,” says Coopersmith. Yet it’s not always obvious. You might assume your son is out of shape, especially if he’s overweight. Or, instead of saying it hurts to breathe, your daughter might simply say she doesn’t like sports and avoid physical activity altogether. “Classic symptoms of asthma include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, an increased respiratory rate and the appearance that your child tugs to breathe—a pulling in at the ribs with each breath seen in infants and young children,” says Coopersmith. If these symptoms wake your child up at night or early in the morning, that’s an extra clue that it might be asthma. Asthma can set in at any age.

Technically, doctors don’t diagnose asthma unless they hear wheezing on three different occasions. “When you go to your doctor to explore asthma symptoms, be a good reporter. Tell the doctor your child’s history. Mention all instances of breathing problems that you remember over her lifetime,” advises Coopersmith. Daily control is the goal A diagnosis of asthma is stunning. “You might panic and think, ‘Oh my gosh, my child can’t breathe!’ Managing asthma can be a challenge but if you embrace it and learn as much as you can about controlling it, you’ll be okay,” says Coopersmith. First, remind yourself and your child that asthma doesn’t have to limit life. “About fifteen percent of Olympic athletes have asthma including runner Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and five-time Olympic gold medalist swimmer, Amy Van Dyken,” exclaims Coopersmith. Next, get educated. Coopersmith recommends the book, Asthma for Dummies and taking the Asthma Control Test at www.asthma.com, an internet resource guide to asthma. You can also take her


Taming the Tiger class offered through PVHS (see box). According to Coopersmith, daily control demands a four-step process: Step 1: Take medicines Physicians usually start with what’s called reliever or rescue medicines. Reliever medicines, i.e. albuterol, work quickly to stop symptoms but they don’t prevent episodes from occurring or reduce swollen airways. If symptoms are severe, a child might also take a daily corticosteroid. These control medicines, e.g. fluticasone, keep symptoms at bay on a day-to-day basis. “Control medicines relieve inflammation in the airways and make airways less reactive and twitchy,” says Coopersmith. These are often taken year-round, but depending on your child’s asthma—which can range from mild to severe—they might be taken seasonally. One caveat to reliever medicines— they’re not the end-all. Coopersmith has seen people get too dependent on reliever medicines: “Especially teens who start managing asthma on their own. Say they start getting symptoms more frequently. Their answer is to take their reliever medicine over and over again. They think it’s taking care of it, but it’s not. Relievers just relieve symptoms, they don’t relieve swelling. Left untreated, swelling in the airways can get out of control and cause spasms, making it impossible to breathe. There are 4000 deaths a year due to asthma.” Step 2: Remove triggers “Allergies and asthma often go handin-hand,” says Coopersmith. Asthma episodes can be triggered by allergies or irritants in the air. “The main allergic triggers are pets, dust mites, cockroaches, mold and pollen,” adds Coopersmith. Become a detective and take notes on when your child’s symptoms are worse. Try to identify the triggers. If symptoms are severe, consider seeing an allergist who can do a skin test to see which triggers cause a reaction in your child’s body. “When people are highly allergic they might need immunotherapy, also known as allergy shots, which often help relieve allergy symptoms and decrease asthma symptoms,” says Coopersmith. Once you identify triggers, do your

best to remove them from your child’s environment. “Don’t overlook particulates. Classics are cigarette smoke, wood smoke, vehicle exhaust and high ozone levels,” she adds. Another tip is to watch how your child reacts to strong odors: “I say if you can smell it, it can trigger an asthma attack.” These include cleaning products, paint, perfume, hair spray, new car or carpet smell and more. When your child gets symptoms, react quickly with reliever medicines. Step 3: Monitor daily Coopersmith recommends using a peak flow meter daily to monitor your child’s breathing. A peak flow meter is a simple, easy-to-use device that measures how well the lungs are working. Your child exhales forcibly into the meter, which measures how fast air comes out of the lungs. Over a few weeks of use you’ll determine your child’s “personal best” number, which will guide you to know when her airways are open or swollen. When used daily, the meter helps you know when to take action with medicines and trigger control. Coopersmith also recommends keeping a daily symptom diary.

Step 4: See your doctor regularly Make a regular, six-month appointment with your doctor to check in on your child’s asthma. “Since your doctor doesn’t live with you, he or she needs to be updated on the details of your child’s respiratory life. For example, has he missed school due to symptoms? Is he breathing well during exercise? Are the medicines working as effectively as before?” suggests Coopersmith. Once asthma is in good control, there’s a chance your doctor will recommend lessening the medicine. “Then it’s your job to be astute and notice how your child does with the change and report it at the next visit.” Coopersmith knows first-hand how hard it can be for parents of a child with asthma. “Parents will get to a place where managing their child’s asthma becomes second nature. My message to parents of newly diagnosed kids is that you will have times when life feels easy again. And when your child’s condition shifts, you’ll take a deep breath and follow the game plan that you’ve put in place,” concludes Coopersmith. Poudre Valley Health Systems sponsored this article.

Resources for kids with asthma Taming the Tiger asthma education class This comprehensive class teaches kids ages 5 and older and their parents how to gain control over asthma. Classes held monthly courtesy of Poudre Valley Health System. Where: Poudre Valley Hospital, 1024 S. Lemay Avenue, Fort Collins Upcoming Dates: Wednesday, Mar. 21 & 28 OR Tuesday, Apr. 17 & 24 OR Wednesday, May 16 & 23 Time: 5:30–8:30pm. Cost: $10 Info/Register: Cindy Coopersmith at 970-495-8153

PA/AC Quarterly Meetings Parents of Asthmatic/Allergic Children, Inc. (PA/AC) offers education and support for parents. Attend a quarterly educational event to learn about asthma treatment, medicines and research. Get support on how to cope with the challenges of managing asthma and allergies. Call 970-495-8153 for information on upcoming events.

Champ Camp This summer camp at Glacier View Ranch gives kids with asthma the opportunity to come together for education and fun. Includes canoeing, rock climbing, swimming, hiking and a ropes course. Held July 15–21. Call 303-847-0279 for more information. Scholarships available. Sponsored by the American Lung Association.

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There are no

fashion RuLes

Lots of leeway to suit your budget and personal style H By Kim Sharpe

“I

t’s a new era in fashion—there are no rules. It’s all about the individual and personal style, wearing high-end, low-end, classic labels, and up-andcoming designers all together,” so says world-renowned fashion designer Alexander McQueen. That’s good news for Everyday Joe’s and Josephine’s just trying to keep their families reasonably fed and clothed. It gives people a lot of flexibility in terms of what they can don to be stylish. Living in the Wild West gives people a lot of fashion leeway, too. Colorado’s known for its casual, outdoor lifestyle and “our clothing reflects that,” says Jenny Bramhall, co-owner of the Clothes Pony & Dandelion Toys in downtown Fort Collins. “Our dressiest outfit is like play clothes in New York or in the South. We’re not super trendy in Colorado. People want to dress for comfort and movement.” Luscious layers When you live in Colorado, there’s also the everchanging weather to contend with. It can be below freezing at 7am and 60 degrees by mid-afternoon. To prepare for our extreme temperature variations, Bramhall says it’s all about layers. We layer for looks, warmth and to remain comfortable despite temperature fluctuations. Regardless of one’s motivation to layer, follow some basic do’s and don’ts. “Layering for fashion usually means several layers of multiple and contrasting garments. Three tops, one skirt, some leggings and a pair of shoes in assorted colors is definitely a layered for fashion look,” according to life123. com author Aysha Schurman. “The point of layering clothing, other than keeping warm, is to display the contrasting items. This is why layering with different colors and cuts works so well together.” For women and girls, camisoles, long-sleeve tops, cardigan sweaters, leggings and scarves make excellent layering options. Long- and short-sleeve t-shirts, button-down shirts and jackets help men and boys achieve fashionable layered looks. Shurman says thicker garments should be worn on top, and longer garments should be worn under shorter ones. Northern Colorado fashion designer Suzanne Akin 20

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calls the latter the “peek-a-boo” effect. She says, “a lot of my customers like to wear my long t-shirt dress under my hoodie dress with leggings, tall socks and boots. The t-shirt dress just peeks out below the hoodie.” Layering for warmth has a different set of rules that includes three layers. The base layer is worn closest to your skin. It should be snug fitting and made of fabric that wicks away moisture, helping you stay dry. Cotton is not a recommended fabric for base layers (or for any layer when staying warm is the goal). Polypropylene, wool and silk are better choices. The mid-layer can be a lightweight fleece pullover, jacket or vest—not form fitting, but not baggy, either. The outer layer should protect from wind and moisture. Whether for fashion or function, layering offers multiple options for regulating body temperature indoors and out, because you can remove or add layers to make adjustments. Affordable attire If your family’s budget seems like a deterrent to dressing in style, consider shopping at thrift stores or second-hand boutiques. One technique is to find a fashion look you like, peruse your closet to see what you have that’s similar to some of the look’s components and then shop for what you need to complete the look. “If you really care about fashion, it’s possible to shop at thrift stores and find some really nice things,” says Linda Strauss, a local mom. “I recently shopped at one of my favorite second-hand shops in Loveland, the Garment Gal, and felt like queen for a day with all the helpful advice I got from the clerk about how to layer items and accessorize.” Just Between Friends is a seasonal shopping event new to northern Colorado that will take place April 20-23, at the Outlets at Loveland, and May 18-21, at the Greeley Family Funplex. It includes used clothing, baby items, toys and household items that people consign. There’s a $2 admission fee charged the first day of the event, which will be totaled and donated to local charities along with items left over after the sale. The House of Neighborly Services will receive proceeds and items from

the Loveland sale. The Rodarte Youth Program and City of Greeley Youth Assistance Fund will receive proceeds and items from the Greeley sale. Denise Lozano, NoCo’s Just Between Friends franchise owner, said it’s a “win-win” for the whole community. “Shoppers can outfit their families for a fraction of retail cost and most of the money generated stays in the community.” Second-hand or vintage clothing can be found at several places in northern Colorado. Teens love Plato’s Closet and thrift stores. For younger fast-growing children check out Once Upon a Child and Play It Again Sports, to name a few. An alternative to thrift and secondhand store shopping is the concept of clothing swaps. This is where an individual invites friends and neighbors to gather and trade gently used clothes outgrown or unwanted by their families. “I love to host and attend clothing swaps!” says Laura Richardson, another local mom. “Mainly, it’s great motivation to clean out my closet and pilfer through my friends’ discards, which are so many times super cute. The best item I’ve ever found at a clothing swap? Lucky Brand jeans that fit me perfectly. Four years later, they’re still my favorite! Swaps are such a great free way to freshen up my wardrobe and get new things for my little guy to wear.” Teenagers (especially girls) love it, too, since they tend to swap clothes with friends on a regular basis anyway. Akin suggests people keep their eye on “deal of the day” websites and shortrun sale sites like planetgear.com or steepandcheap.com. “If you pay attention, you can get a lot for your money.” Consider, however, that “affordability isn’t just about cheap prices. It also means something will last and serve you well,” says Bramhall. When purchasing children’s clothing for her store, she looks for garments that are comfortable feeling, well constructed so they can be handed down and will grow with a child. Some items she purchases have intentionally removable hems to make sleeves and pant legs longer when necessary. Green dressing No, this not about what you might slather on a salad or wearing various shades of chartreuse from head to toe.

“Green” dressing is choosing to wear clothes made ethically (by people who are being paid fair wages) and with ecofriendly fabrics and processes. Natural fabrics such as organic cotton, linen, silk, hemp, bamboo, cashmere and alpaca dyed with natural substances versus chemicals are excellent choices. Some clothing companies also use polyester made from recycled materials. “The bottom line when shopping for environmentally friendly clothing is to do your homework, or shop at a reputable eco-friendly goods store or online supplier who will weigh the facts for you in advance,” says freelance writer Marissa Stapley-Ponikowski in an article at greenlivingonline.com. Another way to dress green is to wear clothing recreated from previously worn garments. Olivea Borden, fashion designer/owner of Oli-Bo-Bolly and 8th-grade student at Polaris Expeditionary Learning School in Fort Collins, is expert at this. During a 4-H project, Borden learned “over 70 percent of clothes that get thrown away in landfills are still wearable. The majority of those are sweaters. So I started getting used sweaters from thrift stores and making them into ‘twirly’ skirts. I use the body of the sweater for the skirt and use the sleeves to make matching leg warmers. They’re really versatile because they’re warm in the winter, and bright and colorful in the spring.” Borden taught a week-long course at her school in February under the supervision of Polaris Counselor Rhea Reiker. Rhea believes, “the idea of combining art, fashion and eco-consciousness is really exciting. For young people to learn how to recycle and up-cycle sustainable clothing is really important for educating youth on how we can reuse materials. At Polaris, we’re always teaching students how to look forward and to be environmentally conscious.” “It’s important to make sure we throw away the bare minimum,” says Borden. By recycling clothing, “you can cut down on a lot of trash. When you transform something old into new clothing, you take something ugly and unwanted and turn it into something people will love to wear.” r m pa r e nt

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nutrition

The amazing, versatile apple

Use this ancient fruit as a snack and in salads, desserts and main dishes R I C H A R D K E LL E R

T

he delicious fruit known as the apple is one of the most versatile of seeded plants. Not only has it been a part of history, it knocked Adam and Eve out of the Garden of Eden and helped Isaac Newton discover gravity. The apple comes in hundreds of varieties and is packed with fiber, potassium, vitamin C and Omega-3 fatty acids. It’s also one of the few fruits that can be utilized in many types of salads, main courses, and desserts. Below are just a few examples of the ways that you and your family can enjoy apples. Apples as snacks Thanks to hefty doses of fiber apples are one of the more filling fruits and can be eaten alone as a between-meal snack. If kids aren’t enthusiastic for its waxy skin or juicy interior, there are plenty of opportunities for enhancements. For example, sliced apples dipped in peanut putter make a great sweet and salty flavor combination. Dunking them into vanilla yogurt, caramel or dark chocolate also works, though more tart apple varieties, such as McIntosh, Rome or Granny Smith, should be used to combat the sweetness of the sugary coatings. Sweet-tart apples also work as an accompaniment to cheese. Just slice an apple and place alongside wedges of cheddar or other mild, smooth cheeses. This combination, along with yogurt, makes for a great school lunch when kids get tired of sandwiches and chips. Apples in salads No fruit salad would be complete without some diced apples nestled beside the grapes and bananas. Not only do their skin hues— red, yellow, and green—bring additional color to the salad, but also their crunchiness adds zip to a dish comprised mostly of soft fruits. In a classic Waldorf salad, apples are used as a sweet counterpart to the bitterness 22

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of the walnuts and celery. They can even be used as a substitute for carrots in a garden salad; allowing for the crunch the root vegetables provides while avoiding looks of disgust from the kids. Apples in main dishes Thanks to their consistency, apples can be cooked in various ways and used in a number of main dish recipes. For an example, tart apples are combined with brown sugar, salt, pepper, cinnamon and nutmeg to create a sauce for grilled pork chops. In another recipe, they’re added with onions, raisins and turkey to produce a potpie.

Apples also boost the flavor of many side dishes. Rejoining their bitter friends onions and celery, the fruit can be included in homemade stuffing. Mix them with sweet potatoes and you have a side dish that goes with the savoriness of beef, chicken or pork. Apples in desserts This is where the apple shines. Be it baked,

dipped or sauced, the apple is the star of many popular desserts. The most common being apple pie, which is simple to make. Just add 6 to 8 tart apples, such as Granny Smiths, into an already-prepared shell, place a piecrust or lattice on top, brush with a mixture of brown and white sugar and water, and bake until the apples are brown and tender. The tree fruit also works well in cakes, crisps and strudels. In a sour cream apple cake, the fruit is mixed with sour cream and a number of other ingredients, such as flour, sugar and nutmeg, to make a sweet, yet tart, pastry. Apple crisps, which in-

volve baking the fruit with uncooked oats, brown sugar and lemon juice, go great with a scoop of vanilla frozen yogurt. If pies and cakes aren’t your family’s favorites, forgo the other ingredients and cook the apples whole. Just core, fill with a cinnamon-sugar mixture, and bake approximately one hour or until tender. The result is a sweet dessert without the heavy pastry.


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poudre school district news

Werner Coordinator Happy to Pitch In people would just step up and pitch in without any problems. It seemed the field was cleared in ten minutes of all the items. I was amazed.” In his spare time, Lotito likes to play sports. His passion was playing beach volleyball in California. “But alas,” says Lotito, “Colorado does not have an abundance of beach front property, yet.” He has been able to supplant the outdoor game in the cold months playing indoors. Lotito says it is an honor to be able to provide his time and knowledge to help the schools. He is proud of the programs that our District has employed to keep our kids safe, and to help them with the volunteers from the community.

Chris Lotito is proud to work with the great volunteers at Werner Elementary School.

Poudre School District has over 16,000 volunteers, consisting of parents, grandparents, seniors and community members. Managing that many volunteers in 48 schools is quite a feat! Helping the PSD’s Volunteers & Partnerships office manage the multitude of volunteers at each school site is a Volunteer Building Coordinator (VBC). These dedicated volunteers donate many hours to ensure the volunteer program at their school is a success. Some have done it for many years, starting in elementary schools, and continuing in this volunteer position even after their children move on to junior high and even high school! Werner’s Volunteer Building Coordinator, Chris Lotito, began this position in the summer of 2010. His son began kindergarten in 2009, and he was “lucky enough” to be able to volunteer in his son’s class for the first time. The coordinator position opened and he took it. Lotito finds this position very rewarding, and says that he believes that

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the volunteer efforts contribute to the overall learning experience for kids. Lotito’s goal for Werner is to take some of his experiences with other volunteer organizations and implement a system that helps organize and manage the volunteers even easier. “The key to a successful volunteer program is communication and my hope is to find ways to improve the means to keep our volunteers abreast of opportunities,” says Lotito. Lotito says that they are very lucky at Werner to have a very strong volunteer support network. They have an impressive annual Fall Festival. I remember the first time I volunteered to work it. I remember the efficiency of this group all working together to get what needed to get done. It seemed to take just minutes to tear down an entire field with the army of volunteers! No one seemed to be actually directing anyone. Everyone just picked up items and seemed to know just what to do. It was very endearing to know that the

Riffenburgh Newscasters Rock Channel 10 Studio The Riffenburgh Elementary “Electric-Style Newscasters” visited the PSD Channel 10 studio recently to record a special episode of their school’s weekly news show called the “R.O.C.K.S. Report.” From behind-the-scene jobs like cameraman and director to on-air talent anchor roles, the fifth-graders took on all Channel 10 jobs needed to create an all-student-produced Riffenburgh “R.O.C.K.S. Report,” which is named after the character traits: Respect, Optimism, Cooperation, Kindness and Self-Control. Herb Saperstone, Channel 10 video production coordinator, and Matt Gohl, PSD Channel 10 video production assistant, taught the students how to operate the equipment, the responsibilities of each job and how to communicate with each other while producing the show. “This gives them an opportunity to be in a T.V. production lab and get a professional experience that they wouldn’t normally get at their school,” says Saperstone. “It’s fun to watch them use the skills they learned five minutes ago and go with it. They pick up the technology so fast.”


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PSD Calendar of Events March 6

Matt Gohl, Poudre School District Channel 10 video production assistant, works with one of the Riffenburgh Elementary “Electric-Style Newscasters.” The Riffenburgh news team recently visited the Channel 10 studio to record a special episode of their weekly news show.

For the young newscasters, who normally record their show at their school, the field trip to the Channel 10 studio was a huge treat. “I think the cameras are really cool,” says Avry, who was the talent for the “Get Up and Move” exercise segment of the show. “I like to act so it’s fun.” “I liked learning about the camera and being shown in front of the green screen,” says Jack. “I thought it was fun telling people what to do and directing the show,” says Delaney. Beth Cain, Riffenburgh video production teacher, says producing the weekly news show gives the students confidence and a chance to work together creatively. “They start with an idea and see it materialize. It’s something they are creating,” she says. “People at school love to see the show and the kids love to get that positive feedback.” Johnson Elementary Climbing Wall Gives Students Confidence and Fun Learning Experiences Johnson Elementary third-grader Lilli Blakeslee was all smiles as she grabbed 28

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her last hand hold, reached the top of her route on the climbing wall and rang the bell of success. “I can’t believe I got to the very top!” said an excited Lilli. “That’s my first time all year!” Every Tuesday morning as many as 30 Johnson Elementary students meet before school to participate in the Climbing Club, an extra-curricular enrichment opportunity for third- through fifthgraders. Students equip themselves with harnesses and choose one of the Rock Climbing Wall routes, which range in difficulty and are all manned by adult volunteer belayers. Fun hand and foot holds like ice-cream cones and letters that spell the name of the school help the climbers as they maneuver themselves to the top. “You can set your goals as to where you want to get on the climbing wall. You keep trying and trying until you reach it and then you can set more goals,” says third-grader Delaney Unter, adding that the climbing compliments her other athletic activities. “It strengthens my arms so I can do more sports. I also do dance and soccer.” Catie Caywood, Johnson art teacher and coordinator of the Climbing Club,

6 :30pm Board of Education business meeting, Johannsen Support Services Complex, 2407 LaPorte Avenue. March 9 K -5 Teacher Work Day, No school for elementary students. March 10 C  olorado History Bowl, Fort Collins High School, 3400 Lambkin Way. March 12-16 S pring Break, No school! Johannsen Support Services Complex is open March 22 Transition Meeting – Legal Night Workshop, for specialneeds students 14 and older and their families, 6 to 8pm, first floor of Larimer County Courthouse, 200 W. Oak. March 27 6 :30pm, Board of Education business meeting and work session, Johannsen Support Services Complex, 2407 LaPorte Avenue.

says climbing gives students confidence and an opportunity to learn a new skill. “I see kids two feet off the ground frozen and scared. Then, after a couple of times, they feel really comfortable,” says Caywood. “This is a brand new skill for many of them who haven’t had this exposure. They get to try something new that they’ve never done before.” “They learn how to put on their own harness, they learn the vocabulary of the equipment and important climbing skills and techniques,” she adds. Of course, students also benefit from the physical aspects of climbing and they enjoy cheering each other. “They learn teambuilding skills. It’s neat to see how they encourage each other,” Caywood says. Despite all the benefits that climbing offers, many of the kids climb simply for the fun of it. “I like getting up early to have fun at school. I think climbing is fun,” says Luke Cunning, fifth-grader. “I like having challenges in life.”


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greeley-evans district 6 news

Wildcat artists bring home statewide awards Four student artists from Greeley Central High School recently earned awards at the 2012 Colorado Scholastic Art Awards, and their artwork will be on display at the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design from February 11 - March 2, in the Philip J. Steele Gallery and Rotunda Pavilion. The students are: Gold Key Winners (Gold Key Awards advance to the national competition)

•C  allahan Foose, 11th grade, photograph “Mary” • Maddison Graybill, 12th grade, sculpture “Red River Hog”

Silver Key Winners

• Callahan Foose, drawing “The Delivery”  • Jessica Martin, 12th grade, photograph “Simplicity”   • Ivonne Morales, 11th grade, drawing “Joka Lisa”

Honorable Mention

• Maddison Graybill, ceramic “Ribbonized”

A full list of statewide winners can be found at www.rmcad. edu/scholastic-art-awards-colorado <http://www.rmcad.edu/scholasticart-awards-colorado>  .

High school students create solutions to environmental concerns Eight teams of high school students from District 6 are among the top 10 finalists in the annual Caring for Our Watersheds environmental-solutions contest. The students are now preparing final presentations to give before a panel of judges on Friday, March 2 at the University of Northern Colorado.  The presentations, which are open to the public, begin at 3pm in the University Center. The winners and awards will be announced later that evening at a dinner for the finalists and their parents. Caring for Our Watersheds chal30

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lenges high-school students to think about their local watersheds and how they can protect this most essential environmental asset. Either individually or as a team, students research their local watershed, identify an environmental concern, and develop a potential solution. More than 100 students from high schools in Greeley-Evans, Loveland and Berthoud entered this year’s contest, writing 1,000-word essays explaining their research on the Cache La Poudre or the Big Thompson watersheds, describing the environmental issues and their proposed solutions, and outlining implementation budgets for their ideas. Their essays were judged in January, and ten finalists were selected. Agrium, a worldwide producer and retailer of fertilizers and other agricultural products and services sponsors the program. The company will give cash awards to the top schools and students, and has also committed to help implement the winning ideas. Locally, the program is supported by the Poudre Learning Center and Central Weld Water Conservancy District. Learn more about the Caring for Our Watersheds program at www. caringforourwatersheds.com    District News Tell your friends and contacts how to stay i n touch with Greeley-Evans School District 6: To Subscribe, send an e-mail to: districtnews-subscribe@greeley schools.org. To unsubscribe, send an e-mail to: districtnews-unsubscribe@ greeleyschools.org. This E-Mail News Service is owned and operated by the Office of School/Community Relations, Greeley-Evans School District 6. Your e-mail address will not be shared or forwarded. To view other services provided by Weld County School District 6, please visit the district Web site at www.greeleyschools.org.

District seeks to expand before- and after-school program through federal grant District 6 is seeking public comments and feedback on an application that will be submitted for a federal 21st Century Community Learning Center grant to expand before- and afterschool programs at four more schools beginning fall 2012. The district currently has 21st CCLC programs at Heiman Elementary, Centennial Elementary, Jackson Elementary, Madison Elementary, Shawsheen Elementary, Franklin Middle, Heath Middle, John Evans Middle, and Northridge High. The district will apply to add the 21st CCLC program at Martinez Elementary, Maplewood Elementary, East Memorial Elementary and Romero Elementary for school year 2012-13. The 21st CCLC grant has the potential of providing five years of funding that will allow for beforeand after-school programming the at the aforementioned schools. The focus of the 21st CCLC before- and after-school program is to provide students with additional academic support in reading, writing, math and science with a heavy emphasis on STEM activities (science, technology, engineering and math).  District 6 also partners with local agencies to provide enrichment activities to the students, such as recreation, drama, arts, cooking, and dance. For more information about 21st CCLC, or to review and provide input on the application, please contact Amanda Balcerak, the district’s 21st CCLC coordinator, at 970-348-6303 or abalcerak@greeleyschools.org. Federal statute requires each applicant to give notice to the community of its intent to submit an application and to provide for public availability and review of the application and any waiver request after submission.


Dreaming of Ponies? Gargot Farms Riding Academy is now accepting students of all ages and abilities 2012 Camp Dates Ages 6-10: June 4 - 8, June 11-15 Ages 11-14: June 25-29 • Individual instruction and small group activities • After school and Saturday lessons available • Safe, trained horses and ponies • Indoor and outdoor arenas • Equine-assisted psychotherapy with Dr. Margot Nacy (for children and teens) • NEW! Ponies for Preschoolers! with instructor, Dana Lessie

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thompson school district news  BHS students impress CSU with science, technology, engineering, and math skills

Dr. Tom Siller from CSU discusses a project with Kelsey Angus.

Dr. Tom Siller, dean of Engineering from Colorado State University, glanced around the classroom full of students. “I have talked to most of you about your projects and I am really impressed with everything,” he says. The Berthoud High School students were impressed as well, being critiqued so positively by a college professor. “I’ve been studying engineering since I was 13 and I don’t remember doing this caliber of work in high school,” says Siller. Siller, Dr. Michael DiMiranda, professor of Engineering Education, and graduate fellow Dr. Paul Hernandez, an educational psychologist, all visited Scott Kindt’s General Physics and AP Physics classes on Jan. 27 as part of their CSU GK-12 collaborative project with BHS (and Thompson Valley High School) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) classes. The GK-12 project is a college/K-12 program that provides multi-disciplinary training across the ages in science, technology, engineering and math. At CSU, the primary focus is on biomedical sciences through three components: research, education and partnerships. Along with their projects, students 32

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in groups of five to 10 each created posters to communicate their work to other scientists, engineers and mathematicians. After receiving some suggestions from their CSU visitors, the students will complete their 4-foot x 3-foot posters. Kindt says these projects, along with the science poster, will be on display at the National Science Foundation GK-12 conference in Washington, DC, in March. Kindt’s AP Physics and General Physics classes have been involved in the CSU GK-12 engineering project for the past two months. “This is an integrated project that also involves the collaboration of Physics, Algebra II, and Principles of Engineering classes at BHS,” he says – a total of about 200 students. “The physics students designed and built stereo amplifiers and speakers. They worked with Rob Sommerfeld’s Principles of Engineering students, who experimented with various materials to design and build the boxes to hold all the electronics.” Then, Algebra II students tested and measured the electronic equipment using algebraic principles. Kindt is in the third year of the CSU-Thompson collaboration. Trevor Vonsegdern, a sophomore who knows what he wants in his future says, “I definitely want to be an engineer – it’s my dream. This taught us a lot about circuitry.” Each group had a lot of flexibility in how they approached their problems and solutions. One student was sure she was going into engineering, but wasn’t

sure if her focus would be chemical, electrical or another area. Colorado Integration Project kicks off Jan. 26 kicked off the first of a two-day training session of the Colorado Legacy Integration Project at TSD. More than 100 teachers attended, primarily from TSD but also from Eagle County Schools, Centennial BOCES and Denver Public Schools. Members from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation attended as well as curriculum leaders from the Colorado Department of Education. It was a full day of training and dialogue. On the second day, participants introduced a Module Center, which facilitates lesson planning, including helping teachers to find reading resources at student reading levels by content area. Superintendent Ron Cabrera said he received compliments from the foundation about how well prepared district staff had been to support the training. TVHS students earn state art awards Several TVHS students received recognition at the recent Scholastic Colorado Visual Arts Awards, which drew some 4,000 pieces of art submitted by students from around the state. Faith Ford received the Gold Key Portfolio award. For other names and awards, see http:// thompson.k12.co.us/Bulletin_board/ ScholasticsArtAwards_TVHS2012.pdf..

BHS students show Superintendent Ron Cabrera and Deputy Superintendent Judy Skupa their speaker project.


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lunch box Poudre School District: Elementary student lunches are $2.O5, secondary student lunches are $2.30 and reduced lunches are $0.40. Entrees offered daily: Elementary—a variety of fruits and vegetables, milk and juices; Secondary--hot and cold sandwiches, fruits and vegetables, deli salad and pizza. . Elementary school 1 Veggie wrap; BBQ chicken sandwich; cheese pizza 2 Hummus & veggies; lasagna; beef tacos 5 Sloppy Joe sandwich; turkey & cheese deli; chicken nuggets 6 Yogurt, cheese & fruit; chili & cinnamon roll; cheeseburger 7 Mac n’cheese; pig in a blanket; PBJ 8 Turkey gravy w/potatoes; chef salad; chicken patty sandwich 9-16 No School! 19 Yogurt; cheese & fruit; rib-a-que sandwich; chicken quesadilla 20 Beef & bean burrito; cheeseburger; corndog

21 Chef salad; cheeseburger; corndog 22 Veggie wrap; Teriyaki chicken dippers; chicken patty sandwich 23 Turkey & cheese wrap; cheese pizza; hummus & veggies 26 Chicken Caesar salad; chicken patty sandwich; turkey pot pie 27 Yogurt, fruit & cheese; mac n’cheese; hotdog 28 Chicken quesadilla; cheeseburger; PBJ 29 Enchilada bake; ham & cheese deli; chicken nuggets 30 Veggie wrap; pepperoni pizza; cheese raviolis Secondary SCHOOLS 1 Green chile burrito; chicken; chicken

Caesar salad 2 Pancake & sausage wrap; chicken fajita w/rice; chicken fajita salad 5 Mac n’cheese; chicken rice bowl; Mandarin chicken salad 6 Chili cheese fries; chicken taco; hummus & veggies 7 Pig in a blanket; pasta w/sauces; buffalo chicken salad 8 Chicken nuggets; grilled ham & cheese; chicken Caesar salad 9 Cheese raviolis; chicken; chef salad 19 Nachos; pasta w/sauces & chicken; chicken Caesar salad 20 Teriyaki chicken dippers; beef tacos; chef salad 21 Chicken nuggets; chili w/cinnamon

rolls; taco salad 22 Philly cheesesteak sandwich; orange chicken w/rice; hummus & veggies 23 Chicken fajita w/rice; green chile burrito; chicken salad 26 Mac n’cheese; BBQ chicken sandwich; chicken Caesar salad 27 Chicken nuggets; green chile smothered burrito 28 Enchilada bake; pasta w/sauces; Mandarin chicken salad 29 Baked potato bar; yogurt, cheese & fruit; chef salad 30 Turkey gravy & potatoes; chicken taco; hummus & veggies

Thompson School District: Elementary lunches are $2.25. Secondary school lunches are $2.50. Reduced lunches are $0.40. Offered daily: PBJs & fruit. Elementary schools 1 Taco; chef salad; turkey sandwich 2 Fish sandwich; fruit & yogurt; turkey sandwich 5 Chicken nuggets; grilled cheese sandwich; Caesar salad 6 Chicken parmesan; chicken tender salad 7 Pork sandwich; rice & bean burrito; garden salad 8 Nachos; chef salad 9 Orange chicken w/rice; fruit & yogurt plate 12 Mac n’cheese; grilled cheese sandwich; Caesar salad 13 Pizza stick w/sauce; baked potato;

chicken tender salad 14 Chicken patty sandwich; burrito; garden salad 15 Chicken quesadilla; baked potato; chef salad 16 Country fried steak fingers; mashed potatoes w/gravy; fruit & yogurt 19 Turkey w/mashed potatoes; grilled cheese sandwich; Caesar salad 20 Cheese pizza; baked potato; chicken tender salad 21 Burger; burrito; garden salad 22 Burrito; baked potato; chef salad 23 French bread boat; fruit & yogurt plate 26 Mini whole grain pancake w/sausage patty; grilled cheese sandwich;

Caesar salad 27 Spaghetti; baked potato; chicken tender salad 28 Turkey hotdog; rice & bean burrito; salad 29-30 Manager’s choice Secondary SCHOOLS 1 Taco; grilled cheese sandwich; grilled cheese & tomato soup 2 Fish sandwich; chicken patty sandwich 5 Chicken nuggets; sloppy Joe 6 Chicken parmesan; chicken patty sandwich 7 Pork sandwich; burger 8 Nachos; lasagna

9 Orange chicken; French bread boat 12 Mac n’cheese; Mexican pizza 13 Pizza stick w/sauce; Cuban wrap 14 Chicken patty sandwich; nachos 15 Chicken quesadilla; chicken patty sandwich 16 Country fried steak fingers; BBQ rice & chicken 19 Turkey w/mashed potatoes; pretzel w/cheese sauce 20 Cheese pizza; chicken fajita wrap 21 Cheeseburger; chicken parmesan 22 Burrito; meatball sandwich 23 French bread boat; hot ham & cheese 26-30 Manager’s choice

Greeley - Evans District 6: To obtain a complete meal, student gets an entrée and can select 1-3 sides. Elementary lunches are $2.15, and middle school lunches are $2.40, reduced-price lunches are $.40. Offered daily: PBJ. 19 Roast pork; turkey & cheese hoagie 20 Bean burrito; chicken salad sandwich 21 Lasagna; PBJ 22 Chicken sandwich; ham & cheese hoagie 23 Pepperoni pizza; tuna salad sandwich 26 Sloppy Joe; turkey & cheese hoagie 27 Chicken quesadilla; chicken salad sandwich 28 Sack lunch; hamburger 29 Roast turkey; ham & cheese hoagie 30 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich

Elementary schools 1 Turkey; ham & cheese hoagie 2 Cheese pizza; tuna salad 5 Hamburger; turkey & cheese hoagie 6 Taquito pie; chicken salad sandwich 7 Chicken w/rice; PBJ 8 BBQ chicken; ham & cheese hoagie 9 Pepperoni pizza; tuna salad sandwich 12 Chili w/tortilla; turkey & cheese hoagie 13 Tacos; chicken salad sandwich 14 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 15 Herb chicken; ham & cheese hoagie 16 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich

Middle schoolS 1 Turkey; Tuscan bagel sandwich 2 Cheese pizza; tuna salad 5 Hamburger; club wrap 6 Taquito pie; chicken salad sandwich 7 Chicken w/rice; PBJ 8 BBQ chicken; ham & cheese hoagie 9 Pepperoni pizza; Italian wrap 12 Chili w/tortilla; turkey & cheese hoagie 13 Tacos; chicken fajita wrap 14 Pasta w/meat sauce; PBJ 15 Herb chicken; Tuscan bagel sandwich 16 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich

19 Roast pork; club wrap 20 Bean burrito; chicken salad sandwich 21 Lasagna; PBJ 22 Chicken sandwich; ham & cheese hoagie 23 Pepperoni pizza; Italian wrap 26 Sloppy Joe; turkey & cheese hoagie 27 Chicken quesadilla; chicken fajita wrap 28 PBJ; hamburger 29 Roast turkey; Tuscan bagel sandwich 30 Cheese pizza; tuna salad sandwich

Windsor School District: Price for elementary lunch is $2.25, for middle school students, $2.30. Reduced lunches are $0.40. Salad bar is served daily with entrees. Offered daily: PBJ and yogurt. Elementary schools 1 Turkey & gravy 2 Pizza 5 Chicken tenders 6 Mac n’cheese 7 WG waffles w/sausage 8 Chicken quesadilla 9 Pizza dippers

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12 Chicken nuggets 13 Spaghetti taco 14 Chili w/cinnamon roll 15 Teriyaki chicken w/brown rice 16 Big daddy pizza 19 Hotdog 20 Pasta primavera

21 BBQ turkey burrito 22 Chicken sandwich 23 No school! 26-30 No school! Secondary SCHOOLS 1 Turkey pot pie 2 Chicken sandwich 5 Chicken tenders

6 Mac n’cheese 7 WG waffles w/sausage 8 Chicken quesadilla 9 Meatball sub 12 Chicken nuggets 13 Tuscan turkey & ham wrap 14 Chili w/cinnamon roll 15 Teriyaki chicken w/brown

rice 16 Steak & cheese sandwich 19 Weiner wrap 20 Pasta primavera 21 BBQ pork burrito 22 Chicken sandwich 23 No school! 26-30 No school!


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calendar

MARCH 2012 Ongoing Through March 4 Trying A feisty 25-year-old girl and her employer, a crusty, aristocratic, octogenarian judge, manage to bridge the generation gap. Bas Bleu Theatre Company, 401 Pine St., FC. 970-498-8066 or www.basbleu.org. Through March 11 Anything Goes Cole Porter’s Tony Award-winning musical romp across the Atlantic. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Market Place Dr., Johnstown. 970-744-3747 or www.coloradocandlelight.com. Through March 17 Avenue Q Join us for this Broadway smash-hit. Adults. Carousel Dinner Theatre, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555 or www.MidtownArtsCenter.com. Through March 18 Othello by William Shakespeare Shakespeare creates a tragedy of a love destroyed by jealousy. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 970-2216730 or www.LCTIX.com or www. openstage.com. March 1-3 100 Years of Broadway Broadway stars light up the stage performing hit songs from Broadway’s smash musicals. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. March 23 – June 2 The Sound of Music Carousel Dinner Theatre, 3750 South Mason St., FC. 970-225-2555. www. MidtownArtsCenter.com

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March 29-31 Straight No Chaser This 10-member, all-male a cappella vocal ensemble is one of the fastestrising groups in the country. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com.

Ready, Set, Grow! Cherry Blossom Tree and Pop-A-Thon An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens.

March 31-April 28 The Ladies Man Presented by OpenStage. A frothy, fastpaced farce in the classic French style. Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 970-221-6730 or www.lctix.com.

Space Exploration: Mars and You! Blast off with us and visit the mysterious red planet, Mars. Greeley History Museum, 701 10th Ave., GR. 6pm. 970-3509220 or www.greeleymuseums.com.

Thursday, March 1

Health in the Outdoors Find out what your body needs for peak performance in your outdoor adventures. REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-223-0123 or www.rei.com.

Friday, March 2

Scrabble @ Your Library Players of all ability and experience levels are welcome. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Noches en Familia: Family Nights ¡Ven y disfruta un tiempo de cuentos, manualidades, canciones y películas en español! Come and enjoy a time of stories, crafts, puppets, and songs in Spanish. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 5pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Family Game Night Cool Beans Playhouse and Cafe 4019 S. Mason St. #5 FC. 970-266-1135 or www.CoolBeansPlayHouse.com. Drop in Art: Snowmen Sculptures Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.

Saturday, March 3

Interesting Reader Society Meeting Young adults meet monthly to talk mainly about teen stuff. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 11am. 970-221-6740 or www.Poudre Libraries.org. Boot Camp for New Dads For men, taught by men! North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9amNoon. 970‑378-4044 or www.Banner Health.com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.


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Breastfeeding: Off to a Good Start Designed for expectant parents who are considering breastfeeding. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9amNoon. 970‑378-4044 or www.Banner Health.com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Day of Dance for your Family’s Health Dancing, hands-on exhibits, healthy food demonstrations, and health screenings. Family Fun Plex, 1501 65th Ave., GR. 9am-1pm. 970-392-2222 or www. BannerHealth.com/NCMCSpirit. Labor and Birth for TeensTopics include labor and birth preparation, breathing, relaxation, and comfort techniques. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 4-6pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/NC MCFamilyLifeEdu. Eagle Watch Take a walk and get a sighting of these amazing birds. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, Carpenter Rd., 1 mile west of I-25, FC. 9-11am. 970-2216311 or www.fcgov.com/naturalareas.

Sunday, March 4

Los Lonely Boys Playing a style of music they call Texican Rock n’ Roll, this group is sure to wow you. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7:30pm. 970-2216730 or www.LCTIX.com.

Monday, March 5

Read and Seed: Scent Memory Game The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. Front Range Fun Join Alan Apt, author of two Front Range guidebooks, “Snowshoe Routes” and “Afoot & Afield,” to learn about his favorite places to go during the shoulder season. REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-223-0123 or www.rei.com.

Tuesday, March 6

Great Decisions: Mexico Transborder Crime and Governance. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. 38

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Baby Care 101 Prepares expectant parents in the basic care of newborns for the first few months. Poudre Valley Hospital Indian Paintbrush Room, 1024 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 6-9pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Art Exploration for Teens: Pastels (Baby Animals) Teens can expand their artistic horizons. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 4-6pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.

Wednesday, March 7

Family Game Night Cool Beans Playhouse and Cafe 4019 S. Mason St. #5 FC. 970-266-1135 or www.CoolBeansPlayHouse.com.

Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions will support brain and emotional development. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Wild World of Art Students can create fun and fabulous projects with flower bouquets. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www. cityofloveland.org/museum.

Thursday, March 8

Tail Tale Story Time Read books, make crafts and meet animals all in the name of compassion. Larimer Humane Society Shelter, 6317 Kyle Ave., FC. 10-11am. Ages 3-6. 970226-3647 or www.larimerhumane.org. Labor Techniques and Comfort Measures Westbridge Medical Suites, 1107 S. Lemay Ave., FC. 7-9pm. 970-495-7500 or www.pvhs.org. Prepared Childbirth Ask questions and make informed decisions about key issues surrounding the birth of your baby. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 7-9pm. 970‑378-4044 or www.BannerHealth. com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Tune Up Your Bike Learn to lube a chain, fix a flat tire in record time, and make other minor adjustments to your bicycle. REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-2230123 or www.rei.com.

Friday, March 9

Drop in Art: Color Mixing Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum. Ready, Set, Grow! Shamrocks and Leprechauns An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Saturday, March 10

Intro to Small Wind Power Basics of wind energy. Sustainable Living Association Offices, 415 Mason Ct., FC. 9am-5pm. 970-224-3247 or www. SustainableLivingAssociation.org. Soils and Three Methods of Composting Sustainable Living Association, FC. Noon-4pm. 970-224-3247 or www.SustainableLivingAssociation.org. Chess @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10am. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 3pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.


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The Winter Farmers Market Features more than 50 vendors, selling produce, eggs, meat, poultry, wine and cider, cheese, bread and baked goods, coffee, tea, locally-made food specialties and crafts. Opera Galleria, 123 N. College Ave., FC. 10am-3pm. www. BeLocalFirst.org. Spanish Prepared Childbirth To receive a flyer printed in Spanish, call 970-378-6709. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-1pm. 970‑378-4044 or www.BannerHealth. com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Survival Skills for New Parents North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9am-1pm. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Sunday, March 11

Intro to Off Grid Systems Sustainable Living Association Offices, 415 Mason Ct., FC. 9am5pm. 970-224-3247 or www. SustainableLivingAssociation.org.

Monday, March 12

Read and Seed: Frogs The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens. Bright Beginnings for One-Year-Olds Explore how thinking and interactions change as your infant becomes a toddler on the go. Loveland Library, 300 N. Adams, LV. 9-10am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Bright Beginnings for Two-Year-Olds Learn how to promote early literacy, brain development, and a healthy/ safe environment for the active twos. Loveland Library, 300 N. Adams, LV. 10-11am. 970-495-7528 or www. pvhs.org.

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Tuesday, March 13

Wee Be Green The “Wee Notables” and their puppet friends will take you on a grand adventure in this fast-paced, interactive musical theatre program highlighting the importance of conservation. Northside Aztlan Center, 112 Willow St., FC. 10:30am & 11:30am. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Kevin Cook: At Home in the Trees, Juniper Cabin Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. Noon. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Introduction to Screenwriting Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 5:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. International Night: Philippines Sherry Manning, a former Peace Corps Volunteer will share her experience with one Filipino family’s incredible story of fighting to preserve their land. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Wednesday, March 14

Wee Be Green The “Wee Notables” and their puppet friends will take you on a grand adventure in this fast-paced, interactive musical theatre program highlighting the importance of conservation. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 2pm. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org.

Bright Beginnings for One-Year-Olds Explore how thinking and interactions change as your infant becomes a toddler on the go. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Wild World of Art Students can create fun and fabulous projects with 3D Tropic Scapes. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.

Thursday, March 15

Wee Be Green The “Wee Notables” and their puppet friends will take you on a grand adventure in this fast-paced, interactive musical theatre program highlighting the importance of conservation. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10:30am, 11:30am. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Map and Compass Techniques REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-223-0123 or www.rei.com. Gearing Up for Script Frenzy Get ready to write a screenplay in 30 days! Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 10:30am, 11:30am. 970221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Genealogy: 50 Things I Learned While Photographing 50,000 Tombstones Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Friday, March 16

School’s Out Craft: Origami Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 1pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Family Game Night Cool Beans Playhouse and Cafe 4019 S. Mason St. #5 FC. 970-266-1135 or www.CoolBeansPlayHouse.com.

Colorado Raptors: Urban Raptors Join Carin Avila from the Colorado Raptor Center when she brings some of the raptors that share our urban areas. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 5:30pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org.

Drop in Art: Rainbow Painting Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/ museum.


Survival Secrets: Spring Break “Break” Survival secrets of various wildlife, plants, and pioneers. Bobcat Ridge Natural Area, FC. 9:30-11:30am. 970-2216311 or www.fcgov.com/naturalareas.

Saturday, March 17

St. Patrick’s Day Parade Downtown, FC. 10am. 970-484-6500 or www.DowntownFortCollins.com.

Read and Seed: Miniature Kites The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Great Western Railway Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 5:30pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.

Map and Compass REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-223-0123 or www.rei.com.

Friday, March 23

Tuesday, March 20

Masterworks #4: From Across the Pond Presented by the Fort Collins Symphony. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.

Bright Beginnings for Infants/ Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions with support brain and emotional development. Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. Noon-1pm. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Sunday, March 18

Wednesday, March 21

Game Day @ Your Library Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 1-5pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Intensive Organic Gardening/ Presented by the Sustainable Living Association. The Old Feed Store, 3612 W. County Rd. 54G, Laporte, CO. Noon4pm. 970-224-3247 or www.SustainableLivingAssociation.org. Masterworks #4: From Across the Pond Presented by the Fort Collins Symphony. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.

Monday, March 19

Prepared Childbirth Ask questions and make informed decisions about issues surrounding the birth of your baby. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 6:30-8:30pm. 970‑378-4044 or www.BannerHealth. com/NCMCFamilyLifeEdu. Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions with support brain and emotional development. McKee Medical Center, 2000 N. Boise Ave., LV. 11:15am-2:15pm. 970-495-7528 or www.BannerHealth.com/McKee.

Maya Culture, Archeology and Travel in Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras Come enjoy the first of this 3-part series. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Bright Beginnings for Infants Bring your baby and learn how nurturing interactions with support brain and emotional development. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Wild World of Art Sculpting. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland. org/museum.

Thursday, March 22

International Night: Philippines Sherry Manning, a former Peace Corps Volunteer will share her experience with one Filipino family’s incredible story of fighting to preserve their land. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 6pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Labor Techniques and Comfort Measures Medical Center of the Rockies, 2500 Rocky Mountain Ave., LV. 7-9pm. 970495-7528 or www.pvhs.org.

Family Game Night Cool Beans Playhouse and Cafe 4019 S. Mason St. #5 FC. 970-266-1135 or www.CoolBeansPlayHouse.com. Ready, Set Grow! Hanging Garden An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens. New Visions Dance Festival Presented by High Performance Dance Theatre. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Drop in Art: Lily Pad Frogs Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970-962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/museum.

Saturday, March 24

A Suffragist Event: A Special Showing of Iron Jawed Angels Take a step back in time and experience life before women had the right to vote. Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 2pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. The Winter Farmers Market Features more than 50 vendors, selling produce, eggs, meat, poultry, wine and cider, cheese, bread and baked goods, coffee, tea, locally-made food specialties and crafts. Opera Galleria, 123 N. College Ave., FC. 10am-3pm. www.BeLocalFirst.org. New Visions Dance Festival Presented by High Performance Dance Theatre. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com.

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Chris Perondi’s Stunt Dog Experience Join us as America’s favorite canine stunt dogs soar, spin, jump and fly! The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 2pm & 6pm. 970-221-6730 or www.LCTIX.com. Once Upon a Party LLC Presents Fairytail Princess Ball. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 2pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com. Casino Royale: The Sting!? Presented by OpenStage Theatre. Join us for our third annual gaming fundraiser. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com. We're having a Baby: A Class for Siblings Kids will learn what a new baby looks like, how to become a “big helper,” and how to make friends with the new baby. North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., GR. 9:30-10:30am. 970‑3784044 or www.BannerHealth.com/ NCMCFamilyLifeEdu.

Sunday, March 25

Animal Afternoon Join Larimer Animal People Partnership volunteers and their special story-loving critters. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 3pm. 970-221-6740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Platinum Pops Season of Life Presented by the Foothills Pops Band. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com. Jahannes Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem Presented by The Larimer Chorale. The Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., FC. 7:30pm. 970-221-6730 or www. LCTIX.com.

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Monday, March 26

What Baby Boomers Share as a Generation: A Brief Psychological Profile Council Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Temple Grandin: Connect With Kids Who Are Different Join us and spend an evening with Temple Grandin, Ph.D. Dr. Grandin will share stories from her remarkable life with a focus on how to connect with children who are different. Drake Centre, 802 W. Drake, FC. 7-8pm. 970-4958560 or www.pvhs.org. Read and Seed: Doughnut Seeds The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 2-4. 970-4162486 or www.fcgov.com/gardens.

Wednesday, March 28

Hemlines Through History Come learn about the “Hemline Rollercoaster of the 20th Century.” University Center for the Arts Annex, 216 Lake St., #316, FC. 7pm. 970-2216740 or www.PoudreLibraries.org. Bright Beginnings for Two-Year-Olds Learn how to promote early literacy, brain development, and a healthy/safe environment for the active twos. Poudre Valley Health System, 1025 Garfield Ave., FC. 10-11am. 970-495-7528 or www.pvhs.org. Wild World of Art Miniature sand paintings. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 3-4pm. 970-962-2562 or www. cityofloveland.org/museum. 4th Annual Festival Chicana/o This event will include guest artists, humor, culture and social commentary. University Center Ballrooms, 2045 10th Ave., GR. 5-8:30pm. 970-351-2162 or www.unco.edu.hispstds/

Thursday, March 29

Script Frenzy Meet and Greet Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 7pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. The Galapagos Experience the Galapagos Islands. Amazing photos of boobies, tortoises, sharks, and more, plus help planning your own adventure. REI, 4025 S. College Ave., FC. 6:30pm. 970-2230123 or www.rei.com.

Friday, March 30

History Comes Alive: Josephine Roche Josephine Aspenwall Roche, was an industrialist, activist, and a politician. In 1912 she became Denver’s first female police officer. She was active in helping to unionize coal workers. President Franklin Roosevelt appointed her as assistant Secretary of the Treasury. Presented by Elinor McGinn. Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St., FC. 3pm. 970-221-6740 or www. PoudreLibraries.org. Family Game Night Cool Beans Playhouse and Cafe 4019 S. Mason St. #5 FC. 970-266-1135 or www.CoolBeansPlayHouse.com. Stargazing View the skies with telescopes provided by the Northern Colorado Astronomical Society. Fossil Creek Reservoir Regional Open Space, Carpenter Rd., 1 mile west of I-25, FC. 9-11am. 970-221-6311 or www.fcgov.com/naturalareas or www. ncastro.org. Ready, Set, Grow! Foolish Fun An introduction to gardening and the four seasons. The Gardens on Spring Creek, 2145 Centre Ave., FC. Ages 4-5. 970-416-2486 or www.fcgov.com/ gardens. Drop in Art: Signs of Spring Explore art with your favorite tots. Loveland Museum/ Gallery, 503 N. Lincoln Ave., LV. 10-11am. 970962-2562 or www.cityofloveland.org/ museum.


JOHN M. JAMES, M.D.

Certified by the American Board of Allergy & Immunology and The American Board of Pediatrics

Specializing in: ASTHMA ALLERGIES ECZEMA 1136 E. Stuart St. Bldg. 3, Suite 3200 • Fort Collins, CO 80525 • (970)221-1681 7251 W. 20th St., Building N, Suite 1 • Greeley, CO 80634 • (970)356-3907

or call 1-800-735-1434 • www.coloradoallergy.com

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time out

The embarrassment theorum Calculations that lead to the Dramatic Teen Eye Roll R i chard K e l l er

M

ath is an everyday necessity for parents, whether it involves calculating the number of socks missing from the dryer, dividing an eight-slice pizza among 20 kids, or when it comes to big families, adding up the children to make sure they’re all present before leaving the mall. Additional variables can be thrown in here or there, like the amount of time it takes a typical teenage girl to, yet again, change outfits before making her parents late, but most of the time the formulas are straightforward. Except when it comes to childhood behavior. When this happens, numerators and denominators no longer help. Instead, the use of mathematical arguments and operations goes into effect. Take for example the common mathematical argument known as the Embarrassment Theorem. Created when the first teenager sighed and rolled her eyes at the first parent, the Embarrassment Theorem states this: The level of embarrassment a parent inflicts on his child is directly proportional to the child’s increased age. To prove, parents start at the beginning, which is null since there’s nothing a newborn or toddler thinks is embarrassing in a parent. They can perform silly dances, do voices, or shoot milk out of their nose and the littlest ones eat it all up. Then again, as sneezing makes them crack up, the littlest kids are an easy and malleable audience. This pattern continues through the earliest years of elementary school, with only the merest hint of potential embarrassment when they don’t laugh at an animal imitation. It’s only when children reach 3rd or 4th grade that the amount of embarrassment begins to overtake enjoyment. Things that 44

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made them giggle just a year prior are received with a “Daaaadddd!” or “Moooommm!” or “Not here, in front of everyone.” They acknowledge the adult’s status as a guardian and may even hang out with them, but conversation is formal at best.

By the time kids reach 5th grade, the embarrassment factor jumps exponentially. ‘Daaaadddd!’ becomes a short, harsh whisper of “Dad!” with the beginnings of P.T.E.R.–Pre-Teen Eye Roll. They still acknowledge parental status, but don’t let them anywhere near the school except for drop-off and pick-up. Once kids hit

middle school, parent embarrassment nearly reaches its peak on the chart, as the simple act of stopping by a classroom to say hello to a child’s teacher becomes an exercise in redfaced humiliation. The theorem reaches apex at the same time children hit puberty. In this period of fragility, the parent, without the non-verbal D.T.E.R, Dramatic Teen Eye Roll, followed by the D.T.A.C., Dramatic Teen Arm Crossing, and the D.T.H.S., Dramatic Teen Heavy Sigh, can say nothing. When D.T.E.R., D.T.A.C. and D.T.H.S. are used in combination, it means the parent in question has embarrassed his child to the point of being ostracized by her peers. This is normally followed by a proclamation that she must have been adopted because her real parents would never embarrass her so. Luckily, the humiliation factor begins to ebb somewhere around senior year of high school. It’s then that an inverse theorem takes effect that states the level of embarrassment a parent inflicts on their child is reduced in young adulthood. In fact, as children reach this age-level, they become fonder of those times when their parents lip-synched Adele in front of their study group or dressed up as Alice Cooper during one Halloween, all in order to get the car keys or extra money to spend at a college pub. Soon enough, children are hanging out with their parents again, resulting in a null value for the theorem. Good news is the Embarrassment Theorem is transferable between generations, meaning today’s parents will eventually get to watch their own children struggle with D.T.E.R and D.T.A.C. while they make their grandkids laugh with funny cartoon voices.


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