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katalyst reconciling ministries network

december 2013

Messiah preparing room for

50+ pastors co-officiate a same-sex wed


CONTENTS

3. And all flesh shall see it together Rachel Harvey

4. The glory of the Lord: justice made flesh Matt Berryman

6. Valleys exalted, mountains made low RMN regional organizers

8. How beautiful the feet of those who bring Biblical Obedience! Joe Openshaw and Bobby Prince

10. Her glory shall be seen Rev. Vicki Flippin

12. Good tidings of great joy to all people new Reconciling communities *Cover: 50+ pastors co-officiate a same-sex wedding in Eastern Pennsylvania in solidarity with Rev. Frank Schaefer who was put on trial for officiating his son’s wedding.

*images from Frank Schaefer trial

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katalyst a publication of Reconciling Ministries Network

EDITOR Rev. Andy Oliver - andy@rmnetwork.org

RMN STAFF Matt Berryman, executive director Rachel Harvey, Deaconess, program director David Braden, director of development Meg Carey, business manager Dr. Ted Jackson, office and database manager Rev. Andy Oliver, director of communications Rev. Izzy Alvaran, WJ regional organizer Robyn Henderson-Espinoza, NCJ regional organizer Helen Ryde, NEJ regional organizer Rev. Laura Rossbert, director & SEJ regional organizer Laura Young, SCJ regional organizer Doug Clement, program intern TC Cassidy, SCJ organizer intern Rev. Cherri Holdridge, Ohio field coordinator Rolly Loomis, Central Conference coordinator Debra Peevey, IWR process coach trainer


And all flesh

by Rachel Harvey, Deaconess | program director

shall see it together I grew up on a lot of teams. From elementary through high school, I played a sport in every season often double-dipping school and church leagues sprinkled with choir, band, and eight years in an evangelical Milli Vanilli style puppet troupe. While I dreaded the individualized competition of the batter’s box, starting block, and solos, I loved being part of something bigger than myself. I’ve never held a first chair position musically (in choir I was seated on the floor while the risers were reserved for our strongest singers) but I never cared. I was happy to be a part of making something beautiful. One of my favorite Advent memories comes from high school choir. Each fall as we peeled open battered sheet music, Mr. Eck, our choir director, shared the Lebanon High School (LHS) tradition of ending the winter concert singing selections from Handel’s Messiah by making space for anyone who wanted to join in. We spent a significant amount of time practicing our collective and seemingly divergent parts. When the time came, Mr. Eck turned around and invited all LHS alumni to the stage to help sing our final selections from Messiah. I was skeptical but people of all ages held mini-reunions in the aisles as they flowed forward to join our ranks. My former spot on the margin was filled by former riser members who rounded out our sound in their full

voices and whole bodied singing. I still remember the way the song and sound was transformed by the new voices around me. It was a beautiful moment. In the past four years from my second chair position at RMN I’ve witnessed many beautiful moments. Moments where our voices, large and small, known and new, rose up together to join the long line of the movement’s call for justice. We rose to speak truth to power, build relationships across theological divides, comfort our community, and enflesh acts of solidarity—and still we rise.

in the wilderness or lost in the choir know that you’re not alone. God calls each of us to take part in the great company of heaven and earth, proclaiming the Good News that a child is born, love is stronger than fear and God journeys with us. Join me, take your part, and let’s co-create a world of love, peace, and justice for all people – together! ... Rachel Harvey is a United Methodist Deaconess appointed to serve RMN as program director.

As an organizer, I am daily inspired by the stories of faithful Reconciling United Methodists living and loving through acts of Biblical Obedience. Most of these aren’t considered front page news-worthy, but isn’t that what Advent is all about? Preparing to make room for new hope to be born from a seemingly lowly place and people, for new voices to rise up in unexpected places and for a new awareness to take shape that forces us to take a new path forward? Whether you feel like you’re a lone voice crying out

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T HUS SAI T H THE LORD O F H OST S; Y ET ONCE, A LIT TLE W HI L E AN D I WILL SHAKE THE H EAVEN S, AN D TH E EA RTH, T HE SEA, AN D THE DRY L A N D ; AN D I WILL SH AKE ALL N AT I ON S, AN D THE DESIRE OF A L L N AT I ON S SHA LL CO ME.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH BIBLICAL OBEDIENCE, RMN WILL CONTINUE TO

It was Justice that crept in beside us, took on our flesh, and was born among us in Christ. It was Justice that brought good news to the poor, proclaimed release to the captives, recovery of sight to the blind; that let the oppressed go free, proclaiming the year of the Lord’s favor. It was Justice that was silenced and killed, that overcame evil, injustice, and oppression and rose to new life.

DEFY THE UNJUST AND DISCRIMINATORY POLICIES IN THE BOOK OF DISCIPLINE.

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“Let it be to me, according to your Word” said one prominent disciple whose “yes” gave birth to Justice in the flesh. Like Mary, we must be willing to speak truth to power and

by Matt Berryman | executive director

The glory of the Lord: justice made flesh

A ND THE G L ORY O F TH E L O RD SHAL L BE REV EALED, A ND ALL F LESH SHALL SEE IT TOG ET HER : F OR TH E MO UTH O F THE L OR D HATH SPOKEN IT.

“And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.” This is the prophetic announcement of Advent set to music in Handel’s magnum opus, Messiah. Much like Isaiah, Handel’s musical herald is confident, declaratory, and strong. The cascading vocal parts are woven finally into one single garland of praise at the conclusion of the chorus leaving the listener consoled, convicted, and challenged. The music incarnates the glory of God’s reign of justice announced by the prophet and delivered in a barn in Bethlehem.


Frank Schaefer tells reporters that he refuses to renounce offering ministry to all persons.

act with courage for the sake of all who continue to wait and watch for the coming of Justice. Reconciling Ministries Network is committed to the birth of justice through words and acts of Biblical Obedience for the sake of our movement, church, and world. Together, we will bring more and more United Methodist individuals and communities into the network through the strong grassroots Reconciling work of our five jurisdictional organizers, so that those who have yet to experience the fullness of justice in The United Methodist Church may know the glory of the Lord. Building on the strong

Frank Schaefer serves communion to gathered witnesses following his trial.

foundation already established by them and many others, RMN will intensify our work and presence in the South Central and Southeastern jurisdictions—regions of challenge and opportunity. By placing new organizers in strategic groupings of Annual Conferences in the South, we want to deepen our impact so that more and more individuals and communities may know the year of the Lord’s favor. In accordance with Biblical Obedience, RMN will continue to defy the unjust and discriminatory policies in the Book of Discipline. Anything less than full inclusion of LGBTQ persons is shot through with sin, runs counter to the gospel of Christ, and perpetuates a lie. Therefore, we will bring good news to the poor, proclaim release to the captives, and recovery of sight to the blind; we will let the oppressed go free and we will proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor. Further, we will continue organizing with boldness and prophetic urgency to provide the ministries of the church to LGBTQ persons. Come what may, we will bring Justice to bear with joy, with courage, and with assurance, knowing that God has already settled this matter.

For same-sex couples called to the vocation of Christian marriage, we will implement tactics designed to create opportunities for such celebrations by organizing Reconciling clergy around the country to perform their weddings. In addition, RMN will work to empower LGBTQ clergy to claim their ordination with courage and authenticity. Moreover, we will organize to speak and act truthfully for the sake of LGBTQ persons called to ordained ministry so that they may obey the call of God. Moving forward, we will strategically engage active and retired bishops, United Methodist seminaries, United Methodist theologians, and campus ministries to grace-filled resistance. The movement for inclusion will grow from strength to strength for the wellbeing of all that is. The advent of justice is upon us. The time is now. Therefore, let us unite together in bold acts and prophetic words so that the glory of the Lord will be revealed and ALL flesh will see it together. ... Matt Berryman has served as executive director for RMN since April 2013.

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In July 2012, the Western Jurisdictional Conference affirmed that God’s grace and love is available to all persons and asserted that The UMC is in error on its stance on sexual orientation. The conferences of the Jurisdiction were invited “to operate as if the ‘incompatible’ statement in ¶161F does not exist.” Reconciling congregations in the Sacramento, CA area took this to heart and have agreed to jointly adopt a declaration of inclusion affirming that their churches will deny neither their services nor facilities to anyone because of sexual orientation: “We must unshackle ourselves from rules reflecting the cultures where same sex marriages are forbidden. We can no longer, in good conscience, deny use of our property to our members and friends at the precious time of marriage requiring them to go somewhere else other than a United Methodist Church to receive ministry.” This is a courageous step rooted in Biblical Obedience. These churches (St. Mark’s UMC, Fair Oaks UMC, and Elk Grove UMC) are inviting other United Methodist congregations to join with them by doing the same with the challenge that “it is time that the voice of the laity be heard” in the current debate on full inclusion of the LGBTQI community in our denomination. They envision 50 churches joining them by Spring 2014. Rev. Izzy Alvaran - RMN Western Regional Organizer - izzy@rmnetwork.org

BE TRAINED TO CHANGE THE UMC! FEB 7-8, 2014 – TULSA, OKLAHOMA FEB 21-22, 2014 - CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA FEB 28-MAR 1, 2014 – ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI MAR 7-8, 2014 – NEW YORK CONFERENCE MAR 14-15 – NORTHERN ILLINOIS CONFERENCE MAR 28-29, 2014 – HOUSTON, TEXAS APR 4-5, 2014 – INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA APR 4-5, 2014 – NEW ENGLAND CONFERENCE SPRING 2014: EASTERN PA, FLA, & ROCKY MTN WWW.RMNETWORK.ORG/COACH 6 | katalyst

Radical feminist theolo irredeemably patriarch liberation. I ask a simi homophobic? Can the seeking to live out the irredeemably homopho to live out Biblical Obe together across radical creates a place for tho Church. North United Methodist Church in Indiana Gene Robinson which motivated them to be a wel coach training, scheduled for April 4-5, 2014. As a irredeemably homophobic. We are seeking to beco to live into Biblical Obedience, and we answer thi gospel, whose overwhelming message is to feed t to your neighbor. Let us find tangible ways to be i welcomed presence in the face of great difficulty

Valleys exa

Robyn Henderson-Espinoza - RMN North Central

mountains

The people who once w light. For there is born - Isaiah 9:2

Darkness comes in man prepare for the birth of light – the kind of light New light is dawning in example is an intention the Texas Conference. Breaking the Silence (BTS), an educational event led by a panel of folks who order to bridge the many miles across the confere board for monthly meetings, the panel was physic gathered 4 hours north and participated in real tim Folks in both locations heard the presentation, en setting, and began to dream about plans by distri are mentoring new groups and the light is growin from each district will be present at the March 28 overcoming the darkness of isolation and paving

Laura Young - RMN South Central Region


ogian Mary Daly said that the bible was hal and could not ever serve as a tool for ilar question: is the church irredeemably community of faithful witnesses who are eir faith become something other than an obic community? I think they can, and the call edience is one such way that we can come l differences and become the community that ose wishing to journey in The United Methodist a members attended an event with Bishop lcoming presence for the upcoming process a community of faithful followers, we are not ome radically hospitable by following the call is call collectively as faithful witnesses to the the hungry, clothe the poor, and give shelter inspired by our communities to be a radically and challenge.

alted,

l Regional Organizer - robyn@rmnetwork.org

made low

walked in darkness have now seen a great a child who will drive out the night.”

ny forms, one of which is isolation. As we f Christ, the SCJ is also preparing for new t that lifts communities out of isolation. n each of our thirteen conferences. One nal movement across the nine districts of the Texas leadership team, recently offered currently host area LGBT support groups. In ence, and following the model used by the BTS cally present in Houston while another group me via Skype conference on a large screen. ngaged in Q & A, discussed the needs of their ict. Things are happening. Existing groups ng. It is my hope that at least one leader 8th-29th Process Coach training. Light! Light the way for love, justice, and joy.

nal Organizer - laura@rmnetwork.org

Prepare for God’s arrival! Make the road straight and smooth, a highway fit for our God. -Isaiah 40:3 What does Biblical Obedience look like in the Northeastern Jurisdiction? Pastors performing samesex weddings and telling their stories, churches opening up their sanctuaries for same-sex wedding ceremonies, LGBTQ clergy continuing to heed God’s call on their lives, despite the threat of charges being brought... but here is a slightly different story: Five members of St Paul’s, Ithaca have been trained as Process Coaches. In February 2013 the church celebrated its 15th Year of being Reconciling. They put on a special event and invited other UMCs in the area. But they didn’t just put a poster up, or send emails. Jami and Diana BreedloveCrouch went door to door inviting people in person, as well as other clergy and congregations. And the work has continued. They are in contact with eight churches in their area. Most of the work is quiet relationship building, getting to know folks, and being prepared to tell their story when the moment is right. In undertaking this work, Jami and Diana and the others at St Paul’s are preparing the way for God to work, they are clearing obstacles, smoothing out bumps and making the hearts and minds of those they are meeting with and talking to ready to hear the Gospel that proclaims a welcome to all, without exception. Helen Ryde - RMN Northeastern Regional Organizer - helen@rmnetwork.org

The Southeast is filled with actions of Biblical Obedience—actions that appear as front-page news, but also those actions of simply being the church. Green Street Church UM and Interfaith Voices lived into Biblical Obedience by hosting a workshop titled “Come Out of the Wilderness.” Rev. Dawn Flynn shared her story as a transgender clergyperson in The United Methodist Church who was intimidated into voluntarily surrendering her clergy credentials after her first public experience dressing as a woman for a fundraiser. Rev. Kelly Carpenter and Rev. Willard Bass led a powerful conversation on racism and homophobia and the importance of challenging privilege so that the work we do together truly builds God’s kin-dom. Rev. Josh Noblitt and I trained new people to be evangelicals for churches that are truly open to and in ministry with all. Rev. Dawn Hand reminded everyone present to “come out, come out, wherever you are,” to stop hiding behind fear but live into God’s love and promise. The two-day gathering was a reminder of the importance of preaching the Gospel that God shares with us, of building authentic communities where all can name their whole personhood without exception and of living into Biblical Obedience in our neighborhoods. I am thankful for the amazing leadership in Western North Carolina and their commitment to our beloved UMC and their faith in the God who calls us together. Rev. Laura Rossbert - RMN Southeastern Regional Organizer - rossbert@rmnetwork.org

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How beautiful the feet of

”THANK YOU” FROM JOE & BOBBY October 26th was a happy day in Birmingham, Alabama...

PLANNED GIVING

Thank you for your show of support of our marriage. We have been overwhelmed with the people near and far who have reached out to us. When we began planning for our wedding, we expected some people to make statements against us—but what we did not expect was that the words of support and encouragement would come from so far away and be so much more numerous. We did not expect clergy to come from all over the connection to stand with us and pray with us before our wedding— we had more than 25 pastors from places as far away as Indiana, Texas, and Florida. We did not expect to be married by a United Methodist bishop, but Bishop Melvin Talbert, a leader in our beloved church, was there to join us in Holy Matrimony.

ENABLES YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW TO LEAVE A LASTING IMPACT.

Many people asked how they can show support to us. For that, we are thankful and appreciate your prayers most of all. We wanted to share a couple ways you can continue to stand with us: Invite one friend to become a Reconciling United Methodist—share this Katalyst and invite them to sign up in solidarity. Share with them why you work with RMN—whether that be a training you attended, a convocation experience that touched you, or simply the fellowship the community

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has created for you. Together, standing up and speaking out, we can change our church! Also, please support the work of Reconciling Ministries Network with a financial gift. RMN has been the church to us when our own local United Methodist Church could not host our wedding. RMN provided pastoral care, a beautiful community of believers, & ensured the hopeful message of our wedding reached across the connection. We know there is so much more work that needs to be done—and we are asking everyone to share in ways that they can to continue the momentum that started in Birmingham, Alabama at our wedding. Sincerely with love and grace, Joe & Bobby


those who bring Biblical Obedience!

IN HONOR OF: Ed & Janelle Armstrong - Therese P & Mike Armstrong | Mary Ann Barclay - Central Texas Chapter of MFSA | Bonnie Beckonchrist - Beverly Drake, Dale Ford, Dr Wallis & Jennifer Calaway, Helen & Lewis Ross, Jean & Barry Wood, Jim & Melinda Kirby, Karen M Wyss & Bonnie J Meyer, Kathy & Steve Pollard, Rachel Hinshelwood | The Marriage of Ron Bennett & Jim Ring - Revs Andrew J & Emily A Peck-McClain | Mark Bowman - Ron Gebhardtsbauer & Gregory Wright | David Braden - Revs Brian & Laura Rossbert | Rev Elizabeth Braddon - Rev Dr Karen P Oliveto | Nancy Carter - Bruce & Lillian Venner | DeLyn & Sara Celec - Joyce Hill | Central UMC’s 29th year as a Reconciling church | Beverly Cole - Jane McMillen | Jennifer Lynne Coles & Courtney Anne Coles - Lisa Coles | Colin - Paul & Dr Kathy Hartke | Jenn Cora - Brian Jones | Shirley Dare - Elizabeth T Okayama | Geraldine DeAngelo Family - Geraldine DeAngelo | Jim Edwards - Jeff Edwards | Julie Fielder - Kelley Payne | The Marriage of Andrew Fiser & Kaki Talbot - Philip Gates, Jessica P Bridges | The Marriage of Danielle Gadomski & Jared Littleton - Ann Lorentzen, Dawn Martin, Danielle & Jared Gadomski Littleton, Elizabeth Guthrie, Jason Levy, Keith Mayton, Melissa & Ryan Linville, Michael A Littleton, Nolen Bunker, Richard & Elizabeth Parks, Caitlin & Adam Cline, Bill & Joy Watts, Marie & Terry Freeman, Matthew Winkel | Rev Nancy Grissom-Self - Kiyoko Kasai Fujiu | Hazel Anne, Patricia, & Wanda - Deborah Maria | Rev Stephen Heiss - Stephanie Charnetsky, Michael & Annette Chalker | The Marriage of Josh & Meghan - Beth Ludlum | Billy Kluttz - Kenan Kerr | Martha Lang & Dalton Hughes - Laurel Hicks | Melany & Cheryl - Rob Vaughn | Rev John Mueller - Nicole Baker | Rev Dr Thomas Ogletree - Connie Prestwood | The Marriage of Joe Openshaw & Bobby Prince - The Table UMC, Emily Fechner, Daniel & Karen Hartzler, Diane Rehfield, Eileen Stringer, Mark Richardson | Rick & Ellen Pearson - Jonathan Pearson Magoon | Steve Phillips & Ron Melvin - Theresa Hunt | Rev Laura Rossbert - Jeffrey Goodie | The Marriage of Helen Ryde & Kate Schiappa - Andrew Rahorcsak, Linda Weissenberger | Glenn Schwerdtfeger - Bryan Babcock | Akiko Miyake-Stoner - Brad Corban | Jim Strickland - Elizabeth Strickland | Bishop Melvin Talbert - James Parkhurst, Rev Patricia Farris, David Bremer, The Table UMC, Joan C Wrenn | TEAM Reconciling Group at Church of the Resurrection - Marty Mather, Daniel & Karen Hartzler | Jay & Maureen Vetter - Donna L & James E Lightbody | Wesley UMC’s 29th year as a Reconciling church | Rev Paul Whipple - Bill & Joy Watts

IN MEMORY OF: Carole Carsey - Margie & Ray Francis | Mildred Green - Andy & Marilyn Belcher, Bishop Calvin D & Velma M Duell McConnell, Ronnie L Egger | Carolyn LaCombe - Rosanne Driscoll | Nancy Law - Bruce & Lillian Venner | Gary Pennington - Andy & Marilyn Belcher | Alice K Shelton - Alan W & Judy L Shelton | Phyllis Caroly Southard - Alexandria Shapoval, Phillips Theological Seminary, Potawatomi UMC | Rev Margo Tenold - Dr Lisa Barrett, Pamela & William Milam

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But after Hurricane Sandy, it became a very different place. All of a sudden, the hustle of the city was replaced with silence and desolation, interrupted by the occasional military vehicle. We tried to stay inside our locked building at night, but one evening my husband and I got caught walking home after dark, and it was scary. For the first time, we missed the people who came to our neighborhood every night to party. Many of our neighbors had left the cold darkness to stay with friends uptown or upstate. So there was almost no one on the streets at night, and we wondered what kinds of people had stayed behind. We felt all alone in a city that had succumbed to chaos.

H e r g lory sh a ll be seen BY REV. VICKI FLIPPIN, THE CHURCH OF THE VILLAGE

“FOR, BEHOLD, DARKNESS SHALL COVER THE EARTH, AND GROSS DARKNESS THE PEOPLE; BUT THE LORD SHALL ARISE UPON THEE, AND [HER] GLORY SHALL BE SEEN UPON THEE.” - ISAIAH 60:1-2 When I think of darkness, I think of Hurricane Sandy. Last year, when it struck New York and New Jersey, my home in the East Village lost power for a week. And I must say that the city feels very different without light. My neighborhood was the kind of place that was alive with activity at all hours of the day and night. At 4am on a Thursday morning, you could see parents pushing strollers, college students eating Pho, and suburbanites getting tattoos—all on the same block. The neighborhood was always lit with streetlights, businesses, and cigarettes.

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In the darkness, we walked in a cautious and quick quiet. All was dead, abandoned, lonely—until we stepped in front of our local market. There was something odd about that tiny grocery. Through the open door and dark windows, we noticed several small circles of light hovering here and there. Was it employees… or looters? Then we realized—people were shopping in there. Our neighbors were buying cookies and apples and bottles of wine. Because that’s what East Villagers do at 11pm. We took a deep breath and realized that the soul of the neighborhood had not, after all, fallen into crime and chaos, as we had feared. There was life and goodness still hanging on in the darkness. We laughed and relaxed the rest of the way home, reassured that all would be well. These days, being queer or an ally in the church feels like living in a city without light. Since the 1970’s, when


discrimination against LGBTQ people became a legal reality in our church, the words of Isaiah have rung true for us—darkness covers the earth, and gross darkness the people. For many of us, the church that used to give us so much life and joy has become a place of desolation and danger. Our children are told that they are incompatible with Christian teaching. Our clergy are put on trial. Our families are talked about like they are “distracting issues” Our enemies are emboldened to do violence to us and those we love. Countless people have left for safer and more enlightened communities. Darkness covers the church, and gross darkness the people. And daylight feels like it will never come. We will never get enough votes. The institution will never cave. The powerful will never risk their power. I know I feel that way when my church prosecutes parents for celebrating their gay sons, when hate speech is spoken freely in our highest assemblies, when our most powerful leaders show little courage or intention of leading. I sometimes feel that God left our temples and assemblies long ago, and we are just stumbling around alone in the darkness. But then I hear the soloist rehearsing “O Holy Night,” and I see the shipment of candles come in for Christmas Eve, and I hear the lector read the Magnificat. And the bass chants the ancient texts: “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light: and they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death—upon them hath the light shineth.” (Isaiah 9:2) Then I look through the open sanctuary doors and windows of our darkened church, and I see little

circles of light hovering here and there. I see the frown of the baby being baptized while her moms look on with delight. I see the trembling hands of the grooms, guided by their pastor, as they exchange wedding bands. I see the mom of a lesbian daughter bringing up queer inclusion with her UM Women in Tennessee. I see the young, lesbian seminarian who wants to make a go of it in her mother church. I see the bishop who is about to break the “covenant” that silences his spirit. Each is a small light hovering in the dark church. Each is a reflection of God’s glory. Each is proof that God is not through with us, that God’s spirit still haunts our temples. And those little circles of light are what make all the difference. Without that light, I might have left years ago. But each of you, shining bright in defiance of the darkness of this era, is a testament that life and goodness still hang on, that sin and chaos have not yet won. Each light in the darkness is a Bethlehem star, a portent that new hope is being born into the world. Of course, we know from our ancient stories that this new birth will be no happy ending. Between the star and resurrection, there is exile, a slaughter of innocents, a cleansing of the temple,

betrayal, abuse, trials, sacrifice, and martyrdom. We have no idea when and how the morning will come for our church or even what it will look like after the world turns. All we have and all we need are the glimpses of glory shining off each other’s faces in the darkness, assuring us that God is still in this, birthing something beautiful and significant among us. ... The Rev. Vicki Flippin is the Pastor of Social Justice, Exploring Faith, and Intergenerational Ministries at The Church of the Village, a progressive, multi-racial, and Reconciling United Methodist Church in Manhattan. A graduate of Yale Divinity School (’08) and the University of Chicago (’05), Flippin has served previously as senior pastor at Diamond Hill UMC in Connecticut, which joined the Reconciling movement during her tenure. She currently serves in leadership roles in the New York Annual Conference’s Commission on Religion and Race and Methodists in New Directions, working for both racial and LGBTQ equality with equal fervor. A proud signer and clergy recruiter for her conference’s Covenant of Conscience, she is committed to the practice of marriage equality in The UMC and had the privilege of preaching at the Reconciling Ministries Network 2013 Convocation. Flippin has close family and church ties to both Taiwan and the American Midwest and currently enjoys life in New York City with her husband and two eccentric cats.

REV. V IC KI FL IP P IN CHURCHQUAKE CONVOCATION

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Good tidings of great joy to all people Help us welcome our newest Reconciling communities!

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2013 December Katalyst  

Reconciling Ministries Network tri-annual magazine