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THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

A SPECIAL PUBLICATION CREATED BY REPUBLIC MEDIA CUSTOM PUBLISHING

-

HEALTHCARE NEWS YOU CAN USE FOR YOUR WHOLE FAMILY

Vol. 33, No. 9

September 2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

COVER/08/09: AFFORDABLE CARE ACT 02: HOME HEALTHCARE 03: OVARIAN CANCER 04: ADOLESCENT SUICIDE 05: PROJECT LIFESAVER 05: DENTAL CLINIC FOR COMPLEX MEDICAL CONDITIONS 05: GROCERY SHOPPING FOR THE HOMEBOUND 06: SUPPORT GROUPS/EVENTS 07: SUPPORT GROUPS/INFO ONLINE 08: ACA: WHO CAN PARTICIPATE; LEVELS OF COVERAGE; CALCULATING COSTS 09: ACA: SUBSIDIES & PENALTIES; QUESTIONS TO ASK; ENROLL AMERICA

HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACE

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

Understanding the

Affordable Care Act

HEALTHCARE News

101

ENROLL AMERICA

Chart your course

Get help navigating the Health Insurance Marketplace

LEVELS OF COVERAGE

BY DEBRA GELBART

Navigator or CAC? “Most people who seek help with navigating the Marketplace will talk with a Certified Application Counselor,” explained Allen Gjersvig, the director of healthcare innovation for AACHC. The Navigators are mostly organizations, he said, but there are a small number of individual people trained to be Navigators who receive extensive training in cultural competency and making referrals to appropriate consumer agencies related to insurance. The CACs, who likely number in the hundreds, receive training mostly in helping people navigate the Marketplace and will be found at community health centers, hospitals and many communitybased groups, he said. There is no charge to talk with a Navigator or CAC.

How and where to get help To find a community health center near you, visit aachc.org and click on “Search for a Health Center” under Health Centers. Or, you can call the Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers at 602-253-0090. For a complete directory of Navigators in Arizona, visit CoverAZ.org, or call the Health Insurance Marketplace at 800-318-2596. The Marketplace representative may also be able to tell you about the three other Arizona Navigator grantees. They are: The Greater Phoenix Urban League, awarded $523,773; the Arizona Board of Regents, awarded $190,268 to administer the grant through the Center for Rural Health at The University of Arizona in Tucson; and Campesinos Sin Fronteras, Inc., an agency serving farm-workers and low-income Hispanics, awarded $71,386.

By The Numbers

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH • About 1 man in 6 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime* • See page 6 of this issue of Living Well for free screening and support group information * Source: American Cancer Society; cancer.org —PAULA HUBBS COHEN

QUESTIONS TO ASK

CALCULATING COSTS

SUBSIDIES AND PENALTIES

Getting ready for the

Affordable

Care Act

Sign-up for the Health Insurance Marketplace starts Oct. 1 BY DEBRA GELBART

T

here are numerous details surrounding and related to the Affordable Care Act, or ACA. We asked local experts to help us provide readers with a broad overview of what’s changing and where to get more information.

Health Insurance Marketplace

“The individual Marketplace will look a bit like Expedia [a travel-planning website], where you’ll be able to see all different plans offered by different insurance companies and the pricing of each plan online in one place,” Stelnik said. “[However], unlike planning a vacation, the decision consumers need to make here is more important and longer-lasting, so it’s very important to educate yourself about the benefits included in each plan.”

The Open Enrollment period for what’s known as the Health Insurance Marketplace (often referred to as the “Insurance Exchanges”) begins Oct. 1, 2013 and runs through March 31, 2014. An important part of the ACA, the Marketplace allows those who want Continued on pages 8–9 AFFORDABLE CARE ACT individual or family health INSIDE: insurance coverage to select a • Who can participate plan and sign up for coverage. • Levels of coverage Actual coverage for the plan • Calculating costs you select can begin as early • Subsidies and penalties as Jan. 1, 2014, as long as you • Questions to ask enroll by Dec. 15, 2013. After • Enroll America that, to be covered by the first of the next month, you must enroll by the 15th of the current month. For example, in order to be covered by Feb. 1, 2014, you must enroll by Jan. 15, 2014. (Source: healthcare.gov) Employees of companies that already offer health insurance probably won’t need to visit the Marketplace. These folks will continue to select their health insurance during their employers’ Open Enrollment periods, although employees may have fewer options as a way to rein in costs, explained Jeff Stelnik, senior vice president at Blue Cross Blue Jeff Stelnik, senior vice president at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, is gearing up for the major shift in Shield of Arizona. laws regarding health insurance.

DID YOU KNOW:

In order to be eligible for a federal premium subsidy (explained on page 9 of this issue of Living Well), you must purchase health insurance through the Marketplace.

TIMELINE OCTOBER 1, 2013 Open enrollment begins

JANUARY 1, 2014 Coverage begins

MARCH 31, 2014

Open enrollment for 2014 closes

RICK D’ELIA

Thanks to $67 million in grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, you’ll be able to get help from local Certified Application Counselors (CACs) who are part of the federal Navigator program, designed to help people who have questions about the new Health Insurance Marketplace. Four organizations in Arizona received grants to operate the Navigator program locally. The largest grant recipient is the Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers (AACHC), recognized by its official name — the Arizona Alliance of Community Health Centers — in the grant documentation. As the fiscal agent for the grant, AACHC will receive $1.3 million to disburse to a variety of statewide community groups to train Navigators and recruit CACs.


2 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013

VITAL Signs

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t can be difficult to find a home healthcare agency that best meets the needs of a person’s elderly loved one, said Scott Hawthornthwaite, director of care coordination for the Area Agency on Aging, Region One, a Phoenix-based non-profit corporation that coordinates services for seniors and their families in Maricopa County. Because of this, he said, people should not hesitate to shop around as there may be more than one agency that will meet their needs.

Resources are available

“Arizona has more non-medical home healthcare agencies than any other state, so there are plenty to choose from,” said Brett Petersen, MSW, director of caregiver services at Duet, a non-profit interfaith organization that has been serving older adults in greater Phoenix since 1981. Petersen noted that while some are superb companies, there are others that people should approach with caution. “One of the first things I tell people who are looking for home healthcare for their loved ones is that in Arizona, non-medical home healthcare agencies are not

regulated or overseen by any government agency,” Petersen said. “This lets people know that they have to be extra mindful.” One important resource that Petersen mentions is the Arizona Non-Medical Home Care Association. “It is made up of a group of responsible business owners who provide non-medical home healthcare and have developed standards of practice,” he said. To be in the group, Petersen said that all caregivers must be fingerprinted, complete required training, be licensed and bonded with insurance, and be in good standing with the Better Business Bureau. “I tell people to begin their search at AZNHA.org and go from there,” he said.

THINKSTOCK

Home Healthcare

BY A ALISON LISO LI SO ON ST STAN STANTON ANTO AN TON N

• What types of screenings and background checks are done for the agency’s employees? • Will the same caregiver come every time? People should also find out ahead of time what an agency’s hourly rates are and ask if they are all-inclusive, or if there is an extra charge for extra services, Petersen said. “An agency may say they charge $19 an hour, but then people may find out later that if it involves giving medicine or visiting on a Saturday it will be more,” he said. “Also, often places will have a minimum number of hours per week, so you want to ask about this as well.”

Resources Area Agency on Aging, Region One’s website and 24-Hour Senior Help Line: AAAPhx.org; 602-264-4357 Arizona Non-Medical Home Care Association: AZNHA.org; 602-283-3503 Duet: DuetAZ.org; 602-274-5022 Medicare: Medicare.gov; 800-MEDICARE; TTY 1-877-486-2048

HEALTH EXPERTS

Questions to ask

People who are looking for non-medical home healthcare for a loved one should ask a variety of questions about the agency, Hawthornthwaite said. These may include: • How does the agency match employees with the client’s preferences, i.e., a male or female caregiver? • Does the agency provide ongoing staff training?

STRENGTH CONDITIONING Aneil Koerper, CSCS As a Certified Strength Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), Aneil Koerper serves as the Health and Fitness Coordinator at The Terraces of Phoenix, a continuing care retirement community in the heart of Phoenix. She developed and oversees The Terraces’ campus-wide Senior Fitness Program, teaching a variety of exercise and wellness classes, managing campus spaces such as the Trail Fitness Park, and performing fitness testing with residents to monitor balance and strength. Koerper is one of two certified FallProof Balance and Mobility Instructors in Arizona, as well as a Senior Fitness Instructor and Personal Trainer with the American Senior Fitness Association.

General Manager: CAMI KAISER, ckaiser@republicmedia.com A division of The Arizona Republic. 200 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004

Manager Creative Development: ISAAC MOYA, imoya@republicmedia.com

Look for Livingwell a-z on the first Wednesday of each month!

Contributing Editor: JIM WILLIAMS, jlwilliams@republicmedia.com

Each month, we bring you local health information you can use to keep you and your family living well. From A to Z, we tackle a broad range of health issues and offer tips for keeping your healthcare costs in check. This publication is produced by Republic Media Custom Publishing. For questions concerning any content included in this publication please contact: Editor Paula Hubbs Cohen, Paula.Cohen@cox.net or call 602-444-8658.

Editor: PAULA HUBBS COHEN, Paula.Cohen@cox.net

Managing Art Director: TRACEY PHALEN, tphalen@republicmedia.com

The Terraces of Phoenix 7550 N. 16th Street Phoenix, AZ 85020 1-800-462-2404 • www.theterracesphoenix.com

Design: LISA QUIRIN, lisa_q@me.com Republic Media Intern: NICK KOSTENKO Advertising: RHONDA PRINGLE, 602-444-4929, rpringle@republicmedia.com. For general advertising inquiries, contact Republic Media at 602-444-8000. AR-0008075820-01

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

Robert Matura

Vice President of Medicare Operations Cigna HealthCare of Arizona

Medicare Enrollment is Just Around the Corner

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f you are eligible for Medicare, there are many choices available. Now is the time to look at your Medicare options so you can make an informed decision when it is time to enroll. Medicare Advantage is a popular option for Medicare beneficiaries and the annual election period is only once a year - starting on October 15 and ending December 7 of each year. October will be here before you know it – now is the time to start planning and comparing your health care options.

Advantage plan, you must first enroll in Original Medicare, and then enroll in the Medicare Advantage plan of your choice during that period. After initial enrollment, most people are required to stay enrolled in their chosen plan through the remainder of the calendar year unless they are eligible for a Special Election Period.

The Initial Coverage Election Period is when you first become eligible for Original Medicare – usually when you turn 65. You can enroll during the three months before, the month of and the three months after your 65th birthday. For initial enrollment in a Medicare

In Phoenix, our Cigna Medicare experts can be reached at 855-298-4379 to help answer your questions and discuss plan options available to you. You can also learn more at www.medicare.gov or call your local Social Security Administration office.

A Special Election Period can result for a variety of reasons but some instances include if you move in or out of a plan’s service area, are dual-eligible for both When Can You Enroll? Medicare and Medicaid or you qualify Federal law specifies times of the year for Extra Help or Low Income Subsidy for Medicare and Medicare Advantage (LIS). enrollment. These include initial, special and annual enrollment periods. Talk to the Experts Health care is an important decision and The Annual Election Period occurs every having the right information can help year from October 15 to December you find the right health care option 7. During this time, all Medicare that meets your individual needs. It’s beneficiaries can enroll in, switch or drop a good idea to talk with your doctor a Medicare Advantage plan. The plan before making changes to your health you choose will be effective on January care coverage, as well as those you 1st of the next year and you’ll remain in trust, like friends and family. Start asking that plan for the full calendar year. This questions now, so when enrollment rolls is the time most beneficiaries choose or around, you get health coverage that change their plan. suits both your lifestyle and your wallet.

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WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013 | LIVING WELL A-Z | 3

THINKSTOCK

PHOTO LAUREL PRACHT

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Two-time survivor

Ovarian cancer often overlooked

Vague symptoms result in frequent late diagnosis

N

o reliable screening tests plus vague symptoms mean the vast majority of the more than 22,000 women reported by the National Institutes of Health to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year are in advanced stages of the disease at the time of detection. Indeed, according to Paul Magtibay, M.D., gynecologic oncologist and chair of the Department of Gynecologic Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, between 75 and 80 percent of women have stage 3 or 4 ovarian cancer at diagnosis.

But there is good news

However, Magtibay said there is good news. “Unlike some other cancers, ovarian cancer responds well to chemotherapy,” he said. “The gold standard of treatment is a combination of cytoreductive surgery called debulking to remove the cancer throughout the abdominal cavity and chemotherapy to kill any microscopic traces of the disease that could not be surgically removed.”

Late-stage symptoms

David S. Alberts, M.D., Arizona Board of Regents professor of medicine, pharmacology, public health and nutritional science, co-director of the

Skin Cancer Institute at The University of Arizona Cancer Center and chair of the Gynecologic Oncology Group’s Cancer Prevention and Control Committee, said that the very nature of ovarian cancer means women don’t begin exhibiting symptoms until they reach late-stage. Stressing that an ovarian cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence, Alberts said that about 20 percent of women who are treated achieve a normal lifespan with no recurrence. Highlighting improvements in care and treatment, he noted that the median survival for ovarian cancer has gone from less than nine months to over six years with an improved quality of life.

“Genetically driven cancers don’t wait for you to finish your plans. It’s up to you to be proactive about your health.” — Mike Janicek, M.D.

Gene mutations

David Alberts, M.D., and ovarian cancer survivor Laurel Pracht

Mike Janicek, M.D., gynecologic oncologist with Arizona Oncology and medical director of the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center’s Cancer Genetic Risk

BY KRISTINE BURNETT

Assessment and Prevention Program, said that women who carry the harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations have up to a 40 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer. While hereditary gene mutations do not guarantee that cancer will develop, the mutation increases the risk exponentially plus the BRCA gene can also lead to early onset of the disease. For some women, this means developing ovarian cancer in their 20s or 30s. “Disease patterns in families can tell us a lot about what to look for and what preventive measures to recommend, such as removal of the ovaries, fallopian tubes and/or breasts, as was recently publicized by actress Angelina Jolie,” Janicek said. “Map out your family disease history and be sure to review it with a doctor who understands the nuances of genetics.”

Free disease mapping

Janicek encourages everyone to take advantage of free online disease mapping and pedigree tools like the Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait (available on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website, FamilyHistory.hhs.gov), and seek genetic counseling from someone trained in interpreting that information.

“ It is critical to point out that the National Cancer Institute published a Clinic Alert in 2006 concerning the value of intraperitoneal cancer drug therapy. The Alert stated that women with stage 3 disease who have undergone tumor debulking down to less than 1 cm in diameter tumor plaques should be considered for chemotherapeutic drug delivery into the intrabdominal space and have that discussion with their oncologists.” — David Alberts, M.D.

Laurel Pracht was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1999, after being told for nearly a year that her bowel issues and back pain were caused by irritable bowel syndrome. Because ovarian cancer is an aggressive and rapidly growing disease, she was in the advanced stages by the time she received an accurate diagnosis. After debulking surgery to remove a tumor that had engulfed both of her ovaries, Pracht underwent chemotherapy. She achieved remission, but the cancer recurred in 2003. A second debulking procedure followed by chemotherapy has left her cancer-free for the last decade. “I am what most physicians consider cured,” Pracht said. “That puts me in a very rare group. Ovarian cancer is much more lethal than people realize.” —KRISTINE BURNETT

3

common ovarian cancer symptoms

Women should see a specialist if they experience one or more of the following symptoms for a month or longer:

1 Increased abdominal size or girth

2 Abdominal bloating with pelvic pain

3 Frequent urination

Resources American Cancer Society: Cancer.org; 800-227-2345 National Cancer Institute: Cancer.gov; 800-4-CANCER Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Arizona: OCAZ.org; info@ocaz.org

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4 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013

KIDS Corner

Understanding adolescent suicide One in six teens has contemplated suicide

I

t is one of the most serious mental health issues for adolescents: suicide. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people ages 15-24. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 4,600 children ages 10-24 commit suicide each year. “The reality is that we have a situation where one in six teenagers has contemplated suicide, and one in 12 has thought about a method to do it,” said Jon McCaine, Ph.D., clinical director of the high-risk youth program at Bayless Healthcare Group in Phoenix. “This is a dominating issue for teenagers — where am I and where am I going?”

Not just growing pains

While it might be easy to dismiss as simply a part of being a moody adolescent, suicidal thinking is much more complex. Biochemical changes that are a part of adolescence can combine with the natural social and psychological difficulties of being a teen. “Some of this is hormonal and some of this is psychological development,” said Ellen Diamond, Ph.D., clinical psychologist with Depression Recovery Centers in Scottsdale. “Adolescents tend to have more extremes in their moods than typical adults do. They don’t have the life experience to realize [that] the way they feel today might not be the way they’re always going to feel. That combination can set up a suicide attempt.”

Modern pressures such as bullying on social media can exacerbate existing teen angst in a way that’s different from the past. And for a teen, that seemingly worldwide embarrassment can feel like a burden too large to bear. “There’s this sense of public humiliation with universal exposure,” McCaine said. “That didn’t happen before [the proliferation of social media sites].”

“A kid once told me ‘It isn’t that I wanted to die really, I just couldn’t keep living the way I was living and didn’t see anything different being possible.” — Jon McCaine, Ph.D.

Warning signs

“This age period is susceptible to suicide and hopelessness because it’s a transitional period in the first place,” McCaine said. “Where you have to separate it is when it becomes more extreme. There’s a level of emotional distress that starts to disrupt their ability to function.” Parents should watch for a drop in grades, a preoccupation with death, and isolation from not just family, but also friends. “If your teenager is starting to stay in their room and not going out, not wanting that social outlet, that’s a warning sign,” Diamond said.

PERFORMANCE PROBLEMS?

BY ELISE RILEY

Resources ST. LUKE’S BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER

Getting help

Depending on the situation, inpatient or outpatient therapy is possible to help a child work through thoughts of suicide. “The best course of treatment depends on the degree of safety,” McCaine said. “If the child is struggling with ideas, doesn’t have a plan and you’re confident that they will talk, then you’re looking at outpatient. [However], it’s better to err on the side of safety.”

One of several local adolescent mental health centers is at St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center. Here, patients ages 4-17 can receive patient-specific care for acute mental health issues. The Center, which also serves adults, includes psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, counselors, social workers and more.

Experts say these are some of the primary warning signs that a teen might be contemplating suicide:

LOCAL

• Sudden disinterest in activities they previously enjoyed • Persistent and sustained sense of hopelessness • Preoccupation with death and themes of death (songs, poetry, etc.) • Substance abuse • Giving personal items away that are of importance • Referring to being gone and people reacting to their absence • Isolation • Reckless behavior • Developing plans for suicide • Previous attempts (one-third of suicides are committed by someone who made an attempt in the previous year)

More info: 602-251-8535; StLukesBehavioralHealth.com

Community Crisis Line: 602-222-9444; 800-631-1314 Maricopa County Empact Suicide Prevention Center: 480-784-1500 Peer Counseling Hotline: 602-248-8336 Teen Crisis Solutions: 480-440-3242 (for parents of struggling and at-risk teens) NATIONAL National Suicide Prevention Center: 800-273-8255 Suicide Prevention Center for Hearing Impaired: 800-799-4889 The Trevor Project LGBTQ Youth Hotline: 866-488-7386 Youth America Peer Counseling Hotline: 877-968-8454

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Project Lifesaver

Keeping Peoria residents safe

T

BY ALISON STANTON

Peoria Police Department

he Peoria Police Department is now better equipped to find people who are likely to wander off from their homes, schools or care facilities. Project Lifesaver is a program that uses a waterproof bracelet with a unique assigned radio frequency. Amanda Jacinto, public safety information officer for the City of Peoria, said that if the person who is wearing the bracelet goes missing, his or her caregiver can then call 911 and officers will begin searching for the person using Project Lifesaver’s radiofrequency tracking equipment. “The bracelet acts like a beacon that the officers can narrow down to a small area and find the missing person,” Jacinto said.

Jacinto said that the Peoria Police Department became part of the Project Lifesaver program this past July, adding that as far as she knows it is the only agency in the Valley that is currently participating. “We felt that it could be a great help to caregivers in our city who have loved ones who may wander away,” she said. “The program offers a way to help find these individuals quickly and safely if they do become lost.” More info: visit PeoriaAZ.gov (623-773-7000) or ProjectLifeSaver.org (877-580-LIFE/5433)

Helpful for caregivers

Fast Facts

According to Gene Saunders, chief executive officer and founder of Project Lifesaver, the fire department or other agency that is offering the program will get a full profile of each person, including their history. “The program is particularly helpful for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and/or those who have had strokes,” he said.

• Project Lifesaver was started in 1999 by the Chesapeake Sheriff’s Office in Chesapeake, Virginia, as a search-andrescue operation based on the need to find missing Alzheimer’s patients. The program was later expanded to finding children with autism and persons with Down syndrome. • Locally, the program is currently offered only to Peoria residents. • There is an initial start-up cost of $325 with an annual $80 fee.

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10,600-square-foot oral healthcare clinic was recently opened by A.T. Still University of Health Sciences (ATSU). The Advanced Care Clinic treats patients with complex dental needs, including those with conditions such as cancer, hemophilia and kidney disease. The Clinic also specializes in comprehensive

oral healthcare for patients whose physical and developmental disabilities require dentists with advanced training. ATSU’s clinics accept most insurance, including Medicare and Medicaid, and also offer reduced-fee services. More info: ATSU.edu/TheCenter; 480-248-8107

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Here’s when you automatically get Part A and Part B

You get retirement benefits from Social Security or the RRB.

Starting the first day of the month you turn age 65.

You get disability benefits from Social Security or certain disability benefits from the RRB.

Starting the first day of the 25th month after your Social Security or RRB benefits begin.

Your disability is ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease).

Starting the first day of the month your Social Security or RRB disability benefits begin.

1-855-298-4382 (TTY 711)

1

informational seminars coming to your area.

This FREE booklet is published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and is designed to help Medicare beneficiaries like you understand exactly how and when you can make new choices for Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage) and Part D prescription drug coverage.

AR-0008062799-01

* While supplies last, quantities are limited. No obligation to enroll. “Cigna” and the “Tree of Life” logo are registered service marks of Cigna Intellectual Property, Inc., licensed for use by Cigna Corporation and its operating subsidiaries. All products and services are provided by or through such operating subsidiaries, including Cigna HealthCare of Arizona, Inc. (CHC-AZ), and not by Cigna Corporation. Cigna Medicare Select Plus Rx HMO plans are offered by CHC-AZ under a contract with Medicare. As of the date of publication, Cigna Medicare Select and Cigna Medicare Select Plus Rx plans are offered to employers and individuals in Maricopa County and certain zip codes within Apache Junction and Queen Creek, Arizona only. H0354_652012a Accepted


6 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013

September Take advantage of over 100 opportunities for you to meet others with similar issues and learn more about various aspects of your health – from A to Z.

PROSTATE CANCER PROSTATE CANCER LEARN & SUPPORT Sept. 5, 6–8 p.m. By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006 US TOO Sept. 9, 7–9 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-242-3131

MEDICARE MEDICARE 101 Various dates, times & locations By John C. Lincoln Register: jclmedicare101.eventbrite.com; 623-434-6265 MEDICARE ABCs Sept. 16, noon–1 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Rec. Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-9355 MEDICARE 101 Sept. 16, 5–6 p.m. Lifeprint Community Center 20414 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix 623-707-2899

WEIGHT LOSS WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINARS Various dates, times & locations By Scottsdale Healthcare Register: bariatricsurgeryaz.com; 480-882-4636 WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINARS Various dates, times & locations By St. Luke’s Register: 800-248-5553

EXERCISES FOR OSTEOPOROSIS & ARTHRITIS Sept. 12, 1–2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Civic Center Library 3839 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 QI GONG FOR STRESS MANAGEMENT Sept. 18, 7–8 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Barnes & Noble 10500 N. 90 St., Scottsdale Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 SPIRIT-LIFTING FOOD Sept. 19, 1–2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Desert Foothills Library 38443 N. Schoolhouse Rd., Cave Creek Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 STRESS MANAGEMENT Sept. 19, 4:30 p.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert 480-543-2000 KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS (MAKO) Sept. 19, 6 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355 KNEE REPLACEMENT SEMINAR Sept. 19, 6–7 p.m. Arrowhead Hospital 18701 N. 67 Ave., Glendale Register: azhealthyhours.com; 855-292-9355 CANCER PREVENTION Sept. 26, 1–2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Civic Center Library 3839 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 RETHINK RA WITH CHEF SEAMUS MULLEN Sept. 30, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa Register: 602-230-2273

MEDICATION CHECKS

BARIATRIC SEMINAR Sept. 14, 8–10 a.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert Register: 480-543-2000

MEDICATION CHECKS Various dates, times & locations By St. Luke’s Register: 877-351-9355

BAND CAMP: BARIATRIC SUPPORT Sept. 24, 4–5 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Bridges Center 555 N. 18 St., Phoenix Register: 602-251-8828

PHARMACIST TALK: KNOW YOUR MEDICATION Sept. 6, 1–2 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707

WELLNESS

PHARMACIST MEDICATION REVIEW Sept. 9, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa Register: 480-325-4707

MEDITATION PILATES PLUS NUTRITION STRATEGIES & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT Various dates & times Lifeprint Community Center 20414 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix 623-707-2899 TOBACCO CESSATION PROGRAM (8 WEEKS) Various dates, times & locations By Scottsdale Healthcare Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 WALK-ERCIZE CLASS Various dates, 9–9:45 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 COUCH TO 5K Sept. 10, 6 p.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert 480-543-2000 FLU SHOT CLINIC Sept. 11, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 (All insurance plans accepted; $25 without insurance; check or credit card only) CHOLESTEROL: HOW LOW IS OK? Sept. 11, 1–2 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 HEALTHY IMMUNE SYSTEM Sept. 11, 1–2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Appaloosa Library 7377 E. Silverstone Dr., Scottsdale Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

MEDICATION REVIEW Sept. 12 Lifeprint Community Center 20414 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix Register: 623-707-2899

HEART/STROKE WHOLEHEARTED HEALTH: FOCUS ON YOUR HEART Call for dates & times Banner Baywood, Mesa: 480-321-2000 Banner Del E. Webb, Sun City West: 623-524-4000 Banner Desert, Mesa: 480-412-3000 Banner Estrella, Phoenix: 623-327-4000 STROKE SURVIVOR SUPPORT Sept. 11, 10 a.m. HealthSouth Scottsdale 9630 E. Shea Blvd, Scottsdale 480-551-5442 CARDIOVASCULAR SCREENING Sept. 12, 8–10 a.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Foothills Food Bank 6028 E. Hidden Valley Dr., Cave Creek Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

STROKE SUPPORT Sept. 24, 3 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355 STROKE CAREGIVER SUPPORT Sept. 26, 2:30–3:30 p.m. Mercy Gilbert 3420 S. Mercy Rd., Gilbert 877-728-5414 ATRIAL FIBRILLATION & STROKE Sept. 30, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355

DIABETES TAKING CONTROL OF DIABETES Various dates, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2040 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix Register: pastoralcareaz.org; 602-841-5505 DIABETES SUPPORT Sept. 9, 3 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355 DIABETES SUPPORT Sept. 12, 1–2 p.m. St. Luke’s 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix Register: 877-351-9355 DIABETES PUMPERS GROUP Sept. 17, 7–8 p.m. By Mercy Gilbert at Rome Towers 1760 E. Pecos Rd., Gilbert 877-728-3535

ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA COMPASS FOR CAREGIVERS Various dates & times Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix Register: 602-839-6850 LEWY BODY DEMENTIA Sept. 6, 12:30–2 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-830-6850 CAREGIVER SUPPORT Sept. 9, 1:30–3 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Rec. Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-9355 ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT Sept. 10, 17 & 24, 10 a.m.–noon By Benevilla at Faith Presbyterian 16000 N. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City 623-584-4999 GPS LECTURE Sept. 13, 10:30 a.m.–noon By Banner Health at Musical Instrument Museum 4725 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix Register: 602-230-2273 SUPPORT GROUP Lunch provided Sept. 15, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Huger Mercy 2345 W. Orangewood Ave., Phoenix 602-406-5600 CAREGIVER SUPPORT (DUET) Sept. 17, 12:30–2 p.m. Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix 602-274-5022 CAREGIVER SUPPORT Sept. 23, 1:30–3 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Rec. Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-9355

SENIORS WORRISOME WOUNDS Sept. 18, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355

STROKE SUPPORT Sept. 12, 2:30–4 p.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414

KNOW YOUR CHOLESTEROL Sept. 20, noon–1 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Tempe Public Library 3500 S. Rural Rd., Tempe Register: 877-351-9355

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE SUPPORT Sept. 19, 6–7 p.m. Mercy Gilbert 3420 S. Mercy Rd., Gilbert 877-728-5414

BACK PAIN TREATMENTS Sept. 25, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355

THINKSTOCK

All groups and events are believed, but not guaranteed, to be free unless otherwise stated. Every effort has been made to verify accuracy, but please call before attending to confirm details.

TOP Events

Please call to confirm reservations and cost (if any).

Ongoing Alzheimer’s Association Workshops WHAT: Educational workshops for Alzheimer’s patients and their families. Topics include making your home safe, communication techniques and more. WHERE/WHEN: Dates, times and locations vary COST: Free PRESENTED BY: Alzheimer’s Association INFO/REGISTER: 602-528-0545; ALZ.org/dsw

Sept.–Dec. Grief Recovery Programs WHAT: Three-month-long programs for people who are recovering from the loss of a loved one. WHERE/WHEN: Banner Heart, Mesa, Sept. 25–Dec. 18. Banner Desert, Mesa, Sept. 25–Dec. 18. Banner Thunderbird, Glendale, Sept. 29–Dec. 15. COST: $15 for materials PRESENTED BY: Banner Hospice INFO/REGISTER: 480-657-1167; BannerHospice.com

Sept. 7 Chronic Pain Expo WHAT: Learn about managing pain as well as overall health. Numerous vendors including massage therapists, rehabilitation experts, alternative therapies, support groups and more. WHERE: JW Marriott Desert Ridge, 5350 E. Marriott Dr., Phoenix TIME: 10 a.m.–2 p.m. COST: Free PRESENTED BY: Arizona Pain Specialists INFO/REGISTER: ArizonaPain.com

WOMEN & CANCER GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER SUPPORT Sept. 10, 5–6:15 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-4673 KIDSUPPORT PARENT ORIENTATION Sept. 10, 5:30–7 p.m. By The Wellness Community at HEALing House 4458 E. Sharon Dr., Phoenix 602-712-1006

GENERAL SURGERY G. Paul Dabrowski, MD, FACS Dr. Dabrowski joined the full-time faculty and staff of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in 2008. He is currently the medical director of Banner Good Samaritan’s Level I Trauma Center. He received his medical degree from the St. Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo. in 1990 and completed his general surgery training and two additional years of fellowship in Surgical Critical Care and Trauma Surgery at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La. He is board certified in both General Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. Dr. Dabrowski has many years of experience in trauma leadership. He is a member of many state and national and is State Faculty for the Advanced Trauma Life Support program. He is a captain (select) in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Navy, He is presently the chief of Professional Services for the 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Marine Logistics Group, U.S. Marine Corps.

Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Specializing in General Surgery 1111 E. McDowell Road, Phoenix (602) 839-2000 www.BannerHealth.com/GoodSam

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Sept. 7 Diabetic Eye Disease Prevention

Sept. 28 Tim Barber Walk for POP: Prostate On-site Project

WHAT: Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist Dr. Joanne Shen will discuss preventing retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma and other forms of diabetic eye disease. WHERE: Mayo Clinic Hospital, 5777 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix TIME: 10 a.m.–noon COST: Free PRESENTED BY: Mayo Clinic INFO/REGISTER: 480-342-1697

WHAT: Walk to raise money for POP, an organization that works to encourage early detection of prostate cancer. WHERE: Tempe Kiwanis Park, 6111 S. All America Way, Tempe TIME: 7:30 a.m. COST: $20 for walkers 12 years and older; $15 under age 12 INFO/REGISTER: 480-964-3013; ProstateCheckUp.org

Sept. 14 Infant Brain Development Class

Sept. 28 Prostate Cancer Screenings & Bone Marrow Donor Registry Event

WHAT: Wired for Success Workshop offers techniques for ‘wiring up’ children’s brains for security, touch, sight, play and sound. WHERE: Tempe St. Luke’s, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe TIME: 9 a.m.–1 p.m. COST: Free PRESENTED BY: The Workshop is a joint venture between St. Luke’s Hospital and The New Directions Institute for Brain Development INFO/REGISTER: TempeStLukesHospital.com; 877-351-9355

Sept. 20 Diet Tips for Healthy Cholesterol Numbers WHAT: Presentation by Sina Nafisi, M.D., FACC, a board-certified cardiologist from St. Luke’s Medical Center and Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital. Free cholesterol screenings after the presentation. WHERE: Tempe Public Library, 3500 S. Rural Rd., Tempe TIME: noon–1 p.m. COST: Free PRESENTED BY: St. Luke’s and Tempe St. Luke’s INFO/REGISTER: 877-351-9355

Sept. 24 Medicine Abuse Webinar WHAT: Learn about prescription drug abuse, how to identify substance abuse warning signs and related topics. WHERE: Online webinar at DrugFreeAZ.org TIME: noon–12:30 p.m. COST: Free PRESENTED BY: DrugFreeAZ.org INFO/REGISTER: DrugFreeAZ.org; 602-264-5700

WOMEN EMPOWERED SUPPORT Sept. 10 & 24, 5:30 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-6444 GYNECOLOGIC CANCER SUPPORT Sept. 11, 6–7:30 p.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert 480-543-2000 OVARIAN CANCER SUPPORT Sept. 21, 10 a.m.–noon By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006

WHAT: Free prostate cancer screenings for men age 40 and older. Attendees can also participate in Just Swab It, a cheek-swabbing event to increase participation in the national bone marrow donor registry. WHERE: Arizona State Urology, 6320 W. Union Hills Dr., Glendale TIME: 8 a.m.–noon COST: Free PRESENTED BY: Arizona Oncology, Arizona State Urology and Southwest Prostate Cancer Foundation INFO/REGISTER: 602-547-3806; SWProstateCancer@aol.com

Sept. 28 5th Annual Tea For Teal: Ovarian Cancer Research Fundraiser WHAT: A traditional English tea, champagne reception, silent auction, more. Proceeds raised fund a TGen research study in hopes of finding biomarkers for an early detection screening tool for ovarian cancer. WHERE: Doubletree Resort by Hilton, 5401 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale TIME: 2–5 p.m. COST: $70 PRESENTED BY: The Anne Rita Monahan Foundation INFO/REGISTER: AnneRitaMonahan.org; info@AnneRitaMonahan.org

CANCER SUPPORT TEEN/YOUNG ADULT Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 4–5 p.m. Cardon Children’s 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-6405 CAVE CREEK CANCER SUPPORT Sept. 14, 10 a.m.–noon By Scottsdale Healthcare at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church 6502 E. Cave Creek Rd., Cave Creek Register: 480-488-3283


WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013 | LIVING WELL A-Z | 7

PANCREATIC Sept. 14, 10 a.m.–noon By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006 LUNG Sept. 14, 1–3 p.m. By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006 ORAL, HEAD & NECK Sept. 18, 4:30–6:30 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-4673 ESOPHAGEAL Dinner provided Sept. 19, 6–7:30 p.m. Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix 602-839-4970 ORAL, HEAD & NECK Sept. 19, 6:30–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale 602-439-1192 LIVING & COPING Sept. 25, 2 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-6444

BREAST CANCER BOSOM BUDDIES SUPPORT GROUPS Various dates, times & locations Ahwatukee/Chandler: 480-893-8900 East Valley: 480-969-4119 Banner Boswell Northwest Valley: 623-236-6616 Scottsdale: 623-236-6616 West Valley: 623-979-4279 LEARN & SUPPORT Sept. 5, 6–8 p.m. By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006 THRIVE! YOUNG SURVIVORS Sept. 10, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix bhrc@jcl.com; 602-780-4673 YOGA FOR RECOVERY Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 6–7:30 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19841 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix bhrc@jcl.com; 602-780-4673 LEARN & SUPPORT Sept. 12 & 26, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix bhrc@jcl.com; 602-780-4673 SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 24, 5–6:15 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-4673 TRIPLE NEGATIVE Sept. 25, 5:30–7 p.m. By The Wellness Community at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006 BREAST RECONSTRUCTION Sept. 26, 6–8 p.m. By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006

FOR MEN ONLY Sept. 26, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix bhrc@jcl.com; 602-780-4673 METASTATIC Oct. 2, 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-4673

PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS SUPPORT (DUET) Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022 DANCE, EXERCISE, YOGA, ART & TAI CHI Various dates, times & locations By the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center Register: 602-406-6903 INTRO TO PARKINSON’S Sept. 9, 16, 23 & 30, 9–11:30 a.m. By the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Belmont Village 13850 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd., Scottsdale Register: 602-406-6903 SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 10, 1–2 p.m. HealthSouth Valley of the Sun 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale 623-878-8800 EARLY ONSET SUPPORT Sept. 13, 10 a.m. By the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at HealthSouth Scottsdale 9630 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale Register: 602-406-3840 SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 17, 3–5 p.m. By Benevilla at Shepherd of the Hills United Methodist 13658 Meeker Blvd., Sun City West 623-584-4999

BREASTFEEDING BREASTFEEDING Sept. 6, 13, 20 & 27, 10 a.m. Mercy Gilbert 3555 S. Val Vista Dr., Gilbert 877-728-5414 BREASTFEEDING Sept. 9, 16, 23, & 30, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas, Phoenix 602-406-4954 BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT Sept. 10, 2–3:30 p.m. Banner Baywood 6644 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa 480-321-2000 BREASTFEEDING Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 11 a.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414 BREASTFEEDING Sept. 21, 1–3 p.m. Banner Baywood 6644 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa 480-321-2000

PARENTING CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION (2–WEEK CLASS) English and Spanish Various dates, 6:30–9:30 p.m. Maryvale Hospital 5102 W. Campbell Ave., Phoenix Register: azhealthyhours.com; 855-292-9355

GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN By Duet; various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022 GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN By Benevilla; various dates, times & locations 623-207-6016 SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS (STOP) Various dates & locations, 7–9 p.m. 623-846-5464 POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 1–2:30 p.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414 GUARDIANSHIP CLINIC (DUET) Sept. 13, 3–5 p.m. Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix Register: 602-274-5022, ext. 44

GASTROINTESTINAL OSTOMY Sept. 15, 2–4 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 480-812-0324

BRAIN ANEURYSM SUPPORT Sept. 18, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix kimberly@JoeNiekroFoundation.org; 760-333-7658 PROGRESSIVE SUPERNUCLEAR PALSY (PSP) SUPPORT Sept. 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale tsebastiani@cox.net; 602-920-4632 BRAIN TUMOR Sept. 24, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 623-205-6446 ADULT BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT Sept. 25, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-508-8024

CAREGIVERS ONLINE NETWORKING (DUET) Various dates & times Register: DuetAZ.org (Events tab) 602-274-5022 SUPPORT GROUPS (DUET) Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022

CELIAC DISEASE Oct. 2, 7–8:30 p.m. Paradise Valley Retirement Center 11645 N. 25 Pl., Phoenix 623-587-8885

RESPIRATORY ASTHMA EDUCATION FOR KIDS Various dates, times & locations By Banner Health 480-412-6344

SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 9 St. Joseph’s Outpatient Rehab 114 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-6688 SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 13, 2:30 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355

LUNG TRANSPLANT SUPPORT Sept. 10, 11:45 a.m.–1 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-7009 BETTER BREATHERS Sept. 18, 2–3 p.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414

SUPPORT GROUP Sept. 19, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999 CAREGIVER SUPPORT Sept. 25, 2:30–3:30 p.m. St. Luke’s 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix Register: 877-351-9355

PAIN SUPPORT Sept. 13 & 27, 6–8 p.m. By American Chronic Pain Assoc. at Catholic Outreach Center 12301 W. Bell Rd., Sun City 602-532-2981

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT GROUPS

CAREGIVERS SUPPORT Oct. 2, 10:30 a.m. By John C. Lincoln at Cowden Center 9202 N. Second St., Phoenix 602-870-6374

AMPUTEE SUPPORT Sept. 10, 6–7 p.m. HealthSouth Valley of the Sun 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale 623-334-5358

GRIEF

HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE Sept. 16, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-402-1774

HOSPICE GRIEF SUPPORT Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 2–2:30 p.m. Banner Heart Hospital 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa 480-854-5000 GRIEF SUPPORT Sept. 12 & 26 St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-3275 GRIEF & BEREAVEMENT Sept. 25, 10 a.m.–noon By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999

PAIN PAIN SUPPORT Sept. 11 & 25, 6:30–8 p.m. By American Chronic Pain Assoc. at Via Linda Senior Center 10440 E. Via Linda, Scottsdale 480-314-2330

MEN’S DISABILITY ISSUES Sept. 19, 5:30–7 p.m. Disability Empowerment Center 5025 E. Washington St., Phoenix donp@abil.org; 602-980-3232 MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (WOMEN) Sept. 28, 10 a.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 480-829-6563

POISON CONTROL BANNER GOOD SAMARITAN Poison & Drug Information Center Hotline: 800-222-1222

PAIN SUPPORT Sept. 12 & 26, 6–8 p.m. HealthSouth Valley of the Sun 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale 623-334-5437

INFO Online

COPD & ASTHMA Sept. 19, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-9355 BETTER BREATHERS Sept. 26, 1:30 p.m. John C. Lincoln 250 E. Dunlap Ave., Phoenix 602-870-6060, ext. 5793

ABRAZO HEALTH CARE (AZ Heart Institute and AZ Heart, Arrowhead, Maryvale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix Baptist and West Valley hospitals): AbrazoHealth.com BANNER HEALTH: BannerHealth.com

BRAIN APHASIA SUPPORT Sept. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 10 a.m. HealthSouth Scottsdale 9630 E. Shea Blvd, Scottsdale 480-551-5442 BRAIN INJURY & CAREGIVER SUPPORT Sept. 5, 6:30–7:30 p.m. HealthSouth Valley of the Sun 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale 602-508-8024 BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT FOR YOUNG ADULTS & CAREGIVERS Sept. 11, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-996-1396

BARNET DULANEY PERKINS EYE CENTER: GoodEyes.com BARROW NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE:TheBarrow.org BOSTON MEDICAL GROUP: Phoenix.BostonMedicalGroup.com

CARDON CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER: BannerHealth.com CHANDLER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER: ChandlerRegional.org CIGNA: Cigna.com JOHN C. LINCOLN HOSPITAL: JCL.com LASER SPINE INSTITUTE: LaserSpineInstitute.com MAYO CLINIC: MayoClinic.com MERCY GILBERT MEDICAL CENTER: MercyGilbert.org

MIRACLE EAR: Miracle-Ear.com MOUNTAIN VISTA MEDICAL CENTER: MVMedicalCenter.com PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL: PhoenixChildrens.com SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE: SHC.org ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER: StJosephs-Phx.org ST. LUKE’S MEDICAL CENTER, PHOENIX: StLukesMedCenter.com TEMPE ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL: TempeStLukesHospital.com

017) 01/, -2<.</,;@ 1.?6)@ MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS Learn About Medicare Advantage HMO Plans from Cigna. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 855.298.4382 (TTY 711).

WholeHearted Health: Focus on Your Heart September 12

Banner Estrella Medical Center

WEEKLY

September 26

morning and afternoon seminars are available

6 - 8 p.m.

WHERE: Cigna Medical Group locations throughout the valley COST: Free seminar, receive a free no obligation gift

Banner Baywood Medical Center RSVP: (602) 230-CARE (2273) www.BannerHealth.com/ SpiritofWomen

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REGISTER: 855.298.4382

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AR-0008022248-01

AR-0008062812-01

LYMPHOMA Sept. 14, 10 a.m.–noon By The Wellness Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: rsvp@twccaz.org; 602-712-1006


8 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013

Continued from cover AFFORDABLE CARE ACT “If you’re a smoker, an insurance company can still charge a higher premium for your coverage.” —Curt Howell, Arizona market president for Humana’s employer group segment

Who can participate

Levels of coverage

Calculating costs

If you already have individual health insurance that you’ve purchased outside of a group plan, you can opt to keep the plan you have until your policy ends in 2014, Stelnik said. Then you can sign up through the Marketplace because your existing policy ending is considered a “qualifying life event” that permits sign up between Open Enrollment periods during a Special Enrollment period. If you need individual or family health insurance (not offered through an employer), you must purchase it during the Open Enrollment period, even outside of the Marketplace such as directly through an insurance company, Stelnick of Blue Cross Blue Shield said. “If you don’t buy insurance, you might find yourself in a situation in mid-2014 where you need medical services but have no coverage,” he said. Those who have group insurance through their employer will need to enroll during their employer’s annual Open Enrollment period, as usual. It’s important to note that the ACA mandates that no one can be denied health insurance, regardless of pre-existing health conditions. Those who are eligible to use the individual Marketplace include those not purchasing through a group such as: • A first-time individual purchaser of health insurance • A recent early-retiree who is not covered by a group, who is not yet Medicare-eligible and who is planning to buy individual coverage • Someone who currently has individual, not group, insurance who wants to continue carrying insurance • Employees of companies that do not provide group health insurance as a benefit

Beginning Oct. 1, the U.S. Health and Human Services website, healthcare.gov, will detail which insurance companies are participating in the Marketplace. It will also describe the levels of coverage available, which are being called bronze, silver, gold and platinum; each level will be standardized according to its range of benefits. For example, within each company’s products, a bronze plan should be more affordable than a silver plan, but probably will not provide as many benefits as a silver plan. Likewise, a silver plan will most likely be more affordable than a gold plan. Some companies may offer a platinum product with premium coverage, but, as its name implies, it will probably be more expensive, so you will need to do a personal costbenefit analysis to determine what level of coverage at what price is best for you and your family.

According to healthcare.gov, until the Marketplace opens, you can use tools like the Kaiser Family Foundation calculator to get a rough estimate of how much health insurance may cost you and your family in 2014. Please note that you won’t be able to obtain exact costs for a specific plan until you visit the Marketplace on or after Oct. 1, 2013. At that time, you’ll be able to see all of the plans available to you and compare features and prices side-by-side.

DID YOU KNOW: The Kaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation focusing on major healthcare issues. It has no connection with Kaiser Permanente or any healthcare provider.

DID YOU KNOW: If you do not have access to a computer, you can get information by calling the Marketplace toll-free at 1-800-318-2596 (TTY: 1-855-889-4325). In addition, ACA “Navigators” are healthcare organizations that have applied and been selected to provide in-person assistance to help people with health insurance enrollment. In Arizona, 17 health centers with 140 sites have received funding to provide such assistance. More information on the Navigator program is located on page 1 of this issue of Living Well.

For more info Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona: AZBlue.com; 602-864-4899 and 877-864-4899 Cigna: InformedOnReform.com; 800-997-1654 Enroll America: EnrollAmerica.org Health Insurance Marketplace: healthcare.gov; 800-318-2596 (TTY: 1-855-889-4325) Humana: Humana.com; 800-889-0301 Kaiser Family Foundation: KFF.org

DID YOU KNOW: If you are Medicare-eligible, nothing changes for you. You will still enroll in Medicare during Medicare’s Open Enrollment period, which this year is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7.

EXPERTS CATARACT & REFRACTIVE SURGERY Scott A. Perkins, MD

As a nationally recognized ophthalmologist with Barnet Dulaney Perkins Eye Center, Dr. Perkins has performed more than 50,000 cataract surgeries and more than 10,000 vision correction procedures such as LASIK and Implantable Contact Lenses (ICLs). As an innovator in the field of ophthalmology, he has participated in over 25 clinical trials for both pharmaceutical and ophthalmic devices. In addition, Dr. Perkins serves on the Board of Directors for Arizona Visionaries, a donor driven non-profit organization providing cataract surgery and eyeglass fittings in third world countries. He is not only trusted for his surgical talents and modest nature, but is also well known for his compassion and ability to connect with and comfort patients.

Yeah,right.

Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology Member of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Locations throughout Arizona (800) 966-7000 / www.GoodEyes.com

PAIN RELIEF Dr. Theodore Manos

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Dr. Manos is a Board Certified Specialist in Anesthesiology and Pain Management. He specializes in procedures such as epidural steroid treatments and facet joint block procedures that can relieve lower back pain and help improve patient’s daily comfort level. Whether it’s arthritis, a herniated disc, sciatica or spinal stenosis of the lower back, his treatments can help patients regain mobility and functionality. These treatments can help eliminate or reduce the use of oral pain medications that patients may be taking on a regular basis. Anyone experiencing chronic lower back pain may be a candidate. In most cases, pain therapy can last for long periods of time. During the first appointment Dr. Manos will evaluate the patients’ unique condition and develop a treatment plan specific to their needs.

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AR-0008062818-01

Cigna Medical Group | Outpatient Surgery Center 3003 N. 3rd Street, 2nd Floor Phoenix, AZ 85012 602.282.9600

GENERAL SURGERY G. Paul Dabrowski, MD, FACS Dr. Dabrowski joined the full-time faculty and staff of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in 2008. He is currently the medical director of Banner Good Samaritan’s Level I Trauma Center. He received his medical degree from the St. Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo. in 1990 and completed his general surgery training and two additional years of fellowship in Surgical Critical Care and Trauma Surgery at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La. He is board certified in both General Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. Dr. Dabrowski has many years of experience in trauma leadership. He is a member of many state and national and is State Faculty for the Advanced Trauma Life Support program. He is a captain (select) in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Navy, He is presently the chief of Professional Services for the 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Marine Logistics Group, U.S. Marine Corps.

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Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Specializing in General Surgery 1111 E. McDowell Road, Phoenix (602) 839-2000 www.BannerHealth.com/GoodSam AR-0008068980-01


WEDNESDAY, September 4, 2013 | LIVING WELL A-Z | 9

“Although price has been found to be the most important consideration in choosing a health insurance plan, it’s just as important to consider the total value of the plan based on the benefits offered.” —Ray Smithberger, president of Cigna’s individual and family plans business

Subsidies and penalties

Questions to ask

Enroll America

If your annual earnings are 400 percent of the federal poverty level or less (in 2013, 400 percent of the federal poverty level equates to $62,040 for a two-person household or $94,200 for a four-person household), you may be eligible for a subsidy (called an “advanced premium tax credit”) to help you pay your premium for the new insurance, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. The Kaiser Foundation subsidy calculator (KFF.org/interactive/subsidycalculator) cites that if you qualify, the maximum premium you would have to pay before receiving help through a subsidy is 9.5 percent of your annual income. You can still opt to purchase individual health insurance outside of the Marketplace within the Open Enrollment period, but if you do, regardless of your income, you will not be eligible to receive a subsidy, according to the law, Stelnik said. If you choose not to have health insurance in 2014, you’ll have to pay a federal penalty that will equal up to one percent of annual household income.

Both Stelnik and Ray Smithberger, president of Cigna’s individual and family plans business, encourage consumers to carefully evaluate the benefits of each available plan in the Marketplace. Stelnik advised determining if your family doctor and any specialists you see are in the provider network of the plan you’re thinking of choosing. Then, he suggested, find out if you’re restricted to only network physicians, which could be a problem when you’re traveling. Ideally, your plan will have an out-of-network component if you plan to travel at all, Stelnik said. Meanwhile, Smithberger cautioned winter visitors and parents of college students about network restrictions. “Make sure if you live in Ohio during the summer and in the Valley during the winter that you can get medical care in both places,” he said. The same applies to your son or daughter who may be attending college out of state.

Enroll America is a nonprofit group launched in September 2011 as an effort to educate and inform consumers about how health insurance coverage is being expanded under the ACA. Enroll America’s advisory council includes organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association. As part of Get Covered America, a National Day of Action will be held this Saturday, Sept. 7 in various locations across the country. In Arizona, Enroll America volunteers will be going door-to-door in various cities throughout the state in an effort to educate Arizonans about the options available to them under the ACA. For more information, email Matt Golab at MGolab@EnrollAmerica.org or call 480-202-5224 between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. If you’d like to connect with Enroll America, you can reach them on the web at GetCoveredAmerica.org, on Twitter at @covered_America and on Facebook at facebook.com/GetCoveredAmerica.

DID YOU KNOW: Between 2014 and 2016, the penalty will gradually rise up to $2,085 per family or 2.5 percent of annual household income, whichever is greater.

DID YOU KNOW: Since the ACA is such a big change in the way healthcare can be purchased, experts advise that you do plenty of advance research by visiting relevant websites, meeting with ACA Certified Application Counselors (see page 1) and/or by calling helpful hotlines. If you do not have access to a computer, you can call the Health Insurance Marketplace toll-free at 1-800-318-2596 (TTY: 1-855-889-4325). The number is available seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Additional helpful websites and phone numbers are listed under “For more info” on page 8.

DID YOU KNOW: “The main service we provide is getting the facts out to consumers about the new Health Insurance Marketplace.” —Jessica Barba Brown, national communications director for Enroll America

In each state, the Health Insurance Marketplace will either be run by that particular state or by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), if a state has elected not to run its own. In Arizona, the Marketplace will be operated by HHS.

A DVERTIS EM ENT

Is it a good idea to buy a hearing aid by mail or online? For years, you’ve seen the magazine ads for amazingly cheap hearing aids that are “every bit as good” as more expensive hearing aids provided by hearing-care professionals. More recently, a growing number of companies have been selling hearing aids via the Internet. The problem is that hearing aids are not merely amplifiers. They are sophisticated digital devices and require professional services including: 1) Audiometric testing to determine your unique hearing needs.

2) Selection and programming of the hearing aids to match your hearing loss. 3) Verification testing to ensure that you’re receiving maximum benefit. 4) Aftercare service, such as reprogramming, cleaning and adjustment The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates hearing aids, says:

“Hearing aids should be properly fitted by a licensed hearing healthcare professional (such as an audiologist or a hearing aid dispenser) so that the amplification matches your hearing loss. If not fitted properly, too much amplification may cause additional hearing loss.” Source: ROBERT BABER IS A

BOARD-CERTIFIED HEARING INSTRUMENT SPECIALIST

Jo sh ua M illste in, D O

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEARING

Aa ron Boor, DO

When you’re looking for a doctor who’s going to take care of you and your family for years to come – you need to find the perfect match. Someone who’s a great listener, who’s there when needed, and someone you can trust. When you choose the John C. Lincoln network of primary care physicians, you’ll find the health care provider who’s just right for you – most offering same-day appointments at convenient locations throughout the Valley.

Don’t wait! Offer ends September 30, 2013 Save on one of our smallest custom digital hearing aids!

BUY 1 GET 1

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• FREE Complete Electronic Hearing Test • FREE Video Otoscope Ear Inspection • FREE Package of Hearing Aid Batteries • FREE In-Office Repairs

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Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with other offers and does not apply to prior sales. Cash value 1/20 cent. Offer expires 9/30/13.

BUY 1 GET *1 BU

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Good only from participating Miracle-Ear® representatives. One coupon per purchase. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. Offer valid on ME-1, ME-2, ME-3 Solutions. Cannot combine with any other offers. Cash value 1/20 cent. Offer expires 9/30/13.

FREE CHARGER WITH PURCHASE Keep your hearing aids charged all day with no need to keep buying batteries. Free charger with the purchase of any Miracle-Ear® ME-1 or ME-2 Hearing Solution (2 aids) with rechargeable battery option. Not valid with any other discount or offer. Does not apply to prior purchases. Offer expires 9/30/13.

TY

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Visit JCL.com/rightdoc or call 623-580-5800 to find your Dr. Right. AR-0008068947-01


Just two weeks ago I had back surgery. Thank you, Laser Spine Institute.

Not an actual patient of Laser Spine Institute

If you’ve been putting off neck or back surgery, come learn about a proven technique that’s minimally invasive. Bring your MRI or CT scans and meet one-on-one with our physicians who will review them and discuss treatment for your specific condition.

Learn more by attending our

FREE MEDICAL SEMINAR on neck and back surgery options.

Saturday, September 21 at 11 a.m.

Laser Spine Institute 8888 E. Raintree Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85260

The advantages of endoscopic surgery at Laser Spine Institute:

We are experts in treating conditions such as:

• No lengthy recovery* • No open back procedures • Less than 1-inch incision • Outpatient procedure • 97% of patients recommend the procedures

• Spinal stenosis • Sciatica • Herniated/bulging disc • Scoliosis • Arthritis of the spine • Pinched nerve

To register, call:

1-855-333-7854 or visit SpineSeminar.com

*As each patient is different, results may vary.

AR-0008065538-01

Medicaid currently not accepted.

LivingWell AZ September 2013  

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