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DISCOVER

LW2: Glaucoma LW3: Teens and drugs LW4: Ovarian cancer

UNDERSTAND

LEARN

COVER: Heart disease LW5: Bedbugs LW9: Ask the experts

covering health-care support groups, classes and events

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HEALTH-CARE NEWS YOU CAN USE FOR YOUR WHOLE FAMILY

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NEXT ISSUE Wednesday, March 7, 2012: Pain management

Vol. 2, No. 2 February 2012

NEWS & TRENDS

Innovations. News.What's new in health-care.

Important information to keep you connected to your health-care community.

EDWARDS LIFESCIENCES

INNOVATIONS

RICK D'ELIA

Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center was the first hospital in Arizona to perform a new nonsurgical heart-valve replacement procedure, the SAPIEN Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR), which recently received FDA approval. TAVR valves are inserted via a catheter through the femoral artery giving hope for patients with inoperable aortic stenosis (failing heart valves). “This procedure was like winning the lottery and I feel great,” said 84-year-old William Ruser. The Scottsdale resident recently underwent the successful TAVR procedure at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center. Info: shc.org

BANNER IRONWOOD MEDICAL CENTER

NEWS

Banner Ironwood Medical Center recently completed a $5.1 million expansion that includes 12 additional inpatient beds and four more labor and delivery rooms. A new nursery is also being added to care for babies that need medical attention while their mothers are being treated. Info: bannerhealth.com Banner Heart Hospital recently expanded its Women’s Heart Center to a full-service center, the first of its kind in the East Valley and one of less than 50 nationwide. The center can now provide more preventative screenings and seminars to help reduce deaths caused by heart disease in women. The expansion is possible largely due to donations raised through former Banner Heart Hospital patient Carol Peterson’s ‘Golf is Where the Heart Is’ annual event. Info: bannerhealth.com Catholic Healthcare West, the fifth-largest health system in the nation, has changed its name to Dignity Health as part of a governance restructure. Under the new structure, Dignity Health is a not-for-profit organization rooted in the Catholic tradition, but is not an official ministry of the Catholic Church. The new structure will enable the organization to grow while preserving the identity and integrity of both its Catholic and non-Catholic hospitals. Info: dignityhealth.org

Getting to the heart of

heart disease Genetics and lifestyle play a major role

BY DEBRA GELBART

A

sk many experts and they’ll tell you that along with lifestyle issues, one of the most significant risk factors for heart disease is genetics. In fact, a strong family history can be key to determining whether you will get heart disease

said Suzanne Sorof, M.D., an interventional cardiologist in Mesa and past president of the Phoenix chapter of the American Heart Association. While you can’t pick your parents, you can pick your lifestyle. Indeed, family history can be offset by decisions that you can control: not smoking, watching your diet, exercising, keeping your glucose levels under control to prevent or stabilize diabetes, monitoring blood pressure, making sure your cholesterol values are within the normal range and reducing stress in your life, Sorof said. And in the ‘who knew?’ category, another, less well-known way to protect your heart is to regularly floss your teeth to remove bacteria because bacteria in dental plaque can travel to your heart and cause disease.

Common symptoms

Sorof said the most common symptom of coronary artery disease is chest pain, also known as angina. Chest pain that recurs and lasts longer than a few minutes can be indicative of heart disease (not necessarily a heart attack). You may experience a feeling of discomfort, heaviness, pressure, aching, burning, fullness or squeezing. Pain also can be felt

By The Numbers

in the shoulders, arms, neck, throat, jaw or back. Other symptoms of coronary artery disease can include shortness of breath, irregular heartbeats (known as palpitations), a rapid heartbeat, weakness or dizziness, nausea and sweating.

Risk factors

“All individuals should be aware of the possibility of having undiagnosed heart disease, in spite of not having any symptoms,” said John S. Raniolo, D.O., a cardiologist and medical director for the cardiac rehabilitation program at John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in Phoenix. “Discuss with your primary care physician your risk for underlying heart disease to determine whether or not you should have a baseline cardiac evaluation.” Raniolo said more than two of the following risk factors for heart disease can be concerning:

Continued on page 8

THE HUMAN HEART:

beats every second or about 100,000 times a day

35 million times a year or up to 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime pumps 2,000 gallons of blood every day through a circulatory system than spans 60,000 miles beats about

SOURCE: HEART.ORG

Choose HealthSouth:

THINKSTOCK

St. Luke’s Medical Center was named the first hospital in Arizona to use the new SAPIEN Tip Confirmation System (TCS). This new technology enables specially trained registered nurses to more accurately and efficiently place peripherally inserted central catheter lines, or PICC lines, without the use and cost of an X-ray. PICC lines are used to administer certain types of intravenous medications, including chemotherapy, antibiotics and nutrition regimens for patients suffering from a variety of diseases and disorders. A PICC line requires accurate placement since it is inserted into a vein in a patient’s upper arm and must reach a large vessel or vein near the heart. Info: stlukesmedcenter.com

Suzanne Sorof, M.D., an interventional cardiologist in Mesa and past president of the Phoenix chapter of the American Heart Association, says the most important steps you can take to protect your heart are not smoking, eating a healthy diet and exercising. “Get moving, go to a gym, take a walk and take advantage of workplace wellness programs. Regular activity that boosts your heart rate is really, really important.” Dr. Sorof is pictured in front of a giant heart display at the Halle Heart Children's Museum in Tempe.

– PAULA HUBBS COHEN

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2 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012

VITAL SIGNS

Glaucoma 101 Early detection essential

BY JAKE POINIER

Facts about glaucoma

K

nown as ‘the silent thief of sight,’ glaucoma is a group of disorders that damage the optic nerve and lead to gradual but irreversible vision loss. “The eye is like a water-balloon filled with something similar to cerebrospinal fluid,” said Andrew Rabinowitz, M.D., a fellowship-trained glaucoma specialist who participates in medical and surgical treatment of glaucoma at Barnet Dulaney Perkins Eye Center. “Your body produces and drains the fluid, but in some cases, the drain gets clogged. Because the eye is a fixed structure, unlike a water-balloon, the pressure goes up and can cause damage to the nerve fibers between the back of the eye and the brain.”

• It is estimated that more than

4 million Americans have glaucoma, but only half of those know.

• Approximately 120,000

are blind from glaucoma, accounting for 9 to 12 percent of all cases of blindness in the U.S.

• About 2 percent of the population aged 40-50 and 8 percent over age 70 have high eye pressure. • Glaucoma is the second-

Eye exams

leading cause of blindness in the world

age 40 and Mexican-Americans over age 60 also experience a higher prevalence of the disease.

Treatments

For about 75 percent of patients, the disease can be managed solely through medicated eye drops. “They’re very safe, predictable and carry the least risk,” said Rabinowitz. “The next level of treatment is a low-level laser that stimulates the eye’s ability to clean its own drain.” The in-office procedure, Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT), takes just a minute or two while providing reduced pressure for as long as a year. In circumstances where medication and laser therapy do not sufficiently decrease the pressure, surgery may be required to implant a drain or create an opening in the eye. (Less invasive methods are

currently in FDA trials, but not yet widely available.) “There’s no free lunch,” Sorenson said. “When you’re altering the anatomy, there’s always a risk. The resulting pressure can be too low, you can get fluid draining where it’s not desired or there can be new inflammation or vessel growth. We’re very fortunate that there are now some medications that you just need once a day, compared with what was available in the past. And thanks to early diagnosis, identification of risk factors and better treatment modalities, glaucoma is not as often the blinding disease it’s been in the past.”

Look for Livingwell a-z on the first Wednesday of each month!

A division of The Arizona Republic. 200 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004

Each month, we bring you local health information you can use to keep you and your family living well. From A to Z, we tackle a broad range of health issues and offer tips for keeping your health-care costs in check. This publication is produced by Republic Media Custom Publishing. For questions concerning any content included in this publication please contact: Editor Paula Hubbs Cohen, Paula.Cohen@cox.net or call 602-444-8658.

and the leading cause of blindness among AfricanAmericans.

SOURCE: GLAUCOMA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, GLAUCOMA.ORG

THINKSTOCK

With no pain, signs or symptoms, early detection and treatment are essential for preventing or minimizing vision loss from glaucoma. As a first step, eye-care professionals will numb the patient’s eyes and use a device called a tonometer to determine the fluid pressure inside the eye, also known as intraocular pressure. Next, a complete eye exam will look at the patient’s optic nerve after dilating the pupils. Finally, and particularly if there is suspicion of optic nerve damage, a visual field test can be used to test optic nerve function. “Typically, a patient is completely unaware of having the disease, which is why annual appointments are so important, particularly after age 40,” said Christina Sorenson, O.D., F.A.A.O., assistant dean of the Arizona College of Optometry at Midwestern University’s Glendale campus. “That’s especially true for patients with risk factors, such as a family history of glaucoma, or having high blood pressure or diabetes.” African-Americans over

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WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012 | LIVING WELL A-Z | 3

Teens and drugs How to help

BY ALISON STANTON

W

hen parents of teenagers find out their child is using illegal drugs, the first question that comes to mind is often the same: Why? Shelly Mowrey, director of programs and communication for DrugFreeAZ.org, the Arizona affiliate of The Partnership for a Drug-Free America, said there are a number of reasons why teens experiment with drugs. “Some do it for fun, others use them to cope,” she said. “Maybe their parents are getting a divorce or they are being bullied at school. Other kids use them to fit in or blend into the crowd.” Chip Coffey, MAPC, LPC, NCC, director of outpatient services at St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center, said one of the biggest reasons he sees for drug use in teens is mental health issues. “They use them to selfmedicate, maybe due to depression, anxiety or a social phobia,” he said.

“One thing that can help your teen is to establish a code that they can use in situations where they feel pressured to use drugs or drink and they want to get out of the situation and go home.”

Warning signs

SHELLY MOWREY, DRUGFREEAZ.ORG THINKSTOCK

When it comes to looking for warning signs, Mowrey said parents need to start with their own intuition. “Do they feel in their gut that something is going on? Is there a voice in the back of their head saying that something is not right? That is red flag number one,” she said. “Other signs are lying and dishonesty about things like where their teens are going and who they are hanging out with. Also, some teens will distance themselves from their family. In addition, their grades might become lower.” According to Coffey, parents should be on the lookout for major changes in the child’s circle of friends. “For example, if a family has been in the same neighborhood for 10 years and all of the sudden their teen has a new circle of friends and the old friends no longer want to be with their child, this could be a sign that something is going on,” he said. The best way for parents to deal with any concerns is to sit down and talk with their teen, Mowrey said.

“A lot of times it turns into a screaming match between parent and child. But nothing gets accomplished that way,” she said. “Helping teens who use drugs needs to come from a place of love and concern, not from punishment.”

Take action

Once parents confirm that their teenager is using drugs, Mowrey said the most important thing to do is take action. “Statistics show that 47 percent of parents take no action at all or wait. They may think it’s a phase or be in denial

about it,” she said. “There is also the piece that relates to embarrassment or shame.” Coffey noted that if a child is using drugs due to a mental illness, it is important to get him or her off the drugs and onto a correct medication that will help the child get better.

Getting help

For some drug-using teens, outpatient programs may be appropriate, Coffey said. “Most behavioral health hospitals run intensive outpatient programs so kids can talk about the subject with

other teens who have the same issues,” he said. Mowrey said that the main thing she tells parents is to not be afraid. “Our organization is there for you, from prevention to intervention. If you want to intervene, we have information on our website called an intervention guide,” she said. “In many cases, an intervention can be a simple conversation with an adult who the teen trusts.” For more information, visit drugfreeaz.org or stlukesbehavioralhealth.com.

Our people make your care the best. Our ranking makes it official. Sure, we’re honored to accept a top-five ranking for large health systems from Thomson Reuters. But we’re even more honored to have some of the best caregivers in all of health care working tirelessly to provide great treatment, care and support to you. They’re what make us one of the five best large health systems out of 321 studied nationwide. And it’s their dedication and commitment to greatness that continue to make us the best we can be. Isn’t it time you find out what a top-five ranked health system can do for you?

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4 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012

One family’s message

U

THINKSTOCK

nfortunately, Sam Klein, a Scottsdale retiree and part-time religious school teacher, knows much more than he’d like to about ovarian cancer. In 2008, he lost his daughter, Shari, a mother of two, to the disease. Then, in 2010, his wife Paula succumbed to ovarian cancer as well.

Ovarian cancer

Early diagnosis essential to positive outcome BY MICHELLE TALSMA EVERSON

W

hen you think about the cancers that affect women, breast cancer is usually the first thing that comes to mind. But ovarian cancer, once known as the ‘silent killer’ for its seemingly benign symptoms, is the ninth most prevalent cancer among women (excluding skin cancer) but the fifth mostly deadly, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Because of its easily misinterpreted symptoms, many cases of ovarian cancer aren’t diagnosed until the later stages. Like all cancers, early diagnosis can save lives, making it all the more important for women to be educated about the disease.

Signs and symptoms

Floyd F. Shewmake, M.D., senior medical director at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, explains that ovarian cancer happens when abnormal malignant cells form on the ovaries. There are several types of ovarian cancer and there are a number of progressions within those types. Oftentimes, women aren’t diagnosed with the disease until the cancer has been present for some time. Why the late diagnosis? Shewmake said that it has to do with a lack of identifiable symptoms. “In the early stages of ovarian cancer, the symptoms can be vague, like problems with your bowels or urinary tract,” he said. “In the later stages, the woman might experience bloating, added girth to her midsection or even weight loss, so it’s difficult to diagnose.” The ACS cites that in 2007 it teamed up with the Gynecological Cancer Foundation and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to determine the most common symptoms of ovarian cancer. They list these as bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, trouble eating or feeling full quickly, and urinary symptoms (such as frequent feelings of needing to go to the restroom). In patients with ovarian cancer, the symptoms tend to be ongoing rather than sporadic.

The relative five-year survival rate of ovarian cancer is 46 percent. Survival rates vary depending on the stage of diagnosis. Women diagnosed at an early stage have a much higher five-year survival rate than those diagnosed at a later stage. SOURCE: OVARIAN CANCER NATIONAL ALLIANCE, OVARIANCANCER.ORG

Who is at risk?

Although there is currently no way to prevent ovarian cancer, some risk factors do exist. Shewmake said that although risk factors are not well outlined, the risk of ovarian cancer is more prevalent among post-menopausal women and sometimes those who never had children. The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance lists obesity, genetics, hormone replacement therapy and a family history of gynecological cancers as other risk factors. The organization also notes that taking oral contraceptives, especially for a long period of time, has been known to reduce the risk of the disease.

Diagnostic steps

If a patient is suspected of having ovarian cancer, there are several different steps to diagnosis it including a pelvic exam, a CA-125 blood test and a trans-vaginal ultrasound. If cancer is further suspected during one of these steps, surgery and a biopsy are the only ways to officially confirm the disease. “Before I went into the insurance end of health-care I was a gastroenterologist and occasionally had to diagnose women with ovarian cancer,” Shewmake said. “The message I’d want to get across is to get your abdominal symptoms evaluated, which needs to include a regular pelvic exam.”

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Treatment and hope

Like many cancers, once diagnosed with ovarian cancer, patients usually go through surgery and a chemotherapy regimen. This often includes removing the ovaries and tumor, a process known as debulking, Shewmake said. Laurel Pracht, an ovarian cancer advocate and a 12-year survivor of the disease, went through treatment — including surgery and chemotherapy — not once, but twice. Whether she’s advocating for ovarian cancer patients or promoting research and awareness, her message is one of hope, something that she believes cancer patients need just as much as any medical treatment. “I tell them [ovarian cancer patients] don’t lose hope. Statistics are just numbers and you’re a person, not a number,” Pracht said. “Today you’re alive and only you can supply the will to live — along with hope — while in treatment.”

Sources/more info • National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health: cancer.gov • Ovarian Cancer National Alliance: ovariancancer.org • Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Arizona: ocaz.org • American Cancer Society: cancer.org • National Ovarian Cancer Coalition: ovarian.org

The family’s battle with the disease started in 2004 when Paula was diagnosed with ovarian cancer after experiencing what Klein refers to as “vague symptoms.” Because of their mother’s diagnosis, both of his daughters were tested and chose to have surgeries (double mastectomies and hysterectomies) as preventative measures to combat the disease. In 2006, Shari was diagnosed with the disease during prophylactic surgery; Klein’s other daughter is cancer-free today. During their battles with the disease, which included rounds of chemotherapy, surgery and more, Paula experienced remission for a couple of years but Shari was never fully in remission. “She passed away at 40 years old and left behind two kids,” Klein said. “She spent about a month in hospice and was a fighter; she told me that ‘I don’t know how to die.’” In Paula’s last few years, Klein said that they traveled a lot, going to Hawaii, Europe and Israel to enjoy what time they had left together. Paula was also heavily involved in ovarian cancer organizations to help spread awareness about the disease. “Women need to be aware and be proactive in their treatments,” Klein said. “The symptoms are very nebulous; if you suspect something, ask a doctor for further testing. Paula just wanted people to be aware.” —MICHELLE TALSMA EVERSON

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Bedbugs...yuck!

Creepy little critters cause countless problems BY GREMLYN BRADLEY-WADDELL

T

hey have a cute ditty in their honor, but the truth is that bedbugs are far from charming little creatures. Just ask Bryan Stevens and Michael Carpenter, two Valley authorities on the subject. They said that while bedbugs have not been shown to transmit diseases to humans — so far, they noted — the bites of these blood-sucking, nocturnal invaders are beyond annoying and their mere presence can even bring on mental health issues. “People with a bedbug infestation may shun friends and family for fear of ‘giving’ them bedbugs, which can lead to a sense of loneliness and depression,” said Stevens, an Assistant in Extension, Community/ Urban Integrated Pest Management at the Arizona Pest Management Center at the University of Arizona. In addition, Stevens said bedbugs can disrupt sleep and have been known to cause the onset of delusional parasitosis, which is the fear of being constantly bitten by parasites.

Comprehensive clean-up

• Avoid using refurbished mattresses. • Use special covers to encase your bedding and make it bedbug-proof. • Check for signs of bedbugs in your hotel room by using a flashlight to inspect all cracks and crevices. • If you suspect bedbugs, call a professional for help.

Difficult to eradicate

Since bedbugs are only about the size of an apple seed and they like to roam around at night, they are notoriously difficult to detect. Their eggs are white and about as big as a grain of salt, Stevens said, and an adult will be dark brown and flat until it feeds and swells in size. Even if you don’t see any bedbugs, though, you might see their telltale leftovers: rust-colored or darkbrown marks (remember, their food is red) on bedding or around cracks and crevices. Making matters worse, these creepy critters can survive even thorough pest-control treatments. That’s because bedbugs can go dormant and can live nine months to a year without a meal, Carpenter said. That means, Stevens said, even when you think you’ve eradicated them, bedbugs may be tucked safely away in their resting stage. And when they re-emerge, they’ll be hungry.

Hike in infestations

According to Stevens, in the Phoenix area alone, the number of reported infestations increased 300 percent between 2008 and 2010. The hike in infestations is attributed to several reasons, including the fact that DDT is no longer used to treat baseboards Then there’s the theory that the increase in international travel has led to more of the hitchhiking pests making their way around the world. That, combined with the reality that different areas of the globe have radically different pest-control standards, makes it easy to see how bedbugs affect folks from all walks of life. Now stop scratching.

THINKSTOCK

Carpenter, a sales inspector with Truly Nolen Pest Control in Phoenix, said that along with paying for a professional treatment — which can easily run $1,000 and up — a homeowner will need to empty and painstakingly clean all closets, drawers, shelves and cabinets. Everything that’s washable, including all bedding, must be thoroughly washed and dried. “It’s almost like you’re moving,” Carpenter said, adding that the mist-like chemical treatment used to eliminate bedbugs does not harm mammals like dogs and cats. The reason for the comprehensive cleaning is that while their name evokes images of mattresses and box springs, in fact, bedbugs like to also nestle in walls, behind electrical outlets, under window casings, inside baseboards or at the edges of carpet. They’ll even hang out in TVs, radios or phones and they don’t mind crowds — you can pick up a straggler in a movie theater, on a cruise ship and in the finest hotels around the world.

Tips to help keep bedbugs at bay

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6 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012

February

FEBRUARY is Heart Health Awareness Month. For more information, visit the American Heart Association at heart.org.

All groups and events are believed, but not guaranteed, to be free unless otherwise stated. Every effort has been made to verify accuracy, but please call before attending to confirm details.

HEART Congestive Heart Failure & Your Meds Feb. 1, 10-11 a.m. By Sun Health Community Education at Sun City West Property Owners & Residents Association (PORA), 13815 Camino del Sol, Sun City West. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617

Keeping Your Heart Beating Feb. 21, noon-1 p.m. St. Luke’s, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phx. 877-351-WELL (9355)

Controlling Diabetes Feb. 8, 15 & 22, 1-2:30 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital, 3929 E. Bell Rd., Phx. 855-292-9355

Mended Hearts Support Group Feb. 22, 6:30 p.m. Banner Heart, 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa. 480-854-5070

‘Tonight, Chocolate Is A Food Group’ Nutrition Class Feb. 8, 6-7:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events or 480-882-4636

Keeping Your Heart Beating Feb. 23, noon-1 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe. 877-351-WELL (9355)

A-Fib: Heart Skipping A Beat? Feb. 1, noon-1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355) Benefits Of Exercise For The Heart Feb. 1, 7-8 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Barnes & Noble, 10500 N. 90 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 Heart-Healthy Eating Feb 7 & 21, 11 a.m.-noon. Banner Heart, 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa. 480-854-5401

Cardiac Health: New Developments Feb. 23, 1-2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Civic Center Library, 3839 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 Living With A-Fib Feb. 25, 9-11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phx. Register: 877-602-4111

Diabetes Workshop Various dates, 10 a.m.-noon. Phoenix Baptist, 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phx. 602-841-5505

Drug-Free Treatment Options For Impotence (Dr. Shawn Blick) Feb. 15, 6-7 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital, 3929 E. Bell Rd., Phx. 855-292-9355

Weight Loss Surgery Seminar Various dates, times & locations. St. Luke’s, Phoenix. Tempe St. Luke’s, Tempe. 800-248-5553

Mended Hearts Support Group Feb. 8, 6:30-8 p.m. John C. Lincoln Deer Valley, 19841 N. 27 Ave., Phx. 623-879-5765 Heart-Healthy Cooking Demo Feb. 9, 9:30-10:30 a.m. By Sun Health Community Education at La Loma Village, 14154 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617 Heart Attack Awareness: Recognition & Early Action Feb. 9, 1-2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Desert Foothills Library, 38442 N. Schoolhouse Rd., Cave Creek. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

Fighting Hand Pain Feb. 15, 7-8 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Barnes & Noble, 10500 N. 90 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

Bariatric Info Seminar Feb. 1 & 15, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-noon. Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon. Banner Gateway, 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert. 480-543-2606 Allergies & Valley Fever Feb. 2, noon-1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355) Empowerment Training For Spinal Cord Injuries Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, Mar. 1, 8, 15 & 22, 4:30-8 p.m. Disability Empowerment Center, 5025 E. Washington St., Phx. 602-507-4209

Mending A Broken Heart (Cardiologist Rajeev Garg, M.D.) Feb. 14, 9-10 a.m. Banner Boswell, 13180 N. 103 Dr., Sun City. 602-230-2273

Continuous Chest Compression CPR classes (Not a certification class) Feb. 3, 9:30-10:45 a.m. OR 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. By Sun Health Community Education at The Colonnade Recreation Village, 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617

Heart-Healthy Day Free screenings (registration required); cooking demos; seminars. Feb. 18, 8-11 a.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355) Evento Para Un Corazón Contento/ Heart-Healthy Day Free screenings (registration required); cooking demos; seminars in English and Spanish. Feb. 18, 9 a.m.-noon. St. Luke’s, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phx. 877-351-WELL (9355) Living With Heart Valve Disease Feb. 18, 9:30 a.m.-noon. St. Joseph’s, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phx. Register: 877-602-4111

Controlling Diabetes Feb. 6, 13 & 20, 1-2:30 p.m. West Valley Hospital, 13677 W. McDowell Rd., Goodyear. 855-292-9355 Blood Pressure Clinic Feb. 7, 9-11 a.m. By Sun Health Community Education at Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Walk-ins welcome. Register: 623-8326617; tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012 Healthy Eating Feb. 8, 1-2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Appaloosa Library, 7377 E. Silverstone Dr., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

LIVING HEALTHY WITH DIABETES Wednesdays Feb. 1, 15 & 29, 6-7 p.m. What: Lecture series featuring topics related to living healthy with diabetes. Where: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, Medical Building I, 19841 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix Cost: Free Register: 623-879-5708 Info: jcl.com HEALTHY HEARTS Saturday Feb. 4, 9 a.m.-noon What: Duet-Partners in Health & Aging invites kinship-caregivers and the children they are raising to visit the Halle Heart Children’s Museum. Where: Halle Heart Children’s Museum, 2929 W. 48 St., Tempe Cost: Free RSVP: Required by noon Feb. 3; 602-274-5022 FAMILY SAFETY FAIR Saturday Feb. 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. What: Car seat safety inspections, blood pressure screenings, ways to keep your home safe and advice for handling medical emergencies. Where: North Peoria Emergency Center, a campus of Arrowhead Hospital, 26900 N. Lake Pleasant Pkwy, Peoria Sponsored by: North Peoria Emergency Center and the Peoria Fire Department Cost: Free Info: azhealthyhours.com; 855-292-9355

GIVE A KID A SMILE DAY Friday Feb. 24 What: As part of national Children’s Dental Month, this outreach program provides restorative care to eligible children ages 4 to 20. Where: John C. Lincoln Desert Mission Dental Clinic, 9201 N. Fifth St., Phoenix Cost: Free to qualified children; call for more information Register: Appointments required. Call 602-870-6363 Info: JCL.com/childrensdental DAY OF DANCE FOR YOUR HEALTH Saturday Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. What: Dance, learn simple ways to stay healthy, enjoy music and participate in health screenings. Where: Superstition Springs Mall, 6555 E. Southern Ave., Mesa and Tempe Marketplace, 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy, Tempe Sponsored by: Banner Heart, Banner Baywood and Banner Desert in partnership with Spirit of Women Cost: Free Info: 480-321-4336; bannerhealth.com/spiritofwomen

6TH ANNUALWALK THE FIGHT WALK-A-THON Sunday Feb. 12, 9:30 a.m. What: Events and activities to raise money for Parkinson’s disease. Includes5Krun,5Kwalkand2.5-block walk.Music,foodvendors,healthfair, children’s activitiesandmore. Where: Tempe Town Lake Beach Park, Rio Salado Pkwy and Packard Dr., Tempe Sponsored by: Parkinson Network of Arizona; all money raised goes directly back to St. Joseph’s Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center Cost: $20 registration fee for runners/walkers; participants 15 and younger free Register/Info: pnaz.kintera.org

Amputee Clinic Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-noon. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa. 480-477-7141

Stroke Clinic Feb. 23, 10 a.m.-noon. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa. 480-477-7141

COMPASS Class For Care Partners Feb. 16, 10-11:30 a.m. Banner Alzheimer’s, 901 E. Willetta St., Phx. 602-839-6850

Parkinson’s Caregivers Feb. 8, 1:30-3 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes, 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phx. 602-274-5022

Pole Walking (For individuals with Parkinson’s) Feb. 16, 2-4 p.m. By Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Desert Palms Presbyterian Church, 13459 W. Stardust Ave., Sun City West. Register: 602-406-6903

Sjögren’s Disease Walkabout & Autoimmune Disease Health Fair Feb. 25, 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Inside Paradise Valley Mall, 4568 E. Cactus Rd., Phx.; 480-391-2522

COMPASS Class For Care Partners Feb. 27, 4-5:30 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s, 901 E. Willetta St., Phx. 602-839-6850

Diabetes Feb. 9, 1-2 p.m. St. Luke’s, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phx. 877-351-WELL (9355)

GENERAL SUPPORT GROUPS

Respiratory Feb. 9, 2-3 p.m. Banner Boswell, 13180 N. 103 Dr., Sun City. 623-832-5708

Are Your Knees Totaled? Feb. 17, noon-1 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-230-2273 (CARE)

Brain Injury & Caregiver Feb. 2, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Brain Injury Assoc. of AZ, HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale. 602-508-8024

Food & Cardiac Disease Feb. 15, 5:30-7 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-230-2273

Hospice Care Feb. 9, 1-2 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Civic Center Library, 3839 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 Parkinson’s Disease 202 Feb. 10, 17, 24 & March 2, 10 a.m.-noon. By Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Desert Garden Church, 18818 N. 128 Ave., Sun City. Register: 877-602-4111

WELLNESS

Women & Heart Disease (Dr. Kristine Sellberg) Feb. 7, 6-7 p.m. Arrowhead Hospital, 18701 N. 67th Ave., Glendale. 855-292-9355

Parkinson’s Disease 101 Feb. 9, 16, 23 & March 1, 10 a.m.-noon. By Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Red Mountain Multigenerational Center, 7550 E. Adobe St., Mesa. Register: 877-602-4111

TOP Events

THINKSTOCK

We invite you to take advantage of our expanded Calendar listings, which includes over 150 opportunities for you to meet others with similar issues and learn more about various aspects of your health – from A to Z.

Urinary Incontinence Feb. 28, 6-7 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

ALZHEIMER’S

Hearing Tests Feb. 21, 22 & 23, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. John C. Lincoln Audiologist at Tatum Health Center, 18404 N. Tatum Blvd., Phx. Appointments: 602-494-6237

Men Who Care Support Group Feb. 1, 7:30-9 a.m. Banner Alzheimer’s, 901 E. Willetta St., Phx. 602-839-6850

Blood Pressure Clinic Feb. 21, 9-11 a.m. By Sun Health Community Education at Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Walk-ins welcome. Register: 623-8326617; tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012 Overcoming Infertility (Dr. Couvaras) Feb. 21, 7-8 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital, 3929 E. Bell Rd., Phx. 855-292-9355 Understanding Colon Screening (Dr. Amy Soloman) Feb. 23, 10 a.m. West Valley Hospital, 13677 W. McDowell Rd., Goodyear. 855-292-9355 Talk Meds With A Pharmacist Feb. 23, 10-11 a.m. By Sun Health Community Education at Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617

Alzheimer’s Caregivers Feb. 2 & 16, 1:30-3 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe. 877-351-WELL (9355) Alzheimer’s Caregivers Feb. 7 & 21, 12:30-2 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes, 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phx. 602-274-5022 Care Partners Support Group Feb. 9, 12:30-2 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s, 901 E. Willetta St., Phx. 602-839-6850 Memory Lecture: Manage & Prevent Challenging Behaviors Feb. 10, 10:30 a.m.-noon. By Banner Alzheimer’s at AZ Museum of Natural History, 53 North Macdonald, Mesa. 602-230-CARE (2273) Planning Ahead Class Feb. 13, 10 a.m.-noon. Banner Alzheimer’s, 901 E. Willetta St., Phx. 602-839-6850

Caregivers (Duet) Various dates, times & locations. Info: 602-274-5022 Caregivers Feb. 1, 10:30 a.m.-noon. John C. Lincoln North Mountain, 9202 N. Second St., Phx. 602-870-6374 Celiac Disease Feb. 1, 7-9 p.m. Paradise Valley Retirement Center, 11645 N. 25 Place, Phx. 623-587-8885 Aphasia/Stroke Feb. 2, 9, 16 & 23, 10-11 a.m. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 9630 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale. 480-551-5481 Stroke Feb. 2, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Banner Boswell Rehab Center, 10601 W. Santa Fe Dr., Sun City. 623-832-7000 Ostomy Feb. 2, 2-4 p.m. Banner Boswell, 13180 N. 103 Dr., Sun City. 623-975-3671

Pain Feb. 9 & 23, 6-8 p.m. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale. 623-334-5437 Parkinson’s Feb. 10, 10 a.m.-noon. By Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 9630 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale. 602-406-3840 Stroke Feb. 10, 2:30-4 p.m. Chandler Regional, 475 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler. 480-728-3828 Interstitial Cystitis Feb. 12, 2-4 p.m. John C. Lincoln North Mountain, 250 E. Dunlap Ave., Phx. 602-469-2766 Parkinson’s Feb. 13, 10-11:30 a.m. Banner Sun Health Research Institute, 10515 W. Santa Fe Dr., Sun City. 602-942-9008 Diabetes Feb. 13, 3-4 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Stroke Feb. 2, 5:30-6:30 p.m. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 13460 N. 67 Ave., Glendale. 623-334-5437

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User: phalent

Time: 01-31-2012 14:16 Product: PNIBrd PubDate: 02-01-2012 Zone: LivingWell

Edition: 1 Page: LW-G

Color: C K Y M

WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012 | LIVING WELL A-Z | 7

Aphasia Feb. 14 & 28, 10-11 a.m. Banner Boswell, 13180 N. 103 Dr., Sun City. 623-972-4263

Information About PSAs Feb. 8, noon-1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Relaxation & Visualization Feb. 9, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817

Insulin Pumpers Feb. 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m. John C. Lincoln North Mountain, 9202 N. Second St., Phx. 602-870-6060

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Feb. 23, noon-1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Better Breathers Feb. 15, 2-3 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414

Brownies N’ Bingo Feb. 24, 2:30-4 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

Ovarian Cancer (Dr. Shana Wingo, Arizona Oncology) Feb. 9, 6-8 p.m. By The Wellness Community at ParadiseValley United Methodist Church, 4455 E. Lincoln Dr., Paradise Valley. 602-712-1006

Caregivers Feb. 15, 2:30-4 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Diabetes & Your Feet Feb. 29, noon-1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Diabetes Feb. 15, 7-8:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-5195

CANCER SUPPORT/ NETWORKING GROUPS

Parkinson’s Caregivers Feb. 17, 10:30 a.m.-noon. By Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at HealthSouth Rehab, 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa. 602-406-4921 Stroke Feb. 21, 3-4 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355) Laryngectomy Feb. 21, 4-5 p.m. Banner Boswell, 13180 N. 103 Dr., Sun City. 623-832-5349 Caregivers Feb. 22, 2:30-3:30 p.m. St. Luke’s, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phx. 877-351-WELL (9355) Better Breathers Feb. 23, 1:30-3 p.m. John C. Lincoln North Mountain, 9202 N. Second St., Phx. 602-870-6060 Parkinson’s & Partners Feb. 27, 10-11:30 a.m. Banner Sun Health Research Institute, 10515 W. Santa Fe Dr., Sun City. 602-942-9008 Amputee Feb. 27, 6-8 p.m. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa. 480-477-7141 Stroke Feb. 28, 5:30-6:30 p.m. HealthSouth Rehabilitation, 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa. 480-477-7141

SENIORS Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program Various dates, times & locations. Mountain Vista Medical Center, Mesa. Tempe St. Luke’s, Tempe. 877-924-WELL (9355) Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (Duet) Various dates, times & locations. Info: 602-274-5022 Medication Checks Various dates, times & locations. Mountain Vista Medical Center, Mesa. Tempe St. Luke’s, Tempe. 877-351-WELL (9355) Healthy Cooking Demonstration Feb. 2, 10-11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center, 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa. 480-325-4707 Ballroom Dance Feb. 2, 9, 16 & 23, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humana Guidance Center, 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa. 480-325-4707 Tai Chi Feb. 3 & 17, 9 a.m. Humana Guidance Center, 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa. 480-325-4707

Thyroid Feb. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414 Drumming Circle Feb. 13, 6-7:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636

Cancer Feb. 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-4073 Prostate Feb. 20, 4-5:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414 Cancer-Fighting Nutrition Feb. 21, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817

Cancer Survivorship Feb. 14, 4 p.m. Banner MD Anderson, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert. 480-256-4141

Mindfulness Tools & Practices Feb. 22, 1 p.m. Banner MD Anderson, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert. 480-256-4141

Reducing Caregiver Chaos Feb. 14, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817

Get The Best Out Of Treatment Feb. 22, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817

Oral, Head & Neck Feb. 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414

Young Women Feb. 14, 6:30-8 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-865-5450

Intro To Chemo & Radiation Feb. 23, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817

Cancer Feb. 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2-3:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414

Gynecologic Feb. 14, 7-8:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-5578

I Can Cope Feb. 27, 6-8 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-865-5450

Yoga For Recovery Feb. 2 & 16, 6-8 p.m. Co-sponsoredbyTheWellnessCommunity, John C. Lincoln Deer Valley, 19841 N. 27 Ave., Phx. 602-712-1006

Writing For Wellness Feb. 15, 9-11 a.m. BySunHealthCommunityEducationin partnershipwithTheWellnessCommunity, Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617

Living With Lymphedema Feb. 27, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events or 480-882-4636

Relaxation & Visualization For Your Cancer Journey Feb. 1, 9:15-10 a.m. BySunHealthCommunityEducationin partnershipwithTheWellnessCommunity, Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617

Cave Creek Cancer Support Group Feb. 3, 10 a.m.-noon. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Good Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 6502 E. Cave Creek Rd., Cave Creek. RSVP: 480-488-3283 Managing Fatigue & Sleep Feb. 7, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817 Kids Can Cope Feb. 7 & 16, 7-8 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-865-5450 Cooking For Health Feb. 8, 9-11 a.m. BySunHealthCommunityEducationin partnershipwithTheWellnessCommunity, Grandview Care Center, 14505W. GraniteValley Dr., Sun CityWest. Register: tinyurl.com/SHCommEd2012; 623-832-6617 Face In The Mirror Tea Party Feb. 8, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3805 Facing Forward (Women) Feb. 8, 1-3 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale. Register: shc.org/events; 480-882-4636 Living Well With Cancer Feb. 8, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817 Coping With Cancer Feb. 8 & 22, 6:30-8 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-865-5450

Journey To Wellness Feb. 15, 4 p.m. Banner MD Anderson, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert. 480-256-4141 Music Therapy & Relaxation Feb. 15, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817 Oral, Head & Neck Feb. 15, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3627

Prostate Feb. 27, 7-9 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-4073 Exercise Guidelines For Survivors Feb. 28, 10 a.m. Banner MD Anderson, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert. 480-256-4141

BREAST CANCER THRIVE! Young Survivors Feb. 2, 6-8 p.m. John C. Lincoln, 19646 N. 27Ave., Phx. 602-712-1006; kwisdom@twccaz.org

Leukemia & Lymphoma Feb. 15, 6-7:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414

Childhood Education, Tours Of Mother & Newborn Care Centers Various dates & times, some in Spanish. Arrowhead Hospital, Glendale. Maryvale Hospital, Phoenix. Paradise Valley Hospital, Phoenix. Phoenix Baptist Hospital, Phoenix. West Valley Hospital, Goodyear. Info: 855-292-9355

Beating Breast Cancer (Dr. Lesley Meng) Feb. 7, 7-8 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital, 3929 E. Bell Rd., Phx. 855-292-9355 Newly Diagnosed Feb. 9 & 23, 6-8 p.m. Co-sponsoredbyTheWellnessCommunity, John C. Lincoln, 19646 N. 27Ave., Phx. 602-712-1006; kwisdom@twccaz.org Breast Cancer Support Group Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-noon. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, 10460 N. 92St., Scottsdale. Register: tinastreasures@shc.org; 480-323-1990

Breastfeeding Support Group Feb. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, 9-10 a.m. West Valley Hospital, 13677 W. McDowell Rd., Goodyear. 855-292-9355 Breastfeeding Feb. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, 11 a.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414 Postpartum Depression Feb. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, 1-2:30 p.m. Chandler Regional, 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler. 480-728-5414 Breastfeeding Support Group Feb. 2, 9, 16 & 23, 1-2:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3035

Young Survival Coalition Feb. 14, 6-8 p.m. John C. Lincoln, 19646 N. 27Ave., Phx. 602-712-1006; kwisdom@twccaz.org

Women’s Services Unit Tours Feb. 2 & 16, 6 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa. 877-924-WELL (9355)

Bosom Buddies Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak, 7400 E. Thompson Peak, Scottsdale. 623-547-2206

Breastfeeding Feb. 3, 10, 17 & 24, 10 a.m. Mercy Gilbert, 3555 S. Val Vista Dr., Gilbert. 480-728-5414

EV Young Survivors (age 40 and under) Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Dynamic Life Coaching Center, 1701 S. Mill Ave., Tempe. 480-326-7023

Children’s Immunization Clinic Feb. 4, 8 a.m.-noon. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn, 3634 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale. 480-882-4317

Coalition Of Blacks Against Breast Cancer Feb. 19, 3-5 p.m. The Wellness Community, 360 E. Palm Lane, Phx. 602-320-0502 Circle Of Help Feb. 23, 6-8 p.m. John C. Lincoln, 19646 N. 27Ave., Phx. 623-434-2784 Breast Cancer Support Group Feb. 28, 7-8:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-5578

PARENTING/KIDS OB Orientation Various dates & times. Banner Gateway, 1900 N. Higley Road, Gilbert. 602-230-2273

Postpartum Depression Support Group Feb. 7, 14, 21 & 28, 10-11:30 a.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-5292 Breastfeeding Class Feb. 11, 6:30-9 p.m. West Valley Hospital, 13677 W. McDowell Rd., Goodyear. 855-292-9355 Nursing Moms Support Group Feb. 14, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Banner Del E. Webb, 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West. 800-230-CARE (2273) Prenatal Breastfeeding Class Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-noon. Phoenix Baptist, 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phx. 855-292-9355

WEBSITES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Spanish-Speaking Feb. 15, 6-7:30 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-4073

• Abrazo Health Care (Arizona Heart Hospital, Arizona Heart Institute, Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital, Paradise Valley Hospital, Phoenix Baptist Hospital,WestValley Hospital): abrazohealth.com

Intro To Medical Qigong Feb. 16, 3 p.m. Banner MD Anderson, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert. 480-256-4141 Lymphedema Education Feb. 16, 4-5 p.m. Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa. 480-412-3817 Colorectal Feb. 16, 6-7:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale. 602-865-5450 Esophageal Feb. 16, 6-7:30 p.m. Banner Good Samaritan, 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phx. 602-839-4970; 602-264-0240; esophagealcancersupportphoenix.com

• Banner Health: bannerhealth.com • Cardon Children’s Medical Center: bannerhealth.com • Chandler Regional Medical Center: ChandlerRegional.org • Duet, Partners in Health & Aging: duetaz.org • HealthSouth Rehabilitation: healthsouth.com

FREE

HEARING TEST 26 Arizona Locations

Call 602-814-0072 www.miracle-ear.com Not a medical exam.Audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. Good only from participating Miracle-Ear providers. See store for details.

• • • • • • • • •

Humana: humana.com John C. Lincoln Hospital: jcl.com Mercy Gilbert Medical Center: MercyGilbert.org MountainVista Medical Center: mvmedicalcenter.com Scottsdale Healthcare: shc.org St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center: stjosephs-phx.org St. Luke’s Medical Center, Phoenix: stlukesmedcenter.com Tempe St. Luke’s: tempestlukeshospital.com TheWellness Community-AZ: twccaz.org

BARIATRIC PROGRAM Hear about medical & surgical treatments for obesity.

THURS., FEB. 2:

Day of Dance for Heart Health

6-6:45PM

TUES., FEB. 21:

Come for the dancing, stay for your health!

6-6:45PM

Saturday, Feb. 11 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tempe Marketplace & Superstition Springs Center

(480) 301-4533 MayoClinic.org/Arizona

www.BannerHealth.com/events

I thought I was healthy and fit. When I learned I had a two-inch hole in my heart, my world turned upside down. Today I’m training for a marathon. My answer was Mayo Clinic. Monica Harlow, Maricopa, AZ

Monica Harlow led an active life despite being born with a serious heart condition. When a checkup showed that she might need a transplant, she was referred to Mayo Clinic. Monica’s team was able to close the hole in her heart using her own natural tissue. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit mayoclinic.org/arizona or call 800-446-2279.

Visit mayoclinic.org/arizona


User: phalent

Time: 01-31-2012 14:16 Product: PNIBrd PubDate: 02-01-2012 Zone: LivingWell

Edition: 1 Page: LW-H Color: C K Y M

8 | LIVING WELL A-Z | WEDNESDAY, February 1, 2012

Choose Belmont Village Senior Living OPENING SOON - TOUR TODAY FOR BEST SELECTION!

RICK D'ELIA

Choosing a Senior Living community is one of the most important decisions you’ll make for your family. Care and safety are top priorities, but lifestyle and independence are important too. At Belmont Village, we don’t think you should have to choose one or the other. As a leader in assisted living and memory care, we’re known for our high operating standards, innovative enrichment programs, beautiful architecture, and exceptional hospitality.When it comes to Senior Living, you should only have to make one choice.

Diane Brown is in her third month of cardiac rehab after a quadruple bypass last October.“I’m the one taking care of others!”she said explaining her surprise when she was told that she needed the procedure. Cardiologist John Raniolo, D.O., right, and inpatient cardiac rehab nurse John Perrine, RN, MS, front left, check in on her progress in the cardiac rehabilitation center at John C. Lincoln Hospital.

Continued from cover: HEART DISEASE

Belmont Village Scottsdale •Discover the Difference

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Private rental apartment units with no buy-in Licensed nurse on-site 24/7 Medication management Assistance with daily living Award-winning Circle of Friends® memory program Dedicated Alzheimer’s care Chef-prepared dining with 24 daily menu choices Free scheduled transportation daily Scottsdale On-site fitness center and 13850 N. Frank Lloyd wellness programs Wright Blvd. Swimming pool Technology center with wi-fi access belmontvillage.com Social activities and events Housekeeping and laundry Designated provider to the NFL Player Care Plan

480.945.3600

®2012 BelmontVillage,L.P. To be licensed as Assisted Living facility prior to occupancy.Above:artist’s illustration. Photographs from a variety of BelmontVillage locations.

The Community Built for Life®

EXPERTS GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS Karen A. Starkey, MD Dr. Starkey focuses on women’s health care for all ages. She provides general OB/ GYN care, but has particular interest and expertise in hormone replacement therapy, pregnancies, minimally invasive treatments and vaginal reconstructive surgery. Board certified by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Dr. Starkey is also a fellow of both organizations. She received her medical degree from the University of Western Ontario where she also finished her residency and she completed her internship at St. Joseph’s Health Care Center in London, Ontario, Canada.

Banner Ironwood Physicians - Obstetrics, Gynecology 37100 N. Gantzel Road • Ste 201 • San Tan Valley 480.394.4620 • www.BannerHealth.com/BMG-IronwoodOBGYN

GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS Tiffany Weathers, MD An OB/GYN, Dr.Weathers specializes in personalized obstetric care, minimally invasive surgery and preventative medicine. She received her medical degree from the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara School of Medicine in Mexico and then completed several internships in Puerto Rico and the U.S. She then went on to Women and Children’s Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., for her residency where she was selected as Best Teaching Resident. She is a board certified OB/GYN and fellow of the Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. In 2008, she was named as one of the Best Doctors in America. Dr.Weathers speaks fluent Spanish.

Banner Ironwood Physicians - Obstetrics, Gynecology 37100 N. Gantzel Road • Ste 201 • San Tan Valley 480.394.4620 • www.BannerHealth.com/BMG-IronwoodOBGYN

CATARACT & REFRACTIVE SURGEON Scott A. Perkins, MD

As a nationally recognized ophthalmologist with Barnet Dulaney Perkins Eye Center, Dr. Perkins has performed more than 50,000 cataract surgeries and more than 10,000 vision correction procedures such as LASIK and Implantable Contact Lenses (ICLs).As an innovator in the field of ophthalmology, he has participated in over 25 clinical trials for both pharmaceutical and ophthalmic devices. In addition, Dr. Perkins serves on the Board of Directors for Arizona Visionaries, a donor driven non-profit organization providing cataract surgery and eyeglass fittings in third world countries. He is not only trusted for his surgical talents and modest nature, but is also well known for his compassion and ability to connect with and comfort patients. Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology Member of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

Locations throughout Arizona (800) 966-7000 / www.GoodEyes.com

• age • family history • high total cholesterol and low HDL (‘good’) cholesterol • diabetes • smoking history • high blood pressure, whether treated or untreated Sorof added that an initial screening is especially important for post-menopausal women with two or more risk factors. “These become exponentially more significant in women past menopause,” she said. “Estrogen bathes your vessels and offers a lot of protection. After menopause, that protection is no longer there.”

Comprehensive testing

An initial evaluation typically includes an electrocardiogram, or EKG, a simple, quick, non-invasive examination of the electrical activity of the heart. An EKG can show subtle problems in the heart’s electrical system that may not be causing any discomfort or limitations, but need to be addressed. A test that’s often recommended after an abnormal EKG is a ‘stress test.’ If a patient is ambulatory, he or she is asked to walk on a treadmill that gradually stresses the heart with progressively increased incline and speed to see how the patient (and the heart) tolerates the activity. “Having the patient walk on a treadmill is far better than speeding up the heart with medication while the patient is lying on a table,” Sorof said. The treadmill test is often followed by an imaging test called an echocardiogram, which is an ultrasound of the heart. Another option for stress testing is a ‘stress nuclear test.’ The American College of Cardiology says the test uses a small dose of radioactive solution to track blood flow to the heart muscle and to evaluate heart function. This is used in combination with a treadmill test. When the two tests are combined, an assessment can be made of the status of the blood supply to the heart. If a problem is discovered through any of these tests, an angiogram may be recommended. This can be a conventional procedure, where a special dye is injected into a vessel and an imaging technology called fluoroscopy takes pictures of the blood flow in an artery or vein. A CT angiogram which uses a computed tomography (CT) scanner may be prescribed instead. “You can’t have a CT angiogram if your heart rate is above 60 beats per minute,” Sorof said. “A conventional angiogram is considered the gold standard for evaluating blockages in arteries or veins.”

Treatments vary

If a blockage is found during an angiogram, several options exist for the patient. Angioplasty — where a stent is implanted in the affected vessel to force it to stay open — is one option, depending on the severity and number of blockages. Meanwhile, bypass surgery is an option for severe blockages. During this surgery, a blocked vessel is ‘bypassed’ and arteries or veins from elsewhere in the patient’s body are grafted to coronary arteries to improve the blood supply to the heart muscle. For patients with a failing heart valve, some hospitals are now using a new procedure to replace the valve. The SAPIEN Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is nonsurgical and involves a catheter threaded through the femoral artery that’s used to implant the device. TAVR recently received FDA approval for use in patients too ill for conventional valve replacement surgery. The recovery time with the TAVR is usually two or three days in the hospital, said Maulik Shah, M.D., an interventional cardiologist in Scottsdale. “That’s much shorter than with traditional open-heart or minimally invasive surgery,” Shah said.

Cardiac rehab a true lifesaver

S

cott Koss is a healthy, fit 50-yearold Scottsdale resident who is a pilot for a major airline. He had no idea until last October that he had a ticking time bomb in his chest. He was undergoing his semiannual medical examination required by the FAA for all pilots, when the doctor discovered that his blood pressure was “so high it was off the charts,” Koss said.“I had SCOTT KOSS absolutely no symptoms and I was feeling great.” He was referred to Phoenix cardiologist John S. Raniolo, D.O., the medical director of the cardiac rehabilitation program at John C. Lincoln HospitalDeer Valley in Phoenix.The results of a treadmill stress test and blood work were concerning to Raniolo and he recommended an angiogram to see if there were blockages in Koss’s heart vessels. The results? Koss needed quadruple bypass surgery, which fortunately, went well. One month later, Koss began cardiac rehabilitation and says rehab — where a patient’s blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen level are monitored while exercising on various types of equipment — has made all the difference in his strength and everyday functioning.“My endurance has improved substantially,” he said.“I’ve gone from being able to walk twice around the hospital floor to being able to walk four miles a day.” Cardiac rehab is prescribed for patients who have had a heart attack or heart surgery, explained Raniolo. “It’s a comprehensive program that includes exercise and education about lifestyle modification of risk factors,” Raniolo said.“Cardiac rehab has been shown statistically to reduce the number of deaths among patients who have had heart attacks or heart surgery. It’s a very important part of a heart patient’s recovery.” —DEBRA GELBART

Miniature pump

Patients whose hearts are weak enough to require an assist device now can benefit from the Impella catheter, the world’s smallest heart pump. The miniature pump is threaded through a leg artery on a catheter and positioned in the left chamber of the heart. Before the development of the Impella, open-heart surgery was required to implant a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The Impella does the work of the heart, pumping blood into the aorta and throughout the body. “It is a much easier device to implant than an LVAD,” said Gyu Gang, M.D., a cardiothoracic surgeon on staff at Banner Heart Hospital in Mesa. “It’s designed for temporary use to allow the heart to regain strength and ability to pump on its own. It’s not designed or approved for permanent use.”

Knowledge is power

Heart disease affects more than 80 million Americans or close to 40 percent of all adults 25 and older in the U.S. But through awareness and proper care, the disease can be prevented or successfully managed, Sorof said. She recommends visiting the American Heart Association website (heart.org) to help you assess your risk factors.


User: phalent

Time: 01-31-2012 14:16 Product: PNIBrd PubDate: 02-01-2012 Zone: LivingWell

ASK AN EXPERT

Health-care advice

QUESTION: If I suspect my child has ingested something poisonous, should I automatically induce vomiting? Answer: Absolutely not. When it comes to accidental ingestion of pills or substances suspected of being poisonous, vomiting should not be automatically induced. If a child, or anyone for that matter, ingests something believed to be poisonous, contact the poison control center right away. Treatment recommendations are provided by trained nurses, typically within a minute or two. Frequently, ingested substances thought to be poisonous are in fact nontoxic, while those that are potentially toxic could be made worse through vomiting. For many years, ipecac was often used to induce vomiting after a poisonous ingestion. However, ipecac can cause dehydration and even hospital admission for prolonged vomiting. As a result, the American Association of Poison Control Centers and the American Academy of Pediatrics stopped recommending ipecac nearly a decade ago. Inducing vomiting in an uncontrolled, nonclinical setting can be dangerous. If you are ever concerned about a potential poisoning, call the Banner Good Samaritan Poison and Drug Information Center at 800-222-1222. We’re just a phone call away. To arm yourself with poison prevention tips, visit our website at www.bannerhealth.com/ Locations/Arizona/Banner+Good+Samaritan+Poison+and+Drug+Information+Center.

THINKSTOCK

DANIEL BROOKS, M.D., IS CO-MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE BANNER GOOD SAMARITAN POISON AND DRUG INFORMATION CENTER

Edition: 1 Page: LW-I

Color: C K Y M

It’s time for a heart to heart. In honor of American Heart Month, the Arizona Heart Institute invites you to have a conversation with us about heart health. Call us for a heart and vascular consultation and we’ll help you understand your true risks for cardiovascular disease. We’ll see you within 24 hours and address your test results and plan of care on the same day. Put your heart health in the hands of Arizona’s leaders in cardiovascular care.

Schedule your heart to heart by calling 602.266.2200 or visiting azheart.com.

Answer: Last month we talked about the two basic styles of hearing aids: in-the-ear and behind-the-ear, or BTE. The question is: which one is best for you? The answer is different for everyone, however, the reason most people are fit with BTEs is that individuals with a hearing loss often complain about background noise and the only technology that has been proven to help with that issue is directional microphones. These small microphones make it possible to configure a hearing aid so that sounds from the side, and especially the back, are amplified less than sounds originating from the front. Although they may have an additional cost, directional microphones seem to be more effective on BTEs because of their placement on the hearing aid.

THINKSTOCK

QUESTION: With so many options, how can I choose the hearing aid best for me?

There has never been a time when hearing aid users have had more options, but due to all the choices, it can be very confusing. When you are ready to take that first step of being fit with a hearing aid, do plenty of research and make sure you are working with a company that has an excellent reputation. ROBERT BABER IS A BOARD-CERTIFIED HEARING INSTRUMENT SPECIALIST AND OWNER OF 21 MIRACLE-EAR CENTERS LOCATED THROUGHOUT ARIZONA

QUESTION: What in the world is a ‘thunderclap headache’? Answer: The term ‘thunderclap headache’ refers to the sudden onset of the worst headache of your life. According to diagnostic criteria, a thunderclap headache should reach maximum intensity within 60 seconds of onset and should be severe enough to really grab your attention (like a boom of thunder). While thunderclap headaches are uncommon, they require urgent medical evaluation because the potential causes can be quite serious or even life-threatening and often have to do with bleeding in and around the brain. It is extremely important to seek emergency medical attention if you experience a thunderclap headache. RASHMI HALKER, M.D., IS A NEUROLOGIST AND HEADACHE SPECIALIST AT THE MAYO CLINIC IN ARIZONA Living Well a-z invites readers to submit questions to a panel of health-care experts. The short questions and answers will offer readers a little more information about hot topics in medicine and refer you to other resources where you can learn more. Responses will also arm you with information so you know what to ask your own health-care providers.

If you would like your question to be considered for the March 7, 2012 issue of Living Well a-z, please write to editor: Paula Hubbs Cohen Paula.Cohen@cox.net or c/o The Arizona Republic 200 E. Van Buren St., CA22 Phoenix, AZ 85004

2632 N. 20th Street, Phoenix


or: C K Y M

User: phalent

Time: 01-31-2012 14:16 Product: PNIBrd PubDate: 02-01-2012 Zone: LivingWell

Edition: 1 Page: LW-FullPageFCAd-A Col-

Finally, free yourself from back pain.

Attend our complimentary Medical Seminar. Call 1-866-811-3275 today to register: Thursday, February 2 at 4 p.m.

Hyatt Regency Phoenix 122 North Second Street Phoenix, AZ 85004

Saturday, February 4 at 10 a.m. Thursday, February 9 at 6 p.m.

Laser Spine Institute 8888 E. Raintree Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Wednesday, February 8 at 2 p.m.

Country Inn Suites by Carlson Mesa 6650 E. Superstition Springs Boulevard Mesa, AZ 85206

Friday, February 10 at 12 p.m.

Renaissance Glendale Hotel & Spa 9495 W. Coyotes Boulevard Glendale, AZ 85035

Learn about minimally invasive spine surgery. We’ll discuss the latest surgical techniques to relieve your neck or back pain, and answer your questions. Meet one-on-one with our physician. Bring your MRI or CT scans to the seminar, and our physician will review them and discuss treatment for your specific condition.

Laser Spine Institute’s minimally invasive procedures are the safe and effective alternative to open neck or back surgery. Each month, more people come to Laser Spine Institute to relieve their neck and back pain than to any other spine surgery center in the nation.

Advantages of our endoscopic approach:

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Spinal stenosis Sciatica Herniated disc Degenerative disc disease Bone spurs

Register today at 1-866-811-3275 or www.SpineSeminar.com

LivingWell-Feb2012  

Living Well AZ. February 2012. Health-Care news you can use for your whole family. Heart Disease. Glaucoma 101. Teens and Drugs. Ovarian Can...

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