Page 1

“I CAN ... help find a CURE and support our community in the fight against breast cancer.” ~ Stephanie Kwan, Phoenix Race committee member

21ST ANNUAL SUSAN G. KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE | SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

OFFICIAL PROGRAM PRESENTED BY

OCTOBER 6, 2013


“I CAN ... ensure resources are available to help those families faced with a breast cancer diagnosis.” ~ Jan Baltzer, survivor, Phoenix Race committee member 2 | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE

‘Answers and information are the most calming thing you can get to combat cancer’ Crystal Reidy

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert, Ariz. doctors work together to treat aggressive breast cancer

C

BY BR IA N SODOM A

rystal Reidy is no stranger to overcoming adversity. In youth, her family was poor and battled homelessness. Reidy worked her way out of poverty, earning a bachelor’s degree in human service and a master’s in counseling. She is even working on a doctoral dissertation focusing on the topic of teaching resilience. Today, the community outreach officer

treatment plan with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert, Ariz. doctors. “At first you don’t have any answers. You just have cancer,” she says. “I think it’s answers and information that is the most calming thing you can get to combat cancer.” Reidy was also fortunate to experience very few side effects from chemotherapy. NO FAMILY HISTORY OF CANCER A lump found in March surprised both she Yes, she lost her hair and there was nausea and her doctors. Reidy has no family history and vomiting, but not to the extent she expected. The mom of three boys with ages of breast cancer and having her first baby ranging from 17 months to 17 years also before the age of 20 further reduced her chances of ever getting it. Even more, Reidy chose not to slow down her daily life while was diagnosed with the very fast-spreading undergoing treatment. She still worked full time and even completed her annual Army Triple Negative form of breast cancer. basic training assignment, which also She was at Stage 3 by the time she was includes firing an M-16 rifle. diagnosed and prepping for chemotherapy treatment in April even though an October 2011 routine exam showed nothing unusual. MAKING THE RIGHT DECISIONS Reidy said her Banner MD Anderson Before telling her two teen-age sons about doctors encouraged her to make the right the diagnosis, Reidy established her for the Maricopa County Attorney’s office and Army National Guard sergeant is grateful for many things, but perhaps even more so after recently winning a battle against a very aggressive form of breast cancer.

decisions for herself when it came to everyday living while undergoing treatment. “For some people, working would stress them out. My goal was not to give up everything,” she says. “They didn’t pressure me either way. I didn’t feel like they said ‘Here are the rules of cancer.’” After finishing her last few rounds of radiation treatment, the now cancer-free Reidy has one thing on her mind. “I was always a real road tripper with my boys. We would always go out and take a trip in the car and go to places in and around Arizona,” she says. “I’m ready to get the hair growing and go on vacation.” To schedule a mammogram screening, call 480-543-6900 or visit bannermdanderson.com.

Created by REPUBLIC CUSTOM PUBLISHING, a division of Republic Media, 200 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004 | Circulation: 602-444-1000 General Manager: CAMI KAISER | Manager Creative Development: ISAAC MOYA | Editor: JIM WILLIAMS | Editorial Intern: NICK KOSTENKO | Managing Art Director: TRACEY PHALEN | Design: CRAIG KURTZ


“I CAN ... continue to teach people how to live a healthy lifestyle.” ~ Meghan Dorn, Phoenix Race committee member 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 3

Join Olympian Amanda Beard to make a difference in the fight against breast cancer

A

B Y G R E M LY N WA D D E L L

Amanda Beard

‘I found my “I CAN” by rising up to be a warrior ...fighting for my Nana every day’

manda Beard, who dove into the international swimming scene at age 14 during the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, is the 2013 Honorary Race Chair for the 21st Annual Susan G. Phoenix Komen Race for the Cure®. The native Californian is also the granddaughter of a 10-year breast cancer survivor. “Watching what cancer did to my paternal grandmother and my father and my whole family made it easy to feel helpless,” says the Tucson resident and married mother of two. “But I did what so many other co-survivors have done — I found my ‘I CAN,’ by rising up to be a warrior and fight for her. I’m still fighting for my Nana every day. I want to do everything within my power to save lives from this terrible disease, and participating in the Race for the Cure is the most powerful way to do that in Arizona.” Amanda is asking the public to show its warrior spirit by joining or otherwise supporting her team, “Swim Like a Mom,” which is also the name of her blog that reflects on motherhood, exercise and other topical issues. And if running’s not your thing or you can’t make the Race date, that’s not a problem, Amanda says. There are multiple ways to help, and one of the best ways is with your wallet. When you support Komen CAN AZ through Race registration or a monetary donation, 75 percent stays in the community and the other 25 percent goes directly to international research. “Maybe it’s that you CAN register for the race,” she says. “Maybe it’s that you CAN donate money to Komen CAN Arizona to support breast cancer education, screening and treatment programs right here in Arizona. “But we CAN make a difference.” Ready to join the fight against breast cancer with Amanda and lots of other supporters? Visit phoenix.info-komen.org/ goto/SwimLikeAMom.


“I CAN ... make the Phoenix Race for the Cure event a special day for everyone!” ~ Bailey Garrison, Phoenix Race committee member 4 | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE

21ST ANNUAL SUSAN G. KOMEN PHOENIX RACE

Find your ‘I CAN’ and save

A

*

Find your “I CAN” and register today at komenCANaz.org for the 21st Annual Komen Phoenix Race for the Cure on Sunday, Oct. 13.

15th Ave.

18th Ave.

17th Ave.

Jefferson St.

Wesley Bolin Plaza FINISH

……

2

AZ State Capitol

Adams St.

16th Ave.

4

……

3

………………………START

……………

17th Ave

9

Monroe St.

…………………………

*

…………

K

Adams St. S START omen CAN AZ is driven by its promise to save lives and end breast cancer forever. It dedicates 100 percent of funds R T K raised through the Annual Susan G. V Komen Phoenix Race for the Cure® to this promise, with 75 percent staying in the community P supporting multiple mission impact initiatives and 25 percent going directly towards international research. G “We’re asking everyone to renew their commitment or find CMV CV their ‘I CAN’ in the fight against breast cancer by joining us at this year’s Race. No other organization does what we do in CV CV CV Arizona, and the need continues to be great,” said Heather FINISH Jefferson St. Roberts, interim executive director for Komen CAN AZ. By participating in the Race for the Cure, you “CAN” MAP KEY CMV Community Village (education, save lives, making a real impact on programs and services community booths) in central and northern Arizona, including: CV Corporate Village (sponsor booths) • The Community Grants program, which has awarded K Kids for the Cure® Area P Premium Pink/Hospitality (restricted) $18.8 million to support local breast health and breast Promise Garden cancer education, screening and treatment programs, and G R Registration/packet pick-up $5.4 million to international, award winning research S Survivor Parade line-up Survivor & Co-Survivor Area grants since the Affiliate’s inception. Up for the Cure® meeting area • Advocacy at the state level for policy and funding changes TV Teaming Volunteer tent to ensure underinsured and uninsured women and men Information, missing persons First aid Water have access to care. This includes the recent restoration of Arizona’s Medicaid. • Community empowerment through education at community health fairs, individual businesses and partnerships like Buddy Check 12. • Survivor support through programs like Komen CAN AZ’s annual Survivor Education and Empowerment Conference. • Collaboration among and connections to local resources, including everything from breast cancer support groups to provider programs.

19th Ave.

W E SL E Y B OL I N P L A Z A

……

Fundraising is making a real impact in Arizona

Ma


“I CAN ... be a warrior and inspire others.” ~ Amy Packard , Phoenix Race committee member

NIX RACE FOR THE CURE | SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 5

ave lives in our community 3rd Ave.

Monroe St.

4th Ave.

7th Ave.

10th Ave.

15th Ave.

12th Ave.

R AC E RO U T E S

Washington St.

Madison St.

… 1 Mile Route 5K Route Water Stops

TOP 10 FUNDRAISING TIPS Komen CAN AZ encourages each Race for the Cure® participant to raise $100 – the approximate cost of providing one mammogram to an underserved community member. While it can be difficult to ask for donations, these fundraising tips will make it easier. And don’t forget the No. 1 rule: Know and tell where donated dollars go — pull stats from komenCANaz.org, share Komen CANdid AZ blog posts and forward emails from Komen CAN AZ showing dollars at work.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Set a goal and spread the word to keep yourself accountable. Offer to do something outrageous if you make your goal. Dye your hair pink, kiss a pig – the sky’s the limit! Share the link to your personalized Race fundraising page via email and social media sites. Host a garage sale, asking family, friends and neighbors to contribute unwanted items. Solicit unwanted gift cards, which you can exchange for cash on a variety of websites. Give up your daily latte for the week and put the savings toward your fundraising efforts. Search the car, couch cushions and junk drawer for loose change. (This a great way for kids to contribute, as well.) Get back to basics with a traditional lemonade stand, bake sale or car wash. Ask a local business to sponsor an event in which they donate a portion of the proceeds to your fundraising efforts. Talk with HR to organize a “casual day” at the office, where employees have to pay to wear casual attire.

Don’t give up! Remember that Race donations can be turned in through Oct. 31, so there’s still time!


“I CAN ... inspire kids to be healthy and volunteer!” ~ Allison Winter, Phoenix Race committee member 6 | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE

REGISTRATION & FEES

CAN’T-MISS RACE DAY ATTRACTIONS

It’s not too late to register! Online: Register at komenCANaz.org by noon on Friday, Oct. 11. In Person: Register at one of the following locations: • Today 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Wildflower Bread Company Chandler Fashion Center

1

• Wednesday–Friday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Paradise Valley Mall (Upper Food Court) • Saturday 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Paradise Valley Mall (Upper Food Court) • Race Day, Sunday, Oct. 13 6 a.m. Wesley Bolin Plaza Please allow plenty of time for parking and registration prior to your event.

2

Race day

Fees: • Breast Cancer Survivor, $20 • Youth (12 and younger), $20 • Adult (13 and older), $35

RACE PARKING & SHUTTLES The Race draws a large crowd so carpooling, riding public transportation (METRO Light Rail, Valley Metro Buses) or using the Race Day Shuttle is highly recommended. Plan extra time to park and walk to the start of the Race. Go to komenCANaz.org to view shuttle stops and schedule. For public transportation, contact Valley Metro at www.valley metro.org or 602-253-5000.

Participating in the Komen Phoenix Race for the Cure® isn’t about running or walking, it’s about saving lives. This familyfriendly event offers something for everyone, with every activity focused on celebrating survivors, honoring those we have lost and continuing to fight breast cancer. Here are five crowd pleasers. The Promise Garden is one of the more private areas in Wesley Bolin Plaza and features hand-decorated tulips with personal messages of hope, love and promise. Always popular, the Survivors’ Celebration and Parade kicks off the morning. Survivors make their way down a short parade route lined with supporters and cheerleaders into the dedicated Cancer Treatment Centers of America Survivor Area and Pink Hat Café, where a continental breakfast will be available for each survivor and one guest. The Kids Area is full of activities by the Arizona Cardinals to learn about Healthy Living. Kids also have the opportunity to make their own take-away tulips in honor of someone special.

SCHEDULE

SAFETY

Race Site Opens: Registration, Teams Area, Community Village, Corporate Village, Promise Garden • 6:30 a.m. Survivors’ Parade Line-Up • 6:45 a.m. Survivors’ Celebration and Parade • Post-parade: Kids’ Area, Survivor and Co-Survivor Area open 1 Mile Walk/Run • 7:15 a.m. • 8:05 a.m. Breast Cancer Survivor’s 5K Run • 8:20 a.m. 5K Run • 8:40 a.m. 5K Walk • 10 a.m. Race Awards Announced

Safety is our top priority. Please help ensure a safe event for all: • Strollers are permitted; however, we ask that those with strollers line up at the back of the crowd. • Animals/pets are not permitted. • Rollerblades, bikes and skateboards are not permitted.

• 6 a.m.

3

4

The Community Village provides an opportunity to meet the programs who benefit from funds raised at the Race for the Cure, and Corporate Village has games and prizes, and gives participants a chance to thank event sponsors.

5

Live Entertainment – including everything from dance troupes to musicians to experienced deejays rallying the crowd – takes place throughout the venue.


“I CAN ... help in the fight against breast cancer in my volunteer efforts on the Komen Race committee.” ~ Melody Spencer, survivor, Phoenix Race committee member 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 7

A special thanks!

2013 KOMEN PHOENIX RACE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE • • • • • • • •

The 21st Anniversary Komen Phoenix Race for the Cure® is made possible by many individuals, organizations and businesses coming together as one. Thank you to the following for their continued commitment to the Komen promise.

2013 KOMEN PHOENIX RACE SPONSORS VIP ($100,000) • Fry’s Food Stores Gold ($25,000) • Ak-Chin • Paradise Valley Mall • Two Men and a Truck • Wildflower Bread Company • Yoplait Silver ($10,000) • Arizona Milk Producers • EDVI Medical Imaging • NextCare Urgent Care Bronze ($7,000) • PepsiCo Copper ($5,000) • Concentra Urgent Care • Dillards West • Edward Jones • Emerson Network Power • Freescale • GEICO • Henkel Consumer Goods, Inc. • HEAD Penn Racquet Sports • Humana • Service King Collision Repair • SimonMed Imaging • smilegeneration.com • SunWest Federal Credit Union • Western Refining Entertainment ($5,000) • Arizona Breast Surgery Specialists

Official Program ($40,000) • Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center Registration ($25,000) • Mayo Clinic Survivor Area ($40,000) • Cancer Treatment Centers of America Sleep In For The Cure ($15,000) • The Roomstore Water Stop ($2,500) • Quicken Loans • Republic Services • Scottsdale Medical Imaging • Specialized Loan Servicing • Valley Women for Women Presenting Media Partner ($100,000) • 12 News • Clear Channel Media & Entertainment • CNN Latino 44 Media Platinum ($50,000) • My 103.9 Media Gold ($25,000) • CBS Outdoor • Prensa Hispana Media Silver ($10,000) • Jewish News • La Voz Arizona • Latino Perspectives Magazine • North Valley Magazine • The Arizona Republic

Bridget Eagy, Volunteer and Special Events Manager Zachary Singh, Race for the Cure Coordinator Sharon Carlson, Survivors Stephanie Hays, Operations Jim Sampson, Operations Amy Packard, Teaming Up for the Cure® Melody Spencer, Registration Allison Winter, Kids for the Cure®

2013 HONORARY KOMEN PHOENIX RACE CHAIR • Amanda Beard, Olympic Gold Medalist and Co-Survivor

2013-2014 KOMEN CAN AZ BOARD OF DIRECTORS President • Carolyn Evani Vice President • Jill Bray Treasurer/Secretary Lisa Pavelka McAlister Members • Jeff Gauvin • Pam Giannonatti • Miryam Gutier-Elm • Cristina Lenko • Tonsa Price-Edwards • Dr. Bodour Salhia • Lisa Schmidtke • Tracey Walker-Banks • Barbra Watson-Riley • Katherine Yu

2013 KOMEN PHOENIX RACE COMMITTEE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Kelli Allen Kelly Allen Jan Baltzer Madison Berry Chris Bethany Meghan Dorn Jessica Doubleday Dale Eagy Karen Emery Iris Finkelstein Cynthia FuQua Bailey Garrison Kitty Glinka Shelly Handy Jim Haugse Rebeca Haugse Mari Hembeck Akua Jitahadi Caronda Jones Toni Kramer Stephanie Kwan Mary LaMontagna Lynne Latino Renee McClure Jasmyne Ramirez Bobbi Reginato Mary Ann Rocha Erica Sanford Joanne Scott Terri Speaks Shelly Sturgess Carsen Wren Leslie Wren


“I CAN ... help find a cure so others will not have to go through what [my mother and I] went through.” ~ Sharon Carlson, survivor, Phoenix Race committee member 8 | OCTOBER 6, 2013 | 21ST ANNUAL KOMEN PHOENIX RACE FOR THE CURE

‘Cancer has been lurking over my shoulder my entire life’ Charlene Cunningham

Managing cancer risk through testing, genetic counseling

C

B Y M A R Y VA N D E V E I R E

harlene Cunningham isn’t giving breast cancer a chance. Two of Charlene’s greataunts died of breast cancer, her grandmother died of ovarian cancer, two aunts are breast and ovarian cancer survivors, and a secondcousin has been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer more than once. “Cancer has been lurking over my shoulder my entire life,” says Charlene, 40. Charlene and her sisters and cousins were tested for breast cancer risk, and 16 of the 20, including Charlene and three sisters, tested positive for the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA. About 5 to 10 percent of breast cancer is hereditary, often caused by a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Risk increases in families with cases of breast cancer and cases of both breast and ovarian cancer.

determine whether additional testing is needed. Patients who test positive for a mutation will sit down with a medical oncologist for counseling about available treatments. “If you have the information, you can decide how you want to manage your risk,” Cianfrocca says. “The right decision for your neighbor might not be the right decision for you.” In addition to surveillance and medications, treatment options for patients with a genetic mutation includes prophylactic, or preventive, surgery. A prophylactic mastectomy lowers breast cancer risk by as much as 90 percent. The prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy, which removes fallopian tubes and ovaries, lowers breast cancer risk by 50 percent. Breast reconstructive surgery options include “direct to implant,” with full reconstructive surgery immediately following the mastectomy. Or, “expanders” can be inserted in a surgery following the mastectomy. The expanders slowly fill over time, and implants are inserted in a final surgery.

CHOOSING OPTIONS Charlene and her sisters chose to have GENE TESTING surgeries to reduce their risk. One sister will The Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center travel from out of state for a mastectomy at Clinical Cancer Genetic Program in Banner MD Anderson in September. Gilbert coordinates genetic testing and Charlene had a salpingo-oophorectomy health surveillance for patients with in 2012. She went to Banner MD Anderson hereditary cancer syndromes. The program in April for a double mastectomy and offers services in screening, treatment, initial reconstructive surgery. support and recovery. Charlene is a high school teacher and Counseling before and after genetic part-time community college instructor testing is vital, says Mary Cianfrocca, DO, raising 10-year-old twin sons and a FACP. Cianfrocca is Director of Banner daughter, 14, on her own. “I have to be MD Anderson’s Breast Cancer Program there for those babies of mine,” she says. and is Medical Director of the Clinical She adds, for a cancer patient, Banner Cancer Genetics Program. MD Anderson is the place to be. Genetic counselors review a woman’s “I have loved everything about it,” she personal and family history to determine says. “I have a team of doctors. They meet the appropriate type of testing and discuss to discuss this comprehensive care. You can the implications of potential test results, so do all the blood work here, the surgery prep, the woman can decide whether to be tested, everything. I’m so lucky I have this place.” Cianfrocca says. “That is the first decision that women need to make when they have To schedule an appointment a family history,” Cianfrocca says. with a genetic counselor, call 480-256-6444 or visit MANAGING RISK bannermdanderson.com. Even if a patient’s test results are negative, counseling afterward is important to

Komen Race for the Cure - Oct. 2013  

21st Annual Susan G. Komen Phoenix Race for the Cure

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you