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PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE

VOLU M E 1 - IS S U E 1

Photography My Life Rufat Abbas

A Full Circle Back to Where It All Began Neill Soden

A Persona Reflected in an Image Sami Al Tokhais

Exposing Life with Dignity & Precision Gus Waschefort

A Storyteller Through Motion Pictures & Still Images Laith Al-Majali

Featured Article

The X-Trail An Interview with David Hobby


The ultimate sensor, APS-C 16M X-Trans CMOS II. World’s fastest auto focus speed of 0.08 sec. achieved by Fujifilm’s unique phase detection AF system. Controls and responses that are even more intuitive with every shot, and simple-to-use Wi-Fi that lets you share each moment on the spot. Only one camera has evolved enough to bring you all this and more.

Available in Silver and Black

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Editor-in-Chief Keitaro So Associate Editor Mohamad Al Moumani Mouna Jidal Media Consultant Geric Cosuco Deo Macaraig Art Director Derick Venzon Head Lay Out Artist Arman Bioc Writer/Researcher Hafsha Masorong Mohammad Abdul Tariq Adora Lyn Bernas In House Photographer Myk Reyes Production Manager Jasper Alfonso Special Thanks Mr. N.C. Kumar

EDITOR’S LETTER

First and foremost, on behalf of Fujifilm let me extend my deepest gratitude to all you for the undying support and patronage to our brand. You are the reason why we keep pushing ourselves to bring better products and why we go beyond our limit in developing new innovations that will help you with your photographic journey. We hope to continue our good rapport with you and pledge to do our best to keep you satisfied and assist you with your practice with the craft. For the last few years, we are pleased to say that our partnership with outstanding photographers has been growing in numbers. From a simple goal of introducing our products and capabilities to them, an extraordinary relationship has developed and later on became a legion. Now with over 198 photographers in 43 countries affiliated with Fujifilm, we have developed a community that has a uniform goal; that is to encourage each and everyone to see the importance of photography in shaping our society. We coudn’t our gratitude enough for their support to us and their contributions to our society, that is why we have formulated on creating a magazine exclusively developed to showcase their skills and works. We hope to give tribute to them by dedicating pages and highlighting their photography career and through this we hope to encourage everyone as well and hope that our readers will learn a thing or two from these outstanding artists. Fujiflim X Magazine aims to be a catalyst of change and inspiration for everyone. For our very first issue ever, we are honored to be given time by one of the most acknowledged photographers in this era, David Hobby, the founder of the ever popular blog page Strobist.com. He gave us his insights regarding photography and his humble beggining in the craft. He shared also with us few of his images taken during one of his trips. We extend our gratitude also to Rufat Abbas for sharing the image used for the cover of this issue. Be inspired from the collection of pictures gathered from few of the most prestigious photographers of the world such as Neill Soden, Gus Waschefort, Laith Al-Majali and Sami Al Tokhais. See how their works have touched and influenced people all over the four corner of the world and get to know them better as photographers who aim to be a light to those in needs. We hope that through this editorial we could motivate more people to take a look of the craft of photography and fuel our readers to keep their undying devotion to the craft intact. Enjoy flicking through our pages and once again thank you very much.

Printed at Printex Printing Press L.L.C. Keitaro So General Manager Electronic Imaging Division FUJIFILM Middle East Fujifilm X Magazine is ian editorial that aims to showcase the magnificent works of Fujifilm X-Photographers all over the world. This is our way to give tribute to them, not only for the support that they have given us, but mostly for their excellent job of being an agent of change through their craft. Fujifilm X Magazine intends to educate our readers with the importance of photography in shaping our society and hopes to be an instrument that can influence people o We hope that Fujifilm X Magazine could inspire photographers as well to better polish themselves in their craft and hope to fuel their passion for photography.


Reasons Why Photographers Can not Resist Shooting with The Fujifilm X-Series Cameras

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Photography My Life Rufat Abbas

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Fujifilm X-M1 Camera Parts Diagram

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Fujifilm X-M1 Dial Mode

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A Persona Reflected in a Image Sami Al Tokhais

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A Storyteller Through Motion Pictures & Still Images Laith Al-Majali

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Fujinon XF 10-24mm

Bringing Back Tomorrow Today Fujifilm X-M1 Review Exposing Life With Dignity & Precision Gus Waschefort

The X- Trail Interview With David Hobby A Full Circle Back to Where it All Began Neill Soden


Rufat Abbas Azerbaijan x100s

Rufat had many reasons why he chose photography. For him, the craft allows you to have that moment of the life captured in the small box in your hands and it is the most accurate way to document the life around you that you won't be able to reconstruct, have it forever and pass it down to the next generation. He believes that a photograph has the ability to convey emotion, mood, narrative, ideas and messages. Rufat fell in love with the entire process of creating an image - from the moment he pressed the shutter release button till the time when the image appeared as a final photograph. Photography simply expresses himself. Born and raised in the capital of Azerbaijan, Baku, Rufat Abas life in photography began when his uncle bought him an old soviet camera "Смена 8M" (Smena 8M) for his 10th birthday. He was just a schoolboy back when he learned how to take photos with this camera. His father taught him how to develop black and white films and make prints using their small bathroom as a darkroom. He was hooked in the whole process and continued on his glorified hobby. Years passed by and his passion to the craft becomes deeper and deeper. Photography changes the way he sees things – It made him noticed the light, shapes, colors, textures, people and everything around him looks different. With the craft, he really loses all of his worries and daily stresses. It also helped him more to connect and communicate with people around the world. Rufat started his life as a professional photographer more than ten years ago. However, his momentum to focus with it seems to be halted many times. In his first attempt in the early 2000's, Rufat didn’t seem to meet his expectations. Like most of the avid photographers who tested to make a living on this kind of profession, he misjudged on his notion whether he is ready or not. Most of the time people confuse the meaning of the word "professional" in respect to photography and this also happened to him. His failure made him decided to get a regular day job to support his family and at the same time to spend more time on planning his photography

business. Rufat started saving and gained more experience in running a business and understanding of new technology. In 2010 he found himself ready to go back to photography business. Now with more confidence and better understanding of business perspective, Rufat is now better equipped on the profession he always wanted to have. Rufat mainly shoots black and white. He forms a consistency in looking for light, emotions, patterns and composition in his photos and what happens in front of his camera. Photography became a way of reflecting reality by means of static images for him and he hopes to freeze a fraction of a second of life. This fraction of a second should tell some story, give you food for thought, evoke an emotion, composed properly and show not only how something looked but also how something felt. Rufat actively participates in various photography exhibitions and competitions as well. He participated in "ABB's international photography competition" (2000, Switzerland), "World Press Photo" (2001, Netherlands), "Baku International photo festival AYNA" (2002, Azerbaijan), "CGAP Microfinance Photography Contest" (2007, USA), "Arts Council Azerbaijan "(2011, Azerbaijan)," British Council's Dickens project "(2012, Azerbaijan)," International Exhibition of Art Photography" (2013, Macedonia) and received the "Photographer of the Year" award in 2011 for his "Fotoqrafika" project. Rufat also covered various assignments for European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) and has been a member of the Azerbaijan Photographers Union since 2000. His first published photography book came out in 2012 and entitled "Life in black and white" in 2012. On 2014, Rufat hopes to precede on a couple of his personal photography projects. He is planning to complete next year, finish setting up a studio and continue taking photos. He would also like to travel to Cuba and take photos of streets of Havana, as a long term plan though and hopefully to have his own personal exhibition.


Photography My Life


My first test on a Fujifilm camera came when I borrowed the Fujifilm x100 camera at Gulf Photo Plus 2013 in Dubai. The next day, I had a privilege to be invited by the Fujifilm ME team to their workshop where I had a chance to test the new Fujifilm x100s model on the eve of the expected official announcement. After spending the whole day with this camera I fell in love with it and had a chance to have one of my own soon. The camera’s performance and image quality is what impressed me most. Features such as the very accurate metering, camera response time, high ISO and low light performance and the ability to handle the mixed lighting situations made me realized how competitive the x100s is. Besides the technical specifications, camera size, weight and design is also important for me, especially when going out and travelling. The optical/hybrid viewfinder, physical dials for shutter speed, aperture and exposure compensation are also on my list of favorite features. I think what separates Fujifilm’s X-Series from the other, there is no doubt that the Camera sensor, low-light performance, and low noise results in the most challenging shooting conditions as well as well balanced stylish design really stands out the most. I also appreciate the great framing of the cameras that produces incredible colors. Ever since owning one, I started to take more photos since I can bring the camera anywhere I go. With this small, stylish and very quiet camera the photographer becomes almost invisible.

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“Photography allows you to have that moment captured in the small box in your hands and it is the most accurate way to document the life around you that you won’t be able to reconstruct, have it forever and pass it down to the next generation.”


Fujifilm X-M1, is yet another innovation in mirror-less cameras. As the line between full frame and cropped sensors diminishes, mirror-less cameras with APS-C (Advanced Photo System type-C) sensors brings a whole new genre to photography world. Fujifilm started off with launching the X-Series with the unique X-Trans sensor that removed anti-aliasing filter to give more detailed images. Latest to X-Series is the X-M1, which has the same sensor technology, it is the smallest and most affordable X-Series camera, combining both the retro style and features of a professional camera.

Fujifilm X-M1

Bringing Yesterday Today The newly-designed body of the Fujifilm X-M1 is less metal and more polycarbonate plastic than the previous X-series models, but it’s quite smaller and lighter. Dimensions are approximately 4.6 x 2.6 x 1.5 inches (117 x 66 x 38mm). It weighs 11.6 ounces (329g) with battery and flash card, as compared to 12.3 ounces for the X-E1, and 15.9 ounces for the X Pro1. The basic layout places most buttons and controls at the right side of the camera for one-handed operation, and there’s a physical Mode dial that makes it easily accessible to double check your current operating mode. Fuji has removed the shutter speed dial and replaced it with a standard mode dial like the ones found on nearly every digital camera. Top of the camera is the shutter release, exposure compensation/ shutter speed dial, hot-shoe, build-in flash and power switch, along with one programmable function button (which by default is the wireless connect switch). The bottom of the camera has the battery and SD card compartment. The tripod mount is located off-center of the lens, extremely close to the door, hence you won’t be able to access vthe battery or card if the camera is mounted on a tripod. The X-series also introduces for the very first time a dedicated video recording button, which sits comfortably inside a recessed rim. The X-M1 now features a tilting monitor that helps out with framing shots over your head, or low to the ground. A 920,000 dot LCD panel can tilt up over 90 degrees and down about 80 degrees. It’s bright, clear and sharp, and composing images using the rear screen is quite easy. Fujifilm X-M1 uses a 16.3 million pixel, APS-C sized X-Trans CMOS sensor. The sensor and processing of the Fujifilm X-M1 allows for a sensitivity range of ISO 200-6400, which is expandable to ISO 100-25,600. The maximum resolution of images is 4896 x 3264 pixels, and images can be saved as raw or JPEG files, with the raw files saved in Fujifilm’s proprietary RAF format. Up to 30 JPEG images, or 10 raw images, can be shot in a burst, with a 5.6 fps maximum continuous shooting speed.

Fujifilm X-M1 uses a 16.3 million pixel, APS-C sized X-Trans CMOS sensor. The sensor and processing of the Fujifilm X-M1 allows for a sensitivity range of ISO 200-6400, which is expandable to ISO 100-25,600. The maximum resolution of images is 4896 x 3264 pixels, and images can be saved as raw or JPEG files, with the raw files saved in Fujifilm’s proprietary RAF format. Up to 30 JPEG images, or 10 raw images, can be shot in a burst, with a 5.6 fps maximum continuous shooting speed. A lot of new features have been introduced in this camera; it’s the first X-Series camera to feature Wi-Fi connectivity. You can transfer images to a mobile device, such as a smartphone or tablet, transfer GPS location data to the camera for geo-tagging of images, and send images to your computer over your home’s wireless network. This is a most useful feature for me as a photographer, which allows me to quickly share images with my clients on the move. The X-M1 also shoots videos at Full HD resolution, that’s 1,920 x 1,080 pixels with a rate of 30 frames per second, commonly known as 1080p. The frame rate is increased from the 24p offered by previous models. Audio is recorded of a built-in stereo microphone, and there’s no external microphone jack. The X-M1 is a fine entry-level compact camera bundled up with semi-pro features. It combines good handling, style and great image quality. The only missing quality was the viewfinder, for the first few days, I had frequently held it up to my eye and was disappointed but after a while I got used to looking at the LCD. Although without the viewfinder it loses something of the essence of the X-Pro1 and X-E1. The most useful feature for me was the Wifi connectivity, which I used quite often to transfer the photos to my iPad and iPhone using the free Fujifilm camera App. The transferring and connection was instantaneous.


Mohammad Abdul Tariq Educational Technologist/ Photographer/ Blogger/ Gadget Geek/ Movie Buff and a writer in the making He works as Educational Technologist for Abu Dhabi Men’s College, where his team and him get to play, review and test out new technology of all sorts. View more of his works @ http://500px.com/Scorpion_stin g and follow him @scorpion_sting on twitter


Exposing Life with Dignity and Precision

Gus Waschefort

South Africa X-Pro 1, x100s

Ever since Gus could have his earliest memory, he remembers that his entire environment has already been engulfed within photography. He never considered the craft as a mere hobby only but instead treated it with dignity as this is the only thing that matters to him. He recalls that at age of 10, while all of his friends are having their own fancy dreams of becoming soldiers or firemen, he couldn’t see himself nothing less than being a National Geographic Photographer. For him, Photography chooses him as much as he chooses it. Gus Waschefort absolutely grew up in photography. Some of his earliest memories are of sitting in a darkroom while his father was working. His father was the chief photographer of the South African Tourism Board (SATOUR) and every time he travelled for assignments, Gus used to tag along with him. His passion to photography grows deeper as he realized that the craft could allow him to travel and explore. Sooner than later, his eagerness to learn more and practice photography led him to leave school early. After finishing grade nine at aged fifteen, he visited Indonesia to pursue a photographic project about Java Rhinoceros in Ujung Khulon Nature Reserve. He had high hopes of seeing them upfront and takes some photos of it the way his early heroes used to do. However, instead of laying eyes on the magnificent creatures, what has greeted him is the chaos that the country is facing after the fall from power of President Suharto who reigned for 32 years. Gus didn’t have the chance to spend the amount of time he had hoped for with the Rhinos, instead, he spent four months in Jakarta mostly photographing the effects of poverty in the region. This experience had a profound effect on Gus and changed the course of his career. The turmoil and poverty spread over the region made him contemplate on what he has to do. He knew that the camera at his hand is no longer a tool to show the interesting facts about wildlife alone, instead, it is an instrument to show the reality the world has to offer. With a new found resolve, Gus shifted his focus from wildlife photography to photojournalism and started to work on freelance assignments across Africa and Asia during the period 1998 and 2002. He has been assigned in several areas including a number of troubled regions such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Angola. Gus was deeply moved by the scenarios presented to his lens and understood that he has the obligation to present them properly to his audience. Over the time, he formed the opinion that in order to cover human rights issues as a photojournalist, he has to better himself and know much more about human rights and armed conflict. He knew that he had too little knowledge of the dynamics in these countries and could further justify his works if he could gain more knowledge. So he returned to high school in 2002 to obtain a diploma and enable him to be admitted into a university and study human rights. Ever since, Gus tailored his expertise so as to not only be a photographer but to be a subject-matter expert on human rights and conflict issues too. He understands by doing so he could be on a better position to cover such situations accurately and comprehensively. As a human rights academe, his understanding on the issue supported him in his photographic work and his technical knowledge on camera allows him to present his ideologies clearer. His inter-personal skills and ability to communicate across cultural divides are of immense importance to him and with these off-camera skills and technical photography skills he learned earlier allowed him to capture nuances that others may miss. To this end, Gus holds a PhD in international human rights law, and has recently been appointed to the international human rights law committee of the International Law Association. He would like to be remembered as a human rights photographer who contributed not only to raising awareness of human rights issues, but also understanding of such issues. He cannot stress enough though that he is a photojournalist first and foremost and his academic work on human rights serves to refine his photographic work on the same issues.


I am very keen with the tools that I use and trusted Fujifilm even during the film days. Back then, I virtually exclusively used Fujifilm Velvia and Fujifilm Provia color slide film. With the kind of job I have Today, I have to adopt a minimalist approach as far as I can and Fujifilm’s X-Series cameras had helped me in a way that I can easily conceal my camera when needed. With a unique small built of Fujifilm, it is amazing how it can pack an incredible IQ system all within. In my work in countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia and South Sudan it is important to be able to maintain a low profile while working, and the Fujifilm system allows me to do that. The lens designs, the X-Trans sensor, the processor, the software, etc. that combines to create amazing image quality in a small, tough and unobtrusive camera is what impressed me the most. I’ve also compared the X-Series cameras with few of its kind and I could point out that the optical viewfinder certainly sets Fujifilm cameras apart from its competitors. Personally, I believe that a decent optical viewfinder is an absolute must for a professional camera and in additional I am impressed with the low light performance of Fujifilm cameras together with fast Fujinon lenses.


“Camera means more than taking pictures of the beauty of the world, instead, it is an instrument to show the reality the world has to offer.�


FUJIFILM X-M1

CAMERA PARTS DIAGRAM On/Off Switch (Have you tried turning it on and off?)

AF-Assist Illuminator / Self Timer Lamp Flash (Bendable)

Function Button / Wi-Fi Button Mode Dial

Hot Shoe

Main Command Dial Strap Eyelet

Micro USB / Remote Release connector & HDMI mini connector compartment

Lens Release Button Battery and SD Card compartment

The X-M1 uses the same 16.3 megapixel X-Trans CMOS sensor found in Fujifilm's other X system cameras.

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Hot Shoe

Function Button / Wi-Fi Button

Main Command and Dial

Flash (Bendable)

Mode Dial

Flash Pop-Up Button (Very Handy)

On/Off Switch (Have you tried turning it on and off?)

Playback Button (for Photos and Videos) Indicator Lamp White Balance Button

Sub-Command Dial

Dedicated Movie Recording Button

Menu/OK Button also a Control Lock Button (If you Press and Hold)

920,000 Dot Tilting LCD Monitor

Selector

Autofucos / Delete Button

Macro Button

Display/Back Button also a Silent Mode button (Press and Hold)

Quick Menu Button also a Monitor Sunlight mode button (Press and Hold)

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l i a r T X e Th by

David Hob


In this first issue of the Fujifilm X Magazine, we are honored to be given some time by one of the most acknowledged photographers in this era, David Hobby. Most known as the founder of Strobist.com, David Hobby was a staff photojournalist with The Baltimore Sun. He runs the popular blog devoted to photographic lighting techniques and has garnered thousand of followers for the short period of time. The blog has an on-line monthly readership of over 300,000 photographers from 175 countries, and was named one of the “25 Best Blogs of 2010� by Time Magazine. In this interview piece, David gave us insights regarding photography, his humble beggining with the craft, and his relationship and experience as a Fujifilm X-Photographer. He shared with us as well some of his magnificent shots taken during one of his trips using Fujifilm camera.


• How did you start in Photography? I took my first photograph at age 7, in 1972. I was hooked. Within a year, I had my own darkroom and was developing my own black and white film. • From all the arts and crafts, why did you choose to take Photography? I love that my camera is a magic black box that allows me to go interesting places, do interesting things and meet interesting people. • Before photography, is there anything else you are interested to do or to be? I studied in school to be an engineer. But although I was successful, I was not happy. So I decided to take a chance and choose the career that offered me to do the thing I truly loved. I became a photojournalist in 1984, and have never looked back. • Can you recall the first time you actually did your very first shot with a camera? What is it that you experienced from those times that gradually made you decide to better polish your skill? Yes! As a young child I was at a family reunion, and my uncle had a camera. It was a 35mm rangefinder and he let me take some photos. To me, then, a camera was an expensive tool to be loved and revered. But later it would become merely a tool. Ten years after that first frame ever, I was covering breaking news for my local newspaper. By that time, I was no longer revering cameras as fragile objects to be cradled gently. They were the tools of my trade. In fact, I remember having a camera shot right out of my hands by the water from a nearby fire hose while I was covering a fire. Nothing gentle about that!

Campfire And Stars Jackman Maine US

Summer Squall Bar Harbor Maine US

• What are your achievements regarding with photography up to date? I have shot many, many assignments and have in fact been published over 10,000 times. I should do the math one day and figure out how many times a photo of mine has been reproduced! But also, I founded Strobist.com in 2006, and that site has taught literally millions of people how to light in much the same way professional photographers do. I am very proud of that. • Do you think you have your own style of photography, if so, what is it about your photos that stand out? I don’t concentrate so much on the style of the photos, but rather on the experiences the photos preserve in my mind and for others. So my focus is more on the style of my experiences than on the style of my photos. If I concentrate on having interesting experiences — and keep my camera with me throughout — the camera will take care of itself.

Cuba


Street of Cuba

Santa Maria Cemetery Old San Juan Puerto


• What do you think makes a good photographer? An understanding that the camera is not very important. The photos are not very important. It is what the camera and photos record that are important. • When was the first time you used a Fujifilm camera? Which model? I used a Fuji 617 many years ago. That was an amazing, elegant and unique professional camera. My dream is that one day Fuji will return to the world of medium format, but with digital cameras. • What feature/features of Fujifilm cameras do you love most? These days? I love the beauty and subtlety of the files produced by the X-Trans sensor. I feel like if I can see it, this sensor can record it. It’s so intuitive, it is almost organic. • How satisfied are you in terms of your output and experience in using Fujifilm cameras? Using Fuji X-cameras has redefined who I am as a photographer. So I am very, very satisfied. I wish I could go back in time to my newspaper photojournalism days and take this camera with me! • Which Fujifilm cameras do you have? Lenses? A few, actually. I have an X100, an X100s, an X-E1, an X-E2, an X-Pro 1 and an X-M1. It is possible that I have a little bit of a problem with buying too many Fuji cameras. But I love them all. As for lenses, I have the 14/2.8, the 18-55/2.8-4 the 23/1.4 and the 35/1.4 • How would you like to be remembered as a photographer? To me, photography is the thing that coalesces and records my experiences as a human being. So that process is much more important to me than how others might remember me after my ultimate memory card expires, so to speak. But I hope that my pictures will outlive me, and allow people to share in the experiences I gathered while I was here.

Street of Cuba

• Any particular plans or goals to achieve this 2014? A big one, in fact! I am traveling around the world for Lynda.com, producing a video series on travel photography. It is one of the best assignments I have ever had in my life. Filming has already begun, but next year I’ll pretty much be living on planes! • Any advice to aspiring photographers? First, look deep inside yourself and try to know who you are as a person. Then, decide what it is that you want your photography to accomplish. Only then will you know what you want to photograph, and why. Once you figure those things out, everything else about photography becomes a much easier decision process.

Newlyweds Grand Central Terminal New York


Vinales Valley Cuba

First Night In Havana


Neill Soden South Africa x100s

As digital cameras and the internet became more accessible to people, learning photography became an easier task to do. This matter became a trend in today’s generation of photographers and Neill Soden is one of those who had modern tools as their learning companion. Born and raised in South Africa, Neill hadn’t had that formal education to the art through attending schools and universities. Instead he spent hours and hours in front of the computer learning a thing or two about photography. Coming with a strong IT background, the digital stuff grabbed his attention and by the time the early DSLR’s started coming onto market in 2006, and along with two of his friends; he picked up a gear and from then started an instant love affair. Photography bug didn’t nibble into him up until the digital age came along only. Although his family fiddles with a 35mm from time to time, Neill wasn’t that much interested to the craft back then. His grandfather was an avid photographer and his dad used to show him a lot of slides taken during their days in what was then called Belgium Congo. Neill didn’t take the privilege of learning film cameras from them. He was more interested in the movie-making business, especially cinematography. Neill couldn’t pinpoint exactly what drew him to photography. However, destiny as we can call it, photography couldn’t be avoided and soon find its way into his life. Once Neill had finally decided to embark with his photographic journey, it didn’t take much of a time to position himself of what he wanted to be. It took him only 39 shots to realize that photography is something that he wants to consider as a medium for his art form. He remembers exactly that it was during a drive to a little picturesque town called Clarens when he first tested his newly bought DSLR. Together with his friends, they visited the one place where every single postcard of the town has been shot and they all gave it a try. As he looked at the images he taken, the frame struck him by surprise. He absolutely nailed it, he thinks for himself; from composition to exposure, everything seems to be what he envisioned it to be. And from then on, Neill never fails to drag his DSLR with him. All throughout, he describes his style to be an ever changing thing. Neill admits that during his early days in photography, he seldom gets carried away when playing around with the editing. For him, this is how we learn our strengths and weaknesses and would able us to find out where ones style lie. He learned that it is not just about getting all the technical aspects right, especially when you are photographing people, but the importance of interacting with strangers as well. People like Chase Jarvis and Zack Arias helped him to see that there is so much more to photography than just the gear and software. More than just painting a picture with light, you are capturing a moment in time that would otherwise have been forgotten, an emotion that might have been missed. Neill couldn’t imagine leaving photography anytime soon. The ecstasy of seeing the reaction of when people see themselves photographed just make every struggle and every doubt he might had absolutely worth it. He hopes that photography will not lose its romance and hopes that more people will see the true essence of photography, just like before.


A Full Circle Back to Where It All Began

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“There is so much more to photography than just the gear and software. More than just painting a picture with light, you are capturing a moment in time that would otherwise have been forgotten, an emotion that might have been missed.”


I have been an avid fan of Fujifilm and had been using their color film even back then. When X-Pro 1 came out, I bought one for myself as soon as it was released in the market. For me, theX-Series system is the closest I can get to a digital rangefinder experience without having to dish out lots of money. I love the size of the cameras where I can just fit the whole system in a small shoulder bag. In addition to that, the files that I have been getting from the camera always surprise me in a positive way. More importantly, I commend Fujifilm for always knowing the needs of their users. Fujifilm knows how to listen to photographers and have kept updating their cameras and making us better.


FUJIFILM X-M1 DIAL MODE Shutter Priority Shutter is manually set by photographer & other settings is balanced by the camera itself

Aperture Priority Aperture is manually set by photographer & other settings is balanced by the camera itself

Manual Photographer has full control on settings that includes shutter speed, ISO, aperture and even the exposure, etc Custom Settings Allows photographer to save settings made for later use

Portrait Camera automatically adjusts settings for a smaller depth of field and higher shutter to avoid blur

Landscape Camera automatically adjusts settings for a higher aperture number and larger depth of field Sports Camera automatically adjusts settings for a faster shutter speed to freeze motions

Scene Position Additional scene modes include portrait enhancer, night, fireworks, sunset, snow, beach, etc

Program Allows photographer to select from pre made settings available already

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Advance Offers more special effects and a multiple exposure feature Advance Auto Similar to Auto mode but with scene selections

Auto Camera automatically adjusts all settings that includes shutter, ISO, Aperture, etc


More camera in a compact, More impact in every photo. Stylish and compact, yet possessing the power to capture every scene with unprecedented image quality and richness of color reproduction. It’s everything you wished for in one More in Aasmall compact, More impact in every photo. camera andcamera more. X-M1. camera with big impact. Stylish and compact, yet possessing the power to capture every scene with unprecedented image quality and richness of color reproduction. It’s everything you wished for in one camera and more. X-M1. A small camera with big impact.

www.fujifilm-mea.com

www.fujifilm-mea.com

facebook.com/fujifilmme facebook.com/fujifilmme

@fujifilmme

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A Persona

Reflected in an Image Sami Al Tokhais

Saudi Arabia X-Pro1, x100s

Photography is more than just learning to use your index finger; it is a philosophy that gives people insight. Proficiency in this medium requires patience, dedication and commitment. Understanding technique alone will only produce “nice” snapshots. If you want to achieve that extraordinary image that takes people’s breath away, one should take photography as a discipline itself. You should have an understanding of photography’s history, who the major players are and how they use this medium. They are your teachers. Recognized photographers have developed the ability of “seeing,” not just with their eyes but also with all their senses combined. For Sami Al Tokhais, this is what photography is all about; it is art where one needs sensitivity more than brains to fuel the senses of imagination and wonder. Ever since 2006, Sami has been an avid practitioner of the art. Photography took over his life in unimaginable ways. It changed the way he perceived things and gave him a purpose. Before that he was very good at video games and spent most of his days playing alone. For him, there was only one motivation in playing video games, which was to beat a game and then that rush would end after. However, in photography the excitement continues everyday through looking at images, reading about the medium and discussing it with others. Sami acknowledges that many people stress the idea of technical understanding of camera functions and lighting. However, the biggest consideration for him to being a good photographer is having the understanding and the grasp of the history of this medium and craft, where it came from, where it’s going, and cultural and political influences on it. Personality plays a huge role also in being a good photographer. Most of the influential photographers we know have a respect for people and culture. They also share willingly what they’ve learned

with others and don’t keep secrets. They believe that the more info that comes out, the more appreciation this art of photography will receive. Sami believes that the technical part can be taken care of with a little education and a lot of practice and it is much better to dwell on your personal understanding on subject matters and the art. Sami sees something special about photography. He put it in a way that by simply capturing a scene in a frame and taking the photo, the beauty of photography starts there. The story doesn’t end but it actually reveals itself to a selected few. In photography you can be a storyteller, a humanitarian, a poet, a historian, or a mere propaganda machine. Photography elicits emotions and retrieves memories. It is a vehicle that takes you somewhere you’ve never been. Sami had his fair share of achievements already. One of the photos he took once made it on Reuters of a peace protest in Colorado, USA. He had also been published a few times in other publications and considers his first time to be published in an Italian magazine as one of his best rewards. It was a photo of the Bahrain World Trade Center for a piece on wind energy and it boosted his confidence and made him feel that he could do more with photography. He could say that he had overcome his fears in the art and wisely put it the way photographer Chuck Close once said, “The dilemma of photography is that it’s the easiest medium in which to be competent but, it’s the hardest medium in which to have personal vision that is readily identifiable.” For Sami, anyone can have enough skill to produce images, but without having a vision, your images are basically just “pretty.” This can be frustrating for many, but once one reaches vision, they become an agent of change; a storyteller.


“Photography is an art where one needs sensitivity more than brain to fuel the senses of imagination and wonder.”

As a member of Fujifilm’s X Photographers, I am pretty much satisfied with my photographic journey companion. Ever since the X-Pro first came out I have stopped shooting with my previous brand of camera. The fact that I can have a better experience with X-Pro 1 in terms of using the Film Simulations Mode plus having the advantage of practicing photography discreetly made it a better choice.I love Fujifilm’s ability to have both the OVF (Optical Viewfinder) and the EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) as a key consideration on several series Fujifilm had releases. In additional, it is worthy to mention the sharp responsive lenses attached with the camera as well and how it produces a richer and stunning result out of it. Fujifilm also gave me the luxury to stop carrying bulky DSLR cameras in my travels. Carrying heavy equipment took away much from my travel experience, so I salute Fujifilm cameras for being handy and dependable at the same time.


A Storyteller Through Motion Pictures & Still Images

Laith Al-Majali Jordan X-Pro1, x100s

Still photography, especially street photography, is Laith’s connection to people. It is what fuels his senses of reality and empathy as an artist and gives him the opportunity to think, analyze, and respond instantly that creates an emotional bond to human beings and who they are. For Laith, photography drives him to do all the other stuff he does, because it provides the basis of his understanding of the human conditions, of human beings on the street. Photography became the affirmation of his connection with the people and to the world he is living in.

To record the moments in our life, is what It’s really what balances Laith and helps him to be who he needs to be. He has his alone time in the streets engaged in an individual creative process and then he has the collaborative side of him when he wants to work with a director and a producer, etc. That’s how he achieves a balance in his own life that is then manifested through his art. Each part pushes his creative energies.

Laith Al-Majali started his creative journey as a filmmaker. Photography for him was something that is just in the corner which he would pick up if needed. His dad gave him a camera when he was still very young and could remember being in school having the camera with him every time. Laith never took still photography seriously instead he was more interested on recording movies and took that path.

As a photographer, Laith had come a long way already. He had his works exhibited internationally and locally, published works in magazines, and got his first commission for the NY Times. Being selected as one of Fujifilm’s X-Photographer is huge for him as well, but what he really considers as his real achievement is all the experiences that he had because of his camera. He had travelled the world, met people from different cultures, photographed artists, political figures and people in the streets, an learned a lot. Photography has enriched his life.

In 2005, Laith took a trip around the Middle East, and bought his first dslr camera. He gave it a try and surprisingly found love the second time around. It was a slow process, but he became a self-taught photographer in the end. Not surprising his education as a filmmaker had a profound influence on his still photography. It was by fate that he attended a workshop in Amman, Jordan with an experienced pro photographer that led him to get a chance to shoot his first documentary story - It was a photo essay on Egyptian construction workers and the conditions in which they live. Once that photo essay was published, he saw people’s enthusiastic reaction to it, it made him understand that photojournalism and reportage is just another form of storytelling, one where he is not using 24 frames per second to tell a story, but trying to capture telling moments either on film or on a sensor. That’s what really intrigued him, the realization that it was his love for human beings and the desire to understand and reveal the human condition itself that really motivated him to become a filmmaker, a street photographer and a photojournalist.

Laith doubts that he will ever leave photography. The craft means more than a job or a hobby, but a way of life already. Having the chance to work in both still and world of film, always keeps things exciting for him and as a storyteller, his mediums helps him depict the world he sees. Laith hopes to be remembered as someone who didn’t just take photos but was there to document important moments that would have passed undocumented if he wasn't there. He hopes that when people thinks of him they will remember him as someone who was always advancing his skills and getting better, a photographer that altered people's feelings through his images, and someone who was connected and had a view on the human condition.


I have been an avid fan of Fujifilm and had been using their color film even back then. When X-Pro 1 came out, I bought one for myself as soon as it was released in the market. For me, theX-Series system is the closest I can get to a digital rangefinder experience without having to dish out lots of money. I love the size of the cameras where I can just fit the whole system in a small shoulder bag. In addition to that, the files that I have been getting from the camera always surprise me in a positive way. More importantly, I commend Fujifilm for always knowing the needs of their users. Fujifilm knows how to listen to photographers and have kept updating their cameras and making us better.

“Photography is just another form of storytelling, where one is not using 24 frames per second to tell the scenario, instead explaining everything in a single shot.�


XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS wide-angle zoom is the latest addition to the family of Fujifilm cameras growing number of lenses. It is the 11th lens for Fujifilm's X-series, which now comprises focal lengths between 15mm and 350mm. With an equivalent focal length range of 15-36mm, the lens covers anything from ultra wide-angle to the classic 35mm angle-of-view. The maximum aperture of f/4 is constant throughout its 2.4x zoom range. The lens boast Fujifilm’s unique HT-EBC (High Transmittance Electron Beam Coating) multi-layer coating that is applied to all sides of Fujinon lenses and an additional newly developed coating that has been added to the reverse side of the front lens composition to further reduce the ghosting that typically occurs when using deep concave lenses.

Fujinon XF 10-24 has an enhanced resolving power at all apertures when used in-conjunction with an X-series camera that incorporates a Lens Modulation Optimizer (LMO) functions. Its high-speed AF is achieved via its inner focusing system which drives smaller lenses in the middle or rear lens groups without moving the larger lenses in the front lens groups. And thanks to light weight internal lenses and the addition of a stepping motor, the XF10-24mm lens is also very quiet to use. With its precision-made, responsive, and finely-tuned metal aperture and focus rings, you are ensured a superb handling experience.

Focal Length: 10-24mm (15-36mm equivalent) Max. Aperture: f/4 (constant) Min. Aperture: f/22 14 lens elements in 10 groups, 4 aspherical, 3 extra-low dispersion 7 rounded aperture blades Min. Focusing Distance: 24 cm (9.45 in) Size (D x L): 78 x 87 mm (3.07 x 3.43 in) Weight: 410 g (0.9 lb) Filter Thread: 72 mm

"The l en from u s covers an ything ltra w i d e -angle the cl assic 35mm to angle -of-vi ew.”


Show off your masterpiece. Share your special moments. It’s so easy thanks to the wireless camera-to-smartphone photo transfer. It’s everything you wished for in one camera and more. A small camera with big impact.

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GRAND STORES-DUBAI: +971-4-2823700 | EMDICO-JEDDAH: +966-2-6978756 | BOUSHAHRI-KUWAIT: +965-1885522 | ABU ISSA BROTHERS-BAHRAIN: +73-17580455 | TECHNO BLUE-DOHA: +974-44466175 PHOTOCENTRE-MUSCAT: +968-24-814752 | GRANDSTORES-AMMAN: +962-6-5829157 | SAWARBY-TUNIS: +216-71-230-530 | ARPHOT-CASABLANCA: +212-22-23-45-67 PHOTO EXPRESS-GIZA: +22-37762062 | FOTOTEK-BEIRUT:+961-1-243000

FUJIFILM X PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE  

For our very first issue ever, we are honored to be given time by one of the most acknowledged photographers in this era, David Hobby, the f...