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VETERANS ISSUE COMPLIMENTS OF

U.S. AIR FORCE MAKES HISTORY! Legendary airman takes up historic appointment Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. 22nd Chief of Staff United States Air Force

Discover a Career in Aviation Legacy Matters: Celebrating the History of Blacks in the Military

EXCLUSIVE LISTS:

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Top Black Military Generals Top Blacks in the Federal Senior Executive Service


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To the military leaders being honored at the BEYA Stars and Stripes event.

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CONTENTS

FEATURES

US BLACK ENGINEER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

BRINGING TECHNOLOGY HOME TO THE BLACK COMMUNITY

COVER STORY 22

One on One: The U. S. Senate unanimously voted (98-0) to confirm the 22nd U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Brown, Jr. USBE Magazine discusses this historic appointment with the general and why he is the right leader at the right time for the Air Force.

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2020 STARS & STRIPES KEYNOTE:

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BEST COMPANIES FOR VETERANS

Gen. David H. Berger, U.S. Marine Corps

20 BLACK CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE HISTORY OF THE U.S. AIR FORCE

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TOP BLACKS IN THE MILITARY:

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TOP BLACK SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES):

Exclusive list honors the U.S. military’s leading African-American flag officers Exclusive list honors the U.S. government’s top African-American SES members

USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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PUBLISHER'S PAGE VOLUME 44 NUMBER 4

DEPARTMENTS

BEYA STARS AND STRIPES: 2020 VETERANS EDITION

People and Events.............. 6

2020 was a momentous year. During the virtual Global Health Security panel at the Women of Color (WOC) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (S.T.E.M.) Conference, BEYA’s sister conference, the spotlight was squarely on vaccine development, vaccines, and vaccination.

Today’s latest news on retirements, promotions, save dates, and other current military and defense events.

Education .......................... 10

There are many paths to achieving a military undergraduate education. USBE magazine gives you some insight into each academy and some of their requirements to be accepted.

Corporate Life ................... 12

Women veteran business owners discuss personal and business success strategies and share and encourage others to do the same.

Career Voices .................... 14

Project management experts teach best practices and model agencies that you will need to pursue a government career and leverage your P.M.P. certificate.

Leading Voices...................72

• Dean Pamela Obiomon - Protecting the Engineering Experience at HBCUs • Maj. (Ret.) Sean Lanier - An Ecosystem for Student Success • James Lampkin - Walmart’s Support for Veterans

Career Outlook .................79

Operation Warp Speed officials on the WOC STEM Conference panel said the tens of millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses soon to be made available will be affordable for every American because a large percentage of development, manufacturing, distribution, and administration costs at vaccine sites had been covered. Officials also said vaccines would be tracked from the manufacturers to vials, from distribution to who received vaccines and where. Officials will also follow the execution of the vaccine, so the system is not overwhelmed. With more than 2 million COVID-19 tests done at testing sites in underserved communities since April, public health officials on the panel stressed the importance of best practices and engagement of community partners. A month before WOC STEM’s virtual conference in October, the Air Force Association (A.F.A.) announced it had wrapped up its first-ever virtual Air, Space & Cyber Conference around the Air Force’s 73rd birthday on Sept. 18. More than 30 years ago, Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. was an F-16 training student. Little did he know then that he would become the first Black military service chief in American history.

Tyrone D. Taborn Publisher and Chief Content Officer

Everything you need to know to pursue a career in aviation.

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NOW THE MOST READ BLACK TECHNOLOGY MAGAZINE REACHING OVER 100,000 READERS IN THE UNITED STATES, UK, AND SOUTH AFRICA

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SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 17-19, 2022 www.beya.org

EXECUTIVE OFFICE Tyrone D. Taborn, CEO and Chief Content Officer Jean Hamilton, President and CFO Alex Venetta, Associate Publisher, Manager of Partner Services Eric Price, Vice President, Recruitment and Professional Training EDITORIAL AND CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rayondon Kennedy, Managing Editor Lango Deen, Technology Editor Michael Fletcher, Contributing Editor Gale Horton Gay, Contributing Editor Garland L. Thompson, Contributing Editor Roger Witherspoon, Contributing Editor GRAPHIC DESIGN Beverly Wladkowski, Art Director Bryan Davis, Digital Director Rachael DeVore, Digital Channel Manager Courtney Taborn, Digital Marketing Manager Joe Weaver, Global Design Interactive CORPORATE AND ALUMNI RELATIONS Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd, CCG Alumni Committee Chair and President Dr. Eugene DeLoatch, Chairman, BEYA Alumni Group Vice Admiral Walter J. Davis, USN (Ret.) National Chair, BEYA Military Alumni Oliver “Bo” Leslie, Retired Program Manager, Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions, Boeing Monica E. Emerson, Women of Color STEM Conference National Chair Matt Bowman, CCG Military Program Manager, Stars & Stripes Committee; Executive Director/Chief of Staff for VADM Walt Davis, USN (Ret.) Ty Taborn, Esq., Corporate Development SALES AND MARKETING Gwendolyn Bethea, Vice President, Corporate Development Kameron Nelson, Account Executive Katrina Shaw, Sales Support Assistant Jay Albritton, Social Media Specialist JOBMATCH AND STUDENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Ashley Turner, University & Professional Relations Development Manager Rod Carter, Recruitment Specialist, College Relations Shelia Richburg, College Coordinator CONFERENCE AND EVENTS Ana Bertrand, Conference Coordinator Jennifer Roberts, Customer Success Manager Brandon Newby, Administrative Assistant Toni Robinson, 360 MMG Rutherford & Associates 17304 Preston Rd Suite 1020 Dallas, TX 75252 ADVERTISING SALES OFFICE

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PEOPLE & EVENTS by Lango Deen ldeen@ccgmag.com

RETIREMENTS, MOVES & CHANGES, AND UPCOMING EVENTS

Lloyd J. Austin III sworn in as Secretary of Defense Vice President Kamala Harris announced on Facebook on January 25th that she had sworn in the new defense secretary. Prior, Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III took part in a brief administrative swearing-in ceremony at the Pentagon shortly after the Senate confirmed President Joe Biden’s nominee. The vote was 93-2. “Today I swore in Lloyd Austin as the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD),” Vice President Harris wrote on her wall. “Secretary Austin’s integrity, experience, and intimate

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knowledge of the issues facing our military make him the right leader for this moment.” Austin and his wife, Charlene Denise Banner Austin, pictured alongside him in the vice president’s photo, have been married for over 40 years. “Great a first black Defense Secretary sworn in by the first woman, woman of color Vice President. Lots of glass ceilings shattered,” wrote one member of the public. Lloyd J. Austin III is a retired four-star

Vice President Kamala Harris swears in Lloyd J. Austin III as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Defense

U.S. Army general with nearly 41 years of military service. He was featured on the cover of US Black Engineer magazine’s end-of-year Veterans edition in 2013 and is a Stars and Stripes honoree. During his illustrious military career, Gen. Austin served as the 33rd Vice Chief of Staff of the Army. His awards

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Top right: Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Bruce T. Crawford

SAVE THEDATE NSBE ANNUAL CONVENTION March 10–14, 2021

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL

2021 TRANSFORMING S.T.E.M. HIGHER EDUCATION November 4–6, 2021 Hyatt Regency Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202

BEYA STEM GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS DIGITAL CONFERENCE February 17-19, 2022 Digital Washington, D.C.

and decorations include five Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the Silver Star, and the Legion of Merit. After retiring, Gen. Austin served on the boards of directors of Nucor Corporation, Tenet Healthcare Corporation, and Guest Services, Inc., and on the board of trustees of the Carnegie Corporation of New York Auburn University. He was also a member of the Raytheon Technologies Board of Directors. Gen. Austin has been a member of the Raytheon

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Bottom right: Gen. (Ret.) Larry O. Spencer

Technologies board (including his service on the predecessor United Technologies Corporation board) since 2016. Gen. Austin is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He holds two master’s degrees – one in education from Auburn University and another in business management from Webster University.

Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, 2020 Black Engineer of the Year, retires from the Army Lt. Gen. Bruce T. Crawford retired in a time-honored U. S. Army ceremony last summer after 34 years of service. The 24th Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy and the 40th Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. James C. McConville presented Crawford with the Black Engineer of the Year Award during the 34th annual BEYA gala. On LinkedIn, one of the organizations responsible for developing equipment for the Army sent “heartfelt THANKS” to the former technology chief. “As you join the ranks of us ‘old soldiers’ you’ll have time to reflect on great accomplishments as well as those who have touched you along the way,” wrote another. As Black Engineer of the Year 2020, he joined a select number of officers. The list includes Capt. Donnie Cochran (1989), Lt. Gen. Albert Edmonds (1996), and Lt. Gen. Joe Ballard (1998).

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PEOPLE & EVENTS BEYA Stars & Stripes veteran continues involvement in global S.T.E.M. program in a new role

strong leadership, supporting optimization and change management. We are proud to add Darrell to our strong bench of talent, providing reliable and innovative support for our customers.”

Last fall, the Air Force Association’s CyberPatriot Program Office announced the appointment of Gen. Larry O. Spencer as a member of the CyberPatriot Board of Advisors. He recently served as president of the Air Force Association (A.F.A.). A strong CyberPatriot advocate, Spencer said he was “grateful for the opportunity to continue involvement in the global S.T.E.M. program,” adding that CyberPatriot offers outstanding opportunities, and its success is vital to our nation’s security. The Air Force Association’s CyberPatriot is its flagship science, technology, engineering, and mathematics program dedicated to strengthening cyber skills. The program features the National Youth Cyber Defense Competition for high school and middle school students, A.F.A. CyberCamps, an Elementary School Cyber Education Initiative, Literature Series, and a CyberGenerations program designed to teach senior citizens to protect themselves from cyber exploitation.

Career Achievement BEYA winner appointed to Trimble Board of Directors

Retired Darrell K. Williams takes up a new appointment with Leidos

Top left: Gen. (Ret.) Darrell K. Williams Bottom left: James C. Dalton

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Leidos recently announced the appointment of retired Army Gen. Darrell K. Williams as vice president, Defense Group logistics. In his new role, he will drive innovation in corporate-wide logistics. Williams recently served as director of the Defense Logistics Agency. He also led a global expeditionary workforce of over 25,000 military personnel and civilians. “Darrell brings a deep understanding of our customers’ ‘can’t fail’ missions and an unwavering commitment to their success,” said Gerry Fasano, Leidos Defense Group president. “Through his experience directing supply chains for the U.S. military, as well as federal, state, local, and international partners, and overseeing the National Defense Stockpile, Darrell has demonstrated

Trimble announced last fall the appointment of James C. Dalton to its board of directors. Dalton, who won the BEYA for Career Achievement in 2006, retired as director of Civil Works for the Army Corps of Engineers in 2019. “James’ expertise in large-scale construction environments enables him to be a strong contributor on the Trimble board,” said Rob Painter, president and CEO of Trimble. “In addition, his experience in sustainability and expertise in managing complex organizations will provide a source of unique insight to our businesses. We are pleased to welcome James to Trimble’s board of directors.” During his career as a federal senior executive service member, Dalton received the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Federal Engineer of the Year Award in 2017, a Presidential Rank Award— Distinguished Executive in 2014, and the Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce Public Service Award in 2009. S

To stay up to date on all news and events, visit our webpage www.blackengineer.com

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EDUCATION by Cori Wilhelm editors@ccgmag.com

GET ACCEPTED!

Want an academy education? Here’s what you need to know. There are many paths to achieving a military undergraduate education. The United States service academies, also known as the United States military academies, are federal academies for the undergraduate education and training of commissioned officers for the United States Armed Forces.

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dmission to each academy is competitive, and each has different requirements for candidates. In general, each academy only admits students who show academic and leadership potential and are in strong physical shape with good moral standing. While details differ within each academy, students’ tuition, room and board, and a monthly stipend are generally paid for by the federal government, with a service commitment after graduation. Further details about each academy and their admissions requirements follow. The United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, NY, is considered the preeminent military

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academy in the United States. Founded in 1802, it is the oldest U.S. service academy and prides itself on a long history of graduating commissioned officers who characterize its ideals of “Duty, Honor, Country” and the Army Ethic. Admission is extremely competitive, and applicants are encouraged to have a well-rounded academic and extracurricular preparation, including four years of mathematics. Applicants to West Point are encouraged to start the admission process early, ideally midway through their junior year of high school. To apply, cadet candidates must be between the ages of 17 and 23, unmarried, and a U.S. citizen. Additionally, cadet candidates cannot be pregnant or legally responsible for child support. They must also submit several test scores with their application, including a medical exam, SAT or ACT with writing portion, and a fitness assessment. In addition to the above requirements,

West Point requires that cadet candidates have a nomination, generally from a member of Congress. They also require an interview and do not offer rolling admissions, so deadlines are essential. The U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, MD, and trains students to become officers in both the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The USNA prioritizes duty, honor, and loyalty and is among the country’s top-ranked public schools. Naval Academy students are midshipmen on active duty in the U.S. Navy and are commissioned officers upon graduating. Graduates commit to serving at least five years in the Navy or Marine Corps. Applicants must meet age requirements (17–23), be a U.S. citizen, cannot be pregnant, and cannot have dependents to be eligible to apply for admission. The UNSA recommends that students complete a preliminary application during their junior year. After this step, applicants will receive a candidate

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Thirty-eight African-American women graduated with the Class of 2020 on June 13, 2020. This will be the largest class of African-American women to graduate together from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Josephine Pride)

is extremely selective and requires a nomination (usually from a member of Congress), with a few appointments from military-affiliated or international sources.

number. They will then need to submit SAT/ACT scores, transcripts, a medical exam, and a fitness assessment. They must also be nominated by a member of Congress, or through an ROTC unit, and must complete an interview with USNA. The UNSA uses rolling admissions but encourages applicants to start early and pay attention to deadlines. The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, CO, is the military academy for both the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Space Force and is ranked among the country’s best universities. Approximately 1,200 cadets are admitted each year. Because it is so selective, the USAFA encourages students to start building their academic and extracurricular portfolio as early as middle school. The application process for the USAFA is lengthy, and it is recommended that candidates start during their junior year. Admission to the USAFA

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Candidates must be between 17 and 23, unmarried with no dependents, and be of good moral character. They must meet standards for academics, leadership, and physical fitness as well. Pre-candidates must submit an official questionnaire, grades, and ACT/SAT scores. Those that meet qualifications become candidates and can move on to additional application requirements. These include a personal interview and writing sample, teachers’ evaluations, physical fitness assessments, and a medical exam. The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) is the smallest U.S. military academy, with approximately 200 graduates per class. The USCGA trains its cadets in both an academic major and in military and maritime skills. The USCGA is looking for students with proven intellectual accomplishment, leadership skills, physical fitness, and a commitment to serve the country. Located in New London, CT, the USCGA is the only U.S. military academy that does not require a congressional nomination. Applicants must be high school graduates aged 17–22, of sound moral character, unmarried with no dependents and no financial debt. They must submit standardized test scores

taken without special accommodations. The UNSA does not offer rolling admissions, and applications must be submitted by January. Applicants will need to complete a fitness assessment and medical exam, and the USCGA may require an interview. Applicants are strongly encouraged to take four years of coursework in mathematics to be competitive. The United States Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA) is located in Kings Point, NY. The USMMA trains its students (known as midshipmen) in marine engineering, maritime law, and other tasks critical to running a large ship. The USMMA is looking for well-rounded candidates of “exemplary character.” Applicants to the USMMA must be U.S. citizens (with a limited number of international midshipmen each year) between the ages of 17 and 25. They must meet physical, security, and academic requirements and receive a nomination from a U.S. representative or senator. The USMMA does not accept military service-connected nominations. Similar to other military academies, they must submit SAT/ACT scores, transcripts, physical fitness assessments, and medical exams. Additionally, candidates must be of good moral character. Applicants are encouraged to take coursework in math and engineering and must follow deadlines for admission set by the USMMA. In conclusion, each United States military academy is looking for applicants with strong academics, fitness, and athletics, and good moral character. Each has a distinct admission process. All applicants to any of the academies are strongly urged to do indepth research before applying and to pay close attention to deadlines. S

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CORPORATE LIFE by Christopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

THE FUTURE IS FEMALE

Women veterans share strategies for personal and business success Michelle Gardner-Ince, developer and director of the Department of Veterans Affairs‘ Women Veteran-Owned Small Business Initiative ( WVOSB)

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ately, According to Michelle Gardner-Ince of the Department of Veterans Affairs, women veterans are the fastest-growing demographic in America. Yet, as she points out, women account for less than 10 percent of the DVA’s business grant recipients. However, as the developer and director of the department’s Women VeteranOwned Small Business Initiative, she hopes to change that. The first program of its kind in the federal government, the WVOSBI provides the education and opportunities that women veterans need to start and run successful businesses. “The question isn’t whether these women are capable,” Gardner-Ince, a former Air Force colonel, explains. 12

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“[The question] is how we band together. If we band together, we can get billion-dollar deals.” In a panel discussion entitled “Women Veterans: 21st Century Issues and Opportunities,” held at the 2020 BEYA conference, Gardner-Ince sat down for a chat with some recent graduates of the WVOSBI. The women discussed the challenges of starting a small business and talked about how their military background prepared them for the experience. On Diversity and Adversity in the Business World Lonye Ford, Air Force veteran and CEO of the cybersecurity firm Arlo Solutions, says that she’s dealt with adversity many times throughout her career.

“In business, there’s going to be a lot of no’s and a lot of doors shut in your face,” she says. “The grit you get from having to run who knows how many miles in boot camp…it builds you up for that. You learn how to stay disciplined under pressure, which you just don’t get in the commercial space.” “You get into these situations where you feel discarded and disrespected,” says Ford. “There are situations where you know you’re doing a great job, but you’re getting overlooked for promotions. You’re like, ‘I know I’m doing the right thing, but I’m not getting a seat at the table.’” It’s these situations, however, to which she credits her persistence and strategic thinking abilities. “Every www.blackengineer.com


time someone knocks you down, you get back up,” she says, “After enough jabs, you learn to move to the side. Eventually, from people jabbing at you all the time, you learn how to fight— you become a fighter.” On the Value of a Military Background for Small Business Owners For Ford, military service was a lesson in how to focus on a goal, a necessary trait for business owners. “The military teaches you how to follow a mission,” she says, “When you have a company, your client provides that mission, and you have to commit to making sure that mission is successful.” Venus Quates, president and CEO of LaunchTECH, agrees. Quates, a fellow Air Force veteran, adds that military services provide a sense of discipline that’s valuable for entrepreneurs. “In business, there’s going to be a lot of no’s and a lot of doors shut in your face,” she says. “The grit you get from having to run who knows how many miles in boot camp…it builds you up for that. You learn how to stay disciplined under pressure, which you just don’t get in the commercial space.” On Finding a Balance Between Life and Work Quates admits that running a business is challenging, and work-life balance often falls by the wayside. But her work provides a sense of purpose that

Panel moderatr Sonia Kumar, President & CEO, Digital Envee, Inc.

justifies the lack of balance. “I started this company to show brown girls not to give up because you’re the only one in the room,” she says. “I’m up until 5 in the morning writing proposals or whatever else because we only have a small window to do amazing things.” Ford speaks of the same lack of balance, particularly in the early days of Arlo, when she and co-founder Arlene Rube were bootstrapping the business. “We didn’t pay ourselves for four years,” she says. “I’d wake up with my kids, go to work at the Pentagon, then come home and clock into Arlo. I’d get maybe four hours of sleep a night.” Like Quates, though, Ford wants to show young women what’s possible for them. For both her and Rube, she says, this desire is stronger than the need for balance. “If you’re not going to have balance, you need a reason why you’re doing this or you’ll just give up,” she says. “We want to show young Black and brown girls that this is possible…that you can be a girl from Jersey or Chicago and make millions of dollars. That’s a very strong ‘why’ for both of us.” S

You can listen to the full Seminar Here: https://l.ead.me/bbfosF

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CAREER VOICES by Christopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

EXPERT TIPS FOR ASPIRING PROJECT MANAGERS Military leaders share their knowledge of management The project management field presents a range of opportunities for professionals from all backgrounds. From scientists and engineers to administrators and consultants, both government and private organizations need people to manage projects.

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hinking about embarking on a career in project management? Want tips on how to gain experience, land a job, and excel in the job? Here are a few pieces of advice from people who have managed projects for some of the largest and most visible organizations in the world. Learn the PMBOK Guide Inside and Out When hiring for this role, a lot of companies and governmental organizations want to see a project management professional (PMP) certification on your resume. This certificate shows that you’re familiar with the best practices of the trade as

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outlined by the Project Management Institute (PMI).

you take the exam. Study strict to the book and you’ll do just fine.”

All of the information required to pass the PMP exam is available in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) guide. According to experts in the field, you should study that guide in preparation for the exam, even if you already have experience managing projects.

… But Get Real-World Project Management Experience, Too A PMP certificate isn’t the only thing required to land a management job, though. Employers want to see realworld experience on your resume. That’s why, alongside studying for the PMP exam, Andre Smith advises aspiring PMs to seek out experiencebuilding opportunities.

“Forget everything you know about project management,” says Eric Watson, a project manager for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. “All organizations make tweaks and modifications [to the PMBOK], but you have to know those standards when

“You can’t spend all of your time studying for the PMP,” says Smith, an engineering project manager who oversees the development of power systems for NASA space www.blackengineer.com


Knowing how to communicate with different personality types, motivate team members, and give everyone a sense of ownership over the project increases the likelihood of its success. missions. “Spend time learning project management, whether it’s through coursework, shadowing someone, or both.” Watson agrees, adding that even small management tasks look good on a CV. “‘Project’ is relative,” he says. “It’s not always a billion-dollar project that you’re managing. It could be a oneweek document you’re writing that needs input from multiple people and multiple projects.” Even “informal” experience, he adds, can help you later on. “When you interview for a job, they’re going to ask what kinds of projects you’ve managed before,” he says. “That doesn’t mean everything you’ve done with your PMP. It just means what other kinds of opportunities you’ve had to manage projects, interface with people, and influence the outcome of a project.” Strengthen Your Leadership Skills While a project manager’s main job www.blackengineer.com

Left to right: Anthony V. Junior Ph.D., MBA, PMP, Principal, Strategic Consulting Network, Inc., and Eric Watson, project manager Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

is to direct and ensure the success of projects, it’s also a leadership role. After all, every project involves people, so even a project management consultant must guide and coach their team along. Aspiring project managers should therefore take steps to improve their leadership skills. Knowing how to communicate with different personality types, motivate team members, and give everyone a sense of ownership over the project increases the likelihood of its success. Dr. Michele Jones, CEO of the Bones Theory Group, adds that project leaders must also know how to assign roles based on each employee’s skill set. She points out that, for the project to succeed, you cannot give a team member more work than they can handle.

assigned part. “Look at the makeup of the team and determine who’s that A, B, C, D, and F, then assign accordingly,” she advises. “Have a conversation, make sure everyone understands what you’re asking them, and then determine the path forward.” She emphasizes that project managers must trust their team to get the job done. The project manager should define a clear plan and set the team up to succeed, but as a leader, they should know when to step back and let their team work. “I manage non-breathing resources,” Jones says of her job as a project manager. “I lead people, but they manage themselves.” S

“You’re going to have some A-level team members who charge hard. They get it and they get moving,” she says. But, Jones explains, there are also “B’s, C’s, D’s, and F’s” on every team. They may not be able to handle as much work as the A’s, but they can still add to the project’s outcome. “Those D’s are dedicated. They may only be able to handle one or two things, but you can count on them to get it done.”

You can listen to the full seminar here: https://l.ead.me/bboL27

A good project manager, she says, is one who knows each person’s limits but holds them accountable for doing their

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by Christopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

Commandant David Berger Speaks on the Importance of STEM Education Gen. David Berger is the

38th commandant of the United States Marine Corps. With experience commanding at every level of the Corps, from the Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, to the 1st Marine Division in Operation Enduring Freedom, he’s among the most seasoned members of the branch. Among many other things, Berger is celebrated by his peers for his mentorship of other soldiers and his advocacy of educational programs. As his friend and fellow Marine Lt. Gen. Walter Gaskin says, “His lifetime commitment to education has made him one of the Corps’ greatest advocates for diversity and inclusion, developing STEM talent, and ensuring our best and brightest Marines are ready to forge ahead.” It is for this reason that the BEYA committee invited him to present the prestigious Stars & Stripes Award at its annual awards dinner. Before presenting the award to the winner, Lt. Col. Nicholas Pomaro, Berger discussed the importance of STEM education for the military.

“Good engineers, mathematicians, and scientists are competent, but great ones are able to translate that technical capability into something that can change the world,” he says. “I believe that the Black engineers, scientists, and mathematicians in this room tonight not only could help us win in the future— we need them to help us win in the future.” 16

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He tells the story of Arleigh Burke, a celebrated Navy commander (later admiral) whose engineering background helped him strategize a victory in the South Pacific in 1943. “The Japanese Navy was very strong,” Berger tells, explaining that Japan’s possession of the Type 93 (or “Long Lance”) torpedo put them at an advantage during World War I. “The Long Lance was very impressive. It was 30 feet long, swam 52 knots, and could outmaneuver anything we had. It ranged 20 miles and had a warhead on it in excess of 1,000 pounds.” Burke’s knowledge of math and engineering, Berger says, enabled him to analyze the other variables in the battle, namely the U.S Navy’s radar capabilities. “Arleigh Burke knew that the U.S Navy’s radar could reach out to 15 nautical miles,” he explains. “The Japanese, although they had a torpedo that could swim 20 miles, did not have the ability to find our ships that far.” Burke knew that another variable— human response time—was the last piece of the equation. In order for the U.S Navy’s radar advantage to outweigh its weapons disadvantage, its personnel would have to move fast. “The technological advantage we had, which engineers developed, would only work if [Arleigh’s] subordinate leaders could make the right decision in less than 10 seconds,” Berger says. It was this situation that prompted Burke to say the words he’d become famous for: “The difference between a good officer and a poor officer is about 10 seconds.” “Being the engineer, Arleigh Burke knew that the radar could give us an advantage, but only a 10-second advantage,” Berger says, “Within those 10 seconds, the Japanese ships would

Gen. David Berger, 38th Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps

close in and there would be no more advantage.” Today, he says, the United States’s advantage is far less than 10 seconds. Whether on water, sky, land, or in the cyber realm, military leaders make crucial decisions in very small amounts of time. “If in 1943 it was 10 seconds, I reckon we might have a four or fivesecond advantage right now,” Berger estimates. “Things happen a lot faster than they did in 1943.” It’s the increased speed of the world—and warfare—which he says makes scientists, engineers, and mathematicians so important to the military today. “It could all come down to 10 seconds or less,” he says, “We need you to make sure that in those 10 seconds, our leaders have the capabilities they need to make the right decision at the right time.” S

Watch Gen. Berger’s keynote speech here: : https://l.ead.me/ bboL2s

www.blackengineer.com


Defining tomorrow with today’s leaders Lockheed Martin salutes our military and veteran community. We know that inclusion drives success. Diverse backgrounds, experiences and points of view help us create incredible work, solve customer’s toughest challenges and engineer solutions around the world. We don’t know what’s going to change the world next. But we’re probably already working on it. Learn more at lockheedmartin.com/diversity

© 2018 Lockheed Martin Corporation

VC18-23838


TopEmployers

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for

Veterans

These companies are hiring veterans, and they tell us why by Lango Deen ldeen@ccgmag.com

AT

the 15th annual BEYA Stars & Stripes dinner, top employers of veterans (or former members of the armed forces of the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) were in attendance. Stars & Stripes is one of the nation’s largest events honoring active and retired African-American admirals, generals, and members of the federal Senior Executive Service. Each year, the Stars & Stripes event’s featured service alternates between the U. S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Air Force, and National Guard Bureau. 18

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Since 2005, many corporations have joined the stellar list of supporters at BEYA Stars & Stripes. Still, on February 14, the brightest stars at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C. included the Department of Defense, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Booz Allen Hamilton, Northrop Grumman, BAE Systems, Lockheed Martin, The Boeing Company, Department of Veterans Affairs, Raytheon Company, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and General Dynamics Corporation. At this flagship event held during

the 2020 BEYA STEM Conference, corporate partners are weapons manufacturers and military technology providers; defense contractors and industrial corporations with core manufacturing concentrations in weapons and military and commercial electronics; and multinational defense, security, and aerospace companies. They are management and information technology consulting firms, medical device manufacturers, aerospace and defense companies, and military product divisions (divisions responsible for defense and aerospace products and services). www.blackengineer.com


They are also defense, aviation, information technology, and biomedical research companies, which provide scientific, engineering, systems integration, and technical services; aerospace, defense, arms, security, and advanced technologies companies with worldwide interests; multinational conglomerates; and technology service providers providing technology and supply chain services with a focus on the enterprise commercial, public, and telecom service provider sectors.

“From supplying goods and materials when our manufacturing might be called upon during first and second World Wars to assisting veterans and active-duty military through numerous ongoing programs, GM has answered America’s call,” said David J. Albritton. Albritton is the lead executive and general manager of General Motors Defense, GM’s new business entity focused on providing various innovative

Nearly one in six BAE Systems employees have served in the military. According to Gerard J. DeMuro, president and chief executive officer of BAE Systems, Inc., to develop tomorrow’s workforce, it is essential to foster the next generation of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (S.T.E.M.) professionals and work to tap all the talent that America has to offer. Horacio Rozanski, president and chief executive officer of Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., a technology and consulting company that serves government clients and Fortune 500 corporations, said that through programs like the USO of Metropolitan Washington-Baltimore’s Project Next S.T.E.P. (Service Member Transition Education Program) and Hiring Our Heroes, a program of the U.S. Chamber Foundation, they are helping to transition service members and veterans for careers in cybersecurity, data science, and other STEM fields. “One-third of our firm’s employees are veterans, active military, or military spouses, so we share your passion for service to country,” Rozanski told the BEYA Stars & Stripes honorees and guests. The unique experiences that members of the armed forces bring to the company are invaluable, said Michael F. Mahoney, chairman and CEO of Boston Scientific Corporation and chairman of its board of directors. Boston Scientific has over 900 veteran employees. General Motors spoke with pride about being a supporter of the United States military for more than a century.

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TopEmployers

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Veterans BAE Systems Booz Allen Hamilton Boston Scientific General Dynamics GM Defense Leidos Lockheed Martin Northrop Grumman Raytheon SAIC Boeing Defense, Space & Security United Technologies World Wide Technology

and advanced automotive technologies and services to the global aerospace, defense, and security industries. In June, the U.S. Army Contracting Command–Detroit Arsenal announced that GM Defense, a subsidiary of General Motors, has been awarded the production contract to build, field, and sustain the Army’s new Infantry Squad Vehicle (ISV). GM Defense’s solution to the Army’s next-generation

transportation needs is based on the award-winning 2020 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 midsize truck architecture and leverages 90 percent commercial off-the-shelf parts. “Winning this Army award is welldeserved recognition for the hard work and dedication of our GM Defense team and their production of a fantastic vehicle,” Albritton said. “We are confident the GMD ISV will meet and exceed all of our customers’ requirements. It’s indeed an honor to leverage our parent company’s experience as one of the world’s largest automotive manufacturers to design, build, and deliver the best technologies available to the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and our allies.” “On behalf of the 105,000 employees of Lockheed Martin, including more than 21,000 veterans, I want to congratulate this evening’s honorees,” said Marillyn A. Hewson, then chairman, president, and CEO of Lockheed Martin. Hewson is currently executive chairman of Lockheed Martin Corporation. She served as Lockheed Martin’s chairman, president, and chief executive officer from January 2014 to June 2020 and held the positions of president and chief executive officer from January 2013 to December 2013. To date, there are 21,424 veterans employed at Lockheed Martin. According to the most recent data, the company has directed $8.6 million in philanthropic contributions to militaryand veteran-focused programs and worked with more than 1,240 veteranowned small businesses in 2017. “On behalf of the Raytheon global team, including our more than 10,000 veterans and reservists, thank you for your leadership as well as service to our great nation,” said Thomas Kennedy, chairman and CEO of Raytheon. Kennedy went on to talk about theoretical capabilities, such as artificial intelligence/machine learning, hypersonic, and quantum computing starting to become realities. David Steward, chairman and founder of World Wide Technology, said it was a minority business enterprise with an established history of supporting active and retired military service members. S USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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S E O R E H G N U S N U CE ARE R O F IR A . .S U E H T S IN D BARRIERS, BLACK

, AN

REJUDICE P , M IS C A R H G U O R TH

by Saundra Wilson editors@ccgmag.com

BLACKS HAVE BEEN MAKING THEIR MARK IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SINCE ITS VERY INCEPTION. DESPITE RACISM, PREJUDICE, AND NUMEROUS BARRIERS, BLACK AIRMEN HAVE BUILT A LEGACY SEALED IN BLOOD, VICTORY, AND PERSEVERANCE.

2020 marks an unprecedented moment in the history of the United States Air Force, with Gen. Charles “CQ” Brown being sworn in as the U.S. Air Force chief of staff, the highest seat in the organization’s structure. Brown was confirmed by the U.S. Senate after a historic 98-0 vote and is the first Black person to ever occupy the position. His appointment was made possible by the grit, excellence, and commitment shown by the thousands of Blacks who came before him in the U.S. Air Force. Their contributions showed our country, and the world, that Blacks belong in the U.S. Air Force, and always have. “This is a very historic day for our nation, and I do not take this moment lightly,” Brown said at his swearing-in ceremony in August. “Today’s possible due to the perseverance of those who went before me, serving as an inspiration to me and so many others,” Brown said. Brown’s reference to his predecessors honors so many, including the brave, barrier-breaking Tuskegee Airman, an all-Black unit of military aviators that fought during World War II, prior to the integration of the military. It also honors the contributions of the

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many women who fought, flew, and led in the U.S. Air Force.

Here are some of those contributions. While this is not an exhaustive list, these highlights serve to recognize and honor these unsung heroes. These are their stories. THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN The Tuskegee Airmen were a group of incredible men and women. They were the first Black military aviators in the U.S. Army Air Corps (AAC), a predecessor of the U.S. Air Force. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the Tuskegee program during World War II, giving Blacks a chance to be trained for one of the most prestigious, skilled tasks in the armed forces— operating complex machinery and flying fighter planes. At the time, many whites both inside and outside of the military considered Blacks to be intellectually inferior. They did not believe they were capable of operating fighter planes. The Tuskegee Airmen more than proved them wrong. During World War II, the Tuskegee Airmen flew more than 15,000 missions in Europe and North Africa, earning them more than 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses. During the two years the Airmen spent in combat, they destroyed or damaged more than 250 German aircrafts and nearly 1,000 transport vehicles and rail cars. The Airmen also had an impressive mission success rate, one that was twice as high as other groups in the 15th Air Force Unit, a unit deployed to carry out air strikes in Germany and Axis-occupied areas of Europe. The Tuskegee Airmen’s success led to the appointment of Gen. Benjamin O.

Davis Jr., one of the unit’s own, as the first African-American general of the newly formed U.S. Air Force. This brave unit risked their lives for our country and fought with the reputation of their entire race on their shoulders. Their contributions will forever be etched in history.

TRAILBLAZING WOMEN Contrary to popular belief, the Tuskegee Airmen weren’t all men. One woman involved was Della Raney, who supported the group as its first nurse. Her brave contributions and medical expertise paved the way for other Black women to follow in her footsteps. Another trailblazing woman, Oleta Crain, served in both the Air Force and the Women’s Army Corps. She was one of three Black women to complete officer training during World War II. Crain served in the U.S. Air Force for 20 years and retired as a major. More than 50 years after the Tuskegee Airmen took to the skies, Shawna Rochelle Kimbrell, a Black woman from Lafayette, IN, earned her pilot’s wings in 1999. Kimbrell is the U.S. Air Force’s first Black female fighter pilot. Kimbrell flew combat missions during Operation Northern Watch, a task force asked to enforce a no-fly zone above the 36th parallel in Iraq. She’s still alive today and has built an incredible military career, earning numerous medals and flying missions all over the world. ENGINEERS AND BRILLIANT MINDS Blacks throughout history have also served in support units and engineer aviation battalions, or EABs. These groups provided significant support to the efforts during World War II and www.blackengineer.com


S

were composed of skilled engineers and construction experts. These airmen were trained alongside air units to defend the airfields. More than 51 Black EABs served during World War II, and many were stationed overseas. Because of the support of these units, fighter pilots could focus on their mission, knowing that the EABs were more than capable of holding down the airfields. THE LEGACY CONTINUES Thanks to the contributions of countless Black men and women, the sky is not the limit for Blacks in the U.S. Armed Forces. Black men and women currently make up 15 percent of the active U.S. Air Force, according to statistics from the organization’s website. They carry on the legacy, and as the baton is passed from generation to generation, the truth remains the same—Blacks are, have been, and always will be leaders, innovators, and warriors in the U.S. Air Force. S

II with the , served in WW top right: IA s, om fr ne e oi is M kw Cloc of Des and captured Smith, a native down, injured, er th ot aff Lu sh . g pt in Ca be >> ived er. Photo by St en. Smith surv gineering care en ul sf es cc Tuskegee Airm su d have a long an and went on to ction with the ed with distin rv lly se , Ke IA el a, ha ic w Sgt. M s. Photo by Staff of Ottum several medal iams, a native ng ill ni W in rt w be II, Ro ar >> ld W en during Wor hter pilot. Tuskegee Airm ack female fig Bl st fir lly s e’ Ke rc el Air Force. Sgt. Micha is the Air Fo hday of the U.S. rt elle Kimbrell bi ch th 70 Ro e na th r aw >> Sh Magazine fo ster at AIRMAN Promotional po m is Burcha Graphics by Trav

The BEYA annual Stars & Stripes event has been honoring our veterans for many years. Learn more about Stars & Stripes here: l.ead.me/bboL4F

www.blackengineer.com

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Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. 22nd Chief of Staff United States Air Force

(U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Clark)

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RightLEADER RightTIME THE

FOR THE

IN AIR FORCE HISTORY by Lango Deen ldeen@ccgmag.com

A LEADER AIMING TO SHAPE AN AIR FORCE MORE READY TO MEET ITS CHALLENGES Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., a 2015 Stars & Stripes award winner, was sworn in as chief of staff of the Air Force in August 2020, the first Black chief of a U.S. military service. He has been described as “an accomplished and thoughtful Air Force leader, a chief of staff chosen to move the service forward at a critical crossroads in the nation’s history.” “Being honored by BEYA’s Stars & Stripes award is extremely humbling, especially considering the caliber of leaders recognized,” the general said. “I’m proud of my academic engineering background and how it has helped me during my Air Force career. I’ve often used the quote, ‘Success takes help; failure you can do alone.’ I’m confident that every success I’ve enjoyed is due to the tremendous support I’ve received from my family, so many friends and colleagues, and so many gracious leaders and organizations like BEYA. I owe them all a debt of gratitude.”

degree in civil engineering at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX. He is a life member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. In 1994, Brown earned a master’s degree in aeronautical science from the Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL. In 2012, the Texas Tech Alumni Association declared Brown a distinguished graduate of Texas Tech University. Brown has served in various positions at the squadron and wing level, including

an assignment to the United States Air Force Weapons School as an F-16 instructor. His special staff tours include aide-de-camp to the chief of staff of the Air Force; director, secretary of the Air Force and chief of staff, Executive Action Group; deputy commander, U.S. Central Command. He also served as a national defense fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA. On March 2, 2020, it was announced Mrs. Sharene Brown, the wife of Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr., places his new chief of staff cover on him during a transition ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, MD, Aug. 6, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Eric Dietrich)

Born into a military family, Brown’s career began in 1984, when he was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He was a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps with a Bachelor of Science www.blackengineer.com

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“I’VE SHARED WITH AIRMEN THAT NO MATTER THE CHALLENGES OR OPPORTUNITIES THAT COME OUR WAY, THEY CAN EXPECT ME TO LEAD BY MEANS OF FOUR TENETS THAT HAVE SERVED ME THROUGHOUT MY CAREER,” — ­ Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. 1. EXECUTE AT A HIGH STANDARD 2. BE DISCIPLINED IN EXECUTION 3 . PAY ATTENTION TO DETAILS 4 . HAVE FUN

that President Donald Trump would nominate Brown to become the next chief of staff of the United States Air Force, succeeding David L. Goldfein. On June 9, 2020, Brown was unanimously confirmed (98–0) by the U.S. Senate to succeed Goldfein as chief of staff of the United States Air Force, making him the first African American to lead a branch of the United States armed forces. “When opportunity knocks, you want to be fully dressed,” he told USBE magazine. “There’s a quote I’ve used throughout my career,” the general said. “I feel like I’ve made the most of every opportunity and see every challenge as an opportunity to take another path.” While the general acknowledged that there are more opportunities now than in his father and grandfather’s days, he also noted obstacles, both overt and not obvious. “As mentioned in my recent video, ‘What I’m Thinking About,’ I have a few things on my mind when it comes to racial disparity,” Brown said. “In my experience, I’ve felt pressure to perform error-free, especially for supervisors I perceived had expected less from me as an African American. I’ve felt that as I rose through the ranks, I often had to work twice as hard to prove their expectations and perceptions of African Americans were invalid to pave the way for those behind me. Even with changing times, and what I’ve been able to achieve as the first African American to serve as the Air Force chief of staff, there are still challenges for me and underrepresented minorities.” A command pilot with more than 2,900 flying hours, including 130 combat hours, Brown has commanded a fighter squadron, the U.S. Air Force Weapons 24

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School, two fighter wings, and U.S. Air Forces Central Command. Before serving as the Air Force chief of staff, he was the commander of Pacific Air Forces, air component commander for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. Nonetheless, Brown agrees that his story is not one size fits all. Brown said he has had experiences, even recently, where he was treated or judged differently than if he were in uniform. “Like many African Americans, I learned to adapt and live in two worlds,” he told USBE magazine. “You learn to adapt to the majority while still providing your perspective as an African American, and not the perspective of all African Americans.” The Air Force has work to do, he added, and the service remains committed to addressing racial disparity, listening to airmen, and taking steps toward meaningful and lasting change.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

In the interview with USBE magazine, the general said the Department of the Air Force recently created its Diversity & Inclusion Task Force, a cross-functional team comprised of diverse airmen whose sole purpose is to make immediate changes that create an equitable environment for all personnel. “I’ve identified four specific areas of focus, he said. “Airmen, bureaucracy, competition, and design implementation. These focus areas are designed to develop and empower leaders to best contribute to our national security while providing them the quality of service and quality of life so all can reach their full potential. Critical to success will be a collaboration with our key stakeholders within the Air Force first, and then

within the department, Congress, and industry. We must move with a purpose to accelerate the required change to remain the most dominant and respected Air Force in the world.” The general expanded on programs such as the Air Force’s Rated Diversity Improvement initiative—a holistic approach to inspire, grow, and retain rated airmen to increase the diversity of the service’s pilots, air battle managers, and combat systems officers; the JROTC Flight Academy, which is intended to inspire and encourage high school youth to pursue aviation careers, and provides an on-ramp for targeted accessions programs; the AIM HIGH Flight Academy and ROTC “You Can Fly” programs, allowing college students to earn their private pilot’s license at no cost if they enroll in the Air Force ROTC program (with no commitment to serve in the military); and increased scholarship opportunities for students to attend historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) through its Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program. “We have instituted a number of initiatives,” Brown said, “to increase recruitment and retention of underrepresented groups to ensure a diverse workforce, capitalizing on the amalgamation of differing backgrounds and experiences that breeds innovation.” The Air Force is also adding more Gold Bar recruiters to recruit a diverse force, but the 10 new recruiters will focus on ROTC programs at minority-serving institutions, including HBCUs and Hispanic-serving institutions. “Additionally, we have eliminated height restrictions for pilot candidates,” Brown said. “Officials at Air Education and Training Command will now specifically screen members who are below 64 inches or above 77 inches for eligibility. We’ve also adjusted policies to support pregnant pilots staying in the cockpit longer without a medical waiver. We are also forming strategic partnerships to increase awareness of the experience and careers our Air and Space Forces have to offer,” he said. The Air Force plans full participation

www.blackengineer.com


U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr., U.S. Air Forces Central Command commander, talks with Airmen assigned to the 774th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, July 25, 2015. Brown met with Airmen from BAF and Kandahar Airfield during his tour of Afghanistan and got a first-hand look at how Airmen support the mission in Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joseph Swafford/Released)

at events such as those held by the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, Women in Aviation International, American Indian Science & Engineering Society, the Society of Asian Scientists & Engineers, the National Gay Pilots Association, and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). “These are just a few as we look for new ways to reach audiences of talented youth and professionals from throughout our diverse nation,” the general said.

STEM OUTREACH PROGRAMS

According to the Facebook page for A.F. Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics Outreach Programs, the Air Force has a critical need for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent for future technology and innovation efforts within America’s STEM workforce. The page says in its mission statement that a diversified STEM talent pool will establish the pace of technological advancements and enable the Air

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Force to avoid technological surprises. The information also said the Air Force and surrounding communities foster development, improvement, coordination, and assessment of STEM outreach programs throughout the United States. It also leverages operations with other Department of Defense components, academia, and industry to improve K-12 STEM literacy and college student accessions into the Air Force or other DOD civilian and military STEM workforces. “The Air Force is serious about recruiting and retaining the right technical talent needed for today and our future—everything from digital engineering to coding, to advance manufacturing, quantum computing, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence,” Brown told USBE magazine. “Tomorrow’s airmen are capable of accomplishing things we haven’t even begun to imagine, so I’m focused on getting these talented Americans in, and keeping them in, our U.S. Air Force.”

September 1947, President Harry S. Truman appointed Gen. Carl A. Spaatz as the first chief of staff of the new United States Air Force. USBE magazine asked Brown to tell us what he would say if he could speak to his famous predecessor. “When you think about it, what used to take thousands of aircraft in bombing campaigns, we can now do with one aircraft, and perhaps with an airman sitting in a building halfway across the world, flying the sortie and releasing the ordinance. The vision you [Spaatz] pioneered, our airmen have refined and matured. What once was a dream is now a reality. It makes you wonder what airmen in another 70 years will be able to do. In the more immediate future, we are working to fuse sensor and shooter data, so the time from launch to strategic effect is a timeline that no adversary can even hope to adapt to… Air dominance is where we started, but joint, all-domain dominance is the future.” S

On Sept. 18, 2020, the Air Force celebrated its 73rd birthday. In

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THE

TOP BLACK

OFFICERS IN THE U. S. M I L I TA R Y

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MORE THAN 70 YEARS after President Harry S. Truman

signed the executive order committing the government to integrating the segregated military, the Senate confirmed Gen. Charles Q. Brown as Air Force chief of staff, making him the first Black leader of a military service. Although Blacks make up about 17 percent of the total force, just 9 percent are officers. According to recent stats, less than 6 percent of Black general officers have flag rank. As USBE magazine has done over the last 15 years, we bring you a list of top Black generals or admirals in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and National Guard. In this edition, the United States Space Force makes its historic entry into USBE magazine’s annual who’s who list. Founded in December 2019, the space service branch will focus on space warfare.

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military LT. GEN. GARY BRITO

U.S.ARMY

U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

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GEN. MICHAEL X. GARRETT Commanding General U.S. Army Forces Command

Gen. Michael X. Garrett became the 23rd commander of United States Army Forces Command, Fort Bragg, NC, on March 21, 2019. As commander of the United States Army’s largest organization, he commands 215,000 active-duty soldiers and 190,000 members of the U.S. Army Reserve while providing training and readiness oversight of the U.S. Army National Guard. In total, the Forces Command team includes 745,000 soldiers and 96,000 civilians. Garrett has commanded from the company through Army Service Component Command and led units in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. A career infantryman, Garrett received his commission in 1984 upon graduating from Xavier University. Following his initial military training courses, including Ranger, Pathfinder, and Jumpmaster, he served his formative years in the 75th Ranger Regiment and the 82nd Airborne Division, where he commanded 3rd Battalion 325th Infantry (Airborne), 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. He also oversaw the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division (Light), which he deployed to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following Brigade Command, Garrett served as the deputy commanding general of United States Army Recruiting Command, and subsequently as chief of staff, XVIII Airborne Corps. In support of Operation New Dawn, he deployed to Iraq as the deputy chief of staff for United States Forces—Iraq. Returning stateside, he served as commanding general, United States Army Alaska, before assuming duty as chief of staff, United States Central Command. His most recent assignment was commanding general, United States Army Central (USARCENT) and Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC). Garrett holds a bachelor’s degree from Xavier University, and his military education includes United States Army Command and General Staff College and a Senior Service College Fellowship. Garrett is happily married to Lorelei, has two grown children, and is a physical fitness enthusiast.

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Lt. Gen. Gary Brito assumed duties as the U.S. Army’s 49th deputy chief of staff, G-1, on Aug. 3. Before this assignment, he served as the commanding general, Maneuver Center of Excellence (MCoE), and Fort Benning. Brito was commissioned an infantry officer through Penn State University and entered active duty in March 1987. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced courses, Airborne and Ranger Schools, Combined Arms Staff Services School, Command and General Staff Officers Course, and Senior Service College at the Joint Advanced Warfighting School (JAWS), Norfolk, VA. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in community studies from Penn State University, a master’s degree in human resource management from Troy State University, and a second master’s degree in joint strategy and campaign planning from the Joint Advanced Warfighting School. He is also a graduate of the M.I.T. Seminar XXI Program. Brito has served in a variety of command and staff assignments throughout his career to include Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and Fort Polk; National Training Center, Training and Doctrine and Command (TRADOC), III Corps and Fort Hood, DIV West-First Army, 25th Infantry Division, 3rd Infantry Division, and 4th Infantry Division. He has deployed to both Iraq and Afghanistan. He is married to the former Michelle Harper of Washington, D.C. They have two sons, Matthew and Patrick.

LT. GEN. R. SCOTT DINGLE

The Surgeon General, U.S. Army Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command

Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle is the United States Army’s surgeon general and the commanding general of the United States Army Medical Command. He previously served as the deputy surgeon general and deputy commanding general (support), U.S. Army Medical Command. Other assignments include commanding general, Regional Health Command—Atlantic; U.S. Army Medical Command deputy chief of staff for operations; chief, medical plans and operations, 18th Airborne Corps surgeon’s office; chief, medical plans and operations Multinational Corps—Iraq surgeon’s office; commander, 261st Multifunctional Medical Battalion; director, health www.blackengineer.com


U.S. ARMY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military care operations/G-3, office of the surgeon general; and commander, 30th Medical Brigade, Germany. Dingle is a distinguished military graduate of Morgan State University. His degrees include a Master of Science in administration, a Master of Military Arts and Science, and a Master of Science in national security strategy. Dingle’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal (2), Legion of Merit (3), Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (8), Joint Service Commendation Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Order of Military Medical Merit, Order of Kentucky Colonels, and the Army surgeon general’s prestigious 9A Proficiency Designator.

LT. GEN. JASON T. EVANS

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-9 (Installations & Quality of Life)

Lt. Gen. Jason T. Evans was confirmed as the Army’s first deputy chief of staff G-9 (installations and quality of life), on Sept. 21, 2019. He last served as commander of U.S Army Human Resources Command. Evans was born in Baltimore, MD, and raised as an Air Force dependent. He attended Wentworth Military Academy, where he earned an associate degree in business administration. He completed his Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Bellevue University in Bellevue, NE. He holds master’s degrees in business administration and national resource strategy. Evans has served in command and staff positions in the continental United States, Italy, Somalia, Kosovo, Germany, and Iraq with the 13th Corps Support Command, III Corps, 510th Personnel Services Battalion, 1st Personnel Command, USAREUR, Installation Management Command, MultiNational Force—Iraq, office of the assistant secretary of the Army, and as the director, military personnel management, in the office of the deputy chief of staff, Army G-1. He is a graduate of the Adjutant General’s Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, Combined Arms Staff School, Command and General Staff College, the Army Resource Management Course, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

LT. GEN. LESLIE C. SMITH

Inspector General, Office of the Secretary of the Army

Lt. Gen. Leslie Smith was sworn in as the Army’s 66th inspector general and promoted to lieutenant general on March 14, 2018. Before those roles, he served as deputy to the inspector general in the office of the secretary of the Army. Smith’s previous assignment was as the fourth commander of the United States Army 20th Support Command (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives). His early assignments include the 1-230th Field Artillery Battalion of the www.blackengineer.com

48th Infantry Brigade, Chemical Staff officer in the 3-52nd Air Defense Artillery Battalion, division and DIVARTY staff officer and company commander in the 82nd Airborne Division, Chemical Branch PERSCOM, S-3, and X.O., in the 23rd Chemical Battalion, and the Joint Staff, J-5. In 2001, he assumed command of the 83d Chemical Battalion, where elements of the battalion deployed in support of Operations New Dawn, Enduring Freedom, and Iraqi Freedom. Following command, he served on the Army Staff in the G-8 as the deputy division chief and chief of N.B.C. Branch for the Full Dimensional Protection Division. In 2005, he assumed command of the 3rd Chemical Brigade at Fort Leonard Wood. He later served as the 25th chief of chemical and commandant of the United States Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear School.

MA J. GEN. CARL ALEX

Deputy Chief of Staff Operations, Joint Forces Command Headquarters-Brunssum North Atlantic Treaty Organization

Maj. Gen. Carl Alex is an accomplished visionary and transformational senior executive with over seven years of senior executive experience in 36 years of military executive and strategic leadership, planning, development, and implementation. Alex is a decisive, highly adaptable, and solution-oriented senior executive with an excellent reputation for resolving problems and managing transitions. He has served at NATO Allied Joint Force Command—Brunssum for more than two years as deputy chief of staff for operations and intelligence. As chief operations officer, he provides strategic leadership, oversight, and daily operations activities and functions. He synchronizes, coordinates, and integrates joint and multi-national efforts, resources, operations, and training to achieve the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) strategic and operational military objectives. Alex builds joint, multi-national, and political relationships and teams for strategic scanning, development, and operational strategies implementation. He provides focused leadership, oversight, and direction for four directorates of 250 personnel. Prior, he served as the director of operations for U.S. Army Central Command (ARCENT), assistant director of operations for U.S. Army Forces Command

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military (FORSCOM), executive manager of logistics U.S. Army Infantry Division, and commander of Train-Advise-Assist Regional Command—East.

MA J. GEN. X AVIER T. BRUNSON Commanding General, 7th Infantry Division Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA

Upon selection for promotion to brigadier general, Xavier T. Brunson served as the assistant commanding general—support, United States Army Special Forces Command (now 1st Special Forces Command) (Airborne) at Fort Bragg, NC and Operation Inherent Resolve. Following his duties, Brunson was assigned as the deputy commanding general, operations, 10th Mountain Division (Light) at Fort Drum, NY. Before command, he served as chief of staff, Combined Joint Task Force— Operations Inherent Resolve, Iraq, and XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, NC. Other operational assignments include Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. Brunson was commissioned as an infantry officer upon graduation from Hampton University in 1990. He has deployed numerous times in support of contingency and named operations. Brunson holds a B.A. in political science from Hampton University, an M.A. in human resource development from Webster University, and an M.S. in national security strategic studies from the United States Army War College. He is married to Col. (retired) Kirsten Brunson, and they have two daughters and one son.

MA J. GEN. RONALD CLARK

Chief of Staff, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii

Maj. Gen. Ronald Clark currently serves as the chief of staff for the United States IndoPacific Command. In this position, he leads a joint and multinational staff charged with ensuring a free and open Indo-Pacific through a careful focus on joint force lethality, design and posture, exercises, experimentation and innovation, and our allies and partners. He previously served as the commanding general of the 25th Infantry Division and the senior commander for United States Army Garrison Hawaii. Before that, he served as the chief of staff, U.S. Army Pacific. Clark is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, 30

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the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, the U.S. Army War College Fellowship at Duke University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar XXI National Security Studies Program. His other previous assignments include rotations as the Army’s deputy director of strategy, , and policy in the Pentagon; deputy commanding general for support, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, NC and in Iraq during Operation Inherent Resolve; and deputy chief of staff—operations for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Allied Rapid Reaction Corps in the United Kingdom.

MA J. GEN. CLEMENT S. COWARD

Director of the Department of Defense (DoD) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO)

Maj. Gen. Clement S. Coward assumed the duties of director of the Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in September. Coward graduated and received his commission in the Air Defense Artillery branch as a second lieutenant from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and entered active duty in 1989. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in speech communications, a Master of Arts in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College, and a Master of Science in strategic studies from the Army War College. Before joining SAPRO, Coward was the commanding general of the 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command based at Fort Bliss, TX. Coward’s key operational assignments include leading at all levels of command and service in support of Operation Desert Storm, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Spartan Shield. His key staff positions have also included serving on the Joint and Army Staffs in the Pentagon. Coward’s military awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, and the Defense Meritorious Service Medal.

MA J. GEN. TELITA CROSLAND

Deputy Surgeon General & Deputy Commanding General (Operations) DHHQ, Falls Church, Virginia

Maj. Gen. Telita Crosland is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, and the Army Command and General Staff College. In addition to her Doctor of Medicine, she also holds a Master of Public Health and a Master of Science in national resource strategy. Crosland entered the Army as a Medical Corps officer in 1993. She is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians, and a www.blackengineer.com


U.S. ARMY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military recipient of the surgeon general’s “A” proficiency designator. Crosland has served in a variety of leadership positions, including commander, U.S. Army Medical Department Activity, Heidelberg, Germany; deputy commander, U.S. Army Medical Center, Landstuhl, Germany; Medical Corps branch chief, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, Fort Knox, KY; commander, U.S. Army Medical Department Activity, Fort Campbell, KY; deputy chief of staff for operations, United States Army Medical Command, Falls Church, VA; commanding general, Regional Health Command— Atlantic, Fort Belvoir, VA. Her awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit (two oak leaf clusters); Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (three oak leaf clusters), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Staff Badge, and the Parachutist’s Badge. She is a member of the Order of Military Medical Merit.

MA J. GEN. SEAN A . GAINEY

Director, Joint Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office Director of fires, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army

Maj. Gen. Sean Gainey was appointed director, Joint CounterUnmanned Aircraft Systems Office (J.C.O.); and director of fires, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., on May 21, 2020. Gainey was commanding general of the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command at Fort Shafter, HI. He served on Fort Bragg, NC, as the commander of the 108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade. In 1990, he commissioned in the Air Defense Artillery Corps upon graduation from Georgia Southern University. He has served in numerous key staff positions and has commanded units from the battery to the brigade level. He deployed with 108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade as a brigade commander in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Gainey was also deployed with 5th Battalion, 7th Air Defense Artillery, and as a battalion commander in support of the Joint Task Force East. Gainey holds a Master of Science degree in personnel management from Central Michigan University and a Master of Science degree in national security and resource strategy from the Dwight. D. Eisenhower School for National Security.

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MA J. GEN. CHARLES R. HAMILTON Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations G-3 Army Materiel Command

Maj. Gen. Charles R. Hamilton assumed duties as deputy chief of staff for operations, G-3, Army Materiel Command on June 29. He is responsible for managing the Army’s logistics enterprise’s operations and providing innovative logistical solutions to the forward tactical edge. Hamilton commanded the 8th Theater Sustainment Command, where he was the lead integrator for all sustainment operations in the U.S Indo-Pacific Command area. Previously, he served as the assistant chief of staff, J-4, United States Forces Korea. He commanded Defense Logistics Agency—Troop Support, where his unit provided $14 billion annually of food, clothing, textiles, construction, engineering equipment, and industrial hardware items for America’s warfighters, ensuring the combatant commanders freedom of maneuver. Hamilton has several overseas tours along with three deployments to Afghanistan. During his last deployment, he served as the 101st Sustainment Brigade commander, leading Task Force Lifeliner. He is a distinguished military graduate from Officer Candidate School. Hamilton graduated from Virginia State University and has a master’s degree in public administration from Central Michigan University and a second master’s degree in military studies from The Marine Corps University. His military education includes Senior Service College as a 2012 O.S.D. Corporate fellow.

MA J. GEN. MITCHELL L . KILGO

Commander of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM) Senior Commander of Aberdeen Proving Ground

Maj. Gen. Mitchell Kilgo assumed duties as the 16th commander of the U.S. Army CommunicationsElectronics Command and senior commander of Aberdeen Proving Ground on June 20, 2019. As the commanding general for a 9,000-person, two-star global command and the senior commander of a 28,000-person military base, Kilgo serves as the U.S. Army’s command, control, communications, computers, cyber, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C5ISR) materiel integrator. He is responsible for enabling the U.S. Army’s warfighting readiness by providing sustainable global USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military C5ISR support. Raised in Newport News, VA, Kilgo entered active duty in January 1988 after graduating from Virginia Union University with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and natural sciences. He also holds a Master of Science degree in systems technology (joint command, control, and communications) from the Naval Postgraduate School and a Master of Science degree in national security strategy from the National War College. During his 31 years as an Army officer, Kilgo served in various command and staff positions. His most recent assignment was as the J-6 for U.S. Central Command, where he oversaw the implementation and management of the global communications and computer networks for the central region.

MA J. GEN. DONNA MARTIN

Provost Marshal General of the Army, Commanding General U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command

Maj. Gen. Donna Martin graduated from Old Dominion University with a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice. She was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Military Police Corps in 1988. Martin earned a master’s degree in strategic studies from the United States Army War College in Carlisle Barracks, PA. MG Martin has served in every staff position from battalion to combatant command. In 2006, Martin was selected to command the 385th Military Police Battalion (Dragoons) at Fort Stewart, GA. After command, Martin remained at Fort Stewart to serve as the 3rd Infantry Division’s inspector general. MG Martin commanded the 202nd Military Police Group (Criminal Investigation Division) at Kaiserslautern, Germany, from July 2011 until May 2013. In June 2013, she assumed command of the Rear Detachment of the 18th Military Police Brigade. In June 2014, Martin reported for duty as the chief of investigations, HQDA Inspector General Agency. From March 2015 until June 2017, Martin assumed responsibilities as the deputy commanding general, United States Army Recruiting Command. From June 2017 to August 2018, Martin also served as the Military Police Corps Regiment and commandant of the Military Police School. In August 2018, Martin assumed command of the Maneuver Support Center of Excellence at Fort Leonard Wood, MI.

MA J. GEN. A .C. ROPER

Deputy Commanding General United States Army Reserve Command

Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper is the deputy commanding general of the United States Army Reserve Command. He

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previously served as the deputy chief, Chief of the Army Reserve. Other assignments include commanding general, 76th Operational Response Command; commanding general, 80th Training Command; acting deputy commanding general, 335th Signal Command; commander, 415th Chemical Brigade, while dual-hatted as the Task Force operations commander, JTF-51, ARNORTH for the C2CRE-A homeland response mission; chief of staff, 87th Division; and assistant chief of staff, 81st Regional Readiness Command. Roper is a graduate of the University of Alabama and the U.S. Army War College. His degrees include a Master of Science and a master’s in strategic studies. Roper’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit (two oak leaf clusters), Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (three oak leaf clusters), Joint Service Commendation Medal, and the Combat Action Badge. Roper has over 33 years of law enforcement experience culminating with his 10-year tenure as chief of police of the Birmingham Police Department. He graduated from the FBI National Academy and FBI National Executive Institute. Roper specializes in protecting critical infrastructure and served on the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force’s executive board.

MA J. GEN. MICHEL M. RUSSELL Director of Operations for the Army, G-4

Maj, Gen. Michel Russell is director of operations for the Army, G-4. He was commissioned a second lieutenant after graduating from John Jay College and Fordham University ROTC in New York. He went on to serve in critical developmental, broadening, and command assignments to include the office of the secretary of defense; Headquarters, Department of the Army; the Joint Staff; United States Forces Korea, J-4/deputy C-4/deputy U-4, and as the 28th chief of transportation and commandant of the U.S. Army’s Transportation School. He has commanded at all levels, including as the 47th Forward Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division during Operation Iraqi Freedom VIII; as commander, 401st Army Field Support Brigade in Bagram, Afghanistan during Operation Iraqi Freedom XI-XII, and most recently as commander, 19th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Republic of Korea. He holds master’s degrees in administration from Central Michigan University, military

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military studies from the Marine Corps University, and national resource strategy from the National Defense University. He is a graduate of the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College, the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, and CAPSTONE.

MA J. GEN. KEVIN VEREEN Commanding General U.S. Army Recruiting Command

Maj. Gen. Kevin Vereen took command of U.S. Army Recruiting Command at Fort Knox, KY, on July 23. He was born at Fort Bragg, NC, and is a native of Fayetteville, NC. He graduated from Campbell University in North Carolina in 1988 and commissioned as a field artillery officer. Vereen later became a military police officer. Before his current assignment, he served as the Army’s provost marshal general, commanding general U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. He serves as the principal military advisor to the secretary of the Army and the chief of staff of the Army on policing matters to include criminal investigations, criminal intelligence fusion, corrections, biometrics, physical security, highrisk personnel security, antiterrorism, and detention operations. Vereen is the Criminal Investigation Division commander, serving as the Department of the Army’s independent criminal investigative authority. He oversees five brigade-level commands/directorates, providing global support in significant criminal investigations, protective services, forensics, and investigative support to military commissions. Vereen has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Campbell University and a master’s degree in international relations and strategic studies from Troy State University and the U.S. Army War College. He is a lifetime member of the Military Police Regimental Association and a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Vereen’s awards include the Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters; National Defense Service Medal; Global War on Terrorism Medal; Iraqi Campaign Medal; Korean Defense Service Medal, and Humanitarian Service Medal.

MA J. GEN. WILLIAM J. WALKER Commanding General District of Columbia National Guard

Maj. Gen. William J. Walker is the commanding general, District of Columbia National Guard. He reports directly to the secretary of the Army and is responsible for the strategic leadership, readiness, and employment of the District of Columbia Army and Air National Guard units.

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Prior senior leadership assignments include commander, Joint Task Force 58th Presidential Inauguration; commander, Land Component Command; commander, Mobilization Augmentation Command and chief of staff, District of Columbia Army National Guard; and vice J-2, National Guard Bureau, Intelligence Directorate and commander, U.S. Army South, Beyond the Horizons, Joint Task Force—Jamaica. Following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Walker served in the Army Operations Center to support Operation Noble Eagle. In 2011, he was again mobilized and simultaneously served as chief, Theater Observation Detachment—Afghanistan, Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL); senior CALL liaison to the commander, International Security Assistance Force Afghanistan; and senior military strategist, American Embassy Kabul, Office of Transition in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Walker was commissioned in 1985 through the University of Illinois at Chicago Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program.

MA J. GEN. DAVID WILSON Commanding General 8th Theater Sustainment Command

Maj. Gen. David Wilson became the commanding general of the 8th Theater Sustainment Command on June 16. He is a distinguished military graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, and was commissioned in the field artillery in 1991. Wilson is the first African-American graduate from The Citadel to become a two-star general. Assignment highlights include director J/U-4, United States Forces Korea/United Nations Command/deputy director, C-4 Combined Forces Command; 40th chief of ordnance and commandant, U.S. Army Ordnance School; executive officer, Army Materiel Command commanding general; brigade commander, 406th Army Field Support Brigade; battalion commander, 121st Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Armored Division. Operational deployments include Operation Restore/Continue Hope, Operation Uphold Democracy, Operation Desert Thunder, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In addition to his Bachelor of Science degree from The Citadel, he also holds a Master of Science degree in general administration from Central Michigan University and a Master of Science degree in national resource strategy from the National Defense University.

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military MA J. GEN. JONATHAN WOODSON Commanding General Army Reserve Medical Command

Maj. Gen. Jonathan Woodson assumed duty as Army Reserve Medical Command commanding general on March 31 following his previous assignment as 3rd Medical Command deputy commanding general. A native of New York, NY, Woodson is a graduate of the City College of New York and the New York University School of Medicine. He received his postgraduate medical education at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School and completed residency training in internal medicine, general, and vascular surgery. He is board-certified in internal medicine, general surgery, vascular surgery, and critical care surgery. Additionally, he holds a master’s degree in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College. Woodson has served in various assignments from the tactical level through Corps, including the 399th Combat Support Hospital commander, 330th Medical Brigade, and appointment as the assistant surgeon general for Reserve affairs, force structure, and mobilization. In his civilian capacity, Woodson is a professor in management and professor of the practice at the Boston University Questrom School of Business; professor of surgery at Boston University School of Medicine; and professor of health law, policy, and management at the Boston University School of Public Health.

BRIG. GEN. KEVIN ADMIR AL

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southeastern Afghanistan. He received a B.S. in cellular biology from the University of Kansas and an M.S. in campaign planning and strategy from the National Defense University. He is also a fellow of the Royal College of Defence Studies in London, England.

BRIG. GEN. SHAN K. BAGBY

Commanding General, Brooke Army Medical Center Deputy Market Director, San Antonio Military Health System Chief, U.S. Army Dental Corps

Brig. Gen. Shan K. Bagby is the commanding general, Brooke Army Medical Center, deputy market director, San Antonio Military Health System, and chief, U.S. Army Dental Corps. Bagby is from New Jersey. His education includes a bachelor’s degree in physics, a Doctor of Dental Medicine degree, a master’s degree in healthcare administration, and a master’s degree in strategic studies. He completed residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery (O.M.S.) and fellowship training in O.M.S. trauma surgery. He is a graduate of the Army Medical Department Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, Airborne Course, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and U.S. Army War College. He is a fellow of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and board-certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. In his leisure time, Bagby enjoys reading, shooting skeet and trap, and exploring new places with his family.

Commandant, U.S. Army Armor School Maneuver Center of Excellence

BRIG. GEN. MILFORD H. BEAGLE, JR.

Brig. Gen. Kevin Admiral currently serves as the U.S. Army Armor School commandant at Fort Benning, GA. Commissioned as an Armor officer through Army ROTC, Admiral has enjoyed the privilege of leading soldiers in armor, cavalry, Stryker, and mechanized infantry units in Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan, and multiple locations in the United States. During staff assignments, Admiral taught at the Armor Captain’s Career Course, served as an aide-de-camp to the 36th Army chief of staff, and as executive officer to the U.N. Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea commander. Before assuming his current duties, Admiral served as the 4th Infantry Division deputy CG—Maneuver and T.F. Southeast commander in

Brig. Gen. Milford Beagle Jr., is the commanding general for the U.S. Army Training Center and Fort Jackson, SC, after serving as deputy commanding general for support, 10th Mountain Division (Light). After graduating from South Carolina State University in 1990 as a distinguished military graduate, he was commissioned into the infantry. He has soldiered with five regiments, including the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard). On the Joint and Army Staff, he served as the joint strategic planner and later executive assistant to the director, J-7, and the division chief, J-5, JIEDDO. On the Army Staff, he served as the executive

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Commanding General U.S. Army Training Center and Fort Jackson

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military officer to the Army’s vice chief. He holds two master’s degrees from Kansas State University and the United States Army School of Advanced Military Studies in Fort Leavenworth, KS. Beagle is married and has two children, one an Army lieutenant and the other a university student.

BRIG. GEN. VINCENT E. BUGGS

Deputy Commanding General of U.S. Army North (Fifth Army) Director, Army Reserve Engagement Cell, U.S. Army North

A native of Bossier City, LA, Brig. Gen. Vincent E. Buggs was commissioned as a Quartermaster second lieutenant from Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, GA, in 1990. He is a graduate of the Command General Staff Course, the Defense Strategy Course, and the Air War College. He currently holds a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in German, a master’s degree in global history, and a master’s degree in strategic studies. Buggs has served in various Logistics Corps positions, including company commander of 998th Quartermaster Company; battalion commander of 1st Battalion, 7th Warrior Training Brigade; deputy commander of 7th Warrior Training Brigade, and the Army Reserve equipment management branch chief. Additionally, Buggs has served as a CENTCOM joint planner, the 79th Theater Sustainment Command support operations chief, and as a CENTCOM liaison officer to AFRICOM and EUCOM. He has three combat deployments to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

BRIG. GEN. JOHNNY DAVIS

to Fort Campbell to command the 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry. He served as director of the Army Wounded Warrior Program, followed by command of the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Fort Myer. After command, Davis served as the executive officer to the UNC/CFC/US Forces Korea commanding general and DCG-O of the 25th Infantry Division. Davis recently served as the joint modernization commander—Fort Bliss, TX.

BRIG. GEN. A ARON R. DEAN, II The Adjutant General District of Columbia National Guard

Brig. Gen. Aaron R. Dean, II, is the adjutant general, District of Columbia National Guard. Before that, he was commanding general of the Multi-Agency Augmentation Command. He also served as the acting land component commander responsible for the strategic leadership and operational employment of units assigned and attached to the District of Columbia Army National Guard (DCARNG). He was the District of Columbia Joint Task Force commander for domestic operations. He ensured the Joint Task Force effectively responded to federal and district missions to support civil authorities in executing their allhazards plans. Dean received his commission from the Army Reserve Officer Training Program at Washington State University. Commissioned as a military police officer, Dean has commanded a company, battalion, and brigade elements and has provided operational planning and leadership for 12 national special security events. In his endeavors as a battalion commander in Operation Iraqi Freedom, he provided advisory assistance to the Baghdad chief of police.

Chief of Staff U.S. Army Futures Command

BRIG. GEN. MICHAEL DILLARD

Brig. Gen. Johnny K. Davis is currently the Army Futures Command chief of staff and proud father of six daughters. He has served in numerous command and staff assignments as an infantry officer, starting as a 24th Infantry Division Bradley platoon leader. He then served in the 82nd Airborne Division and the Old Guard as a company commander and aide-de-camp. Davis was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division as a battalion and brigade operations officer as a field grade. He then served as the aide to the Joint Chiefs of Staff’s vice chairman before returning

Brig. Gen. Michael Dillard, commanding general of the 78th Training Division (Operations), is responsible for planning and executing challenging, realistic exercises that train and assess active reserve and guard units for deployment throughout the world. Before that, he served as the commanding general of the 310th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) of 10,000 soldiers across 10 states; he also supported the 3rd Corps in this capacity. Dillard began his career

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Commanding General of the 78th Training Division

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military in the Army in 1981 as a private. He then received his commission in 1983 from the University of Richmond as a field artillery officer. His prior assignments include deputy commander, 451st Expeditionary Sustainment Command; brigade commander, 97th Training Brigade (Intermediate Level Education), 80th Training Command (Total Army School System); brigade commander, 2nd Brigade (PD), 104th Training Division (Leader Training); and group commander, 2nd Battle Command Training Group. He also served as a battalion commander, 687th Quartermaster Battalion, Kuwait Combined Forces Land Coalition Component, Kuwait, and a company commander for Charlie Company, 3/318th Infantry Battalion, 4th Brigade, 80th Training Division, during Operation Desert Storm. He earned his Master of Business Administration from the Keller Graduate School of Management and a Master of Strategic Studies from the Army War College.

BRIG. GEN. ROBERT EDMONSON Deputy Chief of Staff, G-6, Forces Command

Brig. Gen. Robert Edmonson assumed his position as the deputy chief of staff, G-6, Forces Command in 2018. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant from Frostburg State University. Edmonson began his career in 1991 as an infantry officer, where he served as a rifle platoon leader in the 101st Airborne Division (AASLT). In 1993, he was transferred to the Signal Corps and reassigned to the 101st, where he served as a Signal platoon leader and assistant S-3 in the 501st Signal Battalion. As a captain, he was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, NC, where he served as an infantry brigade signal officer, division radio officer, and alpha company commander, 82nd Signal Battalion. In 2000, he was selected to serve as a member of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Internship Program, Joint Staff, J-6, and the Army Staff, CIO/G-6. As a major, he was reassigned to the 82nd Airborne Division. He served again as an infantry brigade signal officer and deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. From 2004 to 2006, he served as the deputy G-6, 82nd Airborne Division and battalion executive officer, 82nd Signal Battalion.

BRIG. GEN. OMUSO D. GEORGE Director of Resource Management, G8 Installation Management Command (IMCOM)

Brig. Gen. Omuso George oversees all financial management of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command, leading the Army’s effort to provide worldclass installations and services supporting soldier

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and family readiness, mobilization force generation, and Army power projection platforms worldwide. With an $11 billion-plus appropriated funds annual operating budget portfolio that supports over 75 Army installations worldwide, he is the primary advisor on resource management matters. Previously, George served as the director of operations and support in the Army Budget Office, where he was responsible for budget formulation, presentation, and management of the Army’s operations and maintenance, military personnel, and Army Working Capital Fund appropriations, over $106 billion for the fiscal year 2019. He served as the executive officer to the assistant secretary of the Army (financial management and comptroller) from July 2016 to July 2017. Before that, George served as the assistant chief of staff, G-8, for III Corps, Fort Hood, TX, including a deployment with the III Corps Headquarters as the CJ8 director (chief financial officer) in support of Combined Joint Task Force, Operation Inherent Resolve in Kuwait and Iraq from September 2015 to June 2016.

BRIG. GEN. UR AL GLANVILLE

Chief Judge, United States Army Court of Criminal Appeals U.S. Army Legal Services Agency

Brig. Gen. Ural Glanville has served as the chief judge, United States Army Legal Services Agency, since 2013. Before being selected chief judge, U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals, he was the commanding general of the NATO Rule of Law Support Mission/Rule of Law Field Force—Afghanistan. Throughout his military career, Glanville has served in several key positions, including senior legal opinions officer, chief of operational and civil law for the 2125th Garrison Support Unit (XVIII Airborne Corps), command judge advocate for the 359th Signal Brigade, and staff judge advocate for the 335th Signal Command before his deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. As a civilian, Glanville became a superior court judge in Fulton County, GA’s busiest trial court of general jurisdiction. Glanville’s duties include the trial of cases involving felony offenses, equity, and issues regarding the land title. Born in Columbus, OH, he was commissioned in 1984, beginning his 31 years of military service. Glanville is a highly decorated general officer whose military education includes an M.A. in strategic studies from the Army War College, a J.D. from the University of Georgia

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T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military (U.G.A.), a B.A. in history from U.G.A., and an A.A. from Brevard College.

BRIG. GEN. GAVIN LAWRENCE

CHAPLAIN (BRIG. GEN.) WILLIAM (BILL) GREEN, JR.

Brig. Gen. Gavin Lawrence assumed command of the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support on June 25, 2019. Under his leadership, DLA Troop Support annually provides more than $17 billion worth of food, clothing and textiles, construction and equipment, pharmaceuticals, medical supplies, and equipment, as well as industrial repair parts to America’s warfighters and other valued customers worldwide. To accomplish this mission, Lawrence oversees a global workforce of approximately 2,900 civilian and military personnel. Lawrence graduated from the United States Military Academy (USMA) in 1995 and, upon graduation, was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps. Lawrence most recently completed a fellowship with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (M.I.T.) Seminar XXI Program in April 2019. His military education includes the Quartermaster Basic Course, Combined Logistics Captains’ Career Course, U.S. Naval College of Command and Staff, and the U.S. Army War College Advanced Strategic Arts Program. Lawrence’s command assignments include the Headquarters and Distribution Company for 225th Forward Support Battalion, Division Support Command, 25th Infantry Division (Light) at Schofield Barracks, HI; the 801st Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); and the 25th I.D. Sustainment Brigade, 25th Infantry Division.

U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Chaplains

Chaplain (Brig. Gen.) William Green became the Army’s 26th deputy chief of chaplains in August 2019. As the deputy chief of chaplains, Green supports chaplains’ chief in leading the Army Chaplain Corps to provide religious support to soldiers, families, and civilians of the U.S. Army. Green is a native of Savannah, GA, and grew up on Hilton Head Island, SC. He is a 1989 distinguished military graduate of Savannah State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. In 1992, he graduated from Emory University in Decatur, GA, with a Master of Divinity degree from Candler School of Theology. He is endorsed by the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc., and became an Army chaplain in 1994. Green has been married to the former Robin McDowell for 35 years. Together they have three adult children—Rinard, Christian, and Haley—and nine grandchildren.

BRIG. GEN. ISA AC JOHNSON

Assistant Chief of Staff C-9 Republic of Korea-United States Combined Forces Command (C.F.C.)

Brig. Gen. Isaac Johnson is a third-generation Army and a 1992 graduate of Mississippi State University Army ROTC Program. He holds an executive education certification from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a J.D. from Thurgood Marshall School of Law, an M.B.A. from Jackson State University, a B.B.A. from Mississippi State University, and an M.A. in strategic studies from the Army War College. As C-9 Combined Forces Command (C.F.C.), he advises the C.F.C. commander on civilmilitary operations and civil affairs. Previously, he served as chief of staff for the 350th Civil Affairs Command and commander of the 360th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne). Johnson has several joint assignments, overseas tours, and deployments to the Horn of Africa and Afghanistan. As an Army Reservist, in his civilian capacity, he is a licensed Texas attorney and executive with USAA Chief Legal Office in San Antonio, TX.

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Commander, Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support Defense Logistics Agency

BRIG. GEN. JONATHAN MCCOLUMN Chief of Sustainment U.S. Army Central Command

Brig. Gen. Jonathan McColumn serves as the chief of sustainment, U.S. Army Central Command. Also, he serves as the senior proponent advisor (S.P.A.) for acquisition, U.S. Army Reserve. Recognized as a distinguished military student and recipient of the General George C. Marshall award, he graduated and was commissioned from Georgia Military College as a second lieutenant. Upon graduating from Georgia College and State University with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, he entered the U.S. Army. During his 31 years of service, he has served in multiple positions as a logistician and in the Acquisition Corps (contracting). McColumn’s USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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U.S. ARMY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military military education includes the Quartermaster Officer Basic Course, Combined Logistics Officer Advanced Course, Combined Arms Services and Staff School, Logistics Executive Development Course, the Army War College, George Washington University, Elliott School of International Affairs—Senior Manager Course in National Security, Senior Acquisition Management Course, and Program for Executives in Logistics and Technology. He is a member of the Army Acquisition Corps, Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA), level 3 certified in contracting/procurement, and level 1 certified in program management. He has completed master’s degrees in business administration, education, and strategic studies. Also, he attended the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

BRIG. GEN. JAMES M. SMITH Chief of Transportation

Brig. Gen. James S. Moore has served as the chief of staff, Installation Management Command (IMCOM) since July 2019. Moore has commanded at all levels and has held numerous staff positions throughout his career. He previously served as commanding general, 593rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA. Moore is a native of Philadelphia, PA, and a distinguished military graduate of Virginia State University. He graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in business information systems in 1989. Later, he earned a master’s degree in public administration from Troy State University and a master’s degree in joint campaign planning and strategy. His military education includes the Joint Advanced Warfighting School (JAWS) at the Joint Forces Staff College in Norfolk, VA; the Command and General Staff College (CGSC); and the Quartermaster Officers Basic and Advanced courses.

Brig. Gen. James M. Smith relinquished command of the 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command in a ceremony held on June 2. Smith became the 31st chief of transportation upon a social mediabroadcasted ceremony performed June 15 in Wiley Hall auditorium. Smith takes command of the 78-year-old organization that has more than 64,000 soldiers spread worldwide. It is among the Army’s largest branches with a mission of moving personnel and material by truck, rail, sea, and air. He also will serve as the T-School commandant, responsible for training and delivering professional transporters and multifunctional sustainers. Smith received his commission in 1992 from Christopher Newport University in Newport News, VA, with a B.S. in business administration (concentration in accounting). He also holds two master’s degrees: an M.B.A. degree from Webster University and an M.S. in logistics management from Florida Institute of Technology. Smith’s assignments include commands at both the brigade and battalion levels and deployments to both Kuwait and Iraq.

BRIG. GEN. MARK QUANDER

BRIG. GEN. MICHAEL J. TALLEY

Brig. Gen. Mark C. Quander became the 98th commandant of the U.S. Army Engineer School on July 2, 2019. He commissioned as a Corps of Engineer officer from the United States Military Academy in 1995. Throughout his career, Quander has served in command and staff positions in the United States, the Republic of Korea, the Middle East,

Brig. Gen. Michael J. Talley is the commanding general of the United States Army Medical Research and Development Command and Fort Detrick. He served in the enlisted ranks from 1983–1989, graduated with honors from the University of Texas at El Paso, and commissioned as a distinguished

BRIG. GEN. JAMES MOORE

Chief of Staff, Installation Management Command (IMCOM)

Commandant U.S. Army Engineer School

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and Central Asia. He has also served in the Pentagon within both the Joint Staff and the Army Staff. Most recently, Quander served as commander of the Transatlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with a construction program exceeding $5 billion. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from the United States Military Academy. He has also earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Missouri for Science and Technology in engineering management and a master’s degree from Georgetown University in public policy.

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Commanding General U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command and Fort Detrick, MD

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U.S. ARMY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military military graduate in 1991. He was previously assigned as the Army Forces command surgeon and has commanded at every level from company through brigade. He served two Operation Iraqi Freedom combat tours and deployment to Saudi Arabia. He has also held key leadership positions at both combat training centers, Army Special Operations Command, DLA, and the surgeon general’s office. Talley is a graduate of the Army Command & General Staff College, Advanced Military Studies Program, and the Army War College. He holds two Master of Military Arts & Sciences degrees, a Master of Strategic Studies, and a Master of Health Services Management.

BRIG. GEN. FLETCHER WASHINGTON Deputy J-3 US AFRICOM

U.S. ARMY

DID YOU KNOW? 1. The Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Space Force, and Coast Guard are the armed forces of the United States. (Source: U.S. Department of Defense)

2. The Army is the largest and oldest service in the U.S. military. (Source: U.S. Department of Defense)

Brig. Gen. Fletcher Washington has served as deputy J-3 at USAFRICOM since August. His previous general officer positions include assistant J-5 at USPACOM and deputy commanding general, 80th Training Command. He served four years enlisted as a combat engineer before graduating cum laude from Norfolk State University in 1992 as a distinguished military graduate in transportation. He also graduated from Florida Tech in 2000 and National Defense University with a second master’s degree in 2010. He has served as a platoon leader and detachment commander in Mannheim, Frankfurt, and Hanau, Germany; battalion operations and company commander at Fort Story, VA; combat developer at Fort Lee, VA; operations chief in Kuwait; brigade operations at Fort Buchanan, PR and Baghdad, Iraq; force management division chief in Arlington, VA; battalion commander at Fort Shafter, HI; congressional operations division chief and force management chief of staff in the Pentagon; brigade commander in El Paso, TX; garrison commander in Kandahar, Afghanistan; and mission support element commander at Fort Sam Houston, TX.

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3. The first Army Chief of Staff was Lt. Gen. Samuel Young (“Historical Sources Branch,” U.S. Army)

4. Until WWII, most U.S. presidents had served in the Army. Since then, most have served in the Navy. (“List of Presidents who were Veterans,” Veterans Health Administration)

5. In 2020 the Army will have a strength of 1,005,500 and by 2024 will grow to 1,016,500. (Source: “U.S. Military Forces in FY 2020: Army,” Center for Strategic & International Studies)

6. The Army signed more than 68,000 new active-duty soldiers, exceeding its 2019 recruiting mission. (Source: “U.S. Army achieves recruiting goals,” Army Public Affairs)

7. U.S. Army Recruiting Command developed 44 virtual recruiting stations that focus on reaching eligible individuals using social media and texting. (Source: “U.S. Army achieves recruiting goals,” Army Public Affairs)

8. Two outreach teams, the Army Esports Team, and the Warrior Fitness Team were established in 2020. (Source: “U.S. Army achieves recruiting goals,” Army Public Affairs)

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ABOUT THE UNITED STATES ARMY HERE •

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A DV E RTO R I A L

Army Chaplain Corps Honors

First African-American Female Colonel by Sean Kimmons, Army News Service

As the Army’s first AfricanAmerican female chaplain to pin on colonel rank, Monica Lawson had a message to the naysayers during her promotion ceremony Sept. 2, 2020. Even after several leadership roles in her Army career, as well as earning two master’s degrees and being an ordained elder in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, some may think her promotion was only affirmative action. Monica, who serves as the chief of recruiting for the Army chaplaincy, sought to nip any of those thoughts in the bud. “What it was, it was an affirming action,” she said, as a small crowd gathered for the ceremony cheered her on. “Because God affirmed me so that I could be here. When God calls you, he

will open doors for you that no man can close,” she added. “Not only did God open the door, but he provided a seat for me at the table.”

Honoring legacy While the ceremony was for Lawson, she made it a point to speak of those who came before her.

With Lawson’s assistance, Maj. Gen. Thomas L. Solhjem, the Army chief of chaplains, hopes to bring more women to that table.

She recognized five different chaplains who helped pave the way for her and others: Capt. Ella Gibson Hobart, the first woman to serve as a military chaplain, and Henry McNeal Turner, the first African-American chaplain in the Army, who both served in the late 1800s. Col. Louis Augustus Carter, the first African-American chaplain to be promoted to colonel in 1936. Maj. Alice Henderson, the first woman of any race to serve as an Army chaplain in 1974, followed years later by Col. Janet Horton, the first female Army chaplain to be promoted to colonel.

As women only make up about 5 percent of the active-duty Army Chaplain Corps, Solhjem said the newest colonel has been charged with increasing its recruiting mission for female candidates. “We need healers in our Army,” he said. “We need practitioners of the faith in our Army. We need people who have right relationship with God to bring people in direct relationship with God in our Army. They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors.”

Col. Monica Lawson receives her colonel rank during a promotion ceremony Sept. 2, 2020. (Courtesy photo )

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“You’ve seen too many times when people write history, we tend to leave out the history of those who made it possible for us to achieve our historic

Maj. Gen. Thomas L. Solhjem, the Army chief of chaplains, right, speaks during Col. Monica Lawson’s promotion ceremony. (Courtesy photo)

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Col. Monica Lawson, who serves as the chief of recruiting for the Army chaplaincy, speaks during her promotion ceremony Sept. 2, 2020. Lawson became the Army’s first African-American female chaplain to be promoted to colonel.

(Courtesy photo)

moments,” Lawson said. “I wanted to allow the world to see that you can make history and still embrace the history of other people.” Acknowledging the accomplishments of others, regardless of race, religion, or gender, does not diminish your own accomplishments, she added. As a woman of color, she said she understands what it feels like when people try to discount her work. “I know what it is like to have your contributions for the greater good not count and make you feel like it doesn’t matter,” she said. “But I am here to tell you that they do matter. My belief and my life, and what I do in this world, matters.”

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She went to thank those in the Chaplain Corps who let her be herself. “You never asked me to tone it down,” she said. “You always allowed me to just be me.” To her, the promotion was not a tick in a box, but part of the “heart-changing dialogue” currently underway across the nation to end racism. “I know and I understand there were and are still women of color who served before me and are serving today,” she said. “And I acknowledge their sacrifice, their hard work, and their tears.” Before he administered the Oath of Commissioned Officers to Lawson, Solhjem made it clear that she was not being recognized due to her race or

gender, but because she exhibited to a board that she has the potential to lead. The general then asked her not to let the historic accomplishment define her. “You make the definition of what that means,” he said. “Because what we don’t need, Monica, is someone with a singular lane. We need somebody with a big canopy, arms wide open—willing to sacrifice, willing to selflessly serve others and to empower those who are beneath you to succeed. “That’s what comes with the rank of that eagle.”

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U.S. AIR FORCE

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

GEN. CHARLES Q. BROWN, JR. Chief of Staff U.S. Air Force

Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. is the chief of staff of the Air Force. As chief, he serves as the senior uniformed Air Force officer responsible for the organization, training, and equipping of 685,000 active-duty, Guard, Reserve, and civilian forces serving in the United States and overseas. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the general and other service chiefs function as military advisers to the secretary of Defense, National Security Council, and the president. Brown was commissioned in 1984 as a distinguished graduate of the ROTC program at Texas Tech University. He has served in various positions at the squadron and wing levels, including an assignment to the U.S. Air Force Weapons School as an F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor. His special staff tours include aide-de-camp to the chief of staff of the Air Force; director, secretary of the Air Force and chief of staff Executive Action Group; and deputy commander, U.S. Central Command. He also served as a national defense fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA. Brown has commanded a fighter squadron, the U.S. Air Force Weapons School, two fighter wings, and U.S. Air Forces Central Command. Before serving as the Air Force chief of staff, Brown was the commander of Pacific Air Forces, air component commander for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. Brown is a command pilot with more than 2,900 flying hours, including 130 combat hours.

LT. GEN. RICHARD M. CLARK

Superintendent at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO

Lt. Gen. Richard M. Clark is the superintendent, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO. He directs a four-year regimen of military training, academics, athletic, and character development programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Air Force or the United States Space Force. Clark graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1986. His 42

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commands include the 34th Bomb Squadron, Ellsworth Air Force Base, SD; 12th Flying Training Wing, Randolph Air Force Base, TX; Eighth Air Force, Barksdale Air Force Base, LA, and joint functional component commander for Global Strike, Offutt Air Force Base, NE. He has also served as a White House fellow in Washington, D.C., the commandant of cadets, U.S. Air Force Academy, senior defense official/defense attaché, Cairo, Egypt, and as the commander, Third Air Force, Ramstein Air Base, Germany. Before his current assignment, Clark served as the deputy chief of staff for strategic deterrence and nuclear integration, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, VA.

LT. GEN. ANTHONY J. COTTON

Deputy Commander, Air Force Global Strike Command and Deputy Commander, Air Forces Strategic-Air U.S. Strategic Command, Barksdale Air Force Base, LA

Lt. Gen. Anthony Cotton is the deputy commander, Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC), deputy commander, Air Forces Strategic— Air, U.S. Strategic Command, Barksdale Air Force Base, LA. Cotton entered the Air Force through the ROTC program in 1986, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. He has commanded at the squadron, group, and wing levels. He served as the deputy director of the secretary and chief of staff of the Air Force Executive Action Group, as the senior military assistant to the undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence, and deputy director of the National Reconnaissance Office. He was also the vice commander and commander of the 341st Missile Wing, Malmstrom Air Force Base, MT, and the 45th Space Wing and director of the Eastern Range, Patrick Air Force Base, FL. Before his current assignment, Cotton served as the commander and president, Air University, Air Education and Training Command, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL.

LT. GEN. BRIAN S. ROBINSON Deputy Commander, Air Mobility Command Scott Air Force Base, IL

Lt. Gen. Brian S. Robinson is deputy commander, Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base, IL. Before assuming his current role, Robinson served as the director of operations, Headquarters, U.S. www.blackengineer.com


U.S. AIR FORCE

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military Transportation Command, where he was responsible for directing the all-domain command and control and deployment of forces and distributing supplies and equipment for humanitarian, peacetime, and wartime operations for the Department of Defense, including joint training and exercises. Robinson has held staff assignments at Joint Staff, Headquarters Air Force Staff, Air Mobility Command, and the U.S. Air Forces Central 609th Combined Air Operations Center. He has commanded at the squadron, wing, operational, and global 618th A.O.C. levels. Robinson is a native of Philadelphia, PA, where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in computer science from Philadelphia University in 1987. He received his commission from Air Force Officer Training School in 1987. He attended undergraduate pilot training, later serving as a T-38B first assignment instructor pilot before moving on to a series of operational assignments in the C-130 E/H/J and the C-17A, which represent the full range of tactical and strategic airlift and aerial delivery.

MA J. GEN. STACEY T. HAWKINS

Director of Logistics, Civil Engineering, Force Protection, and Nuclear Integration Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command

Maj. Gen. Stacey T. Hawkins is the director of logistics, civil engineering, force protection, nuclear integration, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. He directs policy and procedures for field and depot-level aircraft and commodities maintenance, nuclear weapon systems sustainment, software engineering, conventional munitions, logistics plans, transportation, supply chain operations and management, civil engineering, force protection, and logistics information technology activities. He is the lead command integrator for lifecycle sustainment, product support, and acquisition logistics across the Air Force weapon systems portfolio. Hawkins received his commission from the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado, in 1991. He has commanded at the squadron, expeditionary group, air base wing (installation), and air logistics complex levels. He also led deployed combat logistics operations throughout Southwest Asia, the Horn of Africa, and the Korean Peninsula. Hawkins served as a White House fellow, an aircraft maintenance officer for the U.S. Air Force “Thunderbirds,” and a U.S. Air Force honor guard ceremonial guardsman. His staff assignments include service at the Pentagon, Headquarters Air Mobility Command, and the White House as a special advisor for defense policy and intelligence programs to the vice president. Before his current assignment, Hawkins was

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commander, Ogden Air Logistics Complex, Hill Air Force Base, UT.

MA J. GEN. R ANDALL REED Commander, Third Air Force Ramstein Air Base, Germany

Maj. Gen. Randall Reed is commander, Third Air Force, Ramstein Air Base, Germany. Third Air Force issues directives to subordinate commands and acts on behalf of the U.S. Air Forces in Europe— Air Forces Africa commander as directed. Third, Air Force exercises delegated authority over assigned forces that include personnel management, General Courts-Martial Convening Authority, and advising subordinate commands on requirements, programs, and budget. Third Air Force also works with its subordinate commands to ensure implementation and compliance with relevant policies and directives of the Department of Defense, Headquarters Air Force, and USAFE—AFAFRICA. Additionally, Third Air Force facilitates proper coordination between its subordinate commands and USAFE—AFAFRICA, U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command, DOD agencies, and other field activities. Reed graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1989. He commanded a wing, two expeditionary operations groups, and a flying training squadron. Additionally, he held various joint, headquarters, and base-level positions, including strategic mobility assignments, joint logistics, and a diplomatic post spanning Operation Desert Storm to Operation Inherent Resolve. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Light Fighter Air Assault School and is a command pilot with more than 3,500 hours.

BRIG. GEN. KENYON K. BELL

Commander, 82nd Training Wing and Installation Commander Sheppard Air Force Base, TX

Brig. Gen. Kenyon K. Bell is commander, 82nd Training Wing and installation commander, Sheppard Air Force Base, TX. He is responsible for the training of more than 60,000 officers and enlisted Air Force, Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and international students annually at Sheppard Air Force Base and more than 60 geographically separated

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U.S. AIR FORCE

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military units worldwide. The general was born in Columbia, SC, and received his commission from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1995. He has commanded units stateside and overseas at the squadron, group, and wing levels to include serving as the first commander of the 451st Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Bell has served tours as an airbase wing commander, a staff officer at Headquarters Air Force, and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs; an aide-de-camp for the commander, United States Forces Japan and Fifth Air Force; and in numerous leadership positions within the Air Force enterprise. Before his current assignment, he served as the commander, 72nd Air Base Wing and installation commander at Tinker Air Force Base, OK.

BRIG. GEN. ROY W. COLLINS

Director of Security Forces, Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection U.S. Air Force, Arlington, VA

Brig. Gen. Roy W. Collins is director of security forces, deputy chief of staff for logistics, engineering, and force protection, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force, Arlington, VA. He is the focal point for ensuring Air Force nuclear assets’ physical security and planning and programming for more than 38,000 active-duty and Reserve component security forces at locations worldwide. He provides policy and oversight for protecting Air Force resources from terrorism, criminal acts, sabotage, and acts of war. He ensures security forces are trained, equipped, and ready to support contingency and exercise plans. Collins joined the Air Force in May 1995 as a graduate from the United States Air Force Academy. He served on the Air Mobility Command staff as chief, Antiterrorism and Force Protection Branch, and as the Air Combat Command’s director, Commander’s Action Group. Additionally, he was the deputy director, United States Air Forces Central Command, Air Force Forces Force Protection, Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Before his current assignment, Collins was the chief, Strategic Planning Integration Division, Headquarters the United States Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, VA.

BRIG. GEN. TROY E. DUNN

Director of Military Force Management Policy, Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower, Personnel, and Services Headquarters, U.S. Air Force

Brig. Gen. Troy Dunn is the director of military force management policy, deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel, and services, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force, at the Pentagon in Arlington, VA. The directorate 44

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is responsible for establishing military force management policies for more than 500,000 Total Force military personnel. These policies guide the accession, assignment, evaluation, skills analysis and management, promotion, readiness, retraining, retention, separation, and retirement of the Air Force’s human capital. The office also oversees Total Force contingency, mobilization, training, and rated force management policy. Dunn was commissioned from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1993 with a degree in political science. He has held several leadership, staff, and command positions at the base, major command, Air Staff, and Joint Staff levels. Dunn served as an aidede-camp to the commanders of the U.S. Transportation Command and Air Mobility Command. He was selected as a congressional fellow in the office of Sen. Trent Lott and as a distinguished member of the national security team in the office of the U.S. Senate minority whip. His command tours include squadron, group, and the airbase wing at the Air Force Academy.

BRIG. GEN. RONALD E. JOLLY, SR.

Director of Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa, Ramstein Air Base, Germany

Brig. Gen. Ronald E. Jolly, Sr. is the director of logistics, engineering and force protection, Headquarters, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa, Ramstein Air Base, Germany. As a director, he provides leadership, management, and integration of aircraft and munitions maintenance, civil engineers, contingency contracting, security forces, transportation and materiel management, storage, and distribution. Additionally, he oversees force protection, logistics, and base operating support for over 200 aircraft and 63,000 military members and dependents at 10 wings and 83 geographically separated units. Jolly is a fully qualified aircraft maintenance officer and has served tours as an airbase wing commander, air logistics complex deputy commander for maintenance, chief of staff for Headquarters, U.S. Central Command Directorate of Logistics and Engineering, maintenance group commander, military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force, staff officer at the Headquarters Air Force level, and numerous wing-level maintenance and logistics positions. He has commanded aircraft maintenance organizations at both the group and squadron levels,

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U.S. AIR FORCE

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military supporting flying operations for F-15C/D Eagle, F-15/E Strike Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon, and F-5E/F aircraft and has deployed on multiple occasions in support of operations Southern Watch, Northern Watch, Enduring Freedom, and Iraqi Freedom.

BRIG. GEN. RODNEY D. LEWIS

Deputy Director, Operations Team One, National Joint Operations and Intelligence Center

Brig. Gen. Rodney D. Lewis is the deputy director for operations, Operations Team One, National Joint Operations and Intelligence Center, the Pentagon, Arlington, VA. Lewis leads a Joint Staff team conducting worldwide monitoring, crisis action, strategic nuclear, and current operational watch functions. He earned his commission in 1991 upon graduation from the United States Air Force Academy. He was selected as the General John Hester Award winner for displaying the highest degree of loyalty, integrity, and courage in his graduating class. Before his current position, Lewis served as director, secretary of the Air Force and chief of staff of the Air Force Executive Action Group, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, the Pentagon. A command pilot with more than 3,600 flying hours, principally in the C-17A Globemaster III, Lewis served in operations from Bosnia to Iraq. As a C-17A instructor pilot, he commanded combat-ready aircrews in various mission scenarios. Lewis is also a systems acquisition certified level 2 in program management and test and evaluation. He is a certified systems acquisition level 1 in planning, research, development, and engineering.

BRIG. GEN. (S) BR ANDON PARKER Director, Air Force Colonel Management Office

Col. Brandon D. Parker has been nominated for appointment to the rank of brigadier general. Currently, he leads the team coordinating personnel actions for over 4,000 active-duty colonels and colonel-selects in the Manpower and Personnel office. Col. Parker advises the Chief of Staff, Secretary of the Air Force, and Air Force senior leaders on assignments, retirements, and professional development opportunities. A 1996 graduate of the Air Force Academy, Parker is also a command pilot with more than 2,800 hours in bomber aircraft and over 380 combat hours. Prior, he commanded the 7th Bomb www.blackengineer.com

Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, TX. He has served as vice commander of the 2nd Bomb Wing, Barksdale Air Force Base, LA, and commanded the 23rd Bomb Squadron, Minot Air Force Base, ND. His staff assignments include duty as an executive officer to the Chief of Staff of the Air Force and as a joint planning officer at Headquarters, U.S. Strategic Command, Plans and Policy Directorate, Offutt Air Force Base, NE. Colonel Parker deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He has served as a National Defense Fellow and is a graduate of the School of Advanced Air & Space Studies, and the Air Command and Staff College.

BRIG. GEN. ADRIAN L . SPAIN

Director of Plans, Programs, and Analyses United States Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa, Ramstein Air Base, Germany

Brig. Gen. Adrian Spain directs the command’s resource capability processes, doctrine review, strategy initiatives, politicalmilitary affairs program, and overseeing command analyses and lessons learned. He is also responsible for implementing the U.S. and NATO strategy, ensuring arms control treaty obligations are met. Before his current position, Brig. Gen. Spain was the commander, 380th Air Expeditionary Wing, Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates. Brig. Gen. Spain entered the Air Force in 1994 through the ROTC program, graduating from Villanova University with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. He is a command pilot with more than 2,300 hours in multiple aircraft. As the weapons officer for the 58th Fighter Squadron, he led the first Operation Noble Eagle deployment to the National Capital Region. He also led the first missions under wartime rules of engagement while deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. As commandant of the Air Force Weapons School, he led the post-sequester syllabus rewrite and built the next generation of leaders and tactical experts covering 18 squadrons and six major commands and across all Air Force warfighting domains. As the 53rd Wing Commander, he led more than 70 units across the continental United States devoted to Operational Test and Evaluation for the Air Force.

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U.S. SPACE FORCE

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

BRIG. GEN. DAVID N. MILLER, JR.

Senior military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force, Arlington, VA

Brig. Gen. David N. Miller Jr. is the senior military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force, Arlington, VA. His prior assignment was the director of plans, programs and financial management, Headquarters, United States Space Force, Peterson Air Force Base, CO. Among his many accomplishments in that position he was the lead to stand up United States Space Command. His visionary leadership were instrumental in driving the structural, cultural, and organizational foundation needed to evolve into America’s newest service, the United States Space Force, by securing $3 billion supporting 36,000 space professionals and airmen for mission-essential space operations. Miller is a command space operator with operational certifications in multiple weapon systems. He commissioned into the Air Force in 1993 through ROTC and is a graduate of Lafayette College in Easton, PA. He obtained his Master of Business Administration, with honors, at Regis University, Denver, CO. During his illustrious career he has commanded at the squadron, group, and wing level. He has also held a range of operational leadership and staff positions. Miller also served as a senior advisor to the prime minister’s office and the Ministry of Interior, U.S. Embassy, Baghdad Iraq in 2016.

U.S. SPACE FORCE

DID YOU KNOW? 1. The U.S. Space Force (USSF) is a new branch of the Armed Forces. It was established on Dec. 20, 2019. 2. The USSF was established within the Department of the Air Force, meaning the secretary of the Air Force has overall responsibility for the USSF, under the guidance and direction of the secretary of Defense. 3. Additionally, a four-star general known as the chief of space operations serves as the senior military member of the USSF. 4. The new U.S. Space Force will maintain and enhance the competitive edge of the Department of Defense (DOD) in space while adapting to new strategic challenges. 5. Spacelift operations at launch bases provide services, facilities, and range safety control for the conduct of the DOD, NASA, and commercial space launches. 6. Through the command and control of DOD satellites, satellite operators provide continuous global coverage and autonomous operations.

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7. Satellites provide essential in-theater secure communications, weather and navigational data for ground, air, and fleet operations, and threat warning. 8. Ground-based and space-based systems monitor ballistic missile launches to guard against a surprise missile attack on North America. (Source: U.S. Coast Guard )

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U.S. NAVY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

REAR ADM. STEPHEN BARNETT Commander Navy Region Northwest

Rear Adm. Stephen D. Barnett is a native of Columbia, TN. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Tennessee State University and a Master of Business Administration from Troy State University. He earned his commission at Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1991. At sea, Barnett reported to Patrol Squadron (VPV.P.) 46 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island as a naval flight officer. He served as the operations department admin officer on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and as a department head for VP-5 stationed at NAS Jacksonville. As the commanding officer of VP-47 stationed at Kaneohe, HI, he led the squadron on a simultaneous deployment to Japan and Iraq, executing more than 250 missions supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. His assignments ashore include serving as a detailer at the Bureau of Naval Personnel; naval flight officer instructor for VP-30, NAS Jacksonville; and assistant Joint Requirements Oversight Council secretariat on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Additional assignments include deputy executive assistant to the vice chief of naval operations, commanding officer of Naval Base Coronado, chief of staff for Commander Navy Region Southeast and commander Navy Installations Command, and as deputy commander Navy Installations Command in July 2019.

REAR ADM. DION D. ENGLISH

Director, Logistics, Fleet Supply and Ordnance, N4 U.S. Pacific Fleet

Rear Adm. Dion English is a native of Monroeville, AL, and of Slidell, LA. English attended the Navy’s BOOST program. He graduated from Louisiana State University with a bachelor’s degree and was commissioned through the NROTC program at Southern University in 1993. He earned an M.B.A. from Old Dominion University

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and a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. He attended the Executive Program in Strategy and Organization at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His afloat assignments include USS Scott (DDG 995), USNS San Diego (T-AFS 6), USS Barry (DDG52), and commanding officer, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Expeditionary Support Unit ONE. His shore assignments include ship force support officer, supervisor of shipbuilding, Newport News, VA; executive assistant to commander, Defense Supply Center, Columbus, OH; deputy logistics operations officer, Joint Task Force Civil Support (JTF-CS), Fort Monroe, VA; logistics readiness officer, Logistics Current Operations Division, commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet; director, supply corps detailing; commanding officer, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Sigonella, where the team received the Admiral Stan Arthur Award for 2018 Logistics Team of the Year; and deputy director, supply and distribution, J-44, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

REAR ADM. KENNETH EPPS

Deputy Chief of Staff for Fleet Ordnance and Supply/Fleet Supply Officer, N41 U.S. Fleet Forces Command

Rear Adm. Kenneth Epps is a 1990 graduate of Vanderbilt University. He holds a Master of Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was the Frank Hawkins Kenan Award for Excellence. He is a distinguished graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and completed executive programs in strategy and leadership at Stanford Graduate School of Business and University of Virginia Darden School. His operational assignments include tours on USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63), USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), and USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). His shore assignments include instructor and educational counselor, Navy Supply Corps School; aide and flag lieutenant to the commander, Naval Supply Systems Command and Chief of Supply Corps; readiness analyst and POM development assistant, office of the chief of naval operations (N80); action officer, Defense Logistics Agency (J-33); director, materiel budgets, Naval Inventory Control Point, Philadelphia, PA; assistant commander for financial management and comptroller, Naval Supply Systems Command; chief, Strategy and Readiness Division, Joint Staff (J-4); commanding officer, Fleet Logistics Center Pearl Harbor; assistant commander for operations and warfare engagement, Naval Supply Systems Command; and assistant professor, Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy.

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U.S. NAVY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military REAR ADM. JOHN FULLER

Deputy Director for Force Protection, J-8 Joint Staff

Rear Adm. John Fuller received his commission from the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) with a bachelor’s degree in political science. He earned a Master of Science in management from the Naval Post Graduate School and a Master of Arts in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. He is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar XXI fellow. Fuller’s sea tours include USS Vandegrift (FFG 48); USS Kauffman (FFG 59); Atlantic Fleet Propulsion Examining Board; Amphibious Force, U.S. 7th Fleet, USS Curtis Wilbur ( DDG 54); commanding officer, USS Mason (DDG 87); commander, Task Group—Iraqi Maritime; and deputy and commander, Destroyer Squadron 22. Ashore, his joint and staff billets include USNA 4th battalion officer; military assistant to the director, rapid fielding in the office of the secretary of Defense (AT&L); special assistant to the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)/Joint High-Speed Vessel Council chairman; Small Surface Combatant Task Force; and deputy forLCS, Surface Warfare Division. Flag assignments include commander, Navy Region Hawaii/commander, Naval Surface Group, Middle Pacific; commander, Carrier Strike Group 1; director of the strategy, policy, and plans (J-5), North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command; and currently as the Joint Staff J-8, deputy director for force protection.

REAR ADM. ALVIN HOLSEY Director Task Force One Navy

Rear Adm. Alvin Holsey became director, Task Force One Navy, in July. He previously commanded Carrier Strike Group One, embarked USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), and was the inaugural commander of the International Maritime Security Construct/Coalition Task Force SENTINEL. In his initial flag officer tour, he served as deputy director for operations, National Military Command Center, Joint Chiefs of Staff. He has served in a variety of training and operational squadrons and commanded Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL-37) and the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD

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8). Assignments to shore and staff billets have included operations officer on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, J-3, Joint Operations Directorate, European Command, and executive assistant to the Naval operations chief. Holsey was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program at Morehouse College in 1988, where he received a degree in computer science. He earned a Master of Science in management from Troy State University in 1995 and attended the Joint Forces Staff College in 2010.

REAR ADM. GARY MAYES Commander Navy Region Southeast

Rear Adm. Gary Mayes is a graduate of Purdue University. He was commissioned through Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1988 and designated a Naval aviator in 1989. He received a Master of Military Studies from the USMC Command and Staff College. Mayes is also a graduate of the Strategic Thinking Workshop, University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School, and the Leadership Decision Making Program from the Harvard Kennedy School Executive Education. At sea, he served as the executive officer and commanding officer of HSL-44. He participated in Haiti, South America, the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, the Adriatic Sea, and the Persian Gulf. Mayes served as the officer in charge of a combined East and West Coast HSL/HSM detachment conducting rescue and humanitarian relief missions in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His shore assignments include NAS Guantanamo Bay, Navy Office of Legislative Affairs; Naval aide to the vice president of the United States; administrative aide to the secretary of the Navy; commanding officer of Naval Base Coronado; deputy director, plans and programs for the commander, Navy Installations Command; executive assistant to the assistant secretary of the Navy for energy, installations, and environment; and commander, Navy Region Northwest.

REAR ADM. CEDRIC PRINGLE Commandant National War College

Rear Adm. Cedric Pringle graduated from the University of South Carolina and earned master’s degrees from the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College. At sea, he served on the USS Ranger (CV 61), USS Portland (LSD 37), and as executive officer on USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43). In July 2004, he assumed command of the USS Whidbey Island (LSD. 41). In February 2012, he took command of the USS Makin Island (LHD 8). Ashore, he served on the staffs of Navy Recruiting www.blackengineer.com


U.S. NAVY

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military Area 3, Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4 as chief staff officer; Amphibious Force U.S. 7th Fleet as deputy chief of staff for operations and plans (N-3/N-5); on the Joint Staff as the deputy chief of Forces Division in the Force Structure, Resources and Assessment Directorate (J-8); and as director, Navy Senate Liaison for the secretary of the Navy’s Office of Legislative Affairs. He also served as deputy director of Joint Interagency Task Force South, and as commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3, the Navy’s largest strike group. Pringle assumed command as the 31st commandant of National War College on Oct. 16, 2019. Pringle was also the recipient of the 2015 Navy’s Stars and Stripes Award.

REAR ADM. DARRYL WALKER Deputy Director, Operations, J-3 U.S. Cyber Command

Rear Adm. Darryl Walker enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1985 as an air traffic controller. He is a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in professional aeronautics. He received his commission in the United States Navy through the Aviation Officer Candidate School. Walker is a graduate of the U.S. Naval War College. His operational tours include in the S-3B Viking & EA-6B Prowler, VS-32 deployed onboard USS America (CV 66) and USS Enterprise (CVN 65), and executive officer and subsequent command of VAQ-139 deployed onboard USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). Walker also served as the deputy commodore and commodore of the Electronic Attack Wing U.S. Pacific Fleet flying the EA-18G Growler. Ashore tours include S-3B NATOPS evaluator at the commander, Sea Control Wing Atlantic; Viking community assignments officer at the commander, Naval Personnel Command; deputy director to PERS-43; NAE diversity director to the commander, Naval Air Forces; chief of Naval Operations Strategic Studies Group in Newport, RI; the chief of staff to the chief information officer; executive assistant to the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and executive assistant to the chief of Naval operations.

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REAR ADM. LARRY WATKINS Director, Network Engagement Team U.S. Southern Command

Rear Adm. Larry Watkins is a native of Pittsburgh, PA. He is a 1990 graduate and was commissioned through the University of Missouri-Columbia NROTC with a degree in economics. Watkins is also a graduate of Webster University with a Master of Business Administration degree. He was assigned to USS Reid (FFG 30), deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm as a combat systems officer. He also served as commander, Amphibious Squadron Seven, and as a space support team member, Naval Space Command in Dahlgren, VA. Watkins transferred to the U.S. Navy Reserve in 1998 and completed staff and operational tours at U.S. Southern Command Intelligence Detachment 0174, Harbor Defense Command 207, Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 207, Maritime Expeditionary Squadron Ten, C5F Maritime Operations Center, Joint Transportation Reserve Unit, and C7F, Fort Worth, TX. Watkins’ command and mobilization assignments include commander, Navy Reserve (NR), USS Klakring (FFG 42), U. S. Fleet Forces Maritime Operations Center, U.S. European Command J-3. Mobilizations included officer in charge of the Theater Field Confinement Facility in support of Operation New Dawn, Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, and mobilized in support of Operations Noble Eagle and Enduring Freedom. He was also assigned to Joint Force Command, Norfolk, VA, as a plank owner establishing a new North Atlantic Treaty Organization command.

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U.S. MARINE CORPS

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

MA J. GEN. MICHAEL E. LANGLEY Deputy Commander U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

Maj. Gen. Langley is a native of Shreveport, LA, and graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington, majoring in information systems analysis. He entered the Platoon Leaders Course program in 1982 and was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1985. Previous command billets include guns platoon commander, Battery H, 3rd Battalion, 10th Marines; Headquarters Battery, 3rd Battalion, 10th Marines; Headquarters Battery, 5th Battalion, 11th Marines; Battery K, 3rd Battalion, 12th Marines; inspectorinstructor, Battery K, 4th Battalion, 14th Marines, Huntsville, AL; 3rd Battalion, 12th Marines, 12th Marine Regiment; 201st Regional Corps Advisory Command— Central, International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), Afghanistan; officer in charge (O.I.C.) Special Operations Training Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force (M.E.F.); assistant division commander, 3rd Marine Division; Regional Support Command—Southwest, ISAF, Afghanistan; Afghan National Army 215th Corps Advisor Team O.I.C., Regional Command Southwest, ISAF, Afghanistan; deputy commanding general, II MEF; and commanding general, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade. Previous staff assignments include division officer, Marine Corps Institute, Marine Barracks, 8th and I, Washington, D.C.; G-1B, 1st Marine Division; and liaison officer, 5th Battalion, 11th Marines.

BRIG. GEN. MELVIN G. CARTER Director of Intelligence Headquarters Marine Corps

Brig. Gen. Melvin G. Carter serves as director of intelligence, Marine Corps Headquarters. Before his current assignment, Carter served as the intelligence director for the Joint Special Operation Command (2018–2019). He is a distinguished graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta, GA, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in banking and finance. A native of York, PA, Carter enlisted 50

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in the Marine Corps in 1985. He served as a radio reconnaissance special intelligence communicator with 1st Radio Battalion before earning a second lieutenant commission. After graduating from The Basic School in 1993, Carter was awarded the Signals Intelligence/ Electronic Warfare Military Occupational Specialty before becoming a Marine Air-Ground Task Force intelligence officer. During his military career, Carter served in a variety of staff positions including the S-3A, 2nd Radio Battalion, II Surveillance, Reconnaissance, and Intelligence Group, II Marine Expeditionary Force, the S-2A, 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operation Capable), and the G-2 Plans, I Marine Expeditionary Force. Additional assignments include duty as an executive assistant for the associate director for military affairs, C.I.A. Carter’s principal command tours include commanding officer, 2nd Radio Battalion and commanding officer, Marine Corps intelligence activity.

BRIG. GEN. BRIAN W. CAVANAUGH Assistant Deputy Commandant for P&R (Programs)

Brig. Gen. Brian W. Cavanaugh was designated a naval aviator in 1992. From 1993–1997, Cavanaugh was assigned to HMH462 and completed Unit Deployment Program (U.D.P.) tours while serving with the 31st MEU (S.O.C.) shipboard operations throughout the Pacific. He served in the Maintenance Department and later as the logistics, intelligence, and operations officer. From 1998–2001, Cavanaugh was assigned to HMH-362, where he served as the aircraft maintenance officer (A.M.O.) and as the director for safety and standardization. After his tour with the Ugly Angels, Cavanaugh was assigned to HMX-1 in Quantico, VA. He served as the quality assurance officer and as the A.M.O. for the Greenside Maintenance Department. From 2006–2008, Cavanaugh commanded the Ugly Angels and deployed the squadron to Iraq to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. From the efforts during this deployment, his squadron was subsequently recognized as the Squadron of the Year, and three Marines under his command were recognized as the Marine Corps Aviator of the Year, Crew Chief of the Year, and Ordnance Man of the Year. From 2013–2015, Cavanaugh commanded MAG-36. As the 3rd MEB ACE, MAG36 deployed in direct support of Operation Damayan, typhoon relief in the Philippines. In 2015, elements from the M.A.G. deployed in direct support of Operation Sahayogi Haat, earthquake relief in Nepal. Under his command, MAG-36 conducted a myriad of bilateral exercises throughout the USPACOM area of operations. From 2016–2018, Cavanaugh served as the deputy commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific.

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U.S. MARINE CORPS

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military BRIG. GEN. DIMITRI HENRY Director, J-2 United States Central Command

Brig. Gen. Dimitri Henry enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1981 and attained the rank of staff sergeant. From May 1990–May 1993, Henry served at the 2nd Radio Battalion and deployed with 8th Marines (Desert Shield/Desert Storm), 26th MEU SOC (PROVIDE PROMISE), and was the officer in charge of the II MEF Communications Center. In June 1993, Henry attended Naval Postgraduate School, graduating with a Master of Science degree in systems engineering. From 2001–2004, Henry served as the commanding officer, Co H, Marine Cryptologic Support Battalion, San Antonio, TX. After command, Henry reported to I MEF G-2, where he participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom as the deputy G-2 and intelligence planner from August 2004–August 2006. From August 2006–September 2008, Henry commanded the 1st Radio Battalion and executed two deployments to Iraq to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. Henry took command of Marine Corps intelligence activity in Quantico, VA, in 2010. From 2012– 2015, Henry served at Central Command, Tampa, FL, as the J-2 Operations Division chief. From 2015–2016, Henry served as the executive officer to the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (D.I.A.). After D.I.A., Henry served as the chief of staff, Intelligence Department, HQMC.

BRIG. GEN. LORNA MAHLOCK

Director, C4/Chief Information Officer of the Marine Corps

Brig. Gen. Lorna Mahlock is the assistant deputy commandant for information, director, Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4) leading the chief information officer (CIO) office for the Marine Corps. Before her current assignment, she served as deputy director, Headquarters Marine Corps plans, policy, operations, commanding officer, Marine Air Control Group 18, Okinawa, and Japan. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, she immigrated to Brooklyn, NY, and enlisted in the Marine Corps. She was selected for the Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program, graduated from Marquette University, and was commissioned in December 1991. Designated as an air traffic control officer, she earned certifications as a Federal Aviation Administration www.blackengineer.com

(F.A.A.) tower local controller and a Marine aviation weapons and tactics instructor. She has commanded and led at various levels globally and in combat, including but not limited to: operations and executive officer— Iraqi Freedom 02; director—Marine Air Command and Control System Experimental; commanding officer— Iraqi Freedom 08; information management officer; J-3 land operations lead and division executive officer, Headquarters European Command; Marine Corps Office of Legislative Affairs and assistant chief of staff, G-6, deputy director of operations, plans, policy, and operations (PP&O), Headquarters, United States Marine Corps.

BRIG. GEN. CALVERT L . WORTH

Assistant Deputy Commander, 2nd Marine Division

Brig. Gen. Calvert L. Worth hails from St. Louis, MO, and is a 1989 graduate of the University of MissouriColumbia. He was commissioned via the U.S. Marine Corps Officer Candidates Course in 1991. Worth has served in a variety of billets in the operating forces to include: rifle platoon commander, weapons platoon commander and battalion adjutant in 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines; weapons company executive officer in 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines; assistant operations officer in 1st Battalion, 6th Marines; company commander, operations officer, and battalion executive officer in 1st Battalion, 5th Marines; commanding officer of 1st Battalion, 6th Marines; commanding officer of the 6th Marine Regiment and Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response—Africa. He returned to the 2nd Marine Division to serve as the assistant division commander of the 2nd Marine Division in July 2019 and most recently served as the commanding general for Task Force Southwest 20.1 in Afghanistan. Worth has participated in numerous named operations, including Operation Sea Signal (Cuba), Operation Joint Endeavor (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Operation Iraqi Freedom; Operation Enduring Freedom; Operation Freedom’s Sentinel; and Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan.

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U.S. COAST GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

REAR ADM. MICHAEL JOHNSTON

Assistant Commandant for Acquisition & Chief Acquisition Officer (Cao) (Cg-9) U.S. Coast Guard

Rear Adm. Michael J. Johnston serves as the U.S. Coast Guard’s assistant commandant for acquisition and chief acquisition officer (C.A.O.). As C.A.O., he directs efforts across Coast Guard acquisition programs, acquisition support, personnel, finance, contracting, and research and development activities. Before reporting as C.A.O., he served as executive program officer and director of acquisition programs, where his duties included oversight of Coast Guard acquisition programs for modernization of surface, air, command, and control, and logistics assets in support of the Coast Guard’s maritime missions. Johnston graduated from the Coast Guard Academy in 1990 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. After serving two tours afloat, he attended the Georgia Institute of Technology to complete a Master of Science degree in electrical engineering. He then served as a project manager and senior communications network engineer for the Vessel Traffic Systems and the Differential Global Positioning System. He was selected to serve as an aide to the Coast Guard’s command from 2000–2002. During this timeframe, his work helped restore the nation to normalcy following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He also helped to transition the Coast Guard into the newly formed Department of Homeland Security.

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U.S. COAST GUARD

DID YOU KNOW? 1. Alex Haley, who wrote the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Roots,” was the Coast Guard’s first journalist. 2. One of the lesser-known Coast Guard facts is that becoming a Coast Guard rescue swimmer is extremely hard. More than half the people who try out fail. 3. The Coast Guard refers to a vessel as a “cutter” if it’s over 65 feet long. 4. The Coast Guard launched its first Cutter, Vigilant, in 1791. 5. Until the Navy was re-established in 1797, the Coast Guard was the only naval service in the country. 6. In 1918, sisters Genevieve and Lucille Baker were the first uniformed women to serve in the Coast Guard. 7. The oldest Coast Guard boat station is in Sandy Hook, New Jersey. 8. In 1941, the Coast Guard hired its first civilian women to serve in secretarial and clerical positions. 9. In 1967, the Coast Guard icebreaker Eastwind became the first cutter to ever sail around Antarctica. Eastwind was also the first ship to circumnavigate Antarctica since 1843. 10. Since 2003, the Coast Guard has been operating as part of the Department of Homeland Security. 11. The Coast Guard core values are Honor, Respect, and Devotion to duty. The Coast Guard motto is Semper Paratus, which means Always Ready. (Source: USO)

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NATIONAL GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military

MA J. GEN. ONDR A L . BERRY The Adjutant General Nevada National Guard

Maj. Gen. Ondra L. Berry serves as the adjutant general for the State of Nevada. Appointed by the governor of Nevada, Berry serves as the governor’s principal advisor on all National Guard issues, is responsible for both the federal and state missions of the Nevada National Guard, and serves as the official channel of communication with the National Guard Bureau, Department of the Army, and Department of the Air Force. He is responsible for more than 4,200 Nevada Army and Air National Guard personnel. Before his current position, Berry was the assistant adjutant general—Air, Nevada National Guard, and served as the assistant to the director of National Guard Bureau A-1, service component level personnel director for over 107,000 ANG members. He managed component headquarters, numbered Air Force, and major command-level support in the formulation and coordination of policy and execution of manpower, personnel, services, and training programs of the entire personnel life cycle. This includes the force management, formal training allocation, database and systems administration, modification and analysis, services, manpower and organization, and policy formulation and implementation. Berry received his commission from the Air National Guard Academy of Military Science in 1990.

MA J. GEN. JEMAL J. BEALE Adjutant General New Jersey National Guard

Maj. Gen. Jemal J. Beale was sworn in as the 32nd adjutant general of New Jersey on April 2, 2018. Beale commands the more than 8,400 soldiers and airmen of the New Jersey National Guard. He directs, controls, and manages the New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs to execute federal and state missions. Also, he oversees all state veterans’ programs, commissions, and facilities in New

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Jersey. A combat veteran of Afghanistan, his previous assignments include director, plans, operations, training, and safety; director, logistics; commander, Recruiting and Retention Battalion; and commander, Border Police Mentor Team (OEF). Beale began his military career in 1987 as an enlisted soldier and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1990 after completing the Early Commissioning Program at Seton Hall University. He has served throughout the continental United States, Afghanistan, Albania, Germany, and Italy.

MA J. GEN. SYLVESTER CANNON Deputy Adjutant General Alabama National Guard

Maj. Gen. Sylvester Cannon has served as the deputy adjutant general for Alabama since June 2018. Cannon began his military career in June 1985 and earned his commission as a second lieutenant through the Alabama Military Academy at Fort McClellan, AL. Cannon earned a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting at the University of Alabama, a Master of Science degree in human resource management at Troy State University, and a Master of Strategic Studies from the United States Army War College. He has completed advanced-level military studies courses, including Military Police Officer Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Service Staff School, Command and General Staff College, United States Army War College, Maneuver Enhance Brigade Pre-Command Course, Dual-Status Commanders Course (NORTHCOM), Harvard University General and Flag Officer Homeland Security Executive Seminar, Interim Guard Senior Leader Training (IGSLT), and CAPSTONE. Cannon and his wife Valerie reside in Opelika, AL. They have two adult daughters, Jasmine and Simone. Cannon’s civilian occupation is director—Income Tax Audit & Appeals Division, Alabama Department of Revenue, in Montgomery, AL.

MA J. GEN. JOHN C. HARRIS, JR. Adjutant General Army, Ohio National Guard

Maj. Gen. John Harris is adjutant general— Army, Ohio National Guard, and serves as commander, Ohio Army National Guard. He assumed these duties on Jan. 11, 2011, and is responsible for establishing policies, priorities, and oversight USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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NATIONAL GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military for the readiness of 11,400 soldiers. Harris began his military career in 1981 when he enlisted in the Ohio Army National Guard. He received a commission in 1984 through Officer Candidate School. He has commanded at the platoon, detachment, company, and squadron levels while serving in assignments at the battalion, squadron, and state area command as well as joint force headquarters level. Harris’s recent assignments include chief of staff, deputy chief of staff for personnel, and commander, Task Force Lancer, Kosovo.

MA J. GEN. LEONARD W. ISABELLE JR. Assistant adjutant general and commander Michigan Air National Guard

Maj. Gen. Leonard Isabelle is the assistant adjutant general and commander of the Michigan Air National Guard. He is the principal air advisor to the adjutant general and is responsible for command and control of personnel, equipment, and resources for two flying wings (KC-135R, A-10C, MQ9), an air operations group, a cyber operations squadron, and a combat readiness training center. Isabelle received his commission in 1987 as a graduate of the Academy of Military Science. He graduated from undergraduate pilot training at Reese Air Force Base in 1988. He has held numerous positions in operations and maintenance and has commanded at the flight, squadron, group, and state air component levels. His five operational deployments include Operation Northern Watch, Operation Southern Watch, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2015, Isabelle participated in exercise Judicious Response as a joint air component coordination element director to U.S. Africa Command. In 2016, Isabelle served as the deputy commanding general for U.S. Northern Command Joint Task Force—X and commander of Joint Task Force Search and Rescue for the Ardent Sentry Exercise. As a command pilot, he has logged 2,950 flying hours, including 260 combat hours, primarily in the A-10 and F-16 aircraft.

MA J. GEN. TIMOTHY M. MCKEITHEN Deputy Commanding General National Guard U.S. Army Pacific

Maj. Gen. Timothy McKeithen assumed duties as the deputy commanding general—National Guard U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) on March 3, 2018. As the deputy commanding general, he supports the USARPAC commanding general’s vision by setting the theater for success for contingencies. Before his current assignment, McKeithen served as deputy director of the Army National Guard, National Guard Bureau. As deputy director, he guided the formulation, development, and implementation of all programs and policies affecting 54

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the Army National Guard, which has more than 350,000 citizen soldiers in the 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia and oversaw a budget over $19 billion. McKeithen received his commission from the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, where he was named a distinguished military graduate in 1985. McKeithen most recently served as director of logistics, J-4, Headquarters, North American Aerospace Defense Command.

MA J. GEN. MICHAEL C. THOMPSON Adjutant General Army, Oklahoma National Guard

Maj. Gen. Michael Thompson has served as the adjutant general of the Oklahoma Army National Guard since November 2017. He has oversight of training, administration, logistics, and personnel actions. He directs the Army National Guard staff and guides the staff and subordinate commanders. Thompson also facilitates command staff decisions about force development, planning, strength maintenance, and force operations. Thompson was commissioned in 1986 through the Oklahoma Military Department, Officer Candidate School, Oklahoma City, OK. He has served as land component commander, Oklahoma Army National Guard, chief of staff, Oklahoma Army National Guard, and commander, 90th Troop Command, Oklahoma Army National Guard. Thompson has commanded at the company, battalion, and brigade levels. Before receiving his commission, Thompson served for two and a half years as an enlisted soldier in the Oklahoma Army National Guard.

BRIG. GEN. PETER G. BAILEY

Assistant to the Commander Second Air Force, Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, Mississippi

Brig. Gen. Peter G. Bailey is the Air National Guard assistant to the commander of Second Air Force, Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, MS. He assists in the development, oversight, and direction of all operational aspects of basic military training, www.blackengineer.com


NATIONAL GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military initial skills training, and advanced technical training for the Air Force’s enlisted force, non-rated operations, and support officers. Second Air Force delivers more than 3,400 courses spanning more than 265 Air Force specialties and graduates 150,000 airmen, soldiers, sailors, Marines, and international students annually. Bailey graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy and commissioned in 1990. He served in the active-duty Air Force for 12 years as a B-52H navigator and B-1B weapon systems officer, where he flew combat missions in Operation Desert Fox and Operation Allied Force. Bailey joined the Kansas Air National Guard in 2002 and commanded at the squadron level. During his tenure, he deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. He has served at the air staff level as the National Guard chief of logistics readiness, and his previous assignment was as the commandant of the United States Air Force Officer Training School.

BRIG. GEN. JANEEN L . BIRCKHEAD Assistant Adjutant General Maryland National Guard

Brig. Gen. Janeen L. Birckhead received her commission as a second lieutenant through the Reserve Officers Training Corps at Hampton University as a distinguished military graduate. Upon completion of the Chemical Officer Basic Course, she was assigned to the 29th Support Center and later as aide de camp to the adjutant general for Maryland. During Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2004–2005, she served as the Tiger Team leader and designated military officer for the Office of Administrative Review for Enemy Combatants’ Detention. Birckhead deployed as the deputy, Current Operations, Security Partnering, and International Security Assistance Force Kabul, Afghanistan. Upon redeployment, she was assigned to the Joint Forces Headquarters as a division chief, logistics. Following brigade command of the 70th Regiment, she served as the director of legislative liaison. In 2018, Birckhead assumed command of the Maryland Army National Guard. Concurrently, she also serves dual-hatted as deputy commanding general—Reserves Affairs, United States Army War College. In her civilian capacity, Birckhead serves as a senior advisor in the special trustee’s office for American Indians at the Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. Birckhead resides in Crownsville, MD with her husband, Craig, and two children, Craig and Lindsay.

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BRIG. GEN. RODNEY BOYD Assistant Chief of Staff, J4 (Wartime) U.S. Forces Korea

Brig. Gen. Rodney Boyd was appointed as the assistant chief of staff, J-4 (wartime), for U.S. Forces Korea in March 2020. The appointment made Boyd the first African-American general officer in the Illinois Army National Guard. Boyd began his military career as an enlisted Marine Corps Reservist in 1982. After completing his enlistment with the Marines, he joined the Illinois Army National Guard. From 1989 until 1990, he attended the Illinois Army National Guard Officer Candidate School, receiving his commission as a second lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps in August 1990. Boyd has an extensive background in logistics and operations, including his command of the 108th Sustainment Brigade. In his civilian life, Boyd is employed by AASKI-MAG Aerospace, supporting the Army National Guard Mission Command Training Support Program. Boyd received a bachelor’s degree in criminology from Northern Illinois University, a Master of Arts degree in education from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, and a second Master of Arts degree in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College. Boyd is married to Darlene Boyd, and they have two adult sons.

BRIG. GEN. (S) KONATA A . “DEUCE” CRUMBLY Director of Operations GA Air National Guard

Col. Konata Crumbly is the principal advisor to the adjutant general on all Georgia Air National Guard federal, state, domestic operations, and state partnership program events. He directs Georgia Air National Guard coordination, planning, training, and execution of Joint Staff programs and domestic emergencies in the United States. He liaises with and provides situational awareness to major commands, the National Guard Bureau, state and federal officials, joint partners, Wings, and the Air Dominance Center on Georgia Air National Guard operations. Crumbly graduated from the Reserve Officer Training Corps at Florida A&M University in 1996. He attended Army Aviation Flight School at Fort Rucker, AL, and earned his wings as a UH-60 A/L Blackhawk pilot. After completing his Army Aviation service commitment, which included Operation Allied USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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NATIONAL GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military Force, and the initial invasion of Iraq, Operation Iraqi Freedom, with 3rd Infantry Division, Crumbly joined the Georgia Air National Guard as an E-8C JSTARS pilot in 2004. Crumbly is a command pilot with more than 3,500 flying hours to include over 1,300 combat hours. He is a qualified instructor/evaluator pilot, supervisor of flying, and has held various positions during his 15 years with the GA Air National Guard.

BRIG. GEN. DAVID FLEMING III Assistant Adjutant General Delaware National Guard

Brig. Gen. David Fleming III assumed duties as assistant adjutant general—Army, Delaware National Guard, in May 2016. He also serves as commander, Delaware Army National Guard. As the assistant adjutant general, Fleming ensures that all assigned units and personnel are thoroughly trained, deployable, and equipped for mobilization to support overseas contingency operations or any other homeland defense operation in support of the Nation’s needs and those of the Governor of the State of Delaware. Fleming enlisted in the New Jersey Army National Guard in 1982 as an E-3, 19D cavalry scout. He entered the Simultaneous Membership Program, receiving his commission as a second lieutenant through the University of Pennsylvania ROTC program on May 23, 1986. Fleming joined the Delaware Army National Guard in June of 1986, then entered Rotary Wing Helicopter flight training at Fort Rucker, AL, in September 1986, and graduated in August of 1987, receiving his Army Aviation Wings. Fleming served at every level of command, including company command and battalion command. After flying nearly 2,200 flight hours in both the UH-1H and the UH-60 A/L aircraft, he assumed command of the 72nd Troop Command Brigade in December 2013.

BRIG. GEN. DAVID M. JENKINS Assistant Adjutant General-Army South Carolina National Guard

Brig. Gen. David M. Jenkins is the assistant adjutant general—Army in the South Carolina National Guard. He began his military career as a ROTC cadet at South Carolina State University and received his commission on May 24, 1990.Jenkins served in the SC National Guard for the past 28 years and held key positions including battalion commander and 56

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brigade commander. Jenkins deployed to Afghanistan in 2004 as the strategic plans communication officer and supported numerous federal and state missions over the past 10 years. Jenkins holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from SC State University, an executive M.B.A. in international business from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH, and a Master in Strategic Studies from the Army’s Senior Staff College in Carlisle, VA. Jenkins’ formal military education includes the Signal Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, Combined Arms and Services Staff School, Command and General Staff Officer School, and the Advanced Joint Staff College. In his civilian career, Jenkins works for Lexmark International where he serves as the senior Manager of the Strategic Program Management Office. He is married to his wife of 16 years Dionne and has three children, son Dillon (12), and twin daughters Sydney and Aubrey (10).

BRIG. GEN. CHRISTOPHER S. WALKER Assistant Adjutant General and Commander West Virginia Air National Guard (WVANG)

Brig. Gen. Christopher Walker is the assistant adjutant general and commander of the West Virginia Air National Guard (WVANG). As the assistant adjutant general—air and commander, he provides command and control over all WVANG forces as the principal advisor to the adjutant general on all matters related to the Air National Guard (ANG). Born in New York City, NY, Walker began his Air Force career as a 1988 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. After undergraduate navigator training at Mather Air Force Base in 1989, he served as a C-130 navigator in weather reconnaissance and tactical airlift squadrons throughout the world. In 1997, Walker left active duty to join the ANG as a C-130H3 evaluator navigator and commanded at the squadron and group level. He deployed to various operations and contingencies, such as OEF, OIF, Joint Guard/Joint Forge, and Volant Oak/Coronet Oak. In 2019, he was appointed as dual-status commander of Joint Task Force—World Scout Jamboree (JTF-WSJ), commanding approximately 1,000 soldiers, airmen, sailors, and DOD civilians providing security, logistics, and medical assistance to over 45,000 scouts and support staff from over 150 countries.

BRIG. GEN. K ATHERINE E. WHITE Deputy Commander 46 Military Police Command

Brig. Gen. Katherine E. White served on active duty as a judge advocate for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of the Chief Counsel’s Honors Program, where she was the intellectual property counsel for the Corps of Engineers. As a reservist, she taught contract and www.blackengineer.com


NATIONAL GUARD

T O P B L A C K O F F I C E R S in the U.S. Military fiscal law (1997–2011) and was the associate dean (2006–2011) at the Judge Advocate General’s School in Charlottesville, VA. From 2011–2014, she taught as an instructor in the Department of Law at the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. She joined the Michigan National Guard in 2015 as the staff judge advocate of the 46th Military Police Command, where she became the deputy commanding general on Sept. 1, 2019. She has been deployed with her unit since March as part of the DOD coronavirus response. As a civilian, White is a law professor at the Wayne State University Law School in Detroit, MI, where she has taught since 1996. Since 1999, she has been a member of the University of Michigan Board of Regents. She is also a Fulbright Senior Scholar (Germany 1999–2000), a White House fellow (2001– 2002), and a registered patent attorney.

BRIG. GEN. JAMES ZOLLAR

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army Strategic Initiatives Virginia National Guard

Brig. Gen. James Zollar started his career in 1984 as an 11C (mortarman) enlisted soldier. He commissioned as a second lieutenant in the infantry upon graduation from the ROTC program at Virginia Commonwealth University in 1990 as a distinguished military graduate. In 1997, he branch-qualified in military intelligence, and in 2000, he transferred to the engineer branch. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and a member of the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) since commissioning. Zollar commanded at the company, battalion, and brigade levels and held key staff assignments as the J-3 director of operations and VaARNG chief of staff. Currently, Zollar is the Virginia National Guard’s assistant adjutant general for Army strategic initiatives. He is an associate for Toffler Associates, a future-focused strategic advisory firm based in northern Virginia in his civilian capacity. Zollar deployed to the Sinai Peninsula as an enlisted soldier and Afghanistan and Iraq with the 276th Engineer Battalion in support of combat operations. His awards and permanent unit citations are commensurate with his years of service. He is married to Shawne and a proud father of four children: James Jr., Jasmine, Justin, and Jacob. S

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NATIONAL GUARD

DID YOU KNOW? 1. Each member of the National Guard is sworn to uphold two constitutions: federal and state. 2. The term “national guard” didn’t become an official term until 1916. 3. 50,000 members of the National Guard were called to take on various missions during the 9/11 attacks in 2001. 4. Only two presidents have served in the National Guard in its modern structure: Harry S. Truman and George W. Bush. 5. The National Guard is older than the Army. The U.S. Army wasn’t formed until the beginning of the Revolutionary War. 6. American Samoa is the only territory of the U.S. to not have a National Guard unit. 7. National Guard units were called Minutemen during the American Revolution due to their rapid response ability. 8. The National Guard formed one of the first all-African-American units in U.S. military history, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers. The unit serves to this day and the first African American to receive a Medal of Honor, William Harvey Carney, hailed from it. (Source: Military.com)

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THE TOP

BLACK MEMBERS

SENIOR OF THE

EXECUTIVE

SERVICE According to the 2018 Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Report from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), the percentage of minorities in the Senior Executive Service (SES) remained the same in FY 2016 as it was in FY 2015 at 21.2 percent.

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White people accounted for 78.8 percent of senior executives in 2015 and 2016 and were 66.4 percent of the national labor force. The percentage of Black Americans in the SES—a position classification in the civil service that is equivalent to general officer or flag officer ranks in the U.S. Armed Forces —dropped from 11.4 percent to 11 percent from 2015 to 2016. Black people make up 10.5 percent of the civilian labor force but 18.4 percent of federal employees. The Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Report also showed a wide variation in Black representation across federal agencies. The number of Black Americans in executive departments, for example, ranges from about 38 percent in Education and Housing and Urban

Development to a low of 5.6 percent in the Department of the Interior. Major findings in the FY 2016 FEORP Report: »

The percentage of minorities in the Senior Executive Service (SES) remained the same in FY 2016 as it was in FY 2015 at 21.2 percent.

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The SES is 11.0 percent Black, 4.6 percent Hispanic, 3.5 percent Asian, 0.2 percent Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 1.1 percent American Indian/ Alaska Native, and 0.8 percent NonHispanic Multiracial.

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Black employees represent 18.4 percent (359,757) of the permanent federal workforce as of Sept. 30, 2016, compared to 18.2 percent in FY 2015.

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE ANTHONY R. BAITY Deputy Director of Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection Air Combat Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia

Anthony Baity serves as the deputy director of logistics, engineering, and force protection, Headquarters Air Combat Command (ACC), Joint Base Langley-Eustis, VA. He assists the director in leading a staff of over 300 across 12 divisions and a budget of $5.5 billion. He assists with policy, budget, and oversight of ACC’s maintenance, munitions, supply, transportation, civil engineering, and force protection functions. Baity provides oversight to more than 42,000 personnel assigned in 35 wings at over 100 operating locations worldwide. They maintain and support more than 1,100 fighters and special mission aircraft to execute their assigned missions. Prior to that, Baity was the chief, Resources Division, Directorate of Resource Integration, deputy chief of staff for logistics, engineering, and force protection, Headquarters U.S. Air Force. He led integration of logistics, installations, and mission support programmed resources. He led both the installation support and logistics panels and served as the AF/A4 representative to the Headquarters Air Force Corporate Structure for planning and programming governance. He led the Manpower and Personnel section for the AF/A4 organization, totaling over 300 military and civilian personnel. He also analyzed, developed, and implemented civilian workforce development programs for over 43,000 logistics personnel throughout the Air Force. ANSELM A. BEACH Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army Equity and Inclusion Agency

Anselm A. Beach assumed the position of deputy assistant secretary of the Army (Equity and Inclusion Agency) on Nov. 10, 2019. He is the principal advisor to the assistant secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserves Affairs) on policy development and

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guidance, supervision, education, training, and synchronization for the Army as a Total Force. He serves as the secretary of the Army’s designated proponent for diversity and inclusion, civil rights, equal employment opportunity, military equal opportunity, career program, and policy, and oversight of Army Command Programs. He directs the daily operation and execution of one the most comprehensive complaint adjudication processes, proactive management and prevention programs within the federal government. Beach previously served as the acting executive director, Privacy and Diversity Office, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. In this Senior Executive Service position, he served as a principal advisor to the commissioner on highly sensitive and complex workforce issues, and led five divisions: Diversity and Equal Employment Opportunity Division, Privacy, Freedom of Information Act Division, Custody Support and Compliance Division, and Mission Support Division to serve over 60,000 employees. TERESA R. BICKETT Deputy Director of Financial Management Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

Teresa Bickett is deputy director of financial management, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. As the command’s chief financial civilian, she is responsible for the financial planning and fiscal execution of more than 35 percent of the Air Force’s appropriated budget. She serves as deputy principal financial adviser to the Air Force Materiel Command commander and is responsible for building the command’s budgets; administering the Air Force Working Capital Fund and executing Air Force Materiel Command’s annual budget program of over $60 billion; and providing military, civilian, and contractor pay service to some 80,000 personnel. She also oversees over 3,000 professional financial

managers providing vital services supporting the command’s units worldwide, including 10 major bases. Bickett entered federal civil service in 1985 as a logistician at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX. She moved to WrightPatterson Air Force Base in 1992 and has held a variety of financial management and logistics leadership positions at Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Air Force Life Cycle Logistics Center and the Air Force Research Laboratory. Prior to her current position, she served as the chief for the Centralized Asset Management Division in the Directorate of Financial Management, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. JOHN BONAPART, JR. Director for Logistics, Engineering, and Force Protection Headquarters Air Force Space Command

John Bonapart is the director for logistics, engineering, and force protection, Headquarters Air Force Space Command. As the director, he leads military and civilian personnel responsible for the development of policy, guidance, training, and programming for logistics, civil engineering, and force protection activities in support of over 26,000 space professionals worldwide. He manages the maintenance and lifecycle sustainment of the Command’s space systems through the execution of a $1.4 billion weapon system sustainment budget. He oversees the programming and policy implementation for the Command’s $23 billion physical plant, which includes: 29 million square feet of facilities, seven major installations, and two coastal space launch ranges. Also, he directs policy development for the Command’s integrated defense, resource protection, and physical security activities in support of 2,100 security forces members and 20 high-priority protection level resources. KEVIN BOSTICK Director, Exercises and Coalition Affairs United States Southern Command

Kevin Bostick serves as the commander’s principal executive level advisor concerning civil military operations, training, and exercises. Bostick leads partnerships, exercises, civil affairs operations, science and technology, and humanitarian

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TIMOTHY BRIDGES Executive Director Commander, Navy Installations Command

Timothy Bridges is the executive director for Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), assisting in providing shore capability to sustain the fleet, enable the fighter, and support the family. Prior to his time with the Navy, he served in the Air Force for more than 40 years, both as an active duty civil engineer and as a member of the Senior Executive Service. Bridges was commissioned in 1979 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force ROTC program at the Virginia Military Institute, earning a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Since then, he has served in design, planning, contract and environmental management, and civil engineering operations. His most recent assignment was as the Air Force assistant deputy chief of staff for logistics, engineering, and force protection. He served twice as a base civil engineer squadron commander and as an installation commander. He also served as an Air Force ROTC assistant professor and held various staff positions at the major command and Headquarters Air Force levels in the readiness, energy, environmental, and resources arenas. Bridges retired from active duty at the rank of colonel in July 2006 and entered the Senior Executive Service. STACEY BROWN Chief of the Civil Works Programs Integration Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

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Selected to the Senior Executive Service in June 2019, Stacey Brown is chief of the Civil Works Programs Integration Division for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Washington, D.C. She is responsible for the development, defense, and execution of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, a position that entails close coordination with senior administration officials, Congressional leaders, and project partners. Initially, she served as the chief of the Planning and Policy Division for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and as the chief of the Mississippi Valley Division and Southwestern Division Regional Integration Teams. In that position, she was responsible for ensuring that plans and investigations undertaken by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers were soundly conceived, properly formulated, and responsive to the legislative and executive authorities governing restoration, conservation, and development of the nation’s water and related land resources. Brown earned a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering, a Bachelor of Arts in English, and a minor in engineering management from Tufts University. She is a recipient of the Women of Color STEM Career Achievement in Government Award, the Bronze Order of the de Fleury, and is a registered project management professional. THEODORE BROWN Regional Business Director, South Atlantic Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

Theodore Brown serves as regional business director for the South Atlantic Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), providing executive strategic leadership and technical expertise executing engineering, construction, and project management for civil works, military construction, international and interagency programs within the Southeastern U.S. and throughout Latin America. The current program exceeds $4 billion with a workforce of 3,500. In his prior assignment, Brown served as chief of the Planning and

Policy Division in Headquarters, USACE, Washington, D.C. (January 2009–November 2017), and the leader of the regional integration teams for the Mississippi Valley and Southwestern Divisions. He was responsible for the formulation and coordination of Army Civil Works policy with the Department of the Army, federal agencies, and Office of Management and Budget; led the development and implementation efforts for Water Resources Development Acts; and served as the principal point of contact with Congressional authorizing committees on policy and planning matters. KAREN BURROWS Director, Integrated Warfare Systems Engineering (SEA 05H) Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) United States Navy

Karen S. Burrows serves as the director, integrated warfare systems engineering, Naval Sea Systems Command, and is the technical authority to the Program Executive Office, integrated warfare systems. Burrows is responsible for oversight of command, control, communications, computers, combat systems, and intelligence systems (C5I) research, development, certification for deployment, and life cycle support for U.S. Navy ships. In this capacity, she is the deputy warranted technical and certification authority for Navy integrated warfare capability. Burrows was previously assigned as the executive director of the Naval Ordnance Safety and Security Activity and the deputy for weapons safety. Burrows was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in April 2012 and has over 30 years of service in the Department of Defense.

SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE

assistance activities to improve U.S. military readiness, build partner capacity, and counter transregional/ transnational threats to meet global challenges. He works with Combatant Commands (COCOM), interagency, and U.S. embassies throughout the Southern Command’s area of responsibility. Bostick manages a $65 million budget and executes the strategic direction, priorities, policies, and guidance of the Southern Command commander, deputy commander, and chief of staff.

DR. JUANITA M. CHRISTENSEN Director, U.S. Army Combat Capabilities

Dr. Juanita Christensen was selected for Senior Executive Service in February 2015. She became the executive director of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Aviation & Missile Center USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (AvMC) at Redstone Arsenal, AL, in November 2017. The Aviation & Missile Center comprises approximately 12,000 military and civilian professional, scientific, and support personnel and manages a combined mission and reimbursable customer-funded budget of approximately $3.9 billion annually. The director manages aviation and missile plans and executes technical research and engineering programs and technical demonstrations. During her robust career, she has served in a variety of engineering positions, including director of the Engineering Analysis Directorate, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command; Technical Management Division chief, Project Management Office for Unmanned Aircraft Systems, PEO Aviation. She moved to AvMC in 2012 as deputy director of the Aviation Development Directorate and became director of the Weapons Development and Integration Directorate in 2015. Christensen received her B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Illinois, an M.A. in computer resource and information systems management from Webster University, and a doctorate in business, organizational leadership, from the University of Phoenix. EUGENE (GENE) COLLINS Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Training, Readiness and Mobilization)

Eugene Collins has served as the deputy assistant secretary of the army for training, readiness, and mobilization (DASA (TRM)) since Nov. 10, 2019. He provides responsive support to the assistant secretary of the Army for manpower and reserve affairs by formulating plans, programs, policies, and overall practices for the Army’s All-Volunteer Force, both active and reserve components. He exercises oversight, direction, and organization 62

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of training, readiness, and mobilization across the Army. In conjunction with the Army Staff, he develops, implements, and reviews all policies and programs pertaining to mobilization, demobilization, and accessibility of the reserve component’s readiness resourcing and reporting, training institutions and support, training aids and devices, individual and unit training, and professional leader education and development. He also serves as the advisor to the Army Reserve Forces Policy Committee, a general officer advisory group to the secretary of the Army, to integrate its input and recommendations into the necessary planning efforts of the Department of the Army staff. Collins entered the Senior Executive Service in April 2007 and is a 26-year Air Force veteran, retiring as a colonel, and a Bronze Star combat-proven aircraft maintenance and logistics leader who participated in Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and Southern Watch. ALEXANDER CONYERS Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Review Boards)

Alexander Conyers was appointed to the Senior Executive Service as the deputy assistant secretary of the Army (review boards) [DASA (RB)] on Sep. 29, 2019. As DASA (RB), Conyers leads the Army Review Boards Agency (ARBA), which on behalf of the secretary of the Army, serves as the highest administrative level for review of personnel actions taken by lower levels of the Army, administers 12 boards, and provides oversight of the Army Corrections System (Army prison system) and law enforcement. He has served on several boards, including the Board for Correction of Military Records, the Discharge Review Board, Grade Determination Board, Suitability Evaluation Board, Conscientious Objector Board, Clemency and Parole Board, and the Special Review Board (evaluation appeals). The ARBA adjudicates over 20,000 cases each year. Conyers is a retired military police colonel and served as the chairman of the Army’s Clemency and Parole Board at ARBA prior to being appointed to the SES. He holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from South Carolina State University, a master’s degree in corrections from the University of South Carolina, and a master’s degree in public

administration from Troy University. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy and is a certified corrections executive. ALBERT CURRY, JR. Deputy Assistant Commandant for Engineering and Logistics (CG-4D) U.S. Coast Guard

Albert Curry is currently serving as the Coast Guard’s deputy assistant commandant for engineering and logistics (CG-4D). In this position, he is responsible for overseeing all naval, civil, aeronautical, and industrial engineering, logistics, and environmental and energy management programs for the Coast Guard’s $22 billion capital plan, which includes 23,000 facilities, 250 ships, 1,800 boats, and 200 aircraft. His responsibilities also include the execution of an annual budget of $1 billion and leading over 5,000 personnel at Coast Guard Headquarters and the three Coast Guard Logistics Centers: the Aviation Logistics Center (ALC) in Elizabeth City, NC; the Shore Infrastructure Logistics Center (SILC) in Norfolk, VA; and the Surface Forces Logistics Center (SFLC) in Baltimore, MD. In his previous assignment as the deputy program manager for U.S. Coast Guard Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) Major Acquisitions Programs, he had total programmatic oversight for the following projects: Rescue 21, Nationwide Automated Information System (NAIS), Interagency Operational Command (IOC) Centers, Coast Guard Logistics Information Management System (CG-LIMS), and C4ISR. Before this assignment, Curry served as the deputy project manager for the Rescue 21 Project. Before joining the Coast Guard, Curry served in the U.S. Navy. GERALD D. CURRY Director, Air Force Review Boards Agency, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, Arlington, Virginia

Dr. Gerald D. Curry is a member of the Senior Executive Service, as director, Air Force Review Boards Agency, office of the assistant secretary of the Air Force for manpower and reserve affairs, Arlington, VA. He is responsible for the management and operation of multiple military and www.blackengineer.com


KAREN DAVIS Executive Director, Special Operations

Karen Davis joined the special operations community in 2019 as an executive director responsible for resourcing and integration of programs. Prior to accepting this Army joint duty assignment, she served the Navy as executive director, Program Executive Office Unmanned and Small Combatants, providing oversight of multi-billion-dollar programs for the development, acquisition, and sustainment of littoral combat ships, future frigates, international small combatants, mine warfare, and unmanned systems. She also served as executive director for surface warfare, Naval Sea Systems Command, leading multi-billion-dollar portfolios for fleet support of surface ships, inactive ships, foreign military sales, and ship transfer programs. Davis’ initial SES assignment was as director, integrated combat systems, Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems, leading engineering of integrated combat solutions www.blackengineer.com

for surface combatants, amphibious vessels, and aircraft carriers. Davis’ other career also includes director within the Navy Secretariat, major program manager, and electronics and computer engineer. TERRI A. DICKERSON Director of Civil Rights U.S. Coast Guard

Terri Dickerson, a member of the United States Senior Executive Service since 2000, joined the Coast Guard in 2006 as director, Office of Civil Rights. In February 2013, Dickerson was honored by BEYA for her superior performance and contributions to Coast Guard personnel and missions. From 2000 to 2006, Dickerson was second in charge of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She examined federal agencies’ civil rights offices and advised officials, Congress, and the White House on improved enforcement. In 2005, the White House installed her as the interim agency head after the outgoing chief departed and until a new appointee’s confirmation. Dickerson is a widely published author, penning articles for industry and national publications, including the Washington Post, USA TODAY, and Ladies’ Home Journal. The U.S. Supreme Court cited a study she directed, “Beyond Percentage Plans: The Challenge of Equal Opportunity in Higher Education,” in its 2005 decision on affirmative action. She was named a Presidential Meritorious Executive in 2008. Dickerson earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of Virginia and a Master of Arts from Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy Board of Trustees. LARRY DOUCHAND, SES, P.E. Assistant Commander for Environmental Programs Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC)

Since 2006, Larry Douchand has served as the assistant commander for environmental programs at Naval Facilities Engineering Command. He is responsible for delivering NAVFAC’s full spectrum of environmental

products and services to Navy and Marine Corps installations. Prior to his Senior Executive Service position with NAVFAC (January 2004 to July 2006), he served as chief, Strategic Integration Branch at the Army Corps of Engineers, and was responsible for establishing the management and execution for the $11 billion Base Realignment and Closure Program, which included military construction, environmental cleanup, and real estate disposal. From July 2003 to January 2004, he served as chief, Environmental Support Branch at the Army Corps of Engineers. He holds a Master of Science in environmental management from the University of San Francisco and a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Maryland and a member of the Navy’s Acquisition Community. GAIL FOREST Director of Engineering and Technical Management, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command

SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE

civilian appellate processes that ensure due process, equity, fairness, and impartial treatment for all applicants. He oversees the Air Force Personnel Council, Air Force Board for Correction of Military Records, Air Force Civilian Appellate Review Office, Air Force Security Protection Directorate, and the Department of Defense Physical Disability Board of Review. Curry has served more than 37 years in the federal government, including multiple Air Force assignments as well as the chief of staff at the Defense Security Service, and the Department of Energy, where he entered the ranks of Senior Executive Service as the deputy associate undersecretary for security in the office of the associate undersecretary for environment, health, safety, and security. He was responsible for department-wide security policy development, oversight, and execution. Additionally, Curry’s responsibilities influenced international and domestic nuclear security standards and policies.

Gail P. Forest, a member of the Senior Executive Service, is director of engineering and technical management, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. Forest is the senior technical advisor to the commander in support of the command’s mission to deliver war-winning technology, acquisition, test, and sustainment expeditionary capabilities to the warfighter. She leads the development and implementation of engineering policies and practices spanning science and technology, research, development, test and evaluation, sustainment focused on achieving fleet operational safety, suitability, and effectiveness. Forest also directs development of new initiatives designed to improve the recruitment and career management of the command’s 12,000 military and civilian scientists and engineers. Forest began her career as a manufacturing engineer with Buick Motor Division, General Motors Corporation. In 1982, USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE she entered federal civil service as an engineer in the Maintenance Directorate at Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command. She has held numerous engineering, logistics, and acquisition program management positions. Prior to her current assignment, Forest was the director for information dominance programs, office of the assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, Washington, D.C. She was responsible for planning and programming all acquisition and modernization activities for Air Force command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs. DONJETTE L. GILMORE Executive Director Public Private Partnership Audit-Level Reviews Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment)

Donjette L. Gilmore became the Department of the Navy (DON) and DOD’s first-ever executive director, public private partnership audit-level reviews to oversee and assess the DON’s military family housing privatization initiative’s financial viability, on Oct. 28, 2019. She previously served as the acting auditor general (Navy) from Jan. 31, 2017 until Feb. 3, 2019, while performing her regular duties as the deputy auditor general (Navy). She assumed responsibilities as deputy auditor general (Navy) on Nov. 15, 2015. Gilmore was fully responsible for directing the worldwide operation of the Naval Audit Service and functioned as the senior advisor on all internal DON audit-related matters. From July 2010 to November 2015, she served as director, accounting and finance policy, office of the undersecretary of defense (comptroller) with primary responsibility for DOD financial management regulation. From February 2006 to July 2010, she served as National Geospatial Intelligence Agency’s (NGA) assistant chief information officer, business transformation and financial policy and audit executive. Gilmore earned a Bachelor of Science in accounting and 64

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finance from Auburn University, Auburn, AL, and an M.B.A. from Washington University, St. Louis, MO. She is a certified defense financial manager (CDFM) and holds a DOD Financial Management Certification, Level 3. DUANE W. HARRISON Chief Scientist National Air and Space Intelligence Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

Duane W. Harrison, a defense intelligence senior-level executive, is the chief scientist, National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC), WrightPatterson Air Force Base, OH. NASIC is the Air Force analysis center for foreign air, space, and specialized intelligence. As chief scientist, Harrison guides the 4,100-person center’s analytic production mission, ensuring timely delivery of relevant intelligence data products and services to Air Force and joint operational warfighters, acquisition and force modernization communities, and senior defense and intelligence community policymaking customers. Harrison entered federal service in 2001 as a command, control, communications, and computers and information operations analyst at NASIC. During his tenure, he has served as the senior intelligence analyst for both the Signals Analysis Squadron and the Counterspace Analysis Squadron at NASIC. His extensive career also includes a detail to a U.S. intelligence community special program activity for the office of the director of national intelligence and a joint duty assignment as the representative to the Defense Intelligence Agency and the Missile Defense Agency. Prior to his current assignment, Harrison served as the technical director, Global Exploitation Intelligence Group. ARTHUR HATCHER, JR. Associate Deputy Chief Information Officer Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

Arthur Hatcher, Jr. is the associate deputy chief information officer, office of the secretary of the Air Force, at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He is responsible for producing prioritized and executable resource investment options; collecting and reporting the $7 billion Air Force information technology presidential

budget; developing and implementing results-oriented governance; performing Air Force IT system portfolio management analysis; and facilitating, validating, and reporting compliance with all federal/DOD/ Air Force IT policy, Congressional mandates, and legal obligations. He is also the C4 representative on the Air Force Corporate Board. Hatcher is from Selma, AL. He completed 30 years of active duty with the U.S. Air Force, retiring as a colonel, and entered federal civil service in July 2013. While on active duty, he served on the Joint Staff, a combatant command staffs, and two major commands. He commanded an installation in Southwest Asia, the Air Combat Command Communications Group at Langley Air Force Base, VA; the 99th Communications Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, NV; and provisional commander for the 11th Communications Squadron, Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. His units won both Department of Defense and Air Force-level awards. RUSSELL L. HUDGINS Senior Intelligence Advisor to Space Security and Defense Program

Hudgins is the senior intelligence advisor to the Space Security and Defense Program (SSDP), at the Reston, VA, office. Hudgins leads the development of foundational and operational intelligence support plans for all SSDP activities. He provides input and feedback to Air Force Space Command and the National Reconnaissance Office on matters related to space intelligence capabilities and requirements supporting national security space interests. He works with partners across the IC, the unified and combatant commands, and HQ USAF staff to inform on intelligence issues and resourcing priorities to enhance SSDP activities, as well as representing SSDP at executive-level fora, meetings, and seminars related to space protection strategy, policy, and funding. Prior to his current assignment, Hudgins spent over 12 years at the National www.blackengineer.com


BRENDA JOHNSON-TURNER Director of Real Estate Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

Brenda JohnsonTurner was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in November 2014 and served as director of real estate for the Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Johnson-Turner provides executive leadership for program execution of the Department of the Army’s real estate mission for Army land and improvements worldwide, totaling a program of over $1.3 billion annually. She is responsible for overall policy and ensuring technical expertise to provide real estate acquisition, asset management, and disposal. She also serves as chief of the South Pacific Division and Great Lakes and Ohio River Division Regional Integration Team, in which she manages the Washington-level representation and support through integrating product and service mission areas and establishing and maintaining relationships at a national level for military and other program areas. Johnson-Turner earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Alcorn State University. WANDA JONES-HEATH Chief Information Security Officer, Office of Information Deputy Chief Information Officer Office of the Security of the Air Force

Wanda JonesHeath is the chief information security officer, Office of Information deputy chief information officer, office of the secretary of the Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, VA. She leads military, www.blackengineer.com

civilian, and contractor personnel responsible for developing Air Force cybersecurity policy and strategy for more than 5,000 Air Force information technology systems. She also manages the Air Force’s transition to the risk management framework and provides oversight for the Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act laws. Jones-Heath manages oversight for the project portfolio, including operating system lifecycle management and capabilities for the Comply to Connect program. She delivers cryptographic modernization across the Air Force, implementing the enterprise-wide, cross-domain solution and cryptographic information technology standards. Jones-Heath graduated from the University of South Carolina in 1990 with a degree in computer science. She began her civil service career as a Palace Acquire intern as an information systems specialist in various functional areas. She moved to Headquarters Air Combat Command, Langley Air Force Base, VA, in 1993. There she held positions responsible for policy and guidance for security and network systems. HORACE L. “H.L.” LARRY Director of Air Force Services Headquarters U.S. Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia

Horace L. Larry, a member of the Senior Executive Service, is the director of Air Force Services, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force, the Pentagon, Arlington, VA. He assists the deputy chief of staff for manpower and personnel and services in delivering services capabilities to optimize airmen performance through care solutions that help build and maintain resilient, ready airmen and families. His team provides policy direction, funding advocacy, and oversight for the $2.9 billion worldwide services program. This includes physical fitness, peacetime and wartime troop feeding, Air Force mortuary affairs operations, armed forces entertainment, Air Force protocol, lodging, and libraries. It also includes the Wounded Warrior program, the transition assistance program, Airmen and Family Readiness Centers, child development centers, youth centers, and a wide spectrum of recreational activities. Larry received his Air Force commission in 1975. Over the next 30 years, he was assigned to a variety of installations,

including the Headquarters Air Force Personnel Center, the Air Force Services Agency, Headquarters Air Force Services, and the Air Force Secretariat level at the Pentagon. Larry’s leadership positions include deputy support group commander, Aviano Air Base, Italy; commander of the Air Force Services Agency, San Antonio, TX; and deputy director of Air Force services in the office of the deputy chief of staff for installations and logistics at the Pentagon. DR. PATRICIA MCDANIEL, PH.D. Senior Research Scientist (ST) of Chemistry DEVCOM Chemical Biological Center (CBC)

Dr. Patricia McDaniel received the U.S. federal civil service designation of senior technologist (ST) on May 24. She was selected by the secretary of the Army as the Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center’s fifth senior research scientist of chemistry. This Research and Technology (R&T) directorate position is an Army asset that explores essential science that benefits the warfighter. McDaniel is responsible for managing the process for the Independent Research and Surface Science Initiative fundamental exploratory science programs. Prior to joining CBC, McDaniel served as a program manager in OSD Policy under ASD SOLIC at the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office (CTTSO). As the CBRNE program manager, she spearheaded 50-60 technical projects along with more than 30 international collaborative efforts. McDaniel also served as an Executive Branch American Association for the Advancement of Science, Science and Technology Policy fellow in national defense and global security. She first joined civil service at NASA Langley as a senior chemist, where she received her masters degree in analytical chemistry from Old Dominion University, and her Ph.D. in applied science - polymer chemistry from William & Mary. She also held roles in other government agencies and served as an R&D manager in private industry. USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, where he served in several analytic and liaison positions, and most recently as the senior GEOINT officer for space/counterspace analysis. During this time, he also served as the chair of the Weapon and Space Systems Intelligence Committee’s Counterspace Systems Subcommittee, in which he led and coordinated interagency collaboration on key issues of national-level interest.

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE DR. ERIC L. MOORE Director, U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC), Chemical Biological Center (CBC)

Dr. Eric L. Moore is the director of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center (CBC), the primary Department of Defense technical organization for non-medical chemical and biological defense. He is an expert in chemical and biological defense programs and medical countermeasures and is a former Army officer. As the director of CCDC CBC, Moore oversees many of the nation’s key chemical and biological defense research and engineering projects, building partnerships to enhance warfighter readiness and response to chemical and biological threats. He previously served as the chair and U.S. national lead of the chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) memorandum of understanding (MOU) assesses and inform working groups. As chair, Moore led CBR MOU efforts between the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia to enable warfighters to detect, prevent, protect against, and respond to global CBR threats. Moore received several noteworthy honors, including the 2019 Mid-Atlantic Federal Laboratory Consortium Laboratory Director of the Year Award, the DOD Distinguished Civilian Service Award, and the Harold D. West, Ph.D. Distinguished Biomedical Scientist Award from Meharry Medical College. He is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. Omicron Psi Sigma Chapter. LEVATOR NORSWORTHY, JR. Deputy General Counsel–Acquisition

Levator Norsworthy was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in January

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1998 and currently serves as deputy general counsel (acquisition), where he assists the general counsel in providing advice and counsel to all Army Secretariat officials, including the secretary of the Army, the Army acquisition executive, the Army chief information officer, and their staffs. The provision of legal advice encompasses a variety of functional areas, such as federal procurement law, major weapon system acquisition, military construction, research and development, developmental and operational testing, logistics, international cooperative programs, security assistance, competitive sourcing, and contingency contracting. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Dayton and a Juris Doctorate at the University of Cincinnati College of Law and has received the Presidential Rank Award and a DA Award for Exceptional Civilian Service. DOVARIUS L. PEOPLES Chief Information Officer (CIO)/G6 U.S. Army Corp of Engineers

Dovarius L. Peoples was selected for the Senior Executive Service in January of 2016. He assumed the position of the chief information officer/G-6 in April 2019 with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USACE). In this role, he serves as the principal advisor to the commanding general on information technology issues and is responsible for all aspects of information resource management and information technology for USACE. Prior to this assignment, Peoples served as the deputy to the commanding general, U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command. In this capacity, he provided senior technical leadership ensuring Army theater-level networks were integrated into the Army’s portion of the Department of Defense Information Network and enterprise constructs. The command employed over 14,000 military, civilian, and contractor personnel located in every theater in 20 countries around the world, with an annual budget in excess of $1.4 billion. Previous assignments include: information systems security engineer, National Security Agency; Information Assurance Division chief, USCYBERCOM J-6; lead architecture engineer, Mobility PMO, Defense Information Systems Agency; deputy director of operations, U.S. Army

Information Technology Agency; deputy director for cyber solutions, Joint Service Provider, Pentagon; and associate chief information officer, Office of Personnel Management. CARLOS RODGERS Director, Budget Investment Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Financial Management and Comptroller

Carlos Rodgers supervises budget formulation and financial execution of Air Force procurement, research, development, test and evaluation, military construction, family housing, and base realignment and closure appropriations that total more than $66 billion annually. From 1995 to 2016, Rodgers worked various assignments within Air Force Materiel Command, where he held progressively more responsible acquisition financial management positions in test and evaluation (major range and test facility base operations), foreign military sales, and single/joint service acquisition programs. Rodgers has more than 25 years of experience across all phases of the acquisition life cycle in a variety of different programs, including automated information/computer and communication systems, weapons, munitions, and aircraft. He entered government service as an Air Force Palace Acquire intern in 1987. During his initial assignment, Rodgers worked as a cost and budget analyst at Military Airlift Command, Scott Air Force Base, IL, managing command and control communication system funding. WILLIAM H ROBERTS, JR. Chief Financial Officer Army National Guard, Washington, DC

William H. Roberts Jr., a member of the Senior Executive Service, serves as the chief financial officer for the Army National Guard, Arlington, VA. He is the primary advisor to the director, Army National Guard, on all fiscal matters and is responsible for all ARNG programming, budgeting, and execution of more than $16 billion in resources annually. www.blackengineer.com


TAWANDA ROONEY Deputy Director, Concepts, Development and Management Office, Secretary of the Air Force

Tawanda Rooney is the deputy director, Concepts, Development, and Management Office, Secretary of the Air Force. She assists the director with administration and support for management oversight of assigned organizations, programs, and developmental activities. She is responsible for directing, managing, and leading organizational resources to meet mission objectives consistent with national security and operational priorities. Before this assignment, Rooney served as the director, Intelligence Systems Support Office, leading technology development and methodology efforts that provide specialized and innovative approaches to rapidly address the Department of Defense strategic, operational, and tactical requirements. She began her federal career in 1984 through the Air Force summer-hire program. After earning a bachelor’s in business administration from Virginia State University in 1988, she became a budget analyst with the office of the deputy chief of staff for plans and operations. Five years later, she moved to the Defense Evaluation Support Activity, holding positions that included project manager, contracting officer, and directorate budget representative. In 1997, she became a deputy program manager at the ISSO and was responsible for the acquisition and evaluation of sensitive technology efforts. www.blackengineer.com

Rooney was selected for appointment to Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service in 2006 and assigned as laboratory director to provide R&D as well as technical support to the director of ISSO on acquisition and management of technology, intelligence systems, and related methodologies to support the organization. MARK N. RUSS Deputy Director Operational Support Naval Criminal Investigative Service Naval Criminal Investigative Service

Mark Russ was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 2016 and has 30 years of federal service. Russ was appointed in 2019 as the deputy director of operational support with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). He exercises daily oversight of agency business operations, including financial, human capital, logistical, acquisition, administrative, and information technology functions. He advises the NCIS director on agency business operations and support services, including planning, programming, policies, and procedures associated with cyber, intelligence, human resources, material, capital, fiscal, acquisition, administrative, and technology functions. Prior to his current assignment, Russ served as the executive assistant director (EAD) for the NCIS National Security Directorate (2016–2018). He exercised program management oversight of counterterrorism/counterintelligence investigations and operations, including espionage, terrorism, compromise, technology transfer, cyber intrusion, insider threat, and threats to research development and acquisition programs. He served as the primary advisor to the NCIS director and deputy director on all national security investigations, operations, and operational support services. He was also responsible for manning, training, and equipping agency personnel to protect Navy and Marine Corps forces, operations, information, facilities, equipment, and networks from attacks and the intelligence activities of foreign governments and international terrorist organizations. ALONZIE SCOTT III Director of Mission Support Office of Naval Research

Alonzie Scott III was appointed to the

Senior Executive Service in September and assumed the

responsibilities of the director of mission support, Office of Naval Research (ONR) in November. He is responsible for human capital, command logistics, information technology infrastructure, facility management, security, and performance improvement functions across the ONR enterprise. Prior to this position, Scott was Enterprise Talent Management Office/senior executive advisor at Naval Surface Warfare Center. He was also director of Enterprise Talent Management Office and director, Senior Executive Management Office at NAVSEA. Throughout his career, Scott created innovative talent management; quality of life; and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs. His diverse and successful portfolio of work spans a 36-year career. He earned numerous awards and special recognitions, such as the Navy Civilian Superior Service Award, Black Engineer of the Year (BEYA) Special Recognition Award for Outstanding Leadership, Meritorious Unit Commendation, OPM Best Practice for Executive Leadership, Command Excellence Award, and Navy Civilian Meritorious Service Award. Scott received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of West Florida, where he serves on the Board of Trustees as chair of the Student Affairs Committee.

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As the ARNG’s chief financial officer and senior civilian, he provides oversight to more than 3,000 financial professionals in all the U.S. states and territories. He is responsible for attaining and distributing the necessary financial resources for the 336,000 Army National Guard personnel to meet, or exceed, operational readiness requirements. Prior to his current assignment, Roberts served as the director of accountability and audit readiness, office of the assistant secretary of the Army, financial management and comptroller. Roberts was appointed to the Senior Executive Service on March 19, 2017. He has a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Hampton University and a Master of Business Administration from Johns Hopkins University.

ARTHUR L. SCOTT, JR. Assistant Auditor General for Research, Development, Acquisition, and Logistics

Arthur Scott was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in November 2010 and has 23 years of federal service in the Department of Navy and United States Postal Service Office of Inspector USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE General. As the assistant auditor general for research, development, acquisition, and logistics, he is responsible for overseeing a directorate of 70 auditors in the performance of internal audits that focus on the research, development, and acquisition of Navy and Marine Corps platforms and warfare systems with an annual budget of over $50 billion. His staff is in Washington, D.C., at the historic Washington Navy Yard. A native of South Carolina, Scott holds a Bachelor of Science in accounting from South Carolina State University Scott has received numerous awards and recognitions during his audit career, including the American Society of Military Comptroller’s Meritorious Performance Award from the Department of Defense comptroller. CARL E. SHELTON, JR. Deputy Inspector General of the Marine Corps

Carl Shelton is the principal advisor to the deputy naval inspector general for Marine Corps matters/inspector general of the Marine Corps (IGMC), with full authority to act in all matters within the mission of the IGMC. He is the senior civilian authority for promoting Marine Corps combat readiness, institutional integrity, effectiveness, discipline, and credibility through impartial and independent inspections, assessments, inquiries, investigations, teaching, and training. Acting under the authority, direction, and control of the secretary of the Navy, the IGMC is responsible for investigating and reporting upon the efficiency of the Marine Corps and its preparation to support military operations by combatant commands. Shelton has extensive inspector general experience gained over the past 10 years, and he is certified by the Association of Inspectors General. Prior to assuming his current position, Shelton began his career as an infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps and retired after 30 years of faithful service. His personal awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal (four Gold 68

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Stars), Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, and numerous unit citations/ medals. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from Rutgers University and a master’s degree in national security strategy. THEODORE SHORT, JR. Comptroller, Naval Air Systems Command

Theodore Short’s federal career spans over 25 years in financial management. During his tenure with Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), he has oversight of budget formulation and financial reporting in financial management positions. Short entered Senior Executive Service as NAVAIR comptroller in 2010. He is responsible for budgeting, accounting, and financial management in an organization responsible for $42 billion annually in acquisition and sustainment funds. Short leads fiscal policies and controls financial operations for NAVAIR budgets, accounting and finance, and audit and review. Short has twice been recognized with the prestigious Department of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award. He is a member of the American Society of Military Comptrollers and president of the Southern Maryland chapter. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Salisbury University in 1988. ELLEN L. SMITH Assistant Auditor General for Financial Management and Comptroller Audits Naval Audit Service

Ellen Smith provides executive oversight and direction for audits of the Department of the Navy (DON) accounting and finance, and manpower operations and programs. She serves as the senior official in charge of executing advanced techniques to identify and review the most significant risks and make recommendations and decisions to strengthen internal controls within the DON financial and manpower arenas. Prior to her present assignment,

Smith was the deputy to the assistant auditor general for installations and environment audits. She began her auditing career at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Dahlgren, VA, and later transferred to the Naval Audit Service. She began her public service career as a cooperative education student at the Military Sealift Command in Bayonne, NJ, as an accounting trainee. Smith holds a master’s degree in public administration from Troy University and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University. She is a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute Leadership Development Program at Charlottesville, VA, and the Bridging the Gap Leadership Development Program. She is a certified defense financial auditor and a member of the American Society of Military (ASMC). Smith was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in July 2015 and has over 30 years of government service. JIMMY SMITH Director, Office of Small Business Programs Department of the Navy

Jimmy Smith assumed the responsibilities of the director for the Small Business Program in June 2019. He serves as the chief advisor to the secretary of the Navy on all small business matters. Smith has been charged with overseeing small business acquisition policy, strengthening government and private sector partnerships, and fostering opportunities to leverage small businesses as strategic advantage for the benefit of our warfighters. In March 2017, Smith served as the deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for expeditionary programs and logistics management. He served as the principal advisor to the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition on matters related to the Navy’s Expeditionary Force, delivering upon urgent warfighter needs and overseeing acquisition logistics policy. Before that assignment, he served as the director of nuclear weapon safety and security at Strategic Systems Programs (SSP). In this capacity, he was responsible for the safekeeping of nearly 70 percent of this nation’s nuclear arsenal. Before working at SSP, Smith served as the director for the Above Water Sensors Directorate, where www.blackengineer.com


LISA P. SMITH Department of Defense Senior Executive Service Deputy Director of Logistics, Deputy Chief of Staff of Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection Headquarters Air Force, Washington, D.C.

Lisa P. Smith, a member of the Department of Defense Senior Executive Service, is the deputy director of logistics, deputy chief of staff of logistics, engineering, and force protection, Headquarters Air Force, Washington, D.C. She is responsible for supporting the director of logistics by providing executive leadership and direction for organizing, training, and equipping more than 180,000 technicians and managers maintaining the aerospace weapons system inventory. Smith assists with providing strategic direction for material and equipment management, fuels, vehicle management and operations, distribution, personal property, and passenger traffic management. The directorate develops logistics readiness, maintenance, and munitions policy, ensuring the readiness of the single largest element of manpower supporting Air Force combat forces globally. Smith entered civil service in February 1986 through the Professional and Administrative Career Outstanding Scholar Program at Robins Air Force Base, GA, and has over 29 years of logistics, acquisition, and supply chain experience. She has held leadership positions in the Department of Air Force and office of secretary of Defense. Prior to her current assignment, Smith was the deputy director of logistics, civil engineering, and force protection, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. RENATA C. SPINKS Cyber Technology Officer U.S. Marine Corp Forces Cyberspace Command

Renata Spinks is a cyber technology officer for the Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command. In this capacity, she provides www.blackengineer.com

command-level support to the commanding major general of Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command, leading complex problem sets for offensive and defensive cyberspace operations. Spinks brings a unique set of skills and perspectives to the Corps with almost 20 years of military and civilian service experience. As an Army 44th MEDCOM combat veteran, she served as a patient administrator assigned to medical evacuation for the 28th Combat Support Hospital, where she was exposed to how critical the confidentiality, integrity, availability, and security of data is. Spinks built upon her military experience, achieving expertise in information systems, forensics, cybersecurity operations, and risk management. She has designed and engineered complex systems, tools, techniques, and protocols for financial and law enforcement industries as well as the intelligence community. Before joining the Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command, Spinks served in leadership positions throughout the federal government, building her foundation in cybersecurity while with the Cybercrimes Center supporting human trafficking and child exploitation investigations. Spinks earned a Bachelor of Science degree in information systems from St. Augustine’s University and a master’s degree in technology management. ALPHONSO THOMAS Director of Engineering and Technical Management Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma

Alphonso Thomas, a member of the Senior Executive Service, is the director of engineering and technical management at the Air Force Sustainment Center (AFSC), Tinker Air Force Base, OK. He is responsible for the development, implementation, and oversight of the center’s technical policies, processes, databases, and goals/standards as well as the overall scientific and engineering expertise for the AFSC. Thomas is responsible for leadership and technical direction to a technical workforce of more than 4,500 science and

engineering professionals supporting the center’s mission at three locations (Robins Air Force Base, GA; Hill Air Force Base, UT; and Tinker Air Force Base) and encompassing depot maintenance, repair and overhaul activities, supply chain management, and software maintenance and development enterprise. Thomas began his professional career as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, managing space and missile warning acquisition programs, including the Defense Support Program and the Cheyenne Mountain Upgrade Program. He began his civil service career at the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center leading development and test of software sustainment and upgrades for the B-1 Bomber and electronic attack pods. He later served as chief engineer, Information Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, NY, where he was responsible for development and implementation of tailored systems engineering and program management processes across the directorate’s broad portfolio of command, control, communications, cyber and intelligence science, and technology programs.

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he managed procuring and sustaining warfighting missiles, guns, and ammunition systems for Navy warships. He graduated from Tuskegee University with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. He began his career in government service in 1991 at Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C.

CHRISTOPHER THOMAS Director of Information and Technology U. S. Army, Deputy Chief of Staff G-9

Christopher Thomas was selected to the Senior Executive Service in January 2019. In his current position as the director for information and technology for the U.S. Army deputy chief of staff G-9, he is responsible for the administration of DCS, G-9 Cyber and Mission Assurance programs, and provides expert support for the management and execution of the installations, energy, and environmental business domain. In a previous assignment, Thomas supported the U.S. Coast Guard as the deputy chief information security officer, chief of cybersecurity policy, and deputy chief privacy officer (acting). He supported the Defense Intelligence Agency as the deputy chief of the Systems Certifications Division and senior DIA certifier. Thomas holds USBE & Information Technology | WINTER 2020

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SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE an M.S. in information assurance, and he is a graduate of the National Defense University Advance Management and Chief Information Officer programs. Thomas served over 20 years in the United States Navy. KENYATA WESLEY Executive Director Army Contracting Command – Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland (ACC-APG)

Kenyata L. Wesley Sr. is the executive director of the Army Contracting Command— Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (ACC-APG), a major contracting center of the U.S. Army Contracting Command. He manages and leads a geographically dispersed contracting center responsible for enabling Army readiness by supporting Army-wide research and development efforts and mission-critical contracting for program executive offices, institutional Army customers, and the warfighter. ACC-APG executes more than 32,000 contracting actions annually, valued at more than $11.4 billion. Wesley was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in September 2014 and has held several key assignments within Department of Defense contracting and small business to include acting director for the Office of Small Business Programs, deputy of innovation and technology within the Department of Defense Office of Small Business Programs, special advisor to the director, defense procurement and acquisition policy, and the director of Defense cost and pricing within the office of the undersecretary of Defense for acquisition, technology, and logistics. MARSHALL WILLIAMS Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA (M&RA))

Marshall Williams, in his role as the principal deputy assistant secretary of the Army (manpower and reserve affairs) (ASA (M&RA)), is the highestranking African-American civilian government employee in the Pentagon. He is responsible for the supervision of manpower, personnel, 70

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and reserve component affairs for the Department of the Army and is the principal advisor to the secretary of the Army for policy and performance oversight of human resources, training, readiness, mobilization, military health affairs, force structure, manpower management, equal opportunity, equal employment opportunity, marketing, and other critical matters. Williams retired from the U.S. Army as the senior enlisted advisor to both the 19th secretary of Defense, the Honorable William J. Perry, and the 20th secretary of Defense, the Honorable William S. Cohen. In this capacity, he reported directly to the secretary of Defense and was instrumental in resolving strategic and operational personnel issues that impacted 1.2 million enlisted service members from all military services. In various civilian executive roles, he worked closely with the Department of Defense, federal agencies, and Congress in support of combat systems products and services. His portfolio included the Stryker family of vehicles, the Abrams Main Battle Tank, armament programs, munitions systems, research and development programs, nuclear, biological and chemical defense, and robotic programs. As the chief of staff, Support Solutions Division, at BAE Systems, he was responsible for BAE’s largest and most diverse division with 14,200 personnel. He provided oversight of daily worldwide operations and sustainment, engineering, and systems integration. BRIAN A. WOOD Executive Director U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command Logistics Center

Brian Wood is a member of the Senior Executive Service, appointed on Aug. 2. He serves as the executive director of the U.S. Army Aviation & Missile Command Logistics Center. Wood is the command’s senior leader in developing vision, strategy, and implementation plans to achieve a comprehensive logistics approach for the Army aviation and missile weapon systems. Wood provides leadership and guidance to

a global organization in 33 worldwide locations consisting of more than 1,700 government civilians and approximately 2,500 contractors who provide a wide range of life cycle logistics including acquisition logistics, supply chain management, industrial base operations, and field equipment maintenance. He received his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Memphis State University, and a master’s degree in business administration from Alabama A&M University. MAX R. WYCHE Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1 Headquarters, U.S. Army Materiel Command

Appointed to the Senior Executive Service in July 2015, Max Wyche is currently the deputy chief of staff, G-1, for the U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC). In this position, he serves as one of the lead players in sustaining, training, and renewing the Materiel Command’s 185,000-plus civilian workforce. He directs, controls, and monitors work through two assistant deputies and eight division chiefs, with a staff totaling 81 personnel. Wyche’s portfolio of programs includes civilian and military personnel management, total force development and training, occupational health and safety, quality of life, and installation soldier and family programs. Before his current assignment, Wyche was the executive director, strategic programs and advisory services, Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Services (DCPAS). DCPAS is aligned under the deputy assistant secretary of Defense, civilian personnel policy, and is a Defense human resources activity component. A member of the Senior Executive Service, Wyche was responsible for policies and program development affecting over 800,000 Department of Defense civilian employees. Additionally, he was responsible for managing civilian senior executive management programs, leadership, learning and development, strategic analysis and reporting, strategic human capital planning, human capital program assessment and accountability, and enterprise recruiting and outreach. S

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Pamela Obiomon, Ph.D.,

Dean, Roy G. Perry College of Engineering, Prairie View A&M University

US Black Engineer & Information Technology (USBE&IT) magazine launched the maiden issue of Leading Voices (LV) in the fall of 2017. Broken up into three or four columns written by inventors, entrepreneurs, and STEM policymakers, the section spotlights the 14 challenges outlined by the National Academy of Engineering, and disruptors such as artificial intelligence and bioengineering. Through the years, LV has provided perspectives on smart cities, building a weather-ready nation, and where AI is in your future. An auspicious start for one of USBE magazine’s newest sections. Leading Voices is available in print and online at www.blackengineer.com.

Leading Voices Contributing Editors .........................

Pamela Obiomon, Ph.D.

Dean, Roy G. Perry College of Engineering, Prairie View A&M University

Major (Ret.) E. Sean Lanier

Founder & Executive Director, Resolve Solutions Incorporated (RSI)

James Lampkin

Program Manager Walmart Global Tech’s Information Security (InfoSec)

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Protecting the Engineering Experience at HBCUs T

he times in which we live are truly unprecedented—and challenging. The COVID-19 pandemic and the injustices that have transpired over the last several months presented several opportunities and challenges simultaneously for African Americans and historically Black colleges and universities across this country. While some funding is available to HBCUs across the nation, it is not comparable to what is being offered to our cultural counterparts at prestigious “tier-one” institutions. This discrepancy gives larger predominantly white institutions (PWIs) opportunities to offer more significant scholarships to minorities. As the adage says, money talks, and I believe this situation may cause some HBCUs to get ignored, and the experiences they provide to get overlooked by some of the brightest minority candidates. This is potentially detrimental to minority STEM students, particularly engineers, and we simply cannot allow that to happen. It is imperative that we protect the rich engineering opportunities and experiences aspiring minority students can have at our nation’s HBCUs. The HBCU Difference Statistics show that 90 percent of Black higher education students attend PWIs. However, if you look at the number of students who graduate and receive engineering degrees, HBCUs do a significantly better job of preparing and producing Black engineering graduates than PWIs. Prairie View A&M University is the number three producer of AfricanAmerican engineering students out of 1,074 total engineering schools. That’s pretty extraordinary. Further, we produce 42 percent of Black students who go on to receive doctorate degrees in STEM and engineering. For us to have such a small number of African Americans (10 percent or less), we are still producing a majority of new STEM professionals. This snapshot justifies the significance of HBCUs to STEM industries. Simply put, HBCUs take as their responsibility what most PWIs do not: We train our minority

engineering students so that they have strong foundations. We focus on more than course work and curriculum.

The mission to protect and wholly strengthen engineering programs at HBCUs is truly multifaceted.

The HBCU experience differs from the traditional PWI experience in several ways, but perhaps one of the most notable is in the level of attention given to our first-generation and low-income students. We take an approach that acknowledges that the foundation and background of a student’s academic career is as impactful as the instruction they will go on to receive at the university level. HBCUs are better at identifying those students who might be entering college without the proper preparation from their high schools and, as a result, begin at a bit of a disadvantage compared to their peers. We take deliberate steps to not just level the playing field, but also to aid these students in advancing beyond their initial expectations and goals. At PVAMU, these steps include enrichment tools such as leadership conferences, workshops centered around interviewing skills, and even hands-on experience that takes place in any one of our multimillion-dollar facilities. HBCUs understand that engineers aren’t born; they’re taught. We value the journey that transforms a student from a novice to an expert in all aspects of their development. We take seriously our role in ensuring that once they graduate, they’re not only good at what they do but are seen as pioneers and leaders in their field.

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Leading Voices Addressing the Challenges In order for HBCUs to be raised up and get recognized as the educational STEM titans that we are, our message has to be spoken by voices beyond our own. HBCU partners and advocates need to champion our efforts to their peer companies. These voices are severely lacking right now. What’s more, we have practically no defenders in the larger political arenas and discussions. Yes, we have companies, particularly now with the pandemic, seeking our students out. But companies in the private sector need to work alongside us to showcase to government entities how important we are to the future of the STEM industry. They need to acknowledge to the industry how much we contribute to major advancements in corporate America. Another disconnect in what could otherwise be thriving, symbiotic relationships between HBCU engineering departments and major corporate partners is an interest in our graduates and not our programs and processes. Businesses gladly seek out our students and knock on our doors to recruit our graduates. They want our students to work for them. They want to grow diversity on their teams. Yet, they don’t truly invest in our facilities or teaching. What’s more, they rarely see a need to seriously invest in HBCU campuses as they do with PWIs for mutual growth and forward advancement for everyone involved. Corporations need to focus on creating a thriving engineering ecosystem with HBCUs and not see us simply as ponds to fish for the newest and brightest professionals. Send your experts to our campuses to dialogue about needed innovation and engage in work at our state-of-the-art research centers alongside our professors and students. Give our professors projects to solve and support them financially as you would a PWI campus. Reciprocate to HBCUs the funding, time, and resources given to other “tier-one” institutions and engineering programs. Yes, scholarships are great, and grants are good. However, we need equal investing in our curriculums to effectively promote the amazing work our students and professors achieve every day on our campuses.

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HBCUs: Formidable Opponents College-bound high school seniors know the excitement associated with deciding which college to attend after turning the tassel. I am absolutely an advocate of selecting the school that specializes in your area of study. However, students need to know that HBCU engineering programs should not be an afterthought. We are worthy competitors to many of the well-known PWIs. To overlook a school such as PVAMU, for instance, is to disregard all the cutting-edge research that takes place within our esteemed HBCU learning institutions. PVAMU boasts 11 outstanding research centers. We have a $5 million dollar AI machine learning lab supported by

HBCUs are better at identifying those students who might be entering college without the proper preparation from their high schools and, as a result, begin at a bit of a disadvantage compared to their peers. We take deliberate steps to not just level the playing field, but also to aid these students in advancing beyond their initial expectations and goals.

the Air Force with four postdoctoral researchers, 12 Ph.D. students, 10 master’s students, and 30 undergraduates all doing excellent work. PVAMU won a $5 million dollar research center for cybersecurity initiatives with prestigious faculty and students at the helm. The excellence doesn’t stop there. We’re doing great work in the study of biofuels and fuel cells

in another $5 million research center for energy and sustainability. We at PVAMU are building the facilities and strengthening our programs, and the results of those efforts are very desirable. But we need top students here. One of our top priorities in the College of Engineering at PVAMU is to become the number one producer of African-American engineers in the nation. Currently holding at number three, we get closer to that goal every day. I want students to recognize all that an HBCU like PVAMU can offer them, and that starts with one step in a chain reaction of support and excellence. We want to hire stellar faculty to attract top students. We know those students will go on to achieve great things at the university, and later in their fields of work. Our hope is that the students, now professionals, will go on to become leaders in their highranking companies and bring additional engagement and endowments to our campuses. It really is all connected, and we are ALL needed to preserve and expand STEM and engineering capabilities at HBCUs. The mission to protect and wholly strengthen engineering programs at HBCUs is truly multifaceted. Likewise, the onus to achieve it doesn’t rest solely on one entity in the process of developing successful engineering professionals. However, the goal is singular and clear: In order for the future of engineering to blossom and succeed in our nation, HBCUs must thrive. In order for them to thrive, companies and government entities need to recognize our worth by verbally promoting our facilities and programs, offering robust financial support, and providing opportunities to our students, faculty, and campuses. Companies like Boeing, LockheedMartin, Chevron, and Hewlett Packard are great examples of businesses that understand our mission and show their support with action. But we need more companies to step up and do the same. Then and only then will we be able to preserve excellence in engineering at our HBCU campuses and truly shine as the engineering beacons we are to national and global STEM industries. S

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Major (Ret.) E. Sean Lanier, Founder & Executive Director, Resolve Solutions Incorporated (RSI)

An Ecosystem for Student Success W hen children grow up and dream about their futures, they do not really consider the challenges and obstacles they may face. It is not until they are adults that they begin to realize their goals may not be as easily attained as they thought. Realizing this, and wanting to encourage success for young adults, I created Resolve Solutions Incorporated (RSI), an organization that provides underrepresented students educational, financial, and college/career preparation support. The namesake “resolve” stems from my roots and upbringing. My grandparents, determined to be a part of societal change, were a part of the civil rights movement. I was a part of a patriotic family that felt it a rite of passage, so to speak, for male members to serve in the military. Even I, as a 2-year-old, seemed resolute in my desire to join the armed forces after attending my first airshow. It made me want to be a pilot, and the military was the only viable pathway to get the necessary flight training. Resolve has been a primary catalyst in filling in the gap of service, which I think is, or should be, important to African Americans. Along with the mission of service, I created RSI to address the misnomer of “a limited amount of Black talent” stated by many military leaders and corporate CEOs. As a supply chain expert, there was a numbers aspect that did not add up or make sense to me. If you have a population of 330 million, and 26 million of those are African-Americans, there really should not be a question of talent shortage. RSI aims to create a pool of selected, trained, and qualified AfricanAmerican professionals ready for the workforce. How do I address these issues through RSI? Our strategy begins with mentoring partnerships and identifying candidates qualified to receive ROTC scholarships. They are the secret sauce to the program. Most of our mentors are former military members, as well as alumni of various schools. Others are former and current industry professionals who simply volunteer their time and talents. I try to

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seek out veterans who have served, have a passion for helping young people, and have a desire to help restore the next generation of leaders. I also work to recruit people who may have made some mistakes in their careers and are willing to share those mistakes in hopes that young students will learn from them. There are many people who are not willing to share those experiences at first, who end up bringing valuable life lessons to the conversation with our young people. It is critically important that we expose young students to the positive and negative decisions they may face.

All these things ultimately boil down to considering elements of relationship and success. I want to get students to look at their journey from a holistic perspective, and that can be daunting. That is where RSI mentors come in to converse and work with them as trusted advisors.

At RSI, it is vital that we find mentors who understand the value of investing their time in young people. Most children do not have an adult in their lives for more than a certain period. Once they turn 18, their parents are no longer “guardians.” Even in the military, leaders that come in may be there for one or two years max before there is turnover. Throughout

that entire pipeline, there really is not someone there as a consistent anchor in those young people’s lives. Students really need to have continuity. They must have some type of stabilizing force or someone who can help them see things around the corner and have necessary conversations they might not have considered. The issue is not that young people are not smart; the concern is about them being able to see and prepare for what is coming ahead, and that’s how mentors help to support them. Once we partner students with mentors at RSI, we work together to develop long-term career plans. If you attend one of BEYA’s Stars & Stripes events and look at the careers of noted generals and admirals, you are looking at a 35-plusyear career plan in the flesh. Considering three years of middle school, four years in high school, and four to five years in college, that’s 11 to 12 years of the plan that most students consider. Because most of the young people we serve are first-generation college students, that is just about as far as they think. But say a student considers a career in the military and starts as an O-1 lieutenant/ensign; they have another 20–25 years before they become an O-6 colonel/captain. Who will consistently be there for these young adults during these 10–20 years of their lives? Their RSI mentors will, and that’s why mentorship is such a vital part of our program. RSI also emphasizes professional networking for students. When students enter college, they do not typically have a stable base of contacts to help guide them. Networking is important because young people conceptually have an idea of what they want to do and be as adult professionals. However, building strong networks enables them to get more insight to make informed decisions. The hope is they will then become advocates for RSI by reaching out to their peers. We know peer-to-peer coaching is the toughest form of leadership. But if students have their mentors who help and teach them how to network, that can help close the gap. It is easy for me to talk about RSI, but when we get other

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Leading Voices students talking about their experiences with the program, there is more validity behind our rapport. There are many more young people than mentors, and young people know where the talent is in their peer groups. Again, growth of the AfricanAmerican talent pool is the goal, and networking between students can foster that greatly. Beyond that, RSI also works to shift students’ perspectives on college preparation. The program emphasizes students choosing an institution beyond financial considerations only. There are several studies that show AfricanAmerican and Latinx students base their school choices solely on the most economically feasible options. I work diligently to get them out of the fear of debt, a process we call “clutter.” That clutter tends to obscure students’ vision so that they cannot see the vast array of options that are truly available. RSI highlights other important factors students might not consider, such as cultural demographics, available majors, student-teacher ratios, and average class sizes. RSI also suggests that students consider graduation and employment rates, graduate school agreements, the strength of an institution’s alumni network, available career services, and the overall network support. All these things ultimately boil down to considering elements of relationship and success. I want to get students to look at their journey from a holistic perspective, and that can be daunting. That is where RSI mentors come in to converse and work with them as trusted advisors. Finally, RSI works to provide language immersion opportunities for students. The impetus behind the language immersion is that many of our STEM majors cannot get internships after their freshman year of college because they have not fully entered their majors. Language immersion provides corporate partner interaction as well as some amazing, in-the-moment problemsolving opportunities. In an unknown country, students are forced to look at a problem, consider the best solution, and improve the outcome for the future. So far, participants have proven what we already knew: If you give young people unique experiences, challenges,

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and opportunities, they will rise to the occasion. This makes them better professionals, but it also makes them better individuals and citizens. Part of our vision is not just to get students, as budding professionals, into the C-suite and executive boardrooms. RSI is not happy for them to only have a seat at the table. We want them to sit at the table and be able to contribute value.

Students really need to have continuity. They must have some type of stabilizing force or someone who can help them see things around the corner and have necessary conversations they might not have considered. The issue is not that young people are not smart; the concern is about them being able to see and prepare for what is coming ahead, and that’s how mentors help to support them.

RSI is a tried and tested program with an eight-year track record of success. While the program’s numbers and success rates are good, I know they can be better. We need more funding to get more kids in the program and become more efficient in our operations. The program is designed to be more efficient; it expands and grows as we scale up. We would also like to scale our program and strengthen our partnerships, particularly with HBCUs. Our goal is to develop relationships with 12 to 15 HBCUs within the next year. We have made great progress with the help of partner schools like Virginia Military Institute, Virginia State University, North Carolina A&T State University, and Alabama A&M University. Our strategic goal is to get up to 500 young people a year, with half of those being HBCU students. The success of that goal will be contingent on relationships we build with HBCUs, their alumni, and our mentors. RSI has a passion for helping underrepresented young people pursue military careers and government service. These students already have the drive to be tomorrow’s pioneers and forerunners; they just need opportunities to be trained, to grow, and to transition into better leaders. Because they have a spark, RSI wants to be there to provide the oxygen to turn that spark into a flame. S

There are many Leading RSI wants them to have an E.F. Hutton moment; when they speak, others at the table should be listening. RSI teaches students that when they get in these spaces, they must contribute value while they are there. This is the definition of service.

Voices stories available at Blackengineer.com. Head over to read more stories just like this: https://l.ead.me/bboL3b

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James Lampkin, Program Manager, Walmart Global Tech’s Information Security (InfoSec)

Walmart’s Support for Veterans # ThisIsThatPlace where I leverage my military leadership skills, technical education, and life’s lessons to execute my role as a staff technical program manager in Walmart Global Tech’s Information Security (InfoSec) department. As part of Global Tech, we’re responsible for data security solutions for the world’s largest retailer including our international markets spanning 26 countries, brickand-mortar facilities, and our online presence. Our InfoSec team has a large breadth of territory to manage under our ecosystem, and our primary goal is to be the most trusted retailer in the industry. I am responsible for various aspects of planning and execution in the Data Security program. I help to deliver projects involving cryptographicrelated products and solutions including public key infrastructure, certificate management, and password vaults. The team is responsible for other cryptographic services. However, generally speaking, our main charge in the Walmart enterprise is data securityminded programs. In addition, I currently serve in the Arkansas Army National Guard as a battery commander in the 142nd Field Artillery Brigade. Walmart recognizes that military veterans bring unique perspectives and a variety of experiences from their training that can aid in this goal. Regardless of five-year, 10-year, or 20-year military tenures, there is so much we can leverage from veterans. We know that their training involves many high-level skills, including critical and real-time thinking, being agile and adept at thinking on their feet, leadership, communication, and many others. As the largest private employer in the nation, we encounter a great variety of opportunities that require these problem-solving skills, often with a rapid response. When we consider all that our military branches do for the government and for national security, we know our armed forces encounter a number of similar situations that require them to function as we do. Because of those parallels, we seek out skilled veterans to help us solve complex and multifaceted problems that will help us safeguard our consumers’ information

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and transactions.

We put these skills into action in InfoSec by focusing on intel as a part of our cybersecurity strategy. Our job is to understand the current dynamics of what our adversaries are essentially “doing in the dark.” To be successful, we need to stay on top of the trends our enemies are exploring and researching as potential techniques for future attacks that may

When we consider all that our military branches do for the government and for national security, we know our armed forces encounter a number of similar situations that require them to function as we do. Because of those parallels, we seek out skilled veterans to help us solve complex and multifaceted problems that will help us safeguard our consumers’ information and transactions.

be leveraged against a retail company. We have a team that monitors what is happening in the global landscape and the digital Walmart environment. Their jobs are to analyze and strategize how to harden our own ecosystem to protect the company against possible attacks. My experience as a military intelligence officer in the 142nd FAB is comparable.

The U.S. armed forces all leverage the tools and assets available to understand what adversaries are planning in the global landscape so that they have the appropriate course of action to protect national interests. Our veterans are so important to our corporate strategy because preemptive propositioning and engagement occurs in both the military and Walmart arena. Regarding specific skills that may be relevant in Walmart’s InfoSec division, we look for proficiencies in numerous areas: authentication and authorization, vulnerability management, cryptographic functions, networking, or data and internet security. We are also focused on the cloud environment experience because of its direct impact on so many digital and online applications across our brands, including IoT opportunities and AI processes. This is by no means an exhaustive list. Even if we do not have a particular skill set pinpointed, that by no means implies that other skills are not appreciated, welcomed, or considered. If we find there might be something we could possibly use with a person’s skills to fulfill a niche, we will definitely consider it. Walmart is a company that is openminded and aware enough to appreciate how a unique skill or idea could even lead to new team structure or could possibly become its own program that innovates on behalf of the entire organization. From the top down, Walmart is a hyperfocused organization when it comes to military veterans. Our chief information security officer is a veteran of the Marine Corps. The military experience of other managers and executives who have served in our armed forces is robust. As in InfoSec, veterans receive constant support, respect, and endorsement from the entire enterprise. If you are a military veteran, know that the sky truly is the limit for you in this organization. Any and all of the skills received in your training and career as a soldier can and should have a home at Walmart. S

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JOBS IN

AVIATION

CAREER OUTLOOK According to the Aviation Industry Leaders Report 2019, airlines are the lifeblood of the aviation market. But airlines form just one part of the wider aviation industry, says knowledge platform, Revfine.com. “In addition to airlines, the aviation industry includes aircraft (and drone) manufacturers, researchers, air safety specialists, businesses involved with military aviation, and, increasingly, companies that design, produce, and make use of drones,” writes Revfine. So, what do jobs in aviation—cargo transport, commercial, military, and even space tourism—look like? What kind of salary can one expect? What are the major trends?

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INSIDE >

Everything You Need to Know About the Aviation Industry

>

Discover a Career in Aviation

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CAREER OUTLOOK

Everything You Need to Know About the

AVIATION INDUSTRY by Alfred Lewisn editors@ccgmag.com

Are you a college student or recent college graduate considering an exciting career in aviation? You might be wondering what types of jobs exist in the aviation industry, or if there’s demand for aviation professionals. Consider that the Federal Aviation Administration notes the following pieces of evidence to highlight the need for qualified professionals for aviation careers. 80

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INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

THE FAA,

industry stakeholders, and the aerospace community project there will be more than 2 million more employees needed in the aviation and aerospace industries over the next 20 years. The U.S. Department of Commerce states that employees in STEM fields can expect to earn 26 percent more money on average and will be less likely to experience job loss. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that STEM occupations are projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations. Aviation professionals include positions such as aviation engineers, air traffic controllers, airline pilots, and aircraft equipment mechanics. The aviation and aerospace industries offer multiple high-demand career paths for both professionals interested in flying and professionals who prefer to stay on the ground. Aviation engineers design aircraft and their components, including drones, helicopters, satellites, missiles, and other flying vehicles. Aviation engineers evaluate designs to ensure they meet safety and environmental regulations, determine whether proposals meet technical requirements, and inspect aircraft for problems. Aviation engineers also create models or prototypes to make sure aircraft and other aviation products function as they were designed. According to BLS data, the average salary for an aviation engineer is more than $115,000. Air traffic controllers monitor and direct aircraft to ensure safety on runways and minimize delays. They monitor ground traffic at airports by directing pilots on their takeoff order and which runway they should use. Conversely, air traffic controllers monitor landing flights and their appropriate runway. They also communicate with other traffic control centers to transfer supervision of flights. By managing the flow of aircraft on the ground and in the air, air traffic controllers keep air travel safe for customers and staff. They use computer systems, radars, and visual references to direct aircraft, and are often communicating with several aircraft simultaneously. Not surprisingly, www.blackengineer.com

given their important role in safety, the average air traffic controller salary exceeds $124,000 a year. Looking for a career in the aviation industry that stays on the ground? Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians both repair aircraft as needed, install new and replacement parts, and perform scheduled maintenance. Aircraft mechanics diagnose mechanical and electrical problems on aircraft. They replace defective parts, ensure replacement parts meet established safety standards, and test aircraft parts using specialized diagnostic equipment. Aircraft mechanics stay organized and keep detailed records of their maintenance and repair work. Avionics technicians specialize in an aircraft’s electrical system. They test electronic equipment, diagnose malfunctions based on flight test data, and assemble electrical components. Avionics technicians also install the plane’s instrument panels, repair malfunctioning electrical components, and keep records of their work. Together, aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians ensure planes fly safely. They inspect aircraft, replace malfunctioning equipment, and perform scheduled maintenance. Some specialize in different types of aircraft, like helicopters, drones, or jets. They may also focus on a specific area of the aircraft, like the engine or hydraulic system. On average, aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians make $63,000 a year. Perhaps the most well-known career in aviation is the pilot. Airline and commercial pilots operate aircraft, such as commercial airplanes, military helicopters, and private planes. Pilots must check the condition of their aircraft before and after the flight, monitor the plane’s weight balance, verify fuel supply and weather conditions, and submit their flight plans to air traffic control. Pilots constantly communicate with air traffic controllers. During a flight, pilots monitor the engines and aircraft systems and navigate using cockpit instruments and visual references. Pilots work closely with their co-pilots, air traffic controllers, and ground personnel during takeoff and landing.

Airline pilots transport passengers and cargo, working with crew members to safely complete flights on schedule. Commercial pilots fly charter flights and aerial tours, while corporate pilots transport company executives. Agricultural pilots fly planes involved in agricultural practices, while helicopter pilots specialize in flying helicopters for business and leisure activities. On average, airline and commercial pilots earn over $115,000 a year.

Historical data shows that people are utilizing air travel more often and the industry is often struggling to employ enough qualified professionals to meet these demands. These high demands in the aviation field could lead to increased salaries and greater benefits to draw people to these various aviation positions. Prior to COVID-19, there was talk of a pilot shortage, but pilots are not the only aviation jobs in demand. Boeing estimates that between 2018 and 2037, the demand for new pilots will top 790,000, the need for new technicians will reach 754,000, and the new cabin crew demand will reach 890,000. While it is hard to predict how the COVID-19 outbreak will affect these trends in the short term, there will still be a need for qualified professionals. Another notable aspect to aviation job trends is the slow increase of women in the various job fields. In the United States, the number of commercial female pilots from 2000 to 2017 increased from 4.77 percent to 6.38 percent of the total commercial pilots. This suggests that while more and more women are looking for careers in aviation, there is still a need for more. With high demand and high potential wages, now is a great time to consider preparing your college or career goals to enter the aviation industry. S

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CAREER OUTLOOK

DIS A CAR

AV

by Alfred Lewisn editors@ccgmag.com

A

ccording to the Federal Aviation Administration, to maintain our country’s global leadership in aviation, today’s students must advance their skills in science, technology, education, and math (STEM). STEM is essential to the employment of future generations of workers in an increasingly technical, global marketplace, and it’s the key to a strong economic future for individuals and our country. Gaining the appropriate skills and knowledge through college degrees, trade schools, and other formal or informal means is essential to entering the aviation industry. Aviation careers exist across the nation whether at one of the country’s many airports or at manufacturing or corporate aviation buildings from coast to coast. Aerospace engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering or a related field in order to obtain entry-level positions. Some schools partner with companies to give students specialized, practical experience while earning their degree, which also enhances networking and job placement for the student. Aerospace engineers

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need strong analytical and mathematical skills. While completing an aviation degree, students specialize in topics like structural design, robotics, or propulsion. Aerospace engineers can specialize in systems like military aircraft, drones, spacecraft, or even missiles. Air traffic controllers must meet several requirements in order to enter the profession. Air traffic controllers must hold U.S. citizenship, complete training from an FAA recognized college, graduate from the Air Traffic-Collegiate Training Initiative, and earn a qualifying score on the FAA pre-employment test. Air traffic controllers must also begin their training before the age of 31 and retire by the age of 56. Professionals with prior experience, such as Armed Forces training in air traffic control, may be able to bypass the FAA education requirements. Once they meet all requirements, air traffic controllers still need to pass periodic drug tests as well as complete a rigorous physical exam and performance examinations twice a year.

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians typically need a degree from an FAA-approved aviation maintenance technical school for employment. These schools can offer associate degrees and bachelor’s degrees specific to the job. Many employers prefer candidates with a bachelor’s degree, rather than an associate’s degree. Aircraft mechanics, avionics equipment mechanics, aircraft technicians, and avionics equipment technicians need certification from the FAA to perform their job. Although separate certifications are available for airframe mechanics and engine mechanics, employers tend to prefer candidates with combined airframe and powerplant (A&P) certification. To maintain their credentials, aircraft mechanics must inspect or repair aircraft every 90 days and attend a refresher course every two years to keep their skills up to date. Airline and commercial pilots typically need at least a bachelor’s degree from a certified civilian flight school. They also need a commercial pilot’s license, an instrument rating, and 250 hours of flight www.blackengineer.com


JOB HORIZON

SCOVER REER IN

VIATION experience. Many companies require pilots to undergo physical, psychological, and aptitude tests to ensure they can handle the stress and other psychological effects of the job. Company training for pilots often includes roughly two months of ground school and an exam, 25 hours of flight time, and annual training to maintain their certification. Airline captains and first officers need a transport pilot license. Requirements for the license include obtaining 1,500 hours of flight time, passing written and flight exams, receiving advanced instrument ratings, and passing physical examinations. Employers are seeking A&P mechanics, mechanical skills, strong soft skills, leadership qualities, and dependability— all skills required to grow and advance within a company. Strong soft skills are needed to overcome some of the most common challenges of working in a technical-laden industry like aviation. According to expert Christine Hill, these challenges include:

• Creating cohesion and unity among varied skill levels and personalities

• Getting everyone on the shift to

work as safely as they can and perform well technically with good customer service

• Not knowing how to motivate and/or hold others accountable

• Keeping consistent, accurate, and

positive communication among and within all shifts

• Being a constant great example for others on the team

• Facilitating a healthy and pleasant work environment

• Managing time • Getting or earning respect from

those who have been there longer

• Lacking specific direction,

guidance, and support from upper management

• Being more assertive • Resolving employee relationship

• Trying to stay consistent on training • Ability to delegate responsibilities • Managing and dealing with several personality types as well as various departments

• Providing thorough and detailed

information on the work at hand

• Dealing with upset customers • Poor planning and project management

Job seekers can bolster their resume by seeking internships with an aviation company, which will not only give them hands-on experience in the field but also provide networking opportunities. Gaining a mentor who can help guide a candidate’s skill acquisition and development is also an invaluable resource. With a college degree in hand, some internship experience, and some interview preparation, a job seeker can confidently apply for aviation positions. S

issues and conflicts

• Leading/treating all team members fairly and equally

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Nominate a great STEM mentor or apply today! The Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) are the highest national mentoring awards bestowed by the White House. PAESMEM recognizes those who have made significant contributions both to mentoring and support of the future U.S. STEM workforce. Over 300 individuals and organizations have received this distinguished Presidential recognition, serving as exemplars to their colleagues and leaders in the national effort to develop more fully the nation’s human resources in STEM.

AD

Nominate a mentor or begin an application at www.paesmem.net. The National Science Foundation administers PAESMEM on behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

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FEBRUARY 17-19, 2022

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR AWARD WINNERS! Dr. John Slaughter Legacy Award Olie Burton

Most Promising Scientist in Industry Award Nyaradzo Longinaker

Modern Technology Leader Outstanding Achievement Award Damon Adams

Clarence Kennedy

Eddie Bland III

Alberto Lomeli

Devin Brown

Larry Lynn

Kory Brumfield

Paul McKenzie

Nicole Bullock

Nicholas A. Mingle

Herbert Cannon

Brian Northern

Michael Carswell

Richard Oliver-Goodwin

McKensey Corey Carter

Steve Patton

Brittani Chambers

Lesley A. Perkins

Keshonna Cooper

Maurice Peterson

Alveon Dixon

Stacee Pindell

Walter Ferguson

Anthony Printis

Natalie Franklin

James Riddick

Amrit Ghimire

Richard Simms

James Grant

Calvin Sojournary

Leon Hamer

Les Struthers

Lisa Hill

Kabirah Taylor

Tristan Hyde

Amanda Touchet

Kelly Johnson

Steve Wilson

Danielle Jones

Isaiah Wojckchonski

Natash Jones

Crystal Woods

Maria Joseph-King

Takita Zielieke


ARMY CIVILIAN CAREERS IN STEM Interested in STEM? Join the Army Civilian team and develop and work with cutting-edge technology to support Soldiers and protect and preserve our Nation. Be a part of something bigger. Visit goarmy.com/civilian for more info.

Š2018. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.

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US Black Engineer & IT Volume 44 Issue 4  

US Black Engineer and Information Technology is published by Career Communications Group, Inc. (CCG). CCG is dedicated to celebrating divers...

US Black Engineer & IT Volume 44 Issue 4  

US Black Engineer and Information Technology is published by Career Communications Group, Inc. (CCG). CCG is dedicated to celebrating divers...

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