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Fernanda de Paula

Shelley Hepworth is a producer, writer and editor based in Sydney, Australia. She was the managing editor of the SBS Food website for five years. Travelling across Brazil, Shelley relished the opportunity to explore the country’s dynamic relationship between food and culture, and her own passion for storytelling and photography.

Join Fernanda and Shelley on their culinary exploration of this beautiful and diverse land. Sample recipes from all corners of the country, from the salt cod fritters and cheese balls enjoyed in urban Brazil’s many bars and botecos; to the classic, more substantial meals like moqueca bahiana (seafood stew), feijoada (pork and bean stew) and arroz com mariscos (rice with shellfish); and indulgent sweet treats like coconut mousse and Brigadeiro chocolate truffles.

BRAZIL

Fernanda de Paula grew up in the mountainous state of Minas Gerais in Brazil and moved to Australia almost 10 years ago. She is a journalist, producer and presenter with a flair for recipe creation. She lives in Sydney, travels regularly to Brazil and is thrilled to share her homeland with a global audience.

THIS IS

Discover the taste of Brazil’s rich cultural heritage with This Is Brazil.

With all the colour of Carnival and recipes designed for sharing, This Is Brazil will take you there in no time.

BRAZIL Fernanda de Paula

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HOME-STYLE RECIPES and STREET FOOD

Brazil is a nation that loves to celebrate. Go to any football match, family barbecue, after-work drinks or the famous carnival street parades, and the playful atmosphere is contagious. This festive spirit carries over into every arena of life, including the kitchen. This Is Brazil gives you a taste of both Brazil’s rich heritage and the warm embrace of its people, with fun, easy-to-prepare dishes perfect for sharing with family and friends. So make yourself a cold caipirinha and enjoy cooking the Brazilian way!

Shelley Hepworth

FOOD

THIS IS

Shelley Hepworth 19/12/13 1:52 PM


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CONTENTS Introduction

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Street and Boteco Food: One bite at a time

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The Beach: Brazil’s playground

Home Style: MEALS from the HEART The Brazil Mix

Drinks and desserts: The sweet life Artisan Produce Glossary Index

26 50 88 116 146 176 178

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INTRODUCTION Brazil has a fascinating multicultural past. The land was home to the native Indians before the Portuguese arrived, bringing with them centuries of European tradition and the largest number of African slaves in history. This unprecedented combination of cultures fused in a unique way that is today reflected in dishes across the country. Last century, new waves of European and Asian migrants from countries such as Poland, Lebanon, Japan and Korea added yet another layer to this bubbling culture of passionate people. Brazilians have perfected the art of enjoying life and their capacity for fun captures the world’s imagination. It is a nation that loves to celebrate and will use any excuse to do so. Go to any football match, family barbecue, after-work drinks or the famous carnival street parades, and the playful atmosphere is contagious. Invitations to social occasions in Brazil will specify a start time, but never an end. The parties go on for hours and are usually punctuated by food. At churrascos, the famous Brazilian barbecues, meat is roasted over open flames and served in small portions over long periods. The beach is a social event in its own right, with mobile vendors passing by on foot selling prawn (shrimp) kebabs, grilled cheese, pastries filled with meat, and iced tea. Little bars known as botecos are everywhere and everyone has their favourite. Delicious pesticos, bite-sized snacks, are offered alongside ice-cold beer and the national drink, caipirinha.

prolific use of dendê oil in the cuisine of the North-East can be seen in the deep red tint of seafood stews known as moquecas, embraced across the country. Rice, beans and cassava root (usually made into flour) are consumed every day in Brazil. These ingredients, combined with a variety of meat, seafood, river catch and native fruits and vegetables, form the foundation of the cuisine. Meanwhile, the sugarcane plantations introduced centuries ago by the Portuguese not only helped to create a country of sweet-lovers, but are also responsible for Brazil’s unique sugarcane spirit, cachaça. In this book we aim to give you a taste of Brazil’s rich heritage and hope you feel the warm embrace of its people flowing through the recipes contained herein. The dishes are generally easy to prepare and allow for improvisation and spontaneity, both very Brazilian traits. Remember, in true Brazilian fashion, cooking is a joyful experience and always something to be shared, so have fun!

Brazil is a country of contrasts and while there are lots of choices for grazing, there are plenty of more substantial dishes too – some more casual eateries offer hammocks for patrons to rest in after feasting on the hearty meals they serve. While dishes such as feijoada are simply part of the national identity, others display regional variations. The African slaves brought not just a proud and vibrant culture of food, music, religion and dancing, but also the dendê palm, coconut and banana from their homeland. The

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introduction

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Pastels are served everywhere in Brazil – on the beach, at markets or during house parties. They come with all kinds of fillings: prawn, beef, ham and cheese, plain cheese, cheese and banana. This recipe is for prawn pastels, but you can fill them with whatever you like. Make them small for canapés or slightly larger to serve with a salad for lunch or dinner.

Pastel de Camarao Deep-fried prawn pastries

From Bruno Da Motta · Makes about 30

750 G (1 LB 11 OZ) RAW PRAWNS (SHRIMP) 2 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED 3–4 BIRD’S EYE CHILLIES, FINELY CHOPPED 2 TABLESPOONS OLIVE OIL ¼ ONION, DICED 3 TOMATOES, PEELED, SEEDED AND FINELY CHOPPED 250 ML (8½ FL OZ/1 CUP) TOMATO PASSATA (PURÉED TOMATOES) 2 TABLESPOONS FINELY CHOPPED CORIANDER (CILANTRO) LEAVES 2 TABLESPOONS TOMATO SAUCE (KETCHUP) OIL FOR DEEP FRYING LIME WEDGES TO SERVE

Garlic paste 1 TEASPOON CRUSHED GARLIC 1 TEASPOON FINELY CHOPPED PARSLEY 1 TEASPOON OLIVE OIL

Dough 1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ/6⅔ CUPS) PLAIN (ALL-PURPOSE) FLOUR, PLUS EXTRA, FOR ROLLING 1 TABLESPOON SEA SALT 250 ML (8½ FL OZ/1 CUP) CANOLA OIL 2 TABLESPOONS CACHAÇA (SEE GLOSSARY)

Vinaigrette ¼ YELLOW CAPSICUM (BELL PEPPER), FINELY CHOPPED ¼ GREEN CAPSICUM, FINELY CHOPPED ¼ RED CAPSICUM, FINELY CHOPPED ¼ ONION, DICED 1 TOMATO, DICED 2 TABLESPOONS RED WINE VINEGAR 2 TABLESPOONS OLIVE OIL PINCH OF SALT

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To make the vinaigrette, combine the capsicums, onion, tomato, vinegar, oil and salt in a bowl. Leave to marinate in the refrigerator overnight. Peel and devein the prawns, then combine them with the garlic and 1 teaspoon of the chilli. Leave to marinate in the refrigerator for a couple of hours. To make the garlic paste, use a mortar and pestle to blend the garlic, parsley and oil until a smooth paste is formed. To make the dough, put the flour in a large bowl and make a well in the middle. Add the salt, oil, cachaça and 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) warm water, and mix until combined. Firmly knead the dough for 5–10 minutes, or until the dough has an elastic texture. Rest the dough for at least 30 minutes. Heat the olive oil in a saucepan and cook the onion over a medium heat for 4 minutes, or until it begins to caramelise. Add the garlic paste and remaining chilli. Cook, stirring, for 1–2 minutes. Stir in the chopped tomatoes and sauté for a few minutes to allow the flavours to combine. Stir in the marinated prawns and the passata. Cook for 2–3 minutes, or until the prawns are almost cooked through. Stir in the coriander, tomato sauce and vinaigrette, and season with salt.

Divide the dough into 30 equal portions, then roll each portion into a 12 cm (4¾ in) round, sprinkling the dough with flour as you roll to prevent sticking. Spoon a small portion of the filling into the middle of each dough circle. Use the back of a fork to fold over the dough, creating a half-moon shape, and lightly flatten. Crimp the edges of the dough together. Heat 2.5 cm (1 in) of oil in a deep, heavy-based frying pan or saucepan to 180°C (350°F), or until a cube of bread dropped into the oil turns golden brown in 15 seconds. Cook the pastries in batches for 4 minutes per batch, or until they are golden brown. Remove the pastries using a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Serve the pastries with lime wedges. Notes: The cachaça creates bubbles in the dough when it’s fried, giving it a crunchy texture. You can use vodka or white vinegar instead of cachaça. The filling can also be stirred through pasta for a simple meal.

© 2014 Hardie Grant Books. All Rights Reserved.

street and boteco food

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This typical boteco food is easy to make and seriously delicious to eat. The chips go very well with a cold beer.

Mandioca frita Fried cassava chips

Serves 4–6

1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ) CASSAVA (SEE GLOSSARY), PEELED SALT RICE OR SUNFLOWER OIL, FOR DEEP FRYING

Rinse the peeled cassava under running water to remove any soil. Cut the cassava into pieces 8 cm (3¼ in) long, then cut each piece lengthways into quarters. Add the cassava pieces to a large saucepan and season with salt. Cover with water and bring to the boil over a high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, or until the cassava pieces are soft when tested with a fork. Drain the cassava and leave to cool.

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Pour enough oil into a deep, heavy-based frying pan or saucepan to cover the cassava pieces. Heat the oil to 200°C (400°F), or until a cube of bread dropped into the oil turns golden brown in 10 seconds. Carefully add the cassava pieces to the hot oil in batches, leaving at least 2 cm (¾ in) between the pieces. Cook for 8–10 minutes per batch, or until crisp. Remove the cassava chips using a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Sprinkle with salt, and serve immediately.

© 2014 Hardie Grant Books. All Rights Reserved.


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Street and Boteco Food: One Bite at a Time The Beach: Brazil’s Playground

Brazil has 7,491 km (4,654 miles) of coastline where pristine white sand meets the deep blue waters of the Atlantic, crossing seventeen states from north to south. Brazilians never miss an opportunity for fun, so the beach is part of the lifestyle – a social event. You go to meet new people, have a drink, listen to music and play sports such as footvolley. As always, food is an essential part of the equation.

in 1965 when football was banned on the beaches. Desperate players would take a football to the volleyball courts to disguise the game. A highly skilful sport that requires perfect ball control, it has since been taken up by professional footballers as an intense form of training.

At city beaches, deckchairs and umbrellas are set up as temporary bars with table service for drinks. Food vendors nonchalantly patrol the sand carting mobile cooktops, often with ear-splitting music blaring from built-in speakers. They stop every now and then to fill an order for barbecued prawn (shrimp) skewers, piping hot coalho cheese or grilled corn with butter, and it’s easy to lose yourself for hours, being awoken from your reverie by fellow beachgoers applauding the sunset, or by the (sometimes nasty) surprise of the bill.

While most urban beaches are buzzing, some spots on the coast remain quiet fishing villages that have survived the hunger of property development, and it feels like time has been suspended. Others, such as Natal’s Ponta Negra beach, cohabit with the tourist culture that has sprung up around it. Here fishermen are still working old-style in wooden sail boats called jangadas. After the day’s work at sea, they sell their catch to local distributors or food vendors. Real estate pressures, which grew during the 1960s, continue today, making the future of this fishing culture uncertain. Still, thousands of these fishermen remain scattered across the coast, supplying a notable portion of the seafood that is consumed in the country.

Brazilians are a friendly bunch, so it’s easy to make a new friend or ten as the social groups around you merge into one big party. There has long been an unhealthy divide between rich and poor in Brazil, and sometimes the contrast is unsettling. The beach is one place where people from different classes come together. The beach can also be a spectacle, a people-watching haven. Brazilians are generally comfortable in their skins and it’s not unusual to see a tiny swimming costume on an elderly man or a micro bikini on a large lady. This is all part of everyday life. To blend in, avoid wearing shoes or long-sleeved tops – just grab your swimmers and a sarong, and you’re ready to go. Costumes may look like they shrank in the clothes dryer, but no matter how small the piece of fabric, it always covers the essentials. Going topless is not only a major taboo, it’s also illegal and considered obscene. Impromptu games of beach football are common and so is a relatively new sport that combines aspects of football and volleyball. It’s known as footvolley and it originated in Copacabana 26

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The most surprising of Brazil’s beaches lie thousands of kilometres from the coast, right in the middle of the Amazon. River beaches in the city of Manaus are popular among locals, who frequent the powdery white sands to escape the jungle heat. The Amazon River is so wide that these beaches resemble ocean beaches, but the caiman warnings are a good reminder that the rainforest isn’t far away.

© 2014 Hardie Grant Books. All Rights Reserved.


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Sônia Benevides is well known in the coastal city of Natal for her experimental cooking in her restaurant, O Bule, which sits beneath her home on the shores of a lake. Ferran Adrià, the Spanish master, is the main inspiration for Sônia’s experimental way of working with Brazilian ingredients. This recipe is her interpretation of Japanese temaki (hand roll), using tapioca starch with a unique twist.

Temaki de camarao Tapioca temaki with prawns

From Sônia Benevides · Makes 12

250 G (9 OZ/2 CUPS) TAPIOCA STARCH (SEE GLOSSARY) PINCH OF SALT 20 G (¾ OZ) SQUID OR CUTTLEFISH INK SACHETS 100 G (3½ OZ) BUTTER

1 SMALL ONION, DICED 600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) RAW PRAWNS (SHRIMP), PEELED AND DEVEINED 100 ML (3½ FL OZ) POURING (SINGLE/LIGHT) CREAM

Sift the tapioca starch and salt into a bowl. Combine 150 ml (5 fl oz) water with the squid or cuttlefish ink, then pour into the tapioca mixture. Mix with your fingertips until well combined. The mixture should be like fine, damp sand, clinging together when squeezed in your hand. If needed, add a little more water or tapioca starch until the mixture reaches the correct consistency. Using your hands, push the tapioca mixture through a sieve into another bowl. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Sprinkle one-third of the tapioca mixture into the pan to evenly cover the base, and lightly press with the back of a spoon, ensuring there are no holes or cracks. Cook for 1½–2 minutes, or until the edges start to lift and the pancake is holding together. Turn over and cook for a further 30 seconds. Do not overcook or the pancake will become dry and brittle.

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Transfer the pancake to a plate and cover with a clean tea towel (dish towel). Cook the remaining mixture to make three pancakes in total. Wipe the pan clean after cooking each pancake. Melt the butter in a saucepan and cook the diced onion over a medium heat for 8 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add the prawns and cook for 1 minute, or until they just begin to colour. Stir in the cream and cook for 4 minutes, or until the prawns are cooked through. Transfer the mixture to a food processor and process in short bursts until coarsely chopped. Cut each pancake into quarters. Spoon a heaped tablespoon of the prawn mixture onto the light side of each pancake piece and wrap the pancake around the mixture to make a cone shape.

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Pamonha are corn cakes that are cooked and served in corn husks. This recipe is for savoury pamonha, but you can also make sweet pamonha by omitting the cheese, salt and pepper, and sweetening the corn with a little sugar.

Pamonha Rich corn cakes

Makes 8

8 CORN COBS IN HUSKS 50 G (1¾ OZ) BUTTER, MELTED, PLUS EXTRA TO SERVE 1 TEASPOON SEA SALT

⅛ TEASPOON GROUND WHITE PEPPER 100 G (3½ OZ) QUEIJO FRESCO (SEE NOTE), COARSELY GRATED

Cut the bases off the corn cobs. Remove the husks, taking care not to rip them. Reserve the large inner husks for wrapping the corn cakes. Remove and discard the silk. Coarsely grate the corn. (Alternatively, cut the corn kernels off the cobs and chop in short bursts in a food processor.) Drain off the excess juice through a fine mesh sieve. Combine the corn with the butter, sea salt and white pepper in a bowl. Stir in the cheese and set aside. Soak the corn husks in boiling water for 1–2 minutes, or until softened and pliable. Drain and refresh the husks under cold running water, then pat dry using paper towel or a clean tea towel (dish towel). Trim the edges of the husks to form rectangles. Arrange four of the husks, slightly overlapping

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to form a large rectangle, to make the casing for the corn mixture. Repeat to make eight casings. Divide the filling among the casings, spooning it into the middle. Fold in the sides and ends to enclose the filling, and secure in both directions with kitchen string. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil. Add the parcels and cook for 15–20 minutes, or until set and heated through. Drain the corn cakes, then serve them hot or at room temperature, drizzled with melted butter. Note: Queijo fresco is a fresh cheese with a mild taste and a soft, creamy texture. It can be purchased from South American food stores. You can also use fresh mozzarella; buffalo mozzarella would be even better.

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Home Style:

meals from the heart

Brazil is a country of meat lovers and nothing goes to waste – goat’s tripe stew cooked with blood is still a hit in the North-East. Seafood is important too and there is huge variety along the coast. Grilled (broiled) lobster and crab stew are popular dishes to mark special occasions. Meanwhile the wetlands of the Pantanal and the rivers of the Amazon region contain thousands of species of freshwater fish. Legendary for its giant size, the Amazon’s pirarucu has become a delicacy, and the Pantanal’s striking pintado (painted fish) has a juicy, white flesh that is perfect for soups and stews. Although meat is always on the menu, an excellent assortment of fresh, tropical fruit and vegetables are used in side dishes and salads, making for a very balanced diet. The most prolific is cassava root, one of the basics of the cuisine that the native Indigenous people have used for centuries. A regular day in Brazil consists of three main meals and midafternoon tea. Breakfast is eaten straight after waking up, and it’s common to have French bread with butter, cold meats and coffee, sometimes with a piece of fruit. Lunch is by far the most important meal of the day. Brazilians take their time to sit and eat lunch and, even in the busiest cities, the idea of a cold sandwich behind an office desk isn’t widely accepted. Meals are usually hearty and colourful, with black beans, salad, meat and farofa (page 80) reigning as part of everyday lunches across the nation. Dinners are usually smaller portions that can be eaten late in the evening, so the rich dishes presented in this chapter, like feijoada (page 86) and moqueca (page 64), are mostly enjoyed at lunchtime.

At the Brazilian table, there’s always plenty for sharing, regardless of the amount prepared. When guests arrive unexpectedly, what could be seen as a bit of a problem is solved by ‘adding water to the beans’, a popular saying used to illustrate that a little creative flair can stretch far. If you’re invited to join, you shouldn’t feel like an intruder or that you’re disturbing plans – Brazilians love to deal with surprises as they emerge. To make sure that you’re pleasing your hosts, don’t hold back on the compliments. Usually an easy-going, informal bunch, Brazilians aren’t so relaxed when it comes to table manners. Food is rarely eaten by hand. It’s good practice to let the host start eating before anyone else does, and talking with food in your mouth is seriously unacceptable if you’re over the age of five.

Family is the centre of the universe for most Brazilians and you can see this in action at weekend feasts. A spread of sumptuously prepared dishes is always on offer, abundant not only in quantity, but also in variety and flavour. These lunches go on for hours – a good chance to get an update on what’s going on in life and to celebrate and reinforce the importance of family.

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Barreado is a type of stew that’s cooked in a claypot, sealed with dough. It’s famous in the small town of Morretes in the state of Paraná and was originally conceived as an easy source of energy for carnival revellers who partied throughout the night. Nowadays people travel to Morretes via the Serra Verde Express – a spectacular railway that connects the capital to the coast – to marvel at the enchanting scenery and try the famous barreado.

Barreado Claypot beef stew

ALL EASE ERE IS ADOW E

From Suily Gnata · Serves 8

1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ) STEWING BEEF, CUT INTO CUBES (SEE NOTE) 100 G (3½ OZ) BACON, CUT INTO THIN STRIPS 3 ONIONS, CHOPPED 6 GARLIC CLOVES, CHOPPED 60 G (2 OZ/1 BUNCH) CHIVES, SNIPPED 4 BAY LEAVES

1 TEASPOON GROUND CUMIN 500 G (1 LB 2 OZ/4 CUPS) CASSAVA FLOUR (SEE GLOSSARY) OR PLAIN (ALL-PURPOSE) FLOUR 2 BANANAS, CHOPPED CHILLI SAUCE TO SERVE

Arrange the beef, bacon, onions, garlic, chives, bay leaves and cumin in layers in a claypot. Cover with the lid. Set aside 2 tablespoons of the flour. Put most of the remaining flour in a large bowl and gradually mix in 340 ml (11½ fl oz/1⅓ cups) water to make a firm dough, adding the rest of the flour if needed. Mould the dough around the rim of the claypot to seal the lid.

Put the reserved 2 tablespoons of flour in a deep serving dish. Crack open the dough seal, spoon the stew into the serving dish and stir until creamy. Serve the stew with the bananas and chilli sauce. Note: We suggest using osso buco or gravy beef. The stew is best cooked on a wood stove. You can also use a cast-iron casserole if you do not have a claypot.

Put the claypot over a low heat and cook for 8 hours.

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This recipe is inspired by the Brazilian canja or chicken soup. It’s a hearty and easy-to-digest soup that is usually recommended when someone is unwell. It’s a recipe that spells home to every Brazilian and it’s also great for kids. This version will take some time to prepare, but it will also leave you with a batch of chicken stock that you can use for other recipes.

Canja Caipira Simple chicken soup

N IN

Serves 6

ARE ON

2 ONIONS 2 CARROTS 2 CELERY STALKS ZEST OF 1 LEMON, CUT INTO LARGE STRIPS 1 TABLESPOON BLACK PEPPERCORNS OLIVE OIL FOR COOKING 1 × 1.8 KG (4 LB) FREE-RANGE CHICKEN, CUT INTO 10 PIECES

3 GARLIC CLOVES 1 TEASPOON BUTTER 300 G (10½ OZ/1½ CUPS) MEDIUM-GRAIN RICE 200 G (7 OZ) GREEN BEANS, CHOPPED SNIPPED CHIVES TO SERVE CHOPPED CORIANDER (CILANTRO) LEAVES TO SERVE

Cut one onion, one carrot and the celery stalks into large pieces. Add them to a large stockpot or very large saucepan with 2 litres (68 fl oz/8 cups) water, the lemon zest, the peppercorns and a drizzle of olive oil. Season with salt. Bring to the boil over a high heat and cook for 25 minutes. Add the chicken pieces and boil for a further 30 minutes. Remove the chicken pieces and allow them to cool. Remove the meat from the bones. Shred the meat, then set it aside. Return the bones to the pot. Add another 2 litres (68 fl oz/8 cups) water and simmer for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, finely chop the remaining onion, dice the remaining carrot and roughly chop two of the garlic cloves. Melt the butter with a drizzle of olive oil in a flameproof casserole dish over a medium

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heat. Sauté the onion for 2 minutes. Stir in the rice and cook for 3 minutes. Add the shredded chicken, the diced carrot and chopped garlic. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Ladle 2 litres (68 fl oz/8 cups) of the chicken stock into the casserole dish, ensuring the rice is fully covered. (Reserve the remaining stock for another recipe.) Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Taste and add salt if needed. Grate the remaining garlic clove into the soup, add the beans and cook for 3 minutes. Serve with a generous drizzle of olive oil and freshly ground black pepper, and garnish with plenty of chives and coriander.

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This is a variation of the typical farofa and is also made with toasted cassava flour.

Farofa de Banana Toasted cassava flour with plantain bananas

From Edna Lara · Serves 4

80 ML (2½ FL OZ/⅓ CUP) OIL 3 PLANTAIN BANANAS, SLICED 40 G (1½ OZ) BUTTER

1 ONION, FINELY CHOPPED PINCH OF SUGAR 250 G (9 OZ/2 CUPS) TOASTED CASSAVA FLOUR (SEE GLOSSARY)

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Cook the bananas for 5 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from the pan and set aside.

Note: You can replace the plantain bananas with any type of banana.

Wipe out the excess oil from the pan and add the butter. Cook the onion over a medium heat for 8 minutes, or until golden brown. Add the fried bananas and sugar, then gradually add the cassava flour, stirring constantly. Season with salt. Continue stirring for about 3 minutes, or until the flour is completely incorporated. Serve at room temperature.

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Fava nordestina North-eastern beans

Serves 4–6

300 G (10½ OZ/1⅔ CUPS) DRIED WHOLE BROAD (FAVA) BEANS, SOAKED IN COLD WATER OVERNIGHT 80 ML (2½ FL OZ/⅓ CUP) OLIVE OIL 2 ONIONS, FINELY CHOPPED 3 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED

1 RED CAPSICUM (BELL PEPPER), FINELY CHOPPED 500 ML (17 FL OZ/2 CUPS) CHICKEN STOCK SEA SALT 1 HANDFUL CORIANDER (CILANTRO) LEAVES, CHOPPED 2½ TABLESPOONS WHITE WINE VINEGAR, OR TO TASTE

Drain the broad beans, then transfer them to a saucepan and add enough cold water to cover them. Bring to a simmer, then cook the beans over a medium–low heat for 35 minutes, or until tender. Drain and set aside. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat, and add the onions, garlic and capsicum. Cook, stirring, for 8 minutes, or until softened. Add the beans and the stock, adding extra stock or water if necessary to just cover the beans, then bring to a simmer. Cook for 10–15 minutes, or until the stock has reduced slightly.

Season the beans well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stir in the coriander and vinegar, and serve warm as a side dish. Note: Inspired by traditional fava nordestina, this dish is a little different to the way it is usually prepared in Brazil. It is still highly delicious!

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OS

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Feijoada is Brazil’s national dish. Popular legend claims that it was created by slaves during the colonial period, using the left-over parts of the animal discarded by their masters, but historians have argued that this is nothing more than a myth. The Portuguese have a strong tradition of cooking stews and it’s possible that this is just another dish they introduced. Whatever version you fancy, the truth is that this hearty pork and black bean stew is celebrated nationwide, and every family has its own special recipe.

Feijoada Pork and bean stew

From Therezinha Neves de Souza Paula · Serves 8

600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) DRIED BLACK BEANS, SOAKED IN COLD WATER OVERNIGHT 1 SMOKED PIG’S EAR (SEE NOTES) 300 G (10½ OZ) DRIED SALTED BEEF OR JERKY (SEE GLOSSARY), DICED AND SOAKED IN WATER IN THE REFRIGERATOR OVERNIGHT 1 TABLESPOON OLIVE OIL 1 LARGE ONION, DICED 8 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED 2 SMOKED PIG’S FEET

2 SMOKED PIG’S TAILS 200 G (7 OZ) SMOKED BACON, ROUGHLY CHOPPED 500 G (1 LB 2 OZ) SMOKED PORK RIBS, CUT INTO SEPARATE PIECES 300 G (10½ OZ) PORK LOIN, CUT INTO 3 CM (1¼ INCH) DICE 300 G (10½ OZ) SMOKED PORK SAUSAGE (SEE NOTES), SLICED THICKLY 4 BAY LEAVES 30 G (1 OZ/½ BUNCH) PARSLEY, CHOPPED 30 G (1 OZ/½ BUNCH) CHIVES, SNIPPED

Add the drained black beans, pig’s ear and drained beef to a large saucepan with 2 litres (68 fl oz/8 cups) water. Cover and cook for 1½ hours, or until the beans are al dente. Set aside. Heat the oil in a large frying pan and cook the onion and garlic over a high heat for 4 minutes, or until browned. Add the pig’s feet and tails, bacon, pork ribs, pork loin and sausage. Cook for 5 minutes, or until the meat is browned. Add the bay leaves and the beef and bean mixture. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for another 20 minutes.

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Sprinkle the parsley and chives over the pork and beans to serve. Notes: Smoked pig’s ear, feet and tails will make an authentic Brazilian feijoada, but if you can’t find them, substitute unsmoked pig’s ears, tails and feet, or an equivalent weight of smoked pork hock. You can use any cured, cooked or smoked pork sausage, such as chorizo. Traditional accompaniments to feijoada are orange slices, couve or stir-fried Chinese broccoli (gai larn), rice and toasted cassava flour (see glossary), and a cold Caipirinha (page 126).

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arroz com mariscos Rice with shellfish

Serves 4–6

400 G (14 OZ/2 CUPS) LONG-GRAIN RICE 1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ) BLACK MUSSELS 500 G (1 LB 2 OZ) CLAMS (VONGOLE) 600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) RAW KING PRAWNS (SHRIMP) 60 ML (2 FL OZ/¼ CUP) OLIVE OIL 1 ONION, FINELY CHOPPED 3 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED

1½ TABLESPOONS SWEET PAPRIKA ½ TEASPOON CHILLI FLAKES, OR TO TASTE 2 TABLESPOONS TOMATO PASTE (CONCENTRATED PURÉE) 4 FIRM RIPE TOMATOES, CHOPPED SEA SALT 35 G (1¼ OZ/¾ CUP) CHOPPED CORIANDER (CILANTRO) LIME HALVES TO SERVE

Combine the rice with 750 ml (25½ fl oz/3 cups) water in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook for 15 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed. Remove from the heat and set aside, covered. Scrub the mussels and pull out the hairy beards. Discard any broken mussels or clams, or any open ones that don’t close when tapped on the bench. Rinse well. Peel and devein the prawns, leaving the tails intact. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Cook the onion and garlic over a medium heat, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the paprika and chilli flakes, and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the tomato paste and chopped tomatoes, and cook for another 1 minute.

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Add the prawns and rice, then tightly cover the pan and cook for 2 minutes. Add the mussels, clams and a little water, if necessary (the mixture shouldn’t be too wet but a little liquid is needed to prevent sticking). Cover the pan and cook for 5 minutes, or until the mussels and clams have opened and the prawns are cooked through. Discard any unopened mussels or clams. Add sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, then stir in the coriander. Divide among serving bowls and serve with the lime halves.

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No book about Brazilian food would be complete without mention of churrasco, but the technique – the type of barbecue used, the temperature, cooking times and preparing the meat – could easily make for a full book! Below you can find a guide to the churrasco essentials.

Churrasco Brazilian barbecue

Churrasco is the Portuguese word for barbecue. In Brazil, a typical churrasco is prepared by roasting various cuts of meat on skewers over hot coals. Tradition demands that the meat is seasoned only with rock salt, to allow its true flavours to shine. The key to the Brazilian barbecue lies in the simplicity of the technique – its success depends on the cuts chosen, the quality and freshness of the meat, and the ability of the churrasqueiro

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(meat minder) to instinctively know the exact moment to remove the meat from the heat and to slice it precisely to maximise the flavour. The star of any churrasco is the picanha (rump cap). It’s the prime cut for Brazilians and it usually costs more than filet mignon. Other favourites include chicken hearts, pork sausage, pork rib and spiced pineapple.

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13/12/13 11:26 AM


Sopa de Leao Veloso Seafood soup

Serves 6–8

1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ) SMALL BLACK MUSSELS 600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) RAW KING PRAWNS (SHRIMP) 600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) SMALL SQUID TUBES, CLEANED 600 G (1 LB 5 OZ) FIRM WHITE FISH FILLETS 80 ML (2½ FL OZ/⅓ CUP) OLIVE OIL 2 ONIONS, FINELY CHOPPED 4 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED 2 RED CHILLIES, CHOPPED 1 BAY LEAF

½ TEASPOON SAFFRON THREADS 1½ TABLESPOONS SWEET PAPRIKA 750 ML (25½ FL OZ/3 CUPS) TOMATO PASSATA (PURÉED TOMATOES) 4 LARGE RIPE TOMATOES, PEELED, SEEDED AND FINELY CHOPPED 1.5 LITRES (51 FL OZ/6 CUPS) FISH STOCK SEA SALT 1 HANDFUL CORIANDER (CILANTRO), CHOPPED 1 HANDFUL FLAT-LEAF (ITALIAN) PARSLEY, CHOPPED

Scrub the mussels and pull out the hairy beards. Discard any broken mussels, or any open ones that don’t close when tapped on the bench. Rinse well. Peel and devein the prawns, then cut them in half lengthways. Thinly slice the squid tubes. Skin the fish fillets and slice them. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, chillies, bay leaf and saffron. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, or until the onion has softened. Add the paprika and cook for 1 minute. Stir in the tomato passata, chopped tomatoes and stock, and bring to a simmer.

Add the mussels, cover and cook for 2 minutes, or until they start to open. Add the remaining seafood. Stir to combine well, cover and cook for 4 minutes, or until the mussels have opened and the seafood is cooked through. Discard any unopened mussels. Add sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Stir in the coriander and parsley, and serve immediately.

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O P OF

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Lagosta gratinada Lobster gratin

WOOD

Serves 6

3 LIVE ROCK LOBSTERS, ABOUT 800 G–1 KG (1 LB 12 OZ–2 LB 3 OZ) 185 G (6½ OZ) BUTTER, SOFTENED 3 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED 1 TABLESPOON SWEET PAPRIKA

LARGE PINCH OF CHILLI FLAKES 1 LARGE HANDFUL CORIANDER (CILANTRO), FINELY CHOPPED SEA SALT

Put the lobsters in plastic bags, then place in the freezer for at least 1 hour to put them to sleep. Remove the lobsters from the freezer. Push the tip of a narrow, sharp knife into each lobster through the membrane that joins the head to the tail, to quickly dispatch it. Cut each lobster in half down the middle and remove the digestive tract. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Grease a baking tray with butter.

Put the lobster halves, flesh side down, on the baking tray and bake for 7 minutes. Remove from the oven and heat the oven grill (broiler) to medium–high. Turn the lobster halves over on the tray, then spread each with some of the butter mixture. Grill (broil) for 4–5 minutes, or until golden, bubbling and cooked through. Serve immediately.

Combine the butter, garlic, paprika, chilli flakes and coriander in a bowl. Season well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

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Sagu (tapioca pearls) are a popular dessert ingredient, usually prepared with coconut and condensed milk.

pudim de tapioca Coconut and sago puddings

From Carolina Cazelli · Serves 8

400 ML (13½ FL OZ) MILK 60 G (2 OZ) BUTTER ½ VANILLA BEAN 195 G (7 OZ/1 CUP) SAGO (TAPIOCA) PEARLS (SEE GLOSSARY) 190 ML (6½ FL OZ/¾ CUP) COCONUT MILK

100 G (3½ OZ/1⅔ CUPS) SHREDDED COCONUT 395 G (14 OZ) TINNED CONDENSED MILK 4 EGGS 220 G (8 OZ/1 CUP) SUGAR CHOPPED BRAZIL NUTS TO GARNISH

Combine the milk, butter and vanilla bean in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Combine the sago pearls, coconut milk and coconut in a heatproof bowl. Pour in the boiling milk mixture and stir until well combined. Cover the bowl with aluminium foil and set aside for 40 minutes. Preheat the oven to 170°C (340°F). Blend the condensed milk and eggs in a bowl, then stir into the sago mixture. Set aside. Combine the sugar and 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) water in a small saucepan. Simmer over a medium heat for 8–10 minutes, or until the caramel turns light brown. If it becomes too thick, add some more water.

Put the ramekins in a large roasting tin and pour in enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Cover the tin with aluminium foil and bake for 35–40 minutes, or until the puddings are set. Set aside to cool. Chill the puddings in the refrigerator for 15 minutes. To serve, run a knife around the edge of each pudding, then invert it onto a serving plate and garnish with Brazil nuts. Notes: You can also make one large pudding. Use a 1.5 litre (51 fl oz/6 cup) ovenproof dish and increase the cooking time to 1 hour 10 minutes. You’ll find sago pearls in large supermarkets and Asian food stores.

Pour the caramel mixture over the base of eight 200 ml (7 fl oz) ovenproof ramekins. Pour the sago mixture over the caramel. 118

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Acai is a berry harvested from tall palms that grow on the banks of the Amazon River. It is widely promoted as a ‘superfood’ – full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. This dessert lends a Brazilian twist to a French classic.

Acai Bavaroise Bavarian cream with acai and Brazil nuts

From Carolina Cazelli · Serves 8

75 G (2¾ OZ/½ CUP) MIXED BRAZIL AND CASHEW NUTS, CHOPPED 190 ML (6½ FL OZ/¾ CUP) MILK ½ VANILLA BEAN, SPLIT LENGTHWAYS AND SEEDS SCRAPED 2 EGG YOLKS 55 G (2 OZ/¼ CUP) SUGAR 250 ML (8½ FL OZ/1 CUP) POURING (SINGLE/LIGHT) CREAM 1 TABLESPOON POWDERED GELATINE

½ BANANA, ROUGHLY CHOPPED 100 G (3½ OZ) FROZEN ACAI PULP (SEE GLOSSARY), THAWED

Acai coulis 200 G (7 OZ) FROZEN ACAI PULP, THAWED 75 G (2¾ OZ/⅓ CUP) SUGAR JUICE OF 1 LIME

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Put the nuts on a baking tray and roast for 7 minutes, or until golden. Set aside. Combine the milk and the seeds scraped from the vanilla bean in a small saucepan. Cook over a medium heat until almost boiling. Whisk the egg yolks and sugar in a metal mixing bowl. Slowly incorporate the hot milk, whisking constantly, then place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water and whisk for 10 minutes, or until the mixture is smooth and slightly thickened. Do not overheat the mixture or it will scramble. Remove the bowl from the heat and set aside.

Put the banana, acai pulp and gelatine mixture in a blender and blend until smooth. Pour the banana mixture into the custard mixture and slowly fold in the whipped cream. Spoon the mixture into eight serving glasses and refrigerate for 40 minutes, or until set. To make the acai coulis, combine the acai pulp, sugar and lime juice in a small saucepan. Simmer over a low heat for 10 minutes, or until thickened. To serve, pour a thin layer of the acai coulis over the chilled acai cream and sprinkle the roasted nuts on top.

Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Combine the gelatine with 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) hot water, stirring until the gelatine has dissolved.

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Arroz Doce Sweet rice

Serves 4

200 G (7 OZ/1 CUP) LONG-GRAIN RICE 750 ML (25½ FL OZ/3 CUPS) MILK, PLUS 2 TABLESPOONS EXTRA 395 G (14 OZ) TINNED CONDENSED MILK 20 G (¾ OZ) BUTTER

2 STRIPS LIME ZEST ½ TEASPOON GROUND CINNAMON, PLUS EXTRA FOR SPRINKLING 2 LARGE EGG YOLKS

Put the rice and 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) water in a heavy-based saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside with the lid on for 5 minutes, or until all of the water has been absorbed and the rice is cooked. Stir 750 ml (25½ fl oz/3 cups) of the milk, the condensed milk, butter, lime zest and cinnamon into the rice. Bring to the boil over a medium heat. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10–15 minutes, or until the mixture is creamy and most of the liquid has been absorbed.

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Combine the egg yolks with the extra milk in a small bowl. Stir into the rice mixture and cook, stirring constantly, for a further 2 minutes. Discard the lime zest. Transfer the rice to a large dish or individual serving dishes and dust with the cinnamon. Set aside to cool slightly, then serve warm or chilled.

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RE

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This traditional cake is from the state of Pernambuco. It is made by cooking three layers of cake and wrapping each layer around the previous one.

Bolo de Rolo Roll cake

Serves 12

225 G (8 OZ) BUTTER, SOFTENED 230 G (8 OZ/1 CUP) CASTER (SUPERFINE) SUGAR, PLUS EXTRA FOR SPRINKLING 5 LARGE EGGS, SEPARATED 225 G (8 OZ/1½ CUPS) PLAIN (ALL-PURPOSE) FLOUR

Filling 450 G (1 LB) GOIABADA (PAGE 128), FINELY CHOPPED 1 TEASPOON LEMON JUICE

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Lightly grease a 25 × 30 cm (10 × 12 in) Swiss roll tin (jelly roll tin) and line the tin with baking paper. To make the filling, combine the goiabada, lemon juice and 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) water in a small saucepan over a low heat. Gently simmer, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the mixture forms a smooth, jam-like sauce. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Using an electric mixer, beat the butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Add the egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually add the flour and beat until combined. Wash and dry the beaters, then whisk the eggwhites until firm peaks form. Stir one large spoonful of the eggwhites into the butter mixture to loosen it. Use a whisk to gently fold in the remaining eggwhites. Spread one-third of the batter into the tin in a layer about 3 mm (⅛ in) thick. Bake for 4–5 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool in the tin for 1 minute. 136

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Lay a clean, lightly dampened tea towel (dish towel) on the bench and sprinkle with a layer of sugar. Turn the cake out onto the tea towel, remove the baking paper and then spread the cake with one-third of the filling, leaving a 2 cm (¾ in) border. With one of the short sides facing you, roll up tightly to enclose the filling. Wrap the roll in the tea towel and set it aside, seam side down. Repeat this process to make two more cake layers, spreading them with filling and wrapping them around the previous layer. When the final layer is complete, generously sprinkle the cake with sugar. Wrap the cake in baking paper and twist the ends to secure. Refrigerate the cake for at least 1 hour, or overnight. To serve, trim the ends of the cake and cut it into thin slices.

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Bolo de Cenoura Carrot cake with chocolate topping

Serves 16

3 CARROTS, COARSELY GRATED 170 ML (5½ FL OZ/⅔ CUP) VEGETABLE OIL 400 G (14 OZ/1¾ CUPS) CASTER (SUPERFINE) SUGAR 4 LARGE EGGS 375 G (13 OZ/2½ CUPS) SELF-RAISING FLOUR

Chocolate topping 220 G (8 OZ/1 CUP) SUGAR 125 ML (4 FL OZ/½ CUP) MILK 30 G (1 OZ/¼ CUP) DUTCH (UNSWEETENED) COCOA POWDER 20 G (¾ OZ) BUTTER ½ TEASPOON NATURAL VANILLA EXTRACT

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Lightly grease a 20 × 30 cm (8 × 12 in) baking tin and line the tin with baking paper. Combine the grated carrots and oil in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add the sugar and eggs, and blend until combined. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, add the flour and mix well. Pour the batter into the tin, smoothing the top. Bake for 40 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the cake comes out clean. Leave the cake in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack.

Cook over a low heat, whisking occasionally, until the sugar has dissolved. Increase the heat and gently simmer, whisking occasionally, for 3–5 minutes, or until the topping is glossy and thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. Set aside to cool and thicken for 5 minutes. Pour the topping over the warm cake and set aside to cool before serving. Note: Traditionally, the topping for this cake is made from Brigadeiro (page 122) batter, cooked for 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, to make the chocolate topping, combine all of the ingredients in a saucepan.

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Bolo de mandioca Cassava cake

Serves 16

1 KG (2 LB 3 OZ) CASSAVA (SEE GLOSSARY), FINELY GRATED 125 G (4½ OZ) BUTTER, SOFTENED 345 G (12 OZ/1½ CUPS) CASTER (SUPERFINE) SUGAR 4 LARGE EGGS

225 G (8 OZ/2½ CUPS) FRESHLY SHREDDED COCONUT (SEE GLOSSARY) 250 ML (8½ FL OZ/1 CUP) MILK

Preheat the oven to 190°C (375°F). Lightly grease a square 23 cm (9 in) cake tin and line the tin with baking paper. Wrap the grated cassava in a clean tea towel (dish towel) and tightly squeeze to remove the excess liquid.

Spoon the batter into the tin, smoothing the top. Bake for 50–60 minutes, or until the cake is firm and dark golden brown. Leave the cake in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Using an electric mixer, beat the butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the cassava, coconut and milk, and mix well.

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This Is Brazil