Page 1


14

he thrives on. The first building that Ando designed after forming his own studio was the Tomishima House in Osaka. He has stated, “I walled in the site along its periphery to create an inner sanctuary undisturbed by the noise of the surroundings.” Osaka, like other Japanese cities, is very densely populated, and houses tend to be tiny by Western standards. It is very much in the logic of this context that Ando emphasized privacy in this first work, as he often has in the houses that followed Tomishima. The bustling city of Osaka, Ando’s birthplace, is an inevitable part of his thinking, but from the beginning, he willfully closes out this reality in favor of privacy created by thick walls and openings that are more likely to look skyward than toward the city. Concrete and Sun Ando’s concept of nature may deserve some explanation. For a casual observer, concrete, Ando’s favorite construction material, can seem cold and anything but natural. Cast with the quality seen in his Japanese works, concrete does not resemble the substance seen in other parts of the world. It is smooth and even “soft” to the touch, curiously radiating a warmth that those who have not experienced the quality of Japanese construction can only imagine. But where does nature enter the Tomishima House? A central atrium provides much of the response. The light that falls through this opening is in some sense the real substance of Ando’s architecture. “This direct light softens as it descends through the staggered floor levels,” Ando says, “accommodating bedroom, living room, and dining room—giving a natural rhythm to life within the sanctuary of the building’s blank enclosing walls.” In the great city where there is little room for green spaces, Ando sublimates nature and brings it into his architecture in the form of light or breeze. Ando first came to the attention of architectural circles with another small residence in Osaka, the Sumiyoshi Row House (1976) in the southern part of the city. His design here is a bold combination of strict modernity expressed in a blank concrete facade whose only opening is a doorway, and whose form owes much to Japanese tradition. The deep, narrow site forcibly corresponds to those of neighboring houses, although strict geometry may be more the rule here than in older residences. Black slate floors and concrete walls also impose a contemporary kind of austerity to the interior. The plan is divided into three equal rectangles containing a living space at ground level and a bedroom above it on the street side. The rearmost volume houses a kitchen and bathroom on the bottom floor with a guest room above it. The central void is open to the sky with a bridge linking front and back, and a stairway leading up from

this central courtyard. Residents have no choice but to go outside to pass from the front to the back of the house. Here, not only light and breeze enter Ando’s equation, but so might rain. Though his solid concrete walls create an intimate, protected atmosphere in the house, nature is present, as is Japanese tradition, which often adopts the solution of this kind of open court.

15

Architecture and Place Another milestone in the career of Ando is the Koshino House (1979, 1990 [addition]), located in the fashionable hills of Ashiya, near Kobe. Built for the well-known fashion designer Junko Koshino, the house is on a different scale than Ando’s earlier efforts, with a floor area more than 5,920 square feet (550 sq. m), very generous by Japanese standards. Set on a wooded, green hillside, the structure occupies more than half of the 6,580-square-foot (611 sq. m) site; the architect has again used his smooth concrete walls to provide privacy to the owners, closing the street-side facade and opening the house to its natural setting and the sunlight that both filters and flows in. Ando states, “Taking on the generous nature of the local environment, and a program with a high degree of freedom, we aimed to generate a relationship between architecture and place that allowed the architecture to have autonomy while acting in concert with the surrounding natural environment.” Composed essentially of two concrete rectangles, the house was modified by Ando in 1984 with the addition of a fan-shaped volume originally intended as an atelier. Ando’s enlargement of the Koshino House demonstrates another frequent theme in his designs: a continued presence that readily admits the idea of growth and change, despite the so-called complete nature of the original structures. In the case of the Koshino House, which benefits from an attractive natural setting, which had been absent in his early Osaka residences, Ando further develops the theme of a relation to nature, expressed in this house by views out to the verdant landscape. He explains, “Such things as light and wind only have meaning when they are introduced inside a house in a form cut off from the outside world. The isolated fragments of light and air suggest the entire natural world. The forms I have created have altered and acquired meaning through elementary nature (light and air) that give indications of the passage of time and the changing of the seasons.” The Hill and the Grid Though Ando’s Rokko apartment buildings in Kobe are of a dif-

ferent type than his private houses, they illustrate many of the © 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Kidosaki House

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan


14

he thrives on. The first building that Ando designed after forming his own studio was the Tomishima House in Osaka. He has stated, “I walled in the site along its periphery to create an inner sanctuary undisturbed by the noise of the surroundings.” Osaka, like other Japanese cities, is very densely populated, and houses tend to be tiny by Western standards. It is very much in the logic of this context that Ando emphasized privacy in this first work, as he often has in the houses that followed Tomishima. The bustling city of Osaka, Ando’s birthplace, is an inevitable part of his thinking, but from the beginning, he willfully closes out this reality in favor of privacy created by thick walls and openings that are more likely to look skyward than toward the city. Concrete and Sun Ando’s concept of nature may deserve some explanation. For a casual observer, concrete, Ando’s favorite construction material, can seem cold and anything but natural. Cast with the quality seen in his Japanese works, concrete does not resemble the substance seen in other parts of the world. It is smooth and even “soft” to the touch, curiously radiating a warmth that those who have not experienced the quality of Japanese construction can only imagine. But where does nature enter the Tomishima House? A central atrium provides much of the response. The light that falls through this opening is in some sense the real substance of Ando’s architecture. “This direct light softens as it descends through the staggered floor levels,” Ando says, “accommodating bedroom, living room, and dining room—giving a natural rhythm to life within the sanctuary of the building’s blank enclosing walls.” In the great city where there is little room for green spaces, Ando sublimates nature and brings it into his architecture in the form of light or breeze. Ando first came to the attention of architectural circles with another small residence in Osaka, the Sumiyoshi Row House (1976) in the southern part of the city. His design here is a bold combination of strict modernity expressed in a blank concrete facade whose only opening is a doorway, and whose form owes much to Japanese tradition. The deep, narrow site forcibly corresponds to those of neighboring houses, although strict geometry may be more the rule here than in older residences. Black slate floors and concrete walls also impose a contemporary kind of austerity to the interior. The plan is divided into three equal rectangles containing a living space at ground level and a bedroom above it on the street side. The rearmost volume houses a kitchen and bathroom on the bottom floor with a guest room above it. The central void is open to the sky with a bridge linking front and back, and a stairway leading up from

this central courtyard. Residents have no choice but to go outside to pass from the front to the back of the house. Here, not only light and breeze enter Ando’s equation, but so might rain. Though his solid concrete walls create an intimate, protected atmosphere in the house, nature is present, as is Japanese tradition, which often adopts the solution of this kind of open court.

15

Architecture and Place Another milestone in the career of Ando is the Koshino House (1979, 1990 [addition]), located in the fashionable hills of Ashiya, near Kobe. Built for the well-known fashion designer Junko Koshino, the house is on a different scale than Ando’s earlier efforts, with a floor area more than 5,920 square feet (550 sq. m), very generous by Japanese standards. Set on a wooded, green hillside, the structure occupies more than half of the 6,580-square-foot (611 sq. m) site; the architect has again used his smooth concrete walls to provide privacy to the owners, closing the street-side facade and opening the house to its natural setting and the sunlight that both filters and flows in. Ando states, “Taking on the generous nature of the local environment, and a program with a high degree of freedom, we aimed to generate a relationship between architecture and place that allowed the architecture to have autonomy while acting in concert with the surrounding natural environment.” Composed essentially of two concrete rectangles, the house was modified by Ando in 1984 with the addition of a fan-shaped volume originally intended as an atelier. Ando’s enlargement of the Koshino House demonstrates another frequent theme in his designs: a continued presence that readily admits the idea of growth and change, despite the so-called complete nature of the original structures. In the case of the Koshino House, which benefits from an attractive natural setting, which had been absent in his early Osaka residences, Ando further develops the theme of a relation to nature, expressed in this house by views out to the verdant landscape. He explains, “Such things as light and wind only have meaning when they are introduced inside a house in a form cut off from the outside world. The isolated fragments of light and air suggest the entire natural world. The forms I have created have altered and acquired meaning through elementary nature (light and air) that give indications of the passage of time and the changing of the seasons.” The Hill and the Grid Though Ando’s Rokko apartment buildings in Kobe are of a dif-

ferent type than his private houses, they illustrate many of the © 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Kidosaki House

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan


4 x 4 HOUSE Kobe, Hyogo, Japan : 2001–3

206

This is a minimal private residence in Tarumi, Kobe City, standing along the coast looking over Inland Sea. The site once measured several dozen meters in depth past the breakwater, but a good part of it is now submerged, eroded by the sea. Recent bank protection regulations have permitted construction on a small space measuring just 16.4 square feet (5 sq. m). “Our primary concern;” says Ando, “was to achieve a rich living space on this postage-stamp plot of land, taking advantage of its location.” The building is a tower-shaped structure with a square plan of the largest possible size allowed to be built within this site. The ground level accommodates the entrance; the second level the bedroom; the third level the study; and the top level the living room and kitchen, which is the core of this house. Scarcity of space has resulted in a simple and straightforward structure, but efforts were made to allow for optimal ocean views, notably by giving the ceiling height of the top level the same length as the plan’s side and projecting the front opening toward the sea by 3.3 feet (1 m). Calculated down to a millimeter, the project has required a great amount of concentration in the decisions about the smallest of details, but, says Ando, “It has turned out to be a good experience of acknowledging the limits of human living space.”

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

207

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


4 x 4 HOUSE Kobe, Hyogo, Japan : 2001–3

206

This is a minimal private residence in Tarumi, Kobe City, standing along the coast looking over Inland Sea. The site once measured several dozen meters in depth past the breakwater, but a good part of it is now submerged, eroded by the sea. Recent bank protection regulations have permitted construction on a small space measuring just 16.4 square feet (5 sq. m). “Our primary concern;” says Ando, “was to achieve a rich living space on this postage-stamp plot of land, taking advantage of its location.” The building is a tower-shaped structure with a square plan of the largest possible size allowed to be built within this site. The ground level accommodates the entrance; the second level the bedroom; the third level the study; and the top level the living room and kitchen, which is the core of this house. Scarcity of space has resulted in a simple and straightforward structure, but efforts were made to allow for optimal ocean views, notably by giving the ceiling height of the top level the same length as the plan’s side and projecting the front opening toward the sea by 3.3 feet (1 m). Calculated down to a millimeter, the project has required a great amount of concentration in the decisions about the smallest of details, but, says Ando, “It has turned out to be a good experience of acknowledging the limits of human living space.”

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

207

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


KOSHINO HOUSE

60

61

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© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


KOSHINO HOUSE

60

61

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© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


house in sri lanka

HOUSE NAME

House in Utsubo Park

Town Name, Japan : 2006

Osaka, Japan : 2007–10

234

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Designed for a couple and their two dogs, this house is located in central Osaka, and is bordered by a lush park on its southern side. The terraced house plot is less than 16.4 feet (5 m) wide, but it is 88.6 feet (27 m) deep. Neighbored on two sides by medium high-rise buildings, the site was in some sense threatened with darkness. By taking advantage of the slender characteristics of the site, Ando imagined a design that hinged on the concept of “capturing” the greenery of the park. The spatial composition is simple. The plan is arranged with walls enclosing all four sides. A courtyard directly communicates with the park to the south, and another courtyard faces the entrance to the north. The interior living area is located between these two courtyards. Sunlight reaches fully into the interior space; breeze blows through the house from south to north. The stairs, bathroom, and machinery spaces are concentrated in the northern half, and the dining and double-height living room are to the south. The 11.8-foothigh (3.6 m) end wall, visible from the living room, separates the south court and the park, and is completely covered with greenery. It is equipped with a planter system that creates a vertical green surface linked with the greenery of the park. Moreover, since both the interior and exterior flooring of the house have been covered with the same stone finish, the idea was to create a feeling of continuity between the inside and the outside, linking the house with the park beyond. The private zone is located on the upper floor. The bedroom is set back from the park, with a large roof terrace to the south. In the back of the bedroom, a study room is cantilevered over the north court. From the interior, through the 29.5-foot-deep (9 m) roof terrace, there is a view of a large camphor tree and abundant greenery in the background. This house is conceptualized “so that the whole building works as a device that systematically draws nature inside.”

235

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


house in sri lanka

HOUSE NAME

House in Utsubo Park

Town Name, Japan : 2006

Osaka, Japan : 2007–10

234

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Designed for a couple and their two dogs, this house is located in central Osaka, and is bordered by a lush park on its southern side. The terraced house plot is less than 16.4 feet (5 m) wide, but it is 88.6 feet (27 m) deep. Neighbored on two sides by medium high-rise buildings, the site was in some sense threatened with darkness. By taking advantage of the slender characteristics of the site, Ando imagined a design that hinged on the concept of “capturing” the greenery of the park. The spatial composition is simple. The plan is arranged with walls enclosing all four sides. A courtyard directly communicates with the park to the south, and another courtyard faces the entrance to the north. The interior living area is located between these two courtyards. Sunlight reaches fully into the interior space; breeze blows through the house from south to north. The stairs, bathroom, and machinery spaces are concentrated in the northern half, and the dining and double-height living room are to the south. The 11.8-foothigh (3.6 m) end wall, visible from the living room, separates the south court and the park, and is completely covered with greenery. It is equipped with a planter system that creates a vertical green surface linked with the greenery of the park. Moreover, since both the interior and exterior flooring of the house have been covered with the same stone finish, the idea was to create a feeling of continuity between the inside and the outside, linking the house with the park beyond. The private zone is located on the upper floor. The bedroom is set back from the park, with a large roof terrace to the south. In the back of the bedroom, a study room is cantilevered over the north court. From the interior, through the 29.5-foot-deep (9 m) roof terrace, there is a view of a large camphor tree and abundant greenery in the background. This house is conceptualized “so that the whole building works as a device that systematically draws nature inside.”

235

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in Utsubo Park

248

249

Top to bottom: Roof plan; third-floor plan; second-floor plan; first-floor plan

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in Utsubo Park

248

249

Top to bottom: Roof plan; third-floor plan; second-floor plan; first-floor plan

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Rokko Housing I

110

111

Study sketch of public areas on each level

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Rokko Housing I

110

111

Study sketch of public areas on each level

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in SRI LANKA Weligama, Sri Lanka : 2004–8

250

This very large residence for a Belgian couple, Saskia and Pierre Pringiers, was built on top of a cliff overlooking the Indian Ocean. Although Ando was originally contacted in 2004 for the project, construction was delayed by the consequences of the tsunami that swept across a large part of the ocean on December 26, 2004. Working with PWA Architects, Ando brought construction site managers from Japan to supervise the poured-in-place concrete used for the main structure. Locally sourced temple stones, natural stone, and timber were also employed in the design. Steel doors and windows were manufactured in Belgium for the house. With an area of 27,739 sq. feet (2,577 sq. m), the house has a relatively complex program made up of the client’s own residence, guest areas, and an artist’s atelier for Saskia Pringiers, who is a painter. Ando explains, “These programs were distributed within zigzagging volumes and the interstitial voids created between them were provided as places for entering into a dialogue with the natural Sri Lankan environment.” Seizing on the Japanese tradition of spaces that are neither fully indoors nor outdoors, Ando makes good use of the local climate to provide “semi-outdoor” areas, but as he says, this is a “residence that differs completely in terms of scale and locale from the urban houses that I have built in Japan.”

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

251

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in SRI LANKA Weligama, Sri Lanka : 2004–8

250

This very large residence for a Belgian couple, Saskia and Pierre Pringiers, was built on top of a cliff overlooking the Indian Ocean. Although Ando was originally contacted in 2004 for the project, construction was delayed by the consequences of the tsunami that swept across a large part of the ocean on December 26, 2004. Working with PWA Architects, Ando brought construction site managers from Japan to supervise the poured-in-place concrete used for the main structure. Locally sourced temple stones, natural stone, and timber were also employed in the design. Steel doors and windows were manufactured in Belgium for the house. With an area of 27,739 sq. feet (2,577 sq. m), the house has a relatively complex program made up of the client’s own residence, guest areas, and an artist’s atelier for Saskia Pringiers, who is a painter. Ando explains, “These programs were distributed within zigzagging volumes and the interstitial voids created between them were provided as places for entering into a dialogue with the natural Sri Lankan environment.” Seizing on the Japanese tradition of spaces that are neither fully indoors nor outdoors, Ando makes good use of the local climate to provide “semi-outdoor” areas, but as he says, this is a “residence that differs completely in terms of scale and locale from the urban houses that I have built in Japan.”

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

251

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in SRI LANKA

260

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

261

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in SRI LANKA

260

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

261

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in MONTERREY

266

267

PLAN 3F

PLAN 2F

Top to bottom:

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Third-floor plan; second-floor plan; first-floor plan

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. PLAN 1F


House in MONTERREY

266

267

PLAN 3F

PLAN 2F

Top to bottom:

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Third-floor plan; second-floor plan; first-floor plan

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. PLAN 1F


House in MONTERREY

268

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

269

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in MONTERREY

268

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

269

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


House in MONTERREY

274

275

Axonometric drawing

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. ISOMETRIC


House in MONTERREY

274

275

Axonometric drawing

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. ISOMETRIC


time line of houses 2006–2012

2007

2009

2010

DAMIEN HIRST STUDIO

HOUSE IN UTSUBO PARK

ISHIHARA HOUSE

HOUSE IN TAKAMATSU

HOUSE IN ASHIYA II

LOCATION : GUERRERO, MEXICO

LOCATION : OSAKA, japan

LOCATION : OTSU, SHIGA, JAPAN

LOCATION : TAKAMATSU, KAGAWA, japan

LOCATION : ASHIYA, HYOGO, JAPAN

TERM OF PLANNING : 2006–

TERM OF PLANNING : 2007–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2009

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–11

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–12

SITE AREA : 46,300 sq. m

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2011–12

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2010–13

SITE AREA : 142,6 sq. m

SITE AREA : 214.0 sq. m

SITE AREA : 271.1 sq. m

SITE AREA : 196.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 89,4 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 54.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 206.2 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 78.1 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 186,1 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 92.2 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 378 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 134.3 sq. m

298

2008

2012

HOUSE IN MALIBU III

HOUSE IN NAGOYA

HOUSE IN NORTHERN EUROPE

HOUSE IN ASHIYA I

BOSCO STUDIO AND HOUSE

LOCATION : MALIBU, CALIFORNIA, USA

LOCATION : NAGOYA, AICHI, japan

LOCATION : DUBLIN, IRELAND

LOCATION : ASHIYA, HYOGO, JAPAN

LOCATION : Puerto Escondido, Mexico

TERM OF PLANNING : 2006–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2008–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2009–

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–12

TERM OF PLANNING : 2011–

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–12

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

SITE AREA : 8400 sq. m

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2012–13

SITE AREA : 222000

SITE AREA : 414 sq. m

SITE AREA : 262.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 931 sq. m

SITE AREA : 331.2 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 3200 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 175 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 180.4 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 462 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 129.6 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 374 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 212.7 sq. m

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

299

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 325.0 sq. m

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


time line of houses 2006–2012

2007

2009

2010

DAMIEN HIRST STUDIO

HOUSE IN UTSUBO PARK

ISHIHARA HOUSE

HOUSE IN TAKAMATSU

HOUSE IN ASHIYA II

LOCATION : GUERRERO, MEXICO

LOCATION : OSAKA, japan

LOCATION : OTSU, SHIGA, JAPAN

LOCATION : TAKAMATSU, KAGAWA, japan

LOCATION : ASHIYA, HYOGO, JAPAN

TERM OF PLANNING : 2006–

TERM OF PLANNING : 2007–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2009

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–11

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–12

SITE AREA : 46,300 sq. m

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2011–12

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2010–13

SITE AREA : 142,6 sq. m

SITE AREA : 214.0 sq. m

SITE AREA : 271.1 sq. m

SITE AREA : 196.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 89,4 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 54.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 206.2 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 78.1 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 186,1 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 92.2 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 378 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 134.3 sq. m

298

2008

2012

HOUSE IN MALIBU III

HOUSE IN NAGOYA

HOUSE IN NORTHERN EUROPE

HOUSE IN ASHIYA I

BOSCO STUDIO AND HOUSE

LOCATION : MALIBU, CALIFORNIA, USA

LOCATION : NAGOYA, AICHI, japan

LOCATION : DUBLIN, IRELAND

LOCATION : ASHIYA, HYOGO, JAPAN

LOCATION : Puerto Escondido, Mexico

TERM OF PLANNING : 2006–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2008–9

TERM OF PLANNING : 2009–

TERM OF PLANNING : 2010–12

TERM OF PLANNING : 2011–

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–12

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2009–10

SITE AREA : 8400 sq. m

TERM OF CONSTRUCTION : 2012–13

SITE AREA : 222000

SITE AREA : 414 sq. m

SITE AREA : 262.0 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 931 sq. m

SITE AREA : 331.2 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 3200 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 175 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 180.4 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 462 sq. m

BUILDING AREA : 129.6 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 374 sq. m

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 212.7 sq. m

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

299

TOTAL FLOOR AREA : 325.0 sq. m

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Tadao Ando: Houses  

The new book from Rizzoli New York. Learn more: http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847831593

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