Page 1


U N I T E D STAT E S M I S S I O N TO T H E U N I T E D N AT I O N S

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 36

Entry pavilion

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© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 37

3/5/13 1:55 PM


U N I T E D STAT E S M I S S I O N TO T H E U N I T E D N AT I O N S

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 36

Entry pavilion

02-9823-GSA3_USMissiontotheUN_07_jc.indd 36-37

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 37

3/5/13 1:55 PM


ASTOR PLACE / COOPER SQUARE

Astor Place/Cooper Square NEW YORK, NEW YORK

2002–2006

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

3/5/13 2:29 PM


ASTOR PLACE / COOPER SQUARE

Astor Place/Cooper Square NEW YORK, NEW YORK

2002–2006

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

3/5/13 2:29 PM


ASTOR PLACE / COOPER SQUARE

Built on what was until recently one of the most prominent undeveloped sites in Manhattan, Astor Place is a 21-story luxury residential condominium building. Created for The Related Companies, one of the country’s leading developers, it occupies the long-vacant parking lot site at Astor Place and marks a major, historic gateway to Lower Manhattan, Greenwich Village, and the East Village. The building’s two-story base, which maintains the historic street facades of Layfayette Street, Astor Place, and Cooper Place, contains 13,000 square feet of retail and gallery space and provides the lobby for the 19-story luxury condominium tower that rises above. Conforming to zoning requirements, the base offers a pedestrian street wall on three sides, creating a definition to the large, open, triangular space it fronts. The tower introduces a sculptural object, in counterpoint to the surrounding masonry context. The 140,000-square-foot building, at the intersection of Cooper Square, Lafayette Street, and Astor Place is a striking 21st century form among the several 19th century landmark buildings that are its immediate neighbors. Rather than have the tower abut the buildings behind, a landscaped plaza was introduced between the buildings, which reinforces the object quality of the tower and provides a visual link between Lafayette Street and Cooper Square. The tower is a vertical sequence of serpentine and rectilinear forms. The curved form of the tower expresses the energy of the confluence of streets. A glass curtain wall forms the skin of the curvilinear portions, whereas the rectilinear portion is clad with a grid of zinc and glass, and the base composed of limestone and glass. Astor Place contains 39 loft apartments, ranging in size from one to three bedrooms. The curved window wall offers panoramic, floor-to-ceiling views of Manhattan. The 4,500-square-foot plaza, open to the public from Cooper Square, accommodates public seating alongside a raised, tree-planted, landscaped buffer, which provides visual separation from the residential tower entry on Lafayette Street. It also provides a visual terminus to the Seventh Street view corridor and a spatial extension to Cooper Park.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. View from southeast

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143

3/5/13 2:29 PM


ASTOR PLACE / COOPER SQUARE

Built on what was until recently one of the most prominent undeveloped sites in Manhattan, Astor Place is a 21-story luxury residential condominium building. Created for The Related Companies, one of the country’s leading developers, it occupies the long-vacant parking lot site at Astor Place and marks a major, historic gateway to Lower Manhattan, Greenwich Village, and the East Village. The building’s two-story base, which maintains the historic street facades of Layfayette Street, Astor Place, and Cooper Place, contains 13,000 square feet of retail and gallery space and provides the lobby for the 19-story luxury condominium tower that rises above. Conforming to zoning requirements, the base offers a pedestrian street wall on three sides, creating a definition to the large, open, triangular space it fronts. The tower introduces a sculptural object, in counterpoint to the surrounding masonry context. The 140,000-square-foot building, at the intersection of Cooper Square, Lafayette Street, and Astor Place is a striking 21st century form among the several 19th century landmark buildings that are its immediate neighbors. Rather than have the tower abut the buildings behind, a landscaped plaza was introduced between the buildings, which reinforces the object quality of the tower and provides a visual link between Lafayette Street and Cooper Square. The tower is a vertical sequence of serpentine and rectilinear forms. The curved form of the tower expresses the energy of the confluence of streets. A glass curtain wall forms the skin of the curvilinear portions, whereas the rectilinear portion is clad with a grid of zinc and glass, and the base composed of limestone and glass. Astor Place contains 39 loft apartments, ranging in size from one to three bedrooms. The curved window wall offers panoramic, floor-to-ceiling views of Manhattan. The 4,500-square-foot plaza, open to the public from Cooper Square, accommodates public seating alongside a raised, tree-planted, landscaped buffer, which provides visual separation from the residential tower entry on Lafayette Street. It also provides a visual terminus to the Seventh Street view corridor and a spatial extension to Cooper Park.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. View from southeast

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143

3/5/13 2:29 PM


HAMPTONS HOUSE

The site, a flat, two-and-a-half-acre parcel, just a� mile from the beach, fronts Daniels Lane and is sandwiched between two private lanes serving other homes. Creating a private enclave within the tightly packed shoreline community was of paramount importance. Thick hedges of evergreen plantings enclose an expansive lawn, creating a frame around the varied forms of the house, cabana, pool, and tennis court. The plan distributes the primary spaces of the house on a single level around an open-air entry court. Central to the plan, the courtyard is a private space viewed from adjacent rooms, visually expanding the interior space and anchoring the playful, expressive forms that telegraph the interior workings of the house. The effect is a sense of anticipation on approach and of discovery within. Entering through a driveway gate, you pass through a grove of pear trees toward the parking area and entry to the house. The front door is discovered at the end of a covered cloister, running beside a wall of translucent glass block and separated from the brick-paved courtyard by a row of cedar shingle—clad columns. The courtyard is planted with a stand of pear trees whose shade canopies have been pleached to form a single shape. Further animating the courtyard is the projecting curved volume of the library. This progression, combined with the play of materials and shapes, adds anticipation as guests pass through the front door. From the front entry, looking beyond columns supporting an asymmetrical vaulted ceiling, the eye is pulled through the living room, out to a screened porch, and to an expanse of lawn. Other sculptural volumes flank the living room: the dining room is within a cylindrical form interrupted by a smaller cylindrical form containing the enclosed spiral stair to the home office above. The master bedroom and bedroom wing are organized on the opposite side of the entry and are the foil to the visual excitement of the more public parts of the house. The house provides a variety of private connections to the outdoors, from the courtyard entry to the enclosed living room porch. The courtyard's translucent glass-block wall becomes the bedroom corridor wall and is punctuated by mahogany-framed windows that permit unfiltered light and courtyard views. Sensitive placement of skylights, clerestory windows, and glass-block glazing add surprise and lightness to the spaces. Guests enjoy a level of privacy in a semidetached suite that splays off from the main house and is reached by a covered walkway. A media room, exercise room, art storage, and children’s play area are incorporated at the lower level. The primary exterior materials are cedar shingles, mahogany windows, and lead-coated copper standing seam roofing.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. Pool and cabana with house beyond

163


HAMPTONS HOUSE

The site, a flat, two-and-a-half-acre parcel, just a� mile from the beach, fronts Daniels Lane and is sandwiched between two private lanes serving other homes. Creating a private enclave within the tightly packed shoreline community was of paramount importance. Thick hedges of evergreen plantings enclose an expansive lawn, creating a frame around the varied forms of the house, cabana, pool, and tennis court. The plan distributes the primary spaces of the house on a single level around an open-air entry court. Central to the plan, the courtyard is a private space viewed from adjacent rooms, visually expanding the interior space and anchoring the playful, expressive forms that telegraph the interior workings of the house. The effect is a sense of anticipation on approach and of discovery within. Entering through a driveway gate, you pass through a grove of pear trees toward the parking area and entry to the house. The front door is discovered at the end of a covered cloister, running beside a wall of translucent glass block and separated from the brick-paved courtyard by a row of cedar shingle—clad columns. The courtyard is planted with a stand of pear trees whose shade canopies have been pleached to form a single shape. Further animating the courtyard is the projecting curved volume of the library. This progression, combined with the play of materials and shapes, adds anticipation as guests pass through the front door. From the front entry, looking beyond columns supporting an asymmetrical vaulted ceiling, the eye is pulled through the living room, out to a screened porch, and to an expanse of lawn. Other sculptural volumes flank the living room: the dining room is within a cylindrical form interrupted by a smaller cylindrical form containing the enclosed spiral stair to the home office above. The master bedroom and bedroom wing are organized on the opposite side of the entry and are the foil to the visual excitement of the more public parts of the house. The house provides a variety of private connections to the outdoors, from the courtyard entry to the enclosed living room porch. The courtyard's translucent glass-block wall becomes the bedroom corridor wall and is punctuated by mahogany-framed windows that permit unfiltered light and courtyard views. Sensitive placement of skylights, clerestory windows, and glass-block glazing add surprise and lightness to the spaces. Guests enjoy a level of privacy in a semidetached suite that splays off from the main house and is reached by a covered walkway. A media room, exercise room, art storage, and children’s play area are incorporated at the lower level. The primary exterior materials are cedar shingles, mahogany windows, and lead-coated copper standing seam roofing.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. Pool and cabana with house beyond

163


W HOBOKEN

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 174

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

First-, second-, third-, and eighteenth-level plans | View from southeast | View from east

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3/6/13 10:56 AM


W HOBOKEN

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 174

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

First-, second-, third-, and eighteenth-level plans | View from southeast | View from east

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3/6/13 10:56 AM


W HOBOKEN

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 180

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Living room | Living room

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3/6/13 10:56 AM


W HOBOKEN

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 180

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Living room | Living room

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3/6/13 10:56 AM


Fifth Avenue Penthouse NEW YORK, NEW YORK

2007–2010

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

26-0702-GSA3_FifthAvenuePenthouse_11_jc.indd 296-297

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

3/5/13 3:06 PM


Fifth Avenue Penthouse NEW YORK, NEW YORK

2007–2010

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

26-0702-GSA3_FifthAvenuePenthouse_11_jc.indd 296-297

© 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

3/5/13 3:06 PM


3 2 3 PA R K AV E N U E S O U T H

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 314

Residential lobby | Ground-, typical-, and penthouse-level plans | Rooftop terrace

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 315


3 2 3 PA R K AV E N U E S O U T H

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 314

Residential lobby | Ground-, typical-, and penthouse-level plans | Rooftop terrace

Š 2013 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. 315

Gwathmey Siegel Buildings and Projects, 2002-2012  

The new book from Rizzoli New York. Learn more: http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847841240