Page 1


1

The Creamed Cake Method

l What not to do Adding the eggs too quickly will split the batter. This does not affect the flavor but the cake will be less aerated and stabilized, resulting in a denser cake. If the creaming and egg stages have been hurried, the batter will be runny and curdled. Overcome this by adding 1 tablespoon of flour and continuing to whisk at high speed to aerate and rescue the mixture.

Creaming involves beating softened butter or margarine and sugar together with an electric whisk until the emulsion is light, aerated, and voluminous. Eggs are added very slowly, beating well after each addition to create a stable emulsion (the lecithin in the egg yolk) with maximum aeration (the albumen—the elastic egg white protein). Flour is folded in with a light touch and a metal spoon or flat-bladed spatula to avoid knocking out all the air.

INGREDIENTS This sequence provides step-by-step instructions on the method of making a creamed cake. There is no standard recipe, but most will use softened unsalted butter, golden superfine sugar, eggs, and all-purpose flour, and can also have flavoring added in the form of vanilla bean paste, citrus zest, chocolate and the like.

Place the softened butter and sugar in the clean bowl of an electric mixer. Turn the mixer on slow speed at first to incorporate the butter and sugar together. Continue to cream on high speed for up to 10 minutes to achieve the perfect creamed cake.

l What not to do Not creaming for long enough will prevent the batter from having sufficient air incorporated into the cake—this will result in the cake being dense, tough, with lower sides and a peak in the center of the cake.

Pour the whole beaten eggs from a jug in a very slow, steady stream into the creamed butter and sugar, with the mixer on high speed. This will take up to 20 minutes. Remove the electric beater. Sift the flour into the bowl. This will remove any lumps in the flour and add more air into the cake batter as the flour aerates.

Please see specific recipes for measurements, oven temperatures, and baking times. All ingredients (with the exception of milk) should be at room temperature.

l What not to do Don’t beat the flour into the cake batter—this will knock out the air bubbles and activate the elasticated, stretchy gluten protein, resulting in

a chewy, dense-textured cake. Fold the flour in carefully by hand with a metal blade or rubber spatula until well mixed.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 34

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

35


1

The Creamed Cake Method

l What not to do Adding the eggs too quickly will split the batter. This does not affect the flavor but the cake will be less aerated and stabilized, resulting in a denser cake. If the creaming and egg stages have been hurried, the batter will be runny and curdled. Overcome this by adding 1 tablespoon of flour and continuing to whisk at high speed to aerate and rescue the mixture.

Creaming involves beating softened butter or margarine and sugar together with an electric whisk until the emulsion is light, aerated, and voluminous. Eggs are added very slowly, beating well after each addition to create a stable emulsion (the lecithin in the egg yolk) with maximum aeration (the albumen—the elastic egg white protein). Flour is folded in with a light touch and a metal spoon or flat-bladed spatula to avoid knocking out all the air.

INGREDIENTS This sequence provides step-by-step instructions on the method of making a creamed cake. There is no standard recipe, but most will use softened unsalted butter, golden superfine sugar, eggs, and all-purpose flour, and can also have flavoring added in the form of vanilla bean paste, citrus zest, chocolate and the like.

Place the softened butter and sugar in the clean bowl of an electric mixer. Turn the mixer on slow speed at first to incorporate the butter and sugar together. Continue to cream on high speed for up to 10 minutes to achieve the perfect creamed cake.

l What not to do Not creaming for long enough will prevent the batter from having sufficient air incorporated into the cake—this will result in the cake being dense, tough, with lower sides and a peak in the center of the cake.

Pour the whole beaten eggs from a jug in a very slow, steady stream into the creamed butter and sugar, with the mixer on high speed. This will take up to 20 minutes. Remove the electric beater. Sift the flour into the bowl. This will remove any lumps in the flour and add more air into the cake batter as the flour aerates.

Please see specific recipes for measurements, oven temperatures, and baking times. All ingredients (with the exception of milk) should be at room temperature.

l What not to do Don’t beat the flour into the cake batter—this will knock out the air bubbles and activate the elasticated, stretchy gluten protein, resulting in

a chewy, dense-textured cake. Fold the flour in carefully by hand with a metal blade or rubber spatula until well mixed.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 34

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

35


Carefully fold in the flour using a metal spoon or flat-bladed spatula. This involves carefully drawing the spatula around the edge of the mixture and turning it over with a cutting action until the flour is incorporated. Carefully transfer the mixture into the prepared cake pan. Hold the bowl close to the pan so it does not have to be dolloped from a great height, which would knock out the air.

It is not possible to overcream a cake mixture. I cream my cakes for 10 minutes on maximum speed to ensure high levels of aeration and emulsification before adding the eggs.

Use the back of the spatula to smooth the surface of the cake batter in the pan. The cake is now ready to be baked. Bake in the oven for the stated time or until the cake is a golden color and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove the cake from the oven and let cool in the pan for 10 minutes. The perfect creamed cake should have an even rise and even texture, with uniform air bubbles throughout the cake. The crust will be springy and neither tough nor chewy.

time to make and “bakeIt thetakesperfect cake. I have seen many bakers rush to get the cake in the oven, often cutting corners in the process.

MICH’S TIPS

l What not to do

1

3

2

4

The butter should be taken out of the refrigerator and allowed to come up to room temperature naturally. Don’t be tempted to soften the butter in the microwave—it will simply melt and not have the aeration properties. Cold butter will not cream and will result in a grainy, close, dense cake. It is not technically possible to overcream the butter and sugar—the longer the better. Egg white (albumen) is an elastic protein and works best when warmed up. If egg white is cold, the protein will not stretch around the air bubbles—resulting in a dense cake. Eggs at room temperature will have maximum aeration. Cold eggs are more susceptible to curdling when added to a cake mixture—again resulting in a dense cake. Egg yolk contains lecithin—a good emulsifier.

You practically need to hold your breath while you fold in the flour with the lightest of touches to ensure the flour is incorporated, the batter is smooth, and the minimum number of air bubbles are destroyed. If the flour is beaten in too heavily, the gluten will develop and the resulting cake will be tough, dry, and chewy.

Ensure the oven is preheated to the correct temperature as you start making the cake. It is important the oven is at the right temperature for the cake so that it can be put straight in as soon as it is in the pan. Any delay in waiting for the oven to come to temperature at this stage would allow the cake batter to settle, air to be lost, or the rising agent to start working and lose some of its potency before baking, resulting in a dense cake.

Shallow sides and peaked cake

Close, dense texture

Adding all the flour and beating it with the electric mixer will incorporate the flour and help stabilize the batter. However, it will also work the gluten in the flour—encouraging it to strengthen and become more elasticated and chewy—and sadly it will have this same effect on the baked cake. The resulting batter looks dense, dark, and thick. The resulting cake can clearly be seen to have a poor rise on the sides and an overrisen crust in the center. This is due to the lack of aeration during the making and allowing only for the rising agent in the flour to force the center of the cake up as it bakes. The texture is uneven and dense, and the cake looks darker and has a chewy, tough bite. Not creaming for long enough will prevent the batter from having sufficient air incorporated into the cake—the cake will be dense and tough, with lower sides and a peak in the center.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 36

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

37


Carefully fold in the flour using a metal spoon or flat-bladed spatula. This involves carefully drawing the spatula around the edge of the mixture and turning it over with a cutting action until the flour is incorporated. Carefully transfer the mixture into the prepared cake pan. Hold the bowl close to the pan so it does not have to be dolloped from a great height, which would knock out the air.

It is not possible to overcream a cake mixture. I cream my cakes for 10 minutes on maximum speed to ensure high levels of aeration and emulsification before adding the eggs.

Use the back of the spatula to smooth the surface of the cake batter in the pan. The cake is now ready to be baked. Bake in the oven for the stated time or until the cake is a golden color and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove the cake from the oven and let cool in the pan for 10 minutes. The perfect creamed cake should have an even rise and even texture, with uniform air bubbles throughout the cake. The crust will be springy and neither tough nor chewy.

time to make and “bakeIt thetakesperfect cake. I have seen many bakers rush to get the cake in the oven, often cutting corners in the process.

MICH’S TIPS

l What not to do

1

3

2

4

The butter should be taken out of the refrigerator and allowed to come up to room temperature naturally. Don’t be tempted to soften the butter in the microwave—it will simply melt and not have the aeration properties. Cold butter will not cream and will result in a grainy, close, dense cake. It is not technically possible to overcream the butter and sugar—the longer the better. Egg white (albumen) is an elastic protein and works best when warmed up. If egg white is cold, the protein will not stretch around the air bubbles—resulting in a dense cake. Eggs at room temperature will have maximum aeration. Cold eggs are more susceptible to curdling when added to a cake mixture—again resulting in a dense cake. Egg yolk contains lecithin—a good emulsifier.

You practically need to hold your breath while you fold in the flour with the lightest of touches to ensure the flour is incorporated, the batter is smooth, and the minimum number of air bubbles are destroyed. If the flour is beaten in too heavily, the gluten will develop and the resulting cake will be tough, dry, and chewy.

Ensure the oven is preheated to the correct temperature as you start making the cake. It is important the oven is at the right temperature for the cake so that it can be put straight in as soon as it is in the pan. Any delay in waiting for the oven to come to temperature at this stage would allow the cake batter to settle, air to be lost, or the rising agent to start working and lose some of its potency before baking, resulting in a dense cake.

Shallow sides and peaked cake

Close, dense texture

Adding all the flour and beating it with the electric mixer will incorporate the flour and help stabilize the batter. However, it will also work the gluten in the flour—encouraging it to strengthen and become more elasticated and chewy—and sadly it will have this same effect on the baked cake. The resulting batter looks dense, dark, and thick. The resulting cake can clearly be seen to have a poor rise on the sides and an overrisen crust in the center. This is due to the lack of aeration during the making and allowing only for the rising agent in the flour to force the center of the cake up as it bakes. The texture is uneven and dense, and the cake looks darker and has a chewy, tough bite. Not creaming for long enough will prevent the batter from having sufficient air incorporated into the cake—the cake will be dense and tough, with lower sides and a peak in the center.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 36

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

37


Creamed chocolate cake Chocolate cakes are indulgent and delectable, but there is a real skill to baking the perfect chocolate cake to ensure it has the right intensity of flavor. It should be rich, neither bland nor bitter and overpowering and balanced, with a moist texture and a soft bite. Chocolate cake should always be eaten at room temperature, as chilled chooclate will make the cake feel drier than it is.

Makes one 8-inch round cake (see also page 82 for other sizes) INGREDIENTS 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened 1¾ cups brown sugar 5 medium eggs, beaten 7 ounces bittersweet chocolate (70% cocoa solids), melted 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste

Creaming the butter and sugar

together creates an aerated emulsion. Place the butter and sugar in a clean bowl and whisk slowly at first to incorporate the two ingredients. For this chocolate cake I have suggested brown sugar, as the molasses will ensure the resulting cake has a chewy caramelized texture. Refined or superfine sugar would result in a drier, crispier cake, which would taste sweet, but not have a caramelized undertone.

Add the beaten egg in a slow, steady stream, beating well to incorporate the egg into the creamed mixture.

Don’t be tempted to soften butter in the microwave—it will simply melt and not have the aeration properties necessary to make a light-as-air cake.

Chocolate should be melted

to allow even incorporation through the cake. Let cool before adding to avoid melting the butter and therefore reducing aeration. Don’t be tempted to use chocolate with lower cocoa solids, as the recipe has been formulated to use these solids to help set the cake and impart a decadent chocolate flavor.

l What not to do Using cold ingredients or rushing either of the creaming or egg-adding stages will result in a curdled cake mixture. A curdled mixture has globules of slimy batter with oozing liquid. While it is preferable to avoid this, it is possible to still use this mixture to make a cake. Continue to whisk in its current state for 10 minutes with the addition of a little melted chocolate (which contains more lecithin—a natural stabilizer and emulsifier) or flour (the starch will soak up the liquid and stabilize the batter). The resulting cake will be dense, tight, and chewy but should still have a good flavor.

Once the chocolate is fully

incorporated, the resulting cake batter should have the texture of chocolate mousse.

I like to add a tablespoon of vanilla bean paste at this stage. Vanilla greatly enhances the flavor of chocolate (it is added as an integral ingredient in chocolate manufacturing) by providing a pleasant aftertaste.

1 cup plus 1 tablespoon allpurpose flour Preheat the oven to 325° F.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 38

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

39


Creamed chocolate cake Chocolate cakes are indulgent and delectable, but there is a real skill to baking the perfect chocolate cake to ensure it has the right intensity of flavor. It should be rich, neither bland nor bitter and overpowering and balanced, with a moist texture and a soft bite. Chocolate cake should always be eaten at room temperature, as chilled chooclate will make the cake feel drier than it is.

Makes one 8-inch round cake (see also page 82 for other sizes) INGREDIENTS 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened 1¾ cups brown sugar 5 medium eggs, beaten 7 ounces bittersweet chocolate (70% cocoa solids), melted 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste

Creaming the butter and sugar

together creates an aerated emulsion. Place the butter and sugar in a clean bowl and whisk slowly at first to incorporate the two ingredients. For this chocolate cake I have suggested brown sugar, as the molasses will ensure the resulting cake has a chewy caramelized texture. Refined or superfine sugar would result in a drier, crispier cake, which would taste sweet, but not have a caramelized undertone.

Add the beaten egg in a slow, steady stream, beating well to incorporate the egg into the creamed mixture.

Don’t be tempted to soften butter in the microwave—it will simply melt and not have the aeration properties necessary to make a light-as-air cake.

Chocolate should be melted

to allow even incorporation through the cake. Let cool before adding to avoid melting the butter and therefore reducing aeration. Don’t be tempted to use chocolate with lower cocoa solids, as the recipe has been formulated to use these solids to help set the cake and impart a decadent chocolate flavor.

l What not to do Using cold ingredients or rushing either of the creaming or egg-adding stages will result in a curdled cake mixture. A curdled mixture has globules of slimy batter with oozing liquid. While it is preferable to avoid this, it is possible to still use this mixture to make a cake. Continue to whisk in its current state for 10 minutes with the addition of a little melted chocolate (which contains more lecithin—a natural stabilizer and emulsifier) or flour (the starch will soak up the liquid and stabilize the batter). The resulting cake will be dense, tight, and chewy but should still have a good flavor.

Once the chocolate is fully

incorporated, the resulting cake batter should have the texture of chocolate mousse.

I like to add a tablespoon of vanilla bean paste at this stage. Vanilla greatly enhances the flavor of chocolate (it is added as an integral ingredient in chocolate manufacturing) by providing a pleasant aftertaste.

1 cup plus 1 tablespoon allpurpose flour Preheat the oven to 325° F.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 38

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

39


MICH’S TIPS

1

Before you start, ensure all ingredients are at room temperature. This will allow for maximum aeration, resulting in a light, even-textured cake.

2

Use the best, freshest-quality ingredients—it sounds simple, but don’t think ingredients that are past their prime will miraculously improve once baked in a cake. It is advisable to use the freshest, plumpest, tastiest, highest-quality ingredients to produce spectacular cakes.

3

Melt the chocolate and let cool before adding to the batter so it does not melt the butter (which would reduce the aeration) or cook the eggs.

4

Measure all ingredients accurately. Making cakes is scientific. All ingredients are included for a reason and as such it is imperative the weights and measures are adhered to accurately. Too much or too little of the key ingredients will dramatically affect the result.

5 6

Use chocolate with a minimum of 70% cocoa solids to impart a rich, indulgent chocolate flavor.

Adding the zest of 2 oranges or 1 cup chopped roasted pecans makes a wonderful variation to this chocolate cake recipe.

Pour the cake mixture into the prepared, lined 8-inch round pan (pages 24 to 25) and level with the back of the spatula. Bake in the preheated oven for 1 hour. This chocolate cake will rise (thanks to all the aeration) and have a slight wobble as it comes out of the oven. The crust will be risen and crispy and the cake underneath will be gently glistening as it is removed from the oven—neither completely dry (overbaked) nor wet (underbaked). Let cool in the pan. The crust will settle back down and the top edges may crack as the cake cools—this is perfectly normal.

Flour is folded into the cake mixture with the lightest of touches. Beating with a heavy hand, a wooden spoon, or an electric mixer would knock out air incorporated during creaming and overwork the gluten (protein) in the flour. This would result in a tough, chewy, dense cake. Remove the bowl from the electric mixer and continue by hand. Add the flour into the bowl and use a spatula or metal spoon to carefully fold (cutting and turning action) together. Practically hold your breath at this stage and stop as soon as the cake mixture is evenly mixed.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 40

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

41


MICH’S TIPS

1

Before you start, ensure all ingredients are at room temperature. This will allow for maximum aeration, resulting in a light, even-textured cake.

2

Use the best, freshest-quality ingredients—it sounds simple, but don’t think ingredients that are past their prime will miraculously improve once baked in a cake. It is advisable to use the freshest, plumpest, tastiest, highest-quality ingredients to produce spectacular cakes.

3

Melt the chocolate and let cool before adding to the batter so it does not melt the butter (which would reduce the aeration) or cook the eggs.

4

Measure all ingredients accurately. Making cakes is scientific. All ingredients are included for a reason and as such it is imperative the weights and measures are adhered to accurately. Too much or too little of the key ingredients will dramatically affect the result.

5 6

Use chocolate with a minimum of 70% cocoa solids to impart a rich, indulgent chocolate flavor.

Adding the zest of 2 oranges or 1 cup chopped roasted pecans makes a wonderful variation to this chocolate cake recipe.

Flour is folded into the cake mixture with the lightest of touches. Beating with a heavy hand, a wooden spoon, or an electric mixer would knock out air incorporated during creaming and overwork the gluten (protein) in the flour. This would result in a tough, chewy, dense cake. Remove the bowl from the electric mixer and continue by hand. Add the flour into the bowl and use a spatula or metal spoon to carefully fold (cutting and turning action) together. Practically hold your breath at this stage and stop as soon as the cake mixture is evenly mixed. 40

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Pour the cake mixture into the prepared, lined 8-inch round pan (pages 24 to 25) and level with the back of the spatula. Bake in the preheated oven for 1 hour. This chocolate cake will rise (thanks to all the aeration) and have a slight wobble as it comes out of the oven. The crust will be risen and crispy and the cake underneath will be gently glistening as it is removed from the oven—neither completely dry (overbaked) nor wet (underbaked). Let cool in the pan. The crust will settle back down and the top edges may crack as the cake cools—this is perfectly normal.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved Making & Baking Cakes

41


• WHISKED CAKE METHOD

Makes one 8-inch round cake INGREDIENTS 3 navel oranges (about 9¾ ounces in total), scrubbed—2 roughly chopped and 1 for fresh zest 5 medium eggs, separated 1 cup golden superfine sugar 2¼ cups ground almonds 1 teaspoon natural orange oil TO COVER ½ quantity Bittersweet Chocolate Ganache (pages 100 to 101) with 1 tablespoon natural orange oil added 2 tablespoons sieved apricot jelly, heated 10½ ounces marzipan (minimum 35% ground almonds) Edible gold luster, to finish Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line an 8-inch round cake pan with nonstick parchment paper.

ORANGE & ALMOND CAKE This gluten-free cake has a wonderfully rich Seville orange marmalade flavor, which is why I have chosen to cover the cake with a layer of marzipan and orange ganache. Put the chopped oranges (minus seeds, but with peel) in a saucepan. Add 1 tablespoon water, cover, and let simmer for 30 minutes, until soft and all the water has been absorbed. Let cool. Blend the entire oranges in a food processor or with a handheld blender to form a smooth, thick paste. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks with half the sugar until pale and thick. Carefully whisk in the orange paste and fold in the ground almonds. Stir in the orange oil and zest. Put the egg whites in a large clean bowl and whisk until soft peaks form. Gradually whisk in the remaining sugar, a teaspoon at a time, on high speed until you have a glossy meringue. Stir 2 tablespoons meringue into the cake batter to slacken the mixture, then fold in the remaining meringue until well incorporated. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Check after 20 minutes and cover with parchment or aluminum foil if it is browning too much. Let the cake cool in the pan before turning out. Turn the cake upside down and place on an 8-inch cake board. Skim-coat the top and

sides with half of the orange ganache using an offset spatula (page 107)—the ganache should be at a spreading consistency. Place the cake in the freezer for 10 minutes to firm, while you heat the jelly in a small pan. Remove the cake from the freezer and brush with apricot jelly. Knead and roll the marzipan to a circle large enough to cover the top and sides of the cake (pages 136 to 143). The marzipan should be about 1/8 inch thick. Trim and smooth with icing smoothers once the marzipan is in place. Place the cake on a wire rack and heat the remaining ganache until it is at pouring consistency. Use a ladle to spoon the ganache over the top of the cake and swirl it around the top and sides (page 111). Tap the wire rack to remove any excess ganache. Lift the cake and remove any trimmings from the base of the cake board. Take a 4-inch crank-handled palette knife and smooth the ganache up and down and around the sides of the cake. Spray with edible gold luster before placing on a pretty cake stand to serve. Storage: Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place and consume within 3 days.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 56

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

57


• WHISKED CAKE METHOD

Makes one 8-inch round cake INGREDIENTS 3 navel oranges (about 9¾ ounces in total), scrubbed—2 roughly chopped and 1 for fresh zest 5 medium eggs, separated 1 cup golden superfine sugar 2¼ cups ground almonds 1 teaspoon natural orange oil TO COVER ½ quantity Bittersweet Chocolate Ganache (pages 100 to 101) with 1 tablespoon natural orange oil added 2 tablespoons sieved apricot jelly, heated 10½ ounces marzipan (minimum 35% ground almonds) Edible gold luster, to finish Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line an 8-inch round cake pan with nonstick parchment paper.

ORANGE & ALMOND CAKE This gluten-free cake has a wonderfully rich Seville orange marmalade flavor, which is why I have chosen to cover the cake with a layer of marzipan and orange ganache. Put the chopped oranges (minus seeds, but with peel) in a saucepan. Add 1 tablespoon water, cover, and let simmer for 30 minutes, until soft and all the water has been absorbed. Let cool. Blend the entire oranges in a food processor or with a handheld blender to form a smooth, thick paste. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks with half the sugar until pale and thick. Carefully whisk in the orange paste and fold in the ground almonds. Stir in the orange oil and zest. Put the egg whites in a large clean bowl and whisk until soft peaks form. Gradually whisk in the remaining sugar, a teaspoon at a time, on high speed until you have a glossy meringue. Stir 2 tablespoons meringue into the cake batter to slacken the mixture, then fold in the remaining meringue until well incorporated. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Check after 20 minutes and cover with parchment or aluminum foil if it is browning too much. Let the cake cool in the pan before turning out. Turn the cake upside down and place on an 8-inch cake board. Skim-coat the top and

sides with half of the orange ganache using an offset spatula (page 107)—the ganache should be at a spreading consistency. Place the cake in the freezer for 10 minutes to firm, while you heat the jelly in a small pan. Remove the cake from the freezer and brush with apricot jelly. Knead and roll the marzipan to a circle large enough to cover the top and sides of the cake (pages 136 to 143). The marzipan should be about 1/8 inch thick. Trim and smooth with icing smoothers once the marzipan is in place. Place the cake on a wire rack and heat the remaining ganache until it is at pouring consistency. Use a ladle to spoon the ganache over the top of the cake and swirl it around the top and sides (page 111). Tap the wire rack to remove any excess ganache. Lift the cake and remove any trimmings from the base of the cake board. Take a 4-inch crank-handled palette knife and smooth the ganache up and down and around the sides of the cake. Spray with edible gold luster before placing on a pretty cake stand to serve. Storage: Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place and consume within 3 days.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 56

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Making & Baking Cakes

57


COCONUT CAKE This is a wonderfully creamy cake infused with coconut—it’s one of my favorites. It keeps well and can be enjoyed with the addition of lime curd or lime buttercream. I have chosen to decorate this cake with fresh coconut shavings. Coconuts can be hard to find, and labor-intensive to shave! As an alternative, toast desiccated coconut and sprinkle over the top and sides of the cake.

• ALL-IN-ONE METHOD

Makes one 6-inch cake INGREDIENTS ¾ cup (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, softened ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons golden superfine sugar 11/3 cups self-rising flour 1½ teaspoons baking powder 3 large eggs 2 tablespoons melted creamed coconut TO DECORATE 1 quantity Coconut Cream Frosting (page 93)

Measure all the ingredients, except the coconut, into a large bowl and mix for about 5 minutes with a handheld electric mixer until smooth. Stir in the creamed coconut. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and bake in the preheated oven for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in the pan for 10 minutes before turning out. Place the cake on a serving plate. Spread the frosting over the top and sides of the cake with an offset spatula and press the coconut shavings into the frosting to decorate. Storage: Store in an airtight container at room temperature and consume within 3 days.

Fresh coconut shavings, to decorate Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line a 6-inch round, deep cake pan with nonstick parchment paper.

Coconut will add “significant fat content to this cake, helping to keep it moist.

MICH’S TIPS

1

Add the grated zest of 2 limes to the cake batter for a zingy lime-and-coconut variation. Make a syrup with the juice from the limes mixed with 2 tablespoons golden superfine sugar and stir until dissolved. Spike the cake all over with a skewer as soon as it is baked and spoon over the syrup.

2

Coconut is rich in vitamin B5, iron, and zinc. It has a distinctive flavor and can be used as the hero in all areas of this cake.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 70

Mich Turner’s Cake School


COCONUT CAKE This is a wonderfully creamy cake infused with coconut—it’s one of my favorites. It keeps well and can be enjoyed with the addition of lime curd or lime buttercream. I have chosen to decorate this cake with fresh coconut shavings. Coconuts can be hard to find, and labor-intensive to shave! As an alternative, toast desiccated coconut and sprinkle over the top and sides of the cake.

• ALL-IN-ONE METHOD

Makes one 6-inch cake INGREDIENTS ¾ cup (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, softened ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons golden superfine sugar 11/3 cups self-rising flour 1½ teaspoons baking powder 3 large eggs 2 tablespoons melted creamed coconut TO DECORATE 1 quantity Coconut Cream Frosting (page 93)

Measure all the ingredients, except the coconut, into a large bowl and mix for about 5 minutes with a handheld electric mixer until smooth. Stir in the creamed coconut. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and bake in the preheated oven for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in the pan for 10 minutes before turning out. Place the cake on a serving plate. Spread the frosting over the top and sides of the cake with an offset spatula and press the coconut shavings into the frosting to decorate. Storage: Store in an airtight container at room temperature and consume within 3 days.

Fresh coconut shavings, to decorate Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line a 6-inch round, deep cake pan with nonstick parchment paper.

Coconut will add “significant fat content to this cake, helping to keep it moist.

MICH’S TIPS

1

Add the grated zest of 2 limes to the cake batter for a zingy lime-and-coconut variation. Make a syrup with the juice from the limes mixed with 2 tablespoons golden superfine sugar and stir until dissolved. Spike the cake all over with a skewer as soon as it is baked and spoon over the syrup.

2

Coconut is rich in vitamin B5, iron, and zinc. It has a distinctive flavor and can be used as the hero in all areas of this cake.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 70

Mich Turner’s Cake School


1

Preparing a cake for filling

2

Raspberry & rose puree

Cakes should be allowed to cool completely before splitting and filling to prevent the butter in the filling and frosting from melting. Use a long serrated knife to cut evenly and cleanly through the cake.

Fresh berry purees stirred into vanilla buttercream (page 104) offer an intense burst of summer flavor, as well as adding a wonderful natural color to simple flavored cakes such as vanilla, lemon, orange, or lime.

Remove all the parchment paper and place the cake on a clean work board. Place one hand on the surface of the cake and position a long serrated offset spatula at the desired height, held straight. As you begin to cut through the cake with a forward and backward sawing action, use the hand on the top of the cake to gently turn the cake in one direction. This will ensure you are always cutting in the same position as the cake turns, which will help in protecting the edges of the cake and ensuring an even cut all the way through the cake. Place a thin acrylic work board between the layers to remove the two halves. Repeat this process if you intend to create several thinner layers from one baked cake.

Makes about 1 cup INGREDIENTS 31/3 cups fresh raspberries ½ cup golden superfine sugar

MICH’S TIP

2 to 3 teaspoons rose oil or rose water

Use acrylic work boards to handle and manage the cakes as you work.

The trick is to ensure the fruit is “reduced to concentrate the flavor. ”

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 88

Combine the raspberries, sugar, and 2 tablespoons water in a heavybottomed saucepan set over medium heat. Stir the fruit as it comes to a boil and the sugar dissolves, and continue to heat until the fruit has thickened and reduced by one-third. This can take 20 to 25 minutes.

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Transfer the fruit to a heatproof jug

and use a handheld electric mixer to blitz until smooth. Pass the puree through a fine-mesh strainer set over a large bowl. Use the back of a wooden spoon to force the puree through the strainer, retaining the seeds. The puree should be thick enough to coat the back of a spatula. Stir in the rose oil or water to taste. Storage: This will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 2 weeks. It can also be served with ice cream.

Putting It All Together

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1

Preparing a cake for filling

2

Raspberry & rose puree

Cakes should be allowed to cool completely before splitting and filling to prevent the butter in the filling and frosting from melting. Use a long serrated knife to cut evenly and cleanly through the cake.

Fresh berry purees stirred into vanilla buttercream (page 104) offer an intense burst of summer flavor, as well as adding a wonderful natural color to simple flavored cakes such as vanilla, lemon, orange, or lime.

Remove all the parchment paper and place the cake on a clean work board. Place one hand on the surface of the cake and position a long serrated offset spatula at the desired height, held straight. As you begin to cut through the cake with a forward and backward sawing action, use the hand on the top of the cake to gently turn the cake in one direction. This will ensure you are always cutting in the same position as the cake turns, which will help in protecting the edges of the cake and ensuring an even cut all the way through the cake. Place a thin acrylic work board between the layers to remove the two halves. Repeat this process if you intend to create several thinner layers from one baked cake.

Makes about 1 cup INGREDIENTS 31/3 cups fresh raspberries ½ cup golden superfine sugar

Combine the raspberries, sugar, and 2 tablespoons water in a heavybottomed saucepan set over medium heat. Stir the fruit as it comes to a boil and the sugar dissolves, and continue to heat until the fruit has thickened and reduced by one-third. This can take 20 to 25 minutes.

MICH’S TIP

2 to 3 teaspoons rose oil or rose water

Use acrylic work boards to handle and manage the cakes as you work.

The trick is to ensure the fruit is “reduced to concentrate the flavor. ”

Transfer the fruit to a heatproof jug

and use a handheld electric mixer to blitz until smooth. Pass the puree through a fine-mesh strainer set over a large bowl. Use the back of a wooden spoon to force the puree through the strainer, retaining the seeds. The puree should be thick enough to coat the back of a spatula. Stir in the rose oil or water to taste. Storage: This will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 2 weeks. It can also be served with ice cream.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved

88

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Putting It All Together

89


11

How to skim-coat a cake A skim coat or crumb coat is a covering of buttercream that acts as a base coat to prepare cakes for a flawless top coat ready for decorating. Buttercream is a good base to use, as it can be spread over the sides and top of the cake with an offset spatula to both smooth and shape the cake to ensure it has clean, sharp, angular surfaces and joins and to prepare the cake so no crumbs will crumble into the top coat, spoiling the finish. Misshapen or novelty-shaped cakes benefit from being skim-coated in buttercream to create the perfect base for the top coat.

Makes enough to cover one 8-inch round cake INGREDIENTS 1 (8-inch) round cake

VARIATIONS Many flavors, purees, curds, chocolates, and ganaches can be added to buttercream. Here are my favorites—to be added to 1 quantity of vanilla buttercream. FRUIT CITRUS CURDS—Stir in 9 ounces homemade lemon or lime curd (page 90). FRESH ZESTS—Add 2 tablespoons fine lemon, orange, or lime zest, or combine flavors.

FRUIT PUREES—Add fruit purees to taste as they are in season: raspberry and rose, black currant, mixed summer berries, strawberry, and champagne. WHITE CHOCOLATE—Stir in 7 ounces melted white chocolate. COFFEE—Add a cooled shot of espresso (about 3½ tablespoons or dissolve 2 teaspoons coffee granules in 2 tablespoons freshly boiled water) and let cool. MOCHA—Combine a shot of espresso into chocolate ganache buttercream (page 101) for a mocha flavor.

½ quantity (or 12 to 14 ounces) Chocolate Ganache Buttercream (see Variation, page 101)—this depends on the depth of the cake and whether it is to be split and filled

Trim the cake and turn it upside down onto a cake board the same size as the cake. Starting on the sides, use an offset spatula to paddle the buttercream around the sides of the cake, filling all the holes and gaps to create straight sides. Draw the offset spatula inward around the cake to remove the excess buttercream over the top of the sides so that there is a flat top to work with.

Paddle more buttercream over

the top of the cake and smooth and level with the offset spatula. Transfer the cake to the refrigerator or freezer for 10 minutes until the buttercream has firmed to the touch. It is now ready for its top coat.

YOU WILL ALSO NEED 8-inch cake board

MICH’S TIP Top coats can include more hand-piped buttercream decorations, poured ganache, ready-to-roll icing, or chocolate sugar paste. This method would be the same if you were using a Swiss meringue buttercream (page 124).

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 106

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Putting It All Together

107


11

How to skim-coat a cake A skim coat or crumb coat is a covering of buttercream that acts as a base coat to prepare cakes for a flawless top coat ready for decorating. Buttercream is a good base to use, as it can be spread over the sides and top of the cake with an offset spatula to both smooth and shape the cake to ensure it has clean, sharp, angular surfaces and joins and to prepare the cake so no crumbs will crumble into the top coat, spoiling the finish. Misshapen or novelty-shaped cakes benefit from being skim-coated in buttercream to create the perfect base for the top coat.

Makes enough to cover one 8-inch round cake INGREDIENTS 1 (8-inch) round cake

VARIATIONS Many flavors, purees, curds, chocolates, and ganaches can be added to buttercream. Here are my favorites—to be added to 1 quantity of vanilla buttercream. FRUIT CITRUS CURDS—Stir in 9 ounces homemade lemon or lime curd (page 90). FRESH ZESTS—Add 2 tablespoons fine lemon, orange, or lime zest, or combine flavors.

FRUIT PUREES—Add fruit purees to taste as they are in season: raspberry and rose, black currant, mixed summer berries, strawberry, and champagne. WHITE CHOCOLATE—Stir in 7 ounces melted white chocolate. COFFEE—Add a cooled shot of espresso (about 3½ tablespoons or dissolve 2 teaspoons coffee granules in 2 tablespoons freshly boiled water) and let cool. MOCHA—Combine a shot of espresso into chocolate ganache buttercream (page 101) for a mocha flavor.

½ quantity (or 12 to 14 ounces) Chocolate Ganache Buttercream (see Variation, page 101)—this depends on the depth of the cake and whether it is to be split and filled

Trim the cake and turn it upside down onto a cake board the same size as the cake. Starting on the sides, use an offset spatula to paddle the buttercream around the sides of the cake, filling all the holes and gaps to create straight sides. Draw the offset spatula inward around the cake to remove the excess buttercream over the top of the sides so that there is a flat top to work with.

Paddle more buttercream over

the top of the cake and smooth and level with the offset spatula. Transfer the cake to the refrigerator or freezer for 10 minutes until the buttercream has firmed to the touch. It is now ready for its top coat.

YOU WILL ALSO NEED 8-inch cake board

MICH’S TIP Top coats can include more hand-piped buttercream decorations, poured ganache, ready-to-roll icing, or chocolate sugar paste. This method would be the same if you were using a Swiss meringue buttercream (page 124).

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 106

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Putting It All Together

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13

Macro piping Macro piping with cream-based frostings, larger tips, and disposable pastry bags is a great way for beginners to build confidence with hand piping. Macro piping requires less precision than the more intricate royal icing (pages 166 to 168)—perfect for decorating cupcakes, gateaux, tortes, and roulades. Cupcakes require relatively little time, expertise, and expensive equipment to achieve a fabulous result.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR MACRO PIPING

Pipe individual petals, starting with the base and working upward, holding the thinnest part of the tip uppermost.

Pipe small stars to fill the surface, starting from the outside and working inward.

YOU WILL NEED Cupcakes Vanilla Buttercream (page 104) Disposable pastry bags

Snip the base off the disposable

pastry bag and insert a tip. Roll the back of the bag down to create a stiff cone. Hold the inner cone and spoon the frosting inside until half full. Roll the outside of the bag up

and massage the frosting down to the nozzle to remove any air pockets. Twist the bag at the top of the frosting to seal and hold the bag vertically with this fist grip to pipe the frosting.

A selection of tips: top row, from left to right: No.124, No. 822, and No.124 bottom row, from left to right: No. 822, No. 2C, and No.124

A rosette tip creates an elegant swirl, starting from the inside and working outward.

Pipe an open flower, starting in the center and turning the cake to create the central closed petal. The thinner part of the tip should be uppermost.

An open star tip can be used for a more contemporary swirl. Start from the outside and work inward.

Progress to this more elaborate rose design using the teardrop tip. Pipe individual two-tone petals, starting with the base layer and working your way up.

Decorating cupcakes can be a great introduction to piping for the beginner. Making, baking, and decorating a batch of cupcakes can be very satisfying. They are relatively quick to produce, without having to invest a huge amount of time, energy, equipment, or skill. Bake a batch of vanilla cupcakes and experiment with the flavor and decoration on the top. Here I have chosen to make vanilla cupcakes and have decorated them with a white buttercream blended with fresh Raspberry and Rose Puree (page 89).

I always use disposable pastry bags for piping with buttercream, as they are more hygienic.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 112

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Putting It All Together

113


13

Macro piping Macro piping with cream-based frostings, larger tips, and disposable pastry bags is a great way for beginners to build confidence with hand piping. Macro piping requires less precision than the more intricate royal icing (pages 166 to 168)—perfect for decorating cupcakes, gateaux, tortes, and roulades. Cupcakes require relatively little time, expertise, and expensive equipment to achieve a fabulous result.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR MACRO PIPING

Pipe individual petals, starting with the base and working upward, holding the thinnest part of the tip uppermost.

Pipe small stars to fill the surface, starting from the outside and working inward.

YOU WILL NEED Cupcakes Vanilla Buttercream (page 104) Disposable pastry bags

Snip the base off the disposable

pastry bag and insert a tip. Roll the back of the bag down to create a stiff cone. Hold the inner cone and spoon the frosting inside until half full. Roll the outside of the bag up

and massage the frosting down to the nozzle to remove any air pockets. Twist the bag at the top of the frosting to seal and hold the bag vertically with this fist grip to pipe the frosting.

A selection of tips: top row, from left to right: No.124, No. 822, and No.124 bottom row, from left to right: No. 822, No. 2C, and No.124

A rosette tip creates an elegant swirl, starting from the inside and working outward.

Pipe an open flower, starting in the center and turning the cake to create the central closed petal. The thinner part of the tip should be uppermost.

An open star tip can be used for a more contemporary swirl. Start from the outside and work inward.

Progress to this more elaborate rose design using the teardrop tip. Pipe individual two-tone petals, starting with the base layer and working your way up.

Decorating cupcakes can be a great introduction to piping for the beginner. Making, baking, and decorating a batch of cupcakes can be very satisfying. They are relatively quick to produce, without having to invest a huge amount of time, energy, equipment, or skill. Bake a batch of vanilla cupcakes and experiment with the flavor and decoration on the top. Here I have chosen to make vanilla cupcakes and have decorated them with a white buttercream blended with fresh Raspberry and Rose Puree (page 89).

I always use disposable pastry bags for piping with buttercream, as they are more hygienic.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 112

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Putting It All Together

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TWO-TONE MACRO PIPING

To create a two-tone effect, place your chosen tip in a large disposable pastry bag against the seam. Load the end of a paintbrush with edible food color and draw it up the seam of the bag. Fill the pastry bag with buttercream—

the color will concentrate through the buttercream at the seam. Arrange your decorated cupcakes in liners and present them on a pretty cake stand or in gift boxes.

PIPED GANACHE LEAVES AND SHELLS For the leaves: Snip the end of the pastry bag and fit with a No. 69 tip, then fill with ganache. Hold the bag in two hands, the tip held with the split horizontally, and apply pressure without moving the bag. This will build up the back of the leaf. Slowly bring the tip toward you, maintaining the pressure. Once you have the size and shape of the leaf you like, release the pressure completely and gently lift the tip up and away from the leaf to form the point of the leaf.

Always allow ganache to cool and stiffen to piping consistency. This shell decoration is perfect for sealing the base of any cake or gateau. If the ganache becomes too stiff to pipe, simply warm in a microwave to soften.

For the shells: Snip the end of the

pastry bag, fit with an open star tip, and fill with ganache. Hold the tip at a 45-degree angle and pipe a shell. Release the pressure as you draw the bag around the cake, then start the next shell by applying pressure over the tail of the previous shell. Repeat all around the base.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 114

Mich Turner’s Cake School


TWO-TONE MACRO PIPING

To create a two-tone effect, place your chosen tip in a large disposable pastry bag against the seam. Load the end of a paintbrush with edible food color and draw it up the seam of the bag. Fill the pastry bag with buttercream—

the color will concentrate through the buttercream at the seam. Arrange your decorated cupcakes in liners and present them on a pretty cake stand or in gift boxes.

PIPED GANACHE LEAVES AND SHELLS For the leaves: Snip the end of the pastry bag and fit with a No. 69 tip, then fill with ganache. Hold the bag in two hands, the tip held with the split horizontally, and apply pressure without moving the bag. This will build up the back of the leaf. Slowly bring the tip toward you, maintaining the pressure. Once you have the size and shape of the leaf you like, release the pressure completely and gently lift the tip up and away from the leaf to form the point of the leaf.

Always allow ganache to cool and stiffen to piping consistency. This shell decoration is perfect for sealing the base of any cake or gateau. If the ganache becomes too stiff to pipe, simply warm in a microwave to soften.

For the shells: Snip the end of the

pastry bag, fit with an open star tip, and fill with ganache. Hold the tip at a 45-degree angle and pipe a shell. Release the pressure as you draw the bag around the cake, then start the next shell by applying pressure over the tail of the previous shell. Repeat all around the base.

© 2014 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved 114

Mich Turner’s Cake School

Mich Turner's Cake School: The Ultimate Guide to Baking and Decorating the Perfect Cake  

The new book from Rizzoli New York. Learn more: http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847845088

Mich Turner's Cake School: The Ultimate Guide to Baking and Decorating the Perfect Cake  

The new book from Rizzoli New York. Learn more: http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847845088

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