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Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


a field guide to microgreens Microgreens are the first true leaves of an herb or a vegetable, and they are between 4 and 40 percent more nutrient-packed than their mature-leaf counterparts. But the coolest factor, for me, is that they allow anyone to have tasty and nutritious food ready to eat within a few days of planting. Location is not a mitigating circumstance. I can grow microgreens in a building in Detroit, or in a field in Iowa, it doesn’t matter; they can be grown anywhere and with relative ease. I say this with confidence, based on several years of trial and error, which resulted in perfecting the growing methods we use today at Good Water Farms. The greatest number of microgreen varieties we have grown at any given time is fifty-seven. In the beginning, there was a lot of experimenting with different varieties just to see what grew well and what was popular with our customers. As we became more experienced, we began to realize which varieties needed similar conditions to grow, which were better for one season than another, which were not big enough sellers to repeat. I am now starting to streamline our offerings to a core twenty, and will maybe bring others in during specific seasons. When I first started growing microgreens in 2010, I essentially replicated the systems I had used growing indoor plants in California. When we moved to our second greenhouse and had more space, we laid out all the trays horizontally on flood tables that water the plants from the bottom. Anyone walking in was immediately confronted with hundreds of trays of microgreens in various stages of growth. But while it looked impressive, it was not efficient. At our newest facility, we have enough space to separate out the varieties based on how they grow, and group them together based on factors such as how much water they drink. Basil microgreens, for example, lose nutrients when they are overwatered and turn yellow, and therefore should only be hand watered every second or third day. Fennel, on the other hand, drinks up to twice a day and benefits from the water access provided by special trough tables. Certain microgreens do better under artificial light than in the sun during winter months. I joke that they are like kids; the best way to work with microgreens is to understand their personalities.

Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


grow your own As a species, and as a society, we are finding more ways to disengage from nature, and we are mentally and spiritually far removed from where our food comes from. Technology and the modernization of society in general have given people more permission to disconnect from each other and from the natural world. I see this all the time at the farm. Folks will come to visit, see a pile of earth, and recoil, horrified; they think soil is dirty. How did that happen? Growing microgreens is a rewarding way to start reconnecting spiritually and physically with the Earth. It’s about getting back into the cycle of the planet and your environment. To grow something is to nurture it, to love it, to focus your energy on it. As it grows, it absorbs energy from the atmosphere, the earth, the plant itself. In the case of an edible plant, like a microgreen, when you eat what you have grown, you absorb all this combined positive energy and become part of a cycle that puts you into the rhythm of being one with the universe. For anyone growing microgreens at home, the process is relatively simple, yet requires focus, dedication, and awareness. And as with most things in life, practice makes perfect. If you are mindful during each step of the process, you will soon be comfortable with the growing cycle. And most importantly, trust your instincts; it’s the truest way to connect back to Mother Earth. First, you should ask yourself, “Do I have the discipline and the love to grow something, and do I have the time and care to put into it?” If you answered yes, the first step is procuring the right soil. This means compostable, organic potting soil. Good soil is rich, the color of coffee grounds, and has a moist, earthy smell. It should not smell like manure! Good soil is the nutrient-packed medium that will supply everything the plants need to grow. Next you need to find the right seeds, preferably organic. If you can’t find organic seeds, then buy conventional ones and grow them organically. When you are first starting out, it’s hard to estimate how much seed you will need. A small amount goes a long way. I buy my seeds by the pound, and one pound of seed will yield about a thousand large trays of microgreens. You probably won’t need that much! If you do end up with more seeds than you can use at one time, simply store them in an airtight container in a cool place. Most seeds, from good, reliable sources, will last almost a year when stored properly. Keep in mind that the number of seeds per weight also depends on seed size. For example, the smaller the seed the more you will have per ounce.

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributors: tyler drosdeck and michael sablan featured microgreens: daikon or purple radish, cilantro, fennel special equipment: high-speed blender GF | DF | V

carrot rasam with radish microgreens Originating from the Sanskrit word rasa (essence, or taste), rasam is a popular South Indian soup with many variations. Often made with dhal (split legumes), this version gets its heartiness simply from the texture of the carrots. Radish microgreens add a welcome bitter and crunchy complement to the sour tamarind base. The tempering technique used at the end of this recipe is a common Indian cooking method in which spices are fried in sizzling oil to quickly extract flavor and health benefits. One of the spices that’s tempered is asafoetida, which can be found in specialty Indian grocery stores or from online spice markets (such as Kalustyans in New York City). It has an onion-like aroma, aids digestion, and is a very common component of Indian cuisine. The soup can be served hot, at room temperature, or chilled. Makes 6 servings

Soup:

Make the soup:

1 (2-inch-long) piece of tamarind pulp, cut into small pieces (about 2 tablespoons)

1.

1 cup boiling water 2 tablespoons peanut oil 3 small shallots, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 2 teaspoons ground turmeric 1 (2-pound) bag carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch slices

continued

In a large, heavy-bottomed stockpot, heat the peanut oil over medium heat until hot. Add the shallots and salt. Cook until the shallots begin to brown slightly, 5 to 10 minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the turmeric, then immediately add 7 cups water, the carrots, and reserved tamarind paste. Bring the mixture to boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cover the pot with the lid and simmer for 20 minutes or until the carrots are tender.

2. Remove the pot from the stovetop and let the soup cool slightly. Working in batches as needed, pour the soup into the container of a high-speed electric blender. Cover the container with the lid and blend the soup until smooth. The carrots should be fully blended, but be careful not to over blend as the graininess of the carrots adds a lovely texture to the soup. Return the blended soup to the stockpot. Cook over medium heat until heated through.

Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: julie resnick featured microgreen: pea tendril special equipment: high-speed blender GF | DF* | V* *if you omit the optional cheeses

spring pea soup with pea tendril microgreen pesto and socca with goat cheese Cooking and eating by the seasons requires a bit of planning, particularly when trying to infuse some variety into our meals during a long cold winter. When peas are in season in early summer, Dan and I take the kids to the farm for several hours at a time to harvest. We then come home and tackle the task of shucking and then freezing/vacuum sealing the peas so that we can enjoy them on a cold and dark winter day. When we crack open the bag of frozen peas in the winter, we are all immediately taken back to that warm afternoon at the farm in the sun, with the kids complaining “Are we done yet?” and us replying, “Not yet. You will thank us in January.” This vibrant pea soup will brighten even the darkest of days. Makes 4 to 6 servings

pea soup:

Make the soup:

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1.

1 large clove garlic, chopped 1 large shallot, minced Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 quart vegetable stock 5 cups fresh or frozen peas Zest and juice of 1 large lemon 1 cup loosely packed pea tendril microgreens, plus extra for garnish

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In a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat until warm. Add the garlic and shallot and season with salt and pepper. Cook until fragrant and the shallots have started to caramelize, about 3 minutes.

2. Stir in the stock and bring to a boil. Add the peas and cook just until they turn bright green in color, 2 to 3 minutes for fresh peas and 4 to 5 minutes for frozen. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in the lemon zest and juice and set the soup aside to cool for a few minutes. When the soup has cooled slightly, stir in the microgreens. 3. Working in batches as needed, pour the soup into the container of a high-speed blender. Cover the container with the lid and blend until the greens are completely puréed and the mixture is smooth. 4. Transfer the blended soup to a clean container and serve warm, cold, or at room temperature. The soup can be made up to 2 days in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: preston madson and ginger pierce featured microgreens: nasturtium, dandelion, arugula special equipment: high-speed blender GF | DF

nasturtium, dandelion, and arugula microgreen salad with stone fruit, stracciatella, and toasted pecans We really love this salad because it a perfect reflection of the summer season: the sweetness of the stone fruit and the spiciness of the greens are rounded out with the creamy richness of the cheese and the crunch of the pecans. Use any type of stone fruit or a combination when they are at their ripest, or substitute with apples, pears, or figs during the colder months. Stracciatella is an Italian cheese produced from buffalo milk that is made using a stretching and shredding technique similar to mozzarella. It can be found in gourmet grocers or in stores with dedicated cheese counters. Makes a family style salad or 4 to 6 individual servings 1 1/2 cups loosely packed nasturtium microgreens 1 1/2 cups loosely packed dandelion microgreens 1 1/2 cups loosely packed arugula microgreens Juice of 1 lemon, divided Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1.

Place the nasturtium, dandelion, and arugula microgreens in a large bowl and toss with half the lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. In a separate bowl, toss the stone fruit with the remaining lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil, and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.

2. Evenly spread the stracciatella cheese over the bottom of a serving platter. Distribute the dressed fruit evenly over the cheese and top with the dressed microgreens. Sprinkle with the toasted pecans and serve immediately.

3 or 4 very ripe stone fruit, such as plums, pluots, peaches, nectarines, or apricots, pitted and cut into ž-inch wedges 1 1/2 cups stracciatella cheese 3/4 cup pecans, toasted and chopped

Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: good water farms featured microgreens: various GF | DF | V

elemental salad mixes Salads use microgreens in their purest form, cut fresh from their trays and simply dressed to enhance their flavors. With a plethora of microgreens at my disposal, I regularly toss together handfuls of any variety I have in abundance. And with no particular recipe in mind, I taste as I go, often starting with a base microgreen and slowing adding others in until I reach a texture and flavor intensity I like. The Elemental Salads are loosely based on the philosophy of observing how the physical world is sensed or perceived within the four elements of Earth, Water, Fire, and Air, and how these elements connect with our five senses (hearing, touch, sight, taste, and smell). The Earth Salad is grounding, featuring the strong flavors of root vegetables. The heartiest of the four, this is a great option for cooler months or heavier appetites. Water is a hydrating salad, milder in flavor and soothing in warmer weather. Fire is a spicy and warm salad, best served with a cooling dressing for balance. And, as the lightest of the salads, Air is perfect during a detox or any time an easily digestible meal is advised. To prepare each of the salads below, the procedure is the same. Keeping in mind what size salad you need, simply place equal amounts of the listed microgreens in a large bowl and toss them gently to combine. Or feel free to experiment by including more of some microgreen varieties and less of others within each combination. You can also add a mature leaf green as a base. Then toss with olive oil and vinegar, or a tried-and-true favorite salad dressing. Makes individual servings

Earth Salad daikon radish + carrot + fennel + kale + beet + collard microgreens Water Salad sunflower + purslane + celery + red Malabar spinach + bok choi microgreens Fire Salad sunflower + purple radish + red mustard + holy basil + nasturtium microgreens Air Salad pea tendril + red shiso + dandelion + red-veined sorrel + rainbow chard microgreens

Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: claire ragozzino featured microgreens: red-veined sorrel, holy basil, cilantro (optional) special equipment: high-speed blender GF

springtime kapha bowl A balanced bowl with vibrant greens, sprouted beans, and lemon-scented quinoa to support Kapha in springtime. This recipe includes bitter greens and astringent fresh sprouts, helping to reduce the heavier earth and water elements of Kapha dosha and in support of natural cleansing after a long winter. In spring, cooler rainy days call for a balance of warming nourishment, like cooked grains and pungent spices and lightly cooked seasonal veggies. Makes individual servings

Sprouted mung beans:

Make the sprouted mung beans:

1/2 cup whole mung beans

1.

Olive oil, as needed Juice of 1 lemon Sea salt

Cilantro coconut chutney:
 1 bunch fresh cilantro, stems included, rinsed and patted dry 1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
 or lime juice 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes 1 teaspoon raw honey
 (optional) 3/4 teaspoon sea salt

continued

This process will take between 24 and 48 hours total, depending on how warm your kitchen is. When ready, the mung beans will be softer and will have grown little tails, signaling that they’re ready to eat.

2. Place the beans in a large bowl, cover with 2 cups of filtered warm water, and let soak overnight. If the beans absorb all of the water, add more to cover. The next day, pour the beans into a strainer to drain, discarding the soaking liquid. Rinse the beans once more with cold water and drain. 3. Line a baking sheet with paper towels. Spread the beans evenly on the prepared pan, cover with a towel, and set the pan on a counter out of direct sunlight for another day to allow the beans to begin to sprout. If the beans are not sprouting after 24 hours, rinse once more under cold water. Line the baking sheet with fresh paper towels and spread the beans out again. When they beans have sprouted, transfer them to an airtight, lidded bowl or glass jar and store in the refrigerator to stop the sprouting process. Before serving, rinse in cool water and toss with olive oil and lemon juice to lightly coat. Season with salt to taste.

Make the chutney: 1.

Place the cilantro, ginger, lemon juice, and 1/3 cup water in the container of a high-speed blender. Cover the container with the lid and start the blender on low speed, gradually increasing the speed until the mixture

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: madeline mclean featured microgreen: genovese basil special equipment: food processor; griddle, comal, or 12-inch or larger cast-iron skillet GF | DF | V

griddle flatbread with spring peas, genovese basil microgreens, white bean purée, sautéed leeks, and pumpkin seed dukkah This recipe for flatbread has several parts, but the white bean purée, sautéed leeks, and dukkah can all be made in advance. Dukkah is an Egyptian condiment typically made from a mixture of herbs, nuts, and spices. Here, pumpkin and sesame seeds form the base of the dukkah, which is used as a flavorful garnish for the flatbread. I always keep dukkah on hand, and this recipe will create some extra for your fridge or pantry. It truly works on everything: eggs, salad, sandwiches, fish, grains, and more. If you don’t have time on your side, you can substitute a store-bought flatbread, frozen pizza crust, or even naan for the homemade flatbread. I love this recipe because it’s versatile—depending on how you cut it up, it can be a meal, a snack, or even an hors d’oeuvre. You can also choose to swap in all sorts of other microgreens instead of the Genovese basil, such as arugula, dark opal basil, or pea tendrils. Makes 2 large flatbreads

Pumpkin seed dukkah:

Make the dukkah:

1 cup raw pumpkin seeds, toasted and cooled

1.

1/3 cup raw sesame seeds, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons cumin seeds, toasted and cooled 3 tablespoons coriander seeds, toasted and cooled

Place all of the toasted and cooled seeds in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade attachment. Cover the container with the lid and pulse until coarsely chopped (the mixture should be fine enough to sprinkle, but not as fine as sand). Transfer to a small mixing bowl and stir in the salt, pepper, and curry powder. The dukkah will keep stored in an airtight container or glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 5 weeks, or in the pantry for 3 weeks. Makes about 1½ cups.

½ tablespoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon curry powder

continued

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: molly shuster featured microgreens: arugula, cilantro special equipment: high-speed blender or food processor GF | DF | V

middle eastern whole roasted cauliflower with pomegranate salsa Elegant but simple, this recipe is perfect for entertaining and can be served as a main or side dish. Feel free to double yield for the star of the show–the pomegranate salsa. Ruby red pomegranate seeds and nutty toasted almonds make the base, while spicy arugula and cilantro microgreens add a bright, green dimension. The savory tahini dressing can be made up to 2 days in advance. Makes 4 to 6 servings

Cauliflower:

Make the cauliflower:

1 head cauliflower

1.

1 cup vegetable stock, plus extra as needed

2. Cut the base from the cauliflower and using a paring knife, carefully cut out the core, leaving the cauliflower head intact. Place the cauliflower in a baking dish and pour the stock and lemon juice in the base of the pan. Drizzle the cauliflower with the oil, rubbing to coat. Sprinkle with the za’atar and season with salt and pepper. Cover with foil and bake until the cauliflower is tender, about 45 minutes. Uncover the cauliflower and continue to bake until golden and crisp, 20 to 30 minutes. Check the pan occasionally along the way; if the liquid evaporates, add additional stock as needed, 1/2 cup at a time.

Juice of 1 large lemon 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons za’atar Flakey sea salt, such as Maldon Freshly cracked black pepper

continued

Preheat the oven to 350ºF.

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: nahvae frost featured microgreens: arugula, red mustard, fennel

parmesan farro “risotto” with truffle, roasted monkfish, roasted maitake and oyster mushrooms, and arugula, fennel, and red mustard microgreens in a parmesan mushroom broth I love mushrooms—their various textures, flavors—everything about them. The depth of flavor that maitakes possess is always surprising considering how delicate they are, and oyster mushrooms are so rich and lush. The contrast between these two is exceptionally lovely, especially when paired with the sweetness of the fennel microgreens and the subtle spiciness of the arugula and red mustard microgreens. Farro is an ancient grain often used in Italian cooking, but it’s loaded with protein, fiber, magnesium, and iron, so it boasts more nutritional value than the Arborio rice typically used to make risottos. Its rich, nutty flavor and somewhat chewy texture make for an interesting twist on a traditional dish. If you’re using unhulled farro, soak in enough cold water to cover for 2 hours, then drain and rinse. Makes 2 large portions or 4 smaller servings Mushroom broth:

Make the broth:

1 1/2 pounds shiitake mushrooms, stems included

1.

Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling Sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper 10 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed 1 1/2 Vidalia or yellow onion, cut in half 2 to 3 pieces of Parmesan cheese rind (about 4 ounces)

continued

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2. Place the shiitake mushrooms (caps and stems) on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and toss to combine. Roast until the mushrooms begin to caramelize and crisp up slightly, about 12 minutes. You are looking for the mushrooms to deepen in color and brown into their centers. Transfer the roasted mushrooms to a large, heavy-bottomed saucepot on the stovetop and add the garlic, onion, and 6 cups of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer the broth for another 45 minutes. When ready, strain the broth into a clean saucepot, discarding the solids.

© 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


contributor: chef floyd cardoz featured microgreens: cilantro, pea tendril, daikon radish, red mustard GF

black sea bass en papillote A chef friend sent me a sample of Good Water Farms microgreens and I was amazed by the flavor of the pea tendrils, radish, and red mustard varieties. I had just caught black sea bass off the coast of Long Island and realized when I tasted the microgreens that they would be a perfect fit for a steamed black sea bass with ginger. This is a go-to dish in our home: Its simplicity and clean flavors make you certain that you are eating healthfully, and the flavor punch totally takes you by surprise—so much so that you may not be able to stop eating this dish! Makes 4 servings 1/4 cup julienned scallions 1 serrano chile pepper or other spicy chile, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced 1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into thin strips 4 (6-ounce) fillets fresh black sea bass or snapper 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 1 teaspoon toasted and cooled coriander seeds, crushed with the back of a heavy knife 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper Sea salt 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro microgreens 2 cups loosely packed pea tendril microgreens 2 cup loosely packed daikon radish microgreens 1 cup loosely packed red mustard microgreens 2 tablespoons toasted peanut oil

1.

Preheat the oven to 400°F or bring water to a simmer in a pot with a steamer basket. Cut four squares of aluminum foil or parchment paper, approximately 10 by 10 inches each, and set aside. In a small mixing bowl, toss together the scallions, chile pepper, and ginger.

2. Dot the fillets with the butter and season with the coriander, black pepper, and salt to taste. Arrange one fillet in the center of each piece of foil. Divide the scallion mixture evenly into four portions and stack one portion on top of each fillet. Top with cilantro microgreens. To wrap each piece of fish, bring together the long edges of the foil or paper over the ingredients and fold the edges down, then roll in the outer edges of the packets to form a seal so that no juices can escape. Place the pouches on a baking sheet in the oven or in the steamer basket over the simmering water. Bake or steam the fish for 14 to 18 minutes, depending on the thickness of your fillets. 3. While the fish is cooking, place the pea tendril, daikon radish, and red mustard microgreens in a mediumsize mixing bowl and toss to combine. Drizzle with the peanut oil, sesame oil, and the juice from the lime halves. Season with salt and pepper and toss until the greens are well dressed. 4. One at a time, cut open or unroll each pouch. Carefully transfer the contents of each pouch, including the cooking liquid, to a serving plate. Top with the seasoned microgreens and serve immediately, with lime wedges on the side.

4 teaspoons untoasted sesame oil 2 limes, 1 halved, 1 cut into quarters

Š 2017 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Book Excerpt: The Microgreens Cookbook  

The new book from Rizzoli New York

Book Excerpt: The Microgreens Cookbook  

The new book from Rizzoli New York

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