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in jackson hole

issue 8

spring/summer ’20

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE TIME OF COVID-19 Inside this issue EARTHCHECK CERTIFICATION • CONSERVATION MURALS • SUSTAINABLE RECREATION IN BRIDGER-TETON CAFETERIA FORKS • MINI-FILM FESTIVAL …AND MORE!


3 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 4 PUBLIC ART GOES GREEN

TIM O’DONOGHUE

MARI ALLAN HANNA

CARRIE GERACI

NANCY SHEA

RIVERWIND FOUNDATION

JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE

JH PUBLIC ART

6 JACKSON HOLE ACHIEVES EARTHCHECK CERTIFICATION! 8 CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE 9 CARBON FOOTPRINT CALCULATOR

RIVERWIND FOUNDATION

Photo Credit: Fischer Creative

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MEET THE CONTRIBUTORS

TOM CROWELL

CARRIE BELL

SIENNA TAYLOR

SOPHIE PARKER

ELSA KNOKE

LINDA MERIGLIANO

SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTANT

TETON COUNTY ISWR

Photo Credit: Carson Meyer

10 DOWNLOADABLE SUSTAINABILITY MAP 12 CAP ON WILD WASTE 14 CAFETERIA FORKS OVER CONVENIENCE 16 SUSTAINABLE RECREATION IN BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST

JACKSON HOLE HIGH SCHOOL

JACKSON HOLE HIGH SCHOOL

18 RRR BUSINESS LEADER AND BEST PROGRAM UPDATES 19 ALTERNATIVE FUELS INFOGRAPHIC 20 MINI-FILM FESTIVAL AND ANNOUNCEMENTS ON THE COVER (as pictured from top left): Tim and Janet O’Donoghue, Mari Allan Hanna, Paul Walters, Scott Steen, Carrie Bell, Linda Merigliano, Rani Carr, Josh Hirschmann, Ali Milburn, Lindsey Ehinger, Crista Valentino, Bailey Collins, Phil Cameron, Kelly French, Tom Crowell, Phoebe Coburn

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JACKSON HOLE HIGH SCHOOL

BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to the first all-digital issue of Green Matters in Jackson Hole. Earlier this spring, when we first considered the shift from a printed newsletter to an online publication, it felt like a big decision. Uncertain and risky. Little did we know, change would quickly become the way of the world. When COVID-19 arrived, there were so many questions. How would we all stay safe? When would this end? And would we look ridiculous using something called Zoom?

Moving beyond the individual, readers can learn about the call to advocacy as well as the public policies driving some of the valley’s larger-scale initiatives. The story on page 8 details the recent establishment of the citizen-led Jackson Hole Climate Action Collective. Updates on the landfill cap at Little Horsethief Canyon and the framework for sustainable recreation in Bridger-Teton National Forest, meanwhile, provide a chronicle of the comprehensive planning and management efforts underway.

As we regrouped and reached out to the Green Matters community of sponsors, partners, and contributors, we found them at home, of course, yet hard at work. These determined stewards and innovators were ready for our call. Their answer, across the board, was yes! Yes, they had stories to report and news to tell. Yes, their projects were moving forward and in new and compelling ways. This issue is filled with the information, strategies, and updates they provided. We hope readers are as excited as we are to reconnect with the ongoing work of sustainability in Jackson Hole.

What truly emerges from this issue, however, is the further recognition of sustainability as a defining tenet of this community. Green Matters is pleased to announce Jackson Hole’s recent achievement as an Earthcheck certified sustainable destination. The timeline on pages 6-7 traces the milestones of this multi-year, multi-tiered initiative that involved numerous community partners, a multitude of volunteer hours, and generous donor contributions.

Right from the start, the spread on pages 4-5 is not only eye-catching, but interactive! Be sure to download the Artivive app to witness the debut of a powerful new partner in conservation and a beautiful blend of public art with augmented reality (AR). As these water-wise animals will remind you, sustainability begins with individuals. Don’t miss other ideas for actions one person can take in the articles about measuring one carbon footprint at a time and eliminating one plastic fork per lunch hour.

Finally, to close out the issue and capitalize fully on this new digital platform, join us in a Back-Page Mini-Film Festival to screen the latest announcements in energy conservation, sustainable food, alternative transportation, and zero waste. We thank you for embracing this new format as a way to conserve resources and provide a more dynamic experience, with opportunities for continued innovation in the issues to come. Enjoy and be well!

Tim O’Donoghue, Executive Director, Publisher

Mari Allan Hanna, Editor

TH AN K S TO OUR SPON SOR S

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PUBLIC ART GOES GREEN WITH WILD WALLS By Carrie Geraci, JH Public Art

Our community’s primary goal as stated in the Teton County Comprehensive Plan is to preserve and protect our area’s ecosystem. To address this challenge, JH Public Art is reinforcing its commitment to support artists who practice sustainable techniques and whose artworks inspire acts of conservation. By siting artworks in iconic public settings, JH Public Art aims to reach broad audiences with conservation messages. We commission artists who can galvanize shifts in our behavior and thinking with public artwork that illuminates complex issues and energizes people to become better stewards of the environment.

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This summer you can see us put this pledge into action through our Wild Walls murals, which will be on view from early June through September. The cornerstone of this event is a new, permanent mural at the Snake River Brewery. In addition, we are planning eight temporary murals throughout downtown Jackson. Artists were called upon to create works inspired by the beauty of the scenic and wild Snake River, Teton glaciers, and watersheds unique to the Jackson Hole area. New this year, Wild Walls murals will be paired with Augmented Reality (AR) features that promote a greater understanding of local water quality issues and offer


proactive conservation solutions. We are partnering with local eco-partners, including Protect our Water JH and Teton Conservation District, to create accurate and motivating educational content to pair with each mural.

the Artivive App on your phone, hold your phone in front of your computer or tablet screen while reading this page, and watch these animals come to life — each with an important water conservation story to tell!

You can take a test drive of this exciting new initiative with a portion of our first Wild Walls mural, which was created in conjunction with the Town of Jackson on a large-scale construction fence for the water main replacement project along Town Square. While the full mural extends over 120 feet (at over 7 feet tall!), here you see four local wildlife friends, illustrated by the artist Cal Brackin, with AR content from Protect our Water JH. Download and open

Our art community - from a local to national level - has accepted the challenge to leverage their creativity to broaden these messages. This year’s inspiring and eyecatching Wild Walls murals reinforce how a healthy watershed is connected to a healthy ecosystem to benefit people, plants, animals, and fishes. We hope you find this project to be an ideal example of what can happen when art goes green.

AUTHOR BIO Carrie Geraci founded JH Public Art in 2010. Since then, JH Public Art has installed multiple public permanent and temporary installations totaling over $700,000 in value. JH Public Art has developed public art plans for the Town of Jackson, Teton Village Association, and St. John’s Medical Center; and produced the Public Art & Placemaking Toolkit for Rural Communities in the Intermountain West, a resource for communities looking to launch public art and creative placemaking programs. Geraci serves on the Americans for the Arts Advisory Council for the Public Art Network.

Formerly a full-time artist Carrie Geraci used to show her artwork at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery. She lives in Jackson with her husband and two boys who are attending University of Wyoming and University of Utah. For more information contact: Carrie Geraci, Executive Director | carrie@jhpublicart.org | 307-413-1474 | www.jhpublicart.org

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TIMELINE TO CERTIFICATION: JACKSON HOLE/TETON COUNTY RECEIVE EARTHCHECK SILVER SUSTAINABLE DESTINATION CERTIFICATION By Tim O’Donoghue, Riverwind Foundation 2012: Jackson Hole is a Sustainable Destination Standards Early Adopter

2017: National Geographic World Legacy Award Destination Finalist

In 2012, the Global Sustainable Tourism Council selected Jackson Hole as one of the first Early Adopters of Sustainable Destination Standards. The GSTC’s concluding remarks were that

2018: World Travel & Tourism Council Destination Management Finalist for the Tourism for Tomorrow Awards

“Teton County more than any other place in the world has the potential to become a leader as a sustainable destination”and that we have the natural capital, human capacity, and financial resources to realize this potential. 2014: Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program is created to coordinate the achievement of sustainable destination certification within five years. The Early Adopters program included an assessment of Jackson Hole / Teton County, Wyoming’s sustainability according to 120 criteria. One of the primary findings was that, despite all the organizations and activities working to make Jackson Hole and our community more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable, there was no organization or program working to coordinate and unify these efforts toward community goals and international standards for sustainability. The Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program was created by the Riverwind Foundation in 2014 in response to the GSTC’s findings. One of the primary objectives of the Program was to achieve third-party sustainable destination certification within five years. The purpose of seeking certification was to guide and drive sustainability innovation and improvement with Jackson Hole’s business, government, and nonprofit stakeholders and overall community. Along the way, the Riverwind Foundation and Jackson Hole have received numerous awards and recognition.

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2016, 2017, & 2018: Green Destinations recognition as one of the Top 100 Sustainable Destinations of the world January 2019: The Riverwind Foundation engages EarthCheck for sustainable destination certification. The Riverwind Foundation engaged EarthCheck on January 2019 to continue the initial evaluation begun in 2012 and pursue sustainable destination certification. EarthCheck is one of two destination certification programs that have been accredited by the Global Sustainable Tourism Council and the world’s longest running, most experienced, rigorous program. The process of certification consisted of two stages: Sustainable Destination Certification Benchmarking and Audit The Benchmarking stage involved collecting and submitting data on approximately 60 indicators in 12 key performance areas: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Energy efficiency, conservation and management Greenhouse gas emissions Air quality protection, noise control & light pollution Management of freshwater resources Waste water management, drainage and streams Ecosystem conservation and management


7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Land use planning and development Transport Solid waste management Management of environmentally harmful substances Cultural and Social Management Economic Management

The Audit stage involved a week-long onsite audit by EarthCheck, including: · Evaluations of the validity and reliability of indicator data · Review of sustainability policies, plans, and reports; · Interviews of key sustainability stakeholders; · Site tours; and · Meetings with community leaders and Riverwind Foundation destination certification team members. 44 volunteers contributed 786 hours of in-kind labor and additional funding in support of the Benchmarking and Audit certification stages. October 2019: The Riverwind Foundation receives the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce Green to Green award for demonstrating a commitment to the environment by prescribing to innovative and effective environmentally conscious business practices November 2019: Benchmarking and Audit results are in! Jackson Hole meets 256 out of 266 certification criteria, an increase from the 57 out of 120 in 2012. February 2020: Riverwind Foundation submits progress report to address nonconformances A progress report submitted by the Riverwind Foundation in February 2020 addressed three major non-conformances, sufficiently completing the action or demonstrating the plan and process for completing the action. Of the remaining 10 criteria, three major “nonconformances” and corrective actions were identified: · Create an overarching sustainability policy for Jackson Hole signed by the highest local authorities · Establish a system for monitoring, responding to, and reporting on visitor and resident satisfaction · Create a process for developing a community/ destination action plan

The seven minor non-conformances and corrective actions identified were: · Create a chart illustrating destination management organization · Establish a library of operating permits, leases, and licenses from major destination stakeholders to demonstrate legal compliance · Include predicted climate change impacts in Teton County Risk Assessment · Share the revised Teton County Risk Assessment with public · Create and implement a mechanism for obtaining community feedback on the overarching sustainability policy and management plan · Create a mechanism for conducting an annual review of community / destination management and action plan · Establish a system for destination management record keeping for the key performance areas March 2020: Jackson Hole becomes the FIRST EarthCheck Certified destination in North America! Vision for the Future We’ve reached an intermediate milestone in implementing the principles, policies, and strategies of the Jackson/Teton County Comprehensive Plan and realizing the vision established by the Jackson Town Council and Teton County Commissioners to be “a world-leading sustainable community and destination.” Now, the objective is to further strengthen Jackson Hole’s environmental, social, and economic sustainability by continuing to innovate and improve our individual and community efforts in a more collaborative, unified way. This aspiration must be part of our community’s work to recover from the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic and be more resilient to future events that threaten the integrity of the environment, the fabric of our community, and the vitality of our economy.

AUTHOR BIO Tim is the Executive Director of the Riverwind Foundation where he leads the Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program. He also serves as a sustainability consultant for several international conservation and tourism organizations and their members. For more information contact: Tim O’Donoghue, Executive Director, Riverwind Foundation | riverwind@wyoming.com (307) 690-3316 |www.sustainabledestination.org 7


JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE SEEKS NET ZERO CARBON EMISSIONS BY 2030 By Nancy Shea, JH Climate Action Collective

The Jackson Hole Climate Action Collective (JHCAC) was created to help Teton County do its part to reduce carbon emissions and address local climate change impacts. Under the leadership of Jackson Hole’s Mayor Pete Muldoon, the JHCAC first invited interested citizens to gather in January of 2020. In the months following, the organization has formed action committees and recruited experienced volunteers to lead the effort. We envision a future without catastrophic climate change, and we will work to make Jackson Hole a vital player in creating that future for all. Our overarching goal is to achieve net zero carbon emissions for Teton County by 2030. To accomplish this, we have adopted three action-oriented strategies. STRATEGY 1: Work with local governments to make climate-positive policy decisions. • Seek a commitment to embed climate change in all local government decision-making. • Advocate for the creation of a Climate Action Department with dedicated staff in the Town and County governments, inspired by regional examples. • Advocate for development of a Climate Action Plan (CAP) for town and county, with the target of adoption of a CAP by January 2022. STRATEGY 2: Increase community engagement in manifesting the NetZero Carbon 2030 goal. • Engage a large group of inspired, knowledgeable, motivated residents who are willing to be proactive supporters. • Take advantage of any opportunity to comment at public meetings, engage in debates, and use the media to increase public awareness.

• Work in coordination with all other Teton County organizations that are addressing climate positive goals and prioritizing collaboration and coalition building. • Inspire citizens of Teton County to find ways to lower their own carbon footprint. STRATEGY 3: Marshal resources and expertise and coordinate efforts to implement a climate action plan that achieves Net Zero Carbon by 2030. • Research available funding sources for communityscale action. • Inventory what’s already happening in Teton County and what’s being done in similar communities. • Continue to develop partnerships with other organizations pursuing similar goals. In the coming months, working with partners and other local experts, we will determine what policies and actions will have the most impact for reducing our local carbon footprint. We will reach out to increase membership, engaging as many people as possible and raising community awareness of climate-positive actions. Everyone can make a difference! Join us by sending your name and email to: jhclimateactioncollective@gmail.com or find us on Facebook, Instagram, and jhclimateactioncollective.org.

AUTHOR BIO Nancy Shea, PhD is on the organizing committee of JH Climate Action Collective. She is a consultant to Mountainside Institute and runs Tetons True Nature. She is adjunct faculty for University of Wyoming and Southern Oregon University.

“Jackson prides itself on being a leader so this community must step up to climatepositive actions. The time is here and now – we need to bring together all the expertise and creativity in this community to create collective action. Together, I believe we can create a better world and a livable future for all.” 8

–Hannah Habermann, JHCAC Organizing Committee


SHELTER-IN-PLACE ALTERS HABITS AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS By Tom Crowell, Sustainability Consultant During this period of COVID-19 travel restrictions and social distancing, I, like many, have been enjoying a few lifestyle changes: a short commute from my bedroom to my home office; reconnecting with relatives I haven’t seen in years (while still keeping them at a safe distance); and spending less on dining out, gas, and shopping (reusing, renting and borrowing instead). An added environmental benefit is these changes reduced my carbon footprint by generating fewer greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To understand more about this benefit I took a closer look and researched some of the measurement tools available online. The Carbon Footprint A carbon footprint measures the impact of an individual’s lifestyle and habits on atmospheric emissions. Carbon calculators are tools measuring emissions attributed to individual lifestyle actions. Using a calculator I found at coolclimate.org, I was able to identify opportunities to reduce and offset the GHGs specific to my activities and choices. Here are my results:

Recommended Carbon Calculators The carbon calculator I used (based on a number of journal recommendations) is available at coolclimate.org. This calculator has a nice interface, the interview questions are simple, and information to be input is readily accessible. The results are clear and the recommendations for actions are practical. I also liked footprintcalculator.org, which includes an ecological footprint tool and has a similar visual appeal. There are many on-line calculators to choose from. Each has a different set of inputs and assumptions and produces a variety of results. Some calculators are better for business, while others focus on specific activities, such as events or travel. For more information on how to reduce your footprint and the carbon footprint calculators I researched, including their assumptions and issues, click here. Also, look for my in-depth discussion of carbon calculators for business in the next issue of Green Matters in Jackson Hole. How will your footprint shift post-COVID-19? Perhaps we can take some lessons from the COVID-19 shelter-in-place/social-distancing lifestyle and continue the emissions reducing benefits. I encourage you to check your carbon footprint now, and again in the coming months, as your habits shift to summer and fall and post COVID-19. Challenge yourself to act on the tips provided and measure your success in reducing GHG emissions.

Additional information on greenhouse gases & climate: www.epa.gov/ghgemissions www.climate.gov AUTHOR BIO

Tips I received from the calculator include avoiding trips to see family on the East Coast and vacationing locally instead (with COVID-19 the staycation is more relevant than ever). I also recognized the benefit of sourcing locally produced foods available at the People’s and Farmer’s Markets, among others.

Tom volunteers for the Silicon Couloir TEAMs program, Senior Center, Grand Teton National Park, Riverwind Foundation, Teton County Bike Task Force, and Good Samaritan Mission. He holds an MS Environmental Studies from Antioch University New England/Teton Science Graduate Program and advises businesses on sustainability. Most recently, Tom has endeavored to eat more tofu and less meat to reduce his carbon footprint. For more information: twcrowell@comcast.net

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TO GTNP VIA SOUTHERN GATE north u.s. hwy 89/191 to grand teton national park: elk refuge inn flat creek ranch jackson lake lodge jackson hole airport Xanterra Yellowstone National Park Lodges

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A CAP ON 80 YEARS OF WILD WASTE By Carrie Bell, Teton County ISWR

Teton County’s Little Horsethief Canyon serves as a reminder that landfilling is an accepted practice but not a permanent solution. Landfilling operations on this site at the southern end of Teton County, Wyoming began in the late 1940s. In those days, no one kept records of what they threw away or gave much thought to what would leak out or how it would impact the ground underneath. The characteristics of the untamed, wild west held true in waste management well into the latter half of the twentieth century. Personal accounts of how trash was handled sounded something like, “you would drive up, find whatever hole was available that day, and throw your trash in.” Any information about what was underground in these “cowboy” landfills came from limited aerial photographs, GIS mapping, and personal accounts. Garbage from Jackson Hole was deposited at Little Horsethief until 1989, when Teton County began transferring its trash to more modern, lined landfills in neighboring communities and states.

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In 2009, as part of Wyoming’s landfill remediation program, Teton County began to plan for the official closure and capping of the Little Horsethief Canyon site, as well as the ongoing monitoring and remediation of groundwater contamination from the landfill leachate. Teton County’s Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling department (ISWR) faced the difficult questions of how much waste was in the landfill? How deeply was it buried? And how could the groundwater be protected going forward? ISWR secured local SPET funding and a Wyoming State Loan and Investment Board (SLIB) grant to assist with the costs of the planned remediation. With initial funding secured, work began to “tame the wild waste!” Early tasks included the excavation of an anticipated 300,000 cubic yards of waste, or enough to fill 40 Goodyear blimps. When it was discovered that removing and hauling this tonnage to the landfill in Bonneville County, Idaho would require a total of 1,043,000 miles, 11 years, and $25,000,000, an alternative plan was hatched.


ISWR partnered with neighboring Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management properties to allow the waste excavated from the County’s property at the west end of the canyon to be relocated further east, upward into the canyon, and eventually capped. Excavation proceeded for two years, into the fall of 2018, and finally totaled 800,000 cubic yards; nearly three times the original estimate and enough to fill 107 Goodyear blimps. The advantage of such an extensive excavation was that it created additional operating space at the west end of the canyon for the improvement and expansion of waste processing facilities and services. The upgrades included a new scale house, additional space for yard waste composting, and a new food waste composting facility, which served as the interim trash transfer building, while a new 18,000 square foot, multibay trash transfer building was constructed. These facilities, as well as the final landfill cap, are scheduled for completion by winter 2020/2021. Features of the new Little Horsethief Canyon landfill cap: • Local soil and compost were used as fill material, saving over $200,000. • Once fill material was graded and shaped into the final slopes, a liner and drainage system were installed to allow for the closure slopes to be stable and impermeable. • An added challenge...A Class B fault traverses through the landfill site, so slopes on the landfill cap had to be evaluated to ensure stability and safety in the event of an earthquake. • Once complete, soil will be placed on top of the impermeable layer and seeded for vegetation. • Landfill caps are designed to stop precipitation from entering the buried waste and releasing contaminated leachate.

AUTHOR BIO Carrie Bell, found her passion for waste diversion and sustainability after going to school for something completely different. She enjoys educating the community and working with community partners on waste reduction. For more information contact: Carrie Bell, Waste Diversion and Outreach Coordinator, Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling | cbell@tetoncountywy.gov|(307) 733-7678 |www.roadtozerowastejh.org

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STUDENTS ASK CAFETERIA TO FORK OVER CONVENIENCE TO REDUCE WASTE By Sienna Taylor, Sophie Parker, and Elsa Knoke, JHHS

Jackson Hole High School students consider themselves lucky to have wonderful food service and passionate kitchen staff. Everything from the classic mac and cheese to chicken curry is cooked with obvious care and consideration. During the 2019-2020 school year, the Students for Sustainability club (SFS), took the opportunity to build upon this high standard of service by encouraging an awareness of the waste generated from cafeteria meals.

outside of the Jackson Whole Grocer to secure funds to purchase the additional forks needed to fully supply the cafeteria.

According to the club’s research, every cafeteria in the Teton County School District utilizes single-use plastic utensils and paper plates. While this method is cheap and convenient, the practice takes a massive toll on the environment. The forks at Jackson Hole High School alone produce 90,000 units of waste per year.

Acquiring the forks was just the first step. The club faced additional challenges in implementing the new utensils. The forks were not put in place until October, two months into the school year, and, at the request of the kitchen staff, a small supply of plastic forks continued to be offered. To assist with the transition to reusables, SFS members created a system in which dirty-fork collection bins filled with sanitizer and water were placed on the side of the trash cans and put out every morning by the janitorial staff. After each lunch, SFS leaders brought the bins into the kitchen where they were put through an industrial dishwasher.

The members of SFS set out to change their school’s practice of using plastic utensils early in 2019. Led by faculty advisor Roan Eastman and 2019 club leader Millie Peck, they hosted a school-wide “fork drive,” which brought in almost 400 reusable forks. The 2020 SFS club leaders, Sienna Taylor, Sophie Parker, Elsa Knoke, and Holland Gaston, then held a community-wide fundraiser

The club was surprised to see that after surveying the student body in February, 25.4% of students consistently chose the single-use, plastic option. They cited concerns about cleanliness and convenience. Despite a bacteria swab test revealing no difference in cleanliness on the metal compared to the plastic, one student reported that they “believe they are very unsanitary.” Another

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DO YOU CONSISTENTLY USE METAL FORKS? 189 Responses

43.4%

Yes No

16.4%

I have but not consistently 25.4%

14.9%

I bring my own utensils from home

commented, “it is easier to just throw away one of the plastic ones.” Changing students’ minds regarding this issue remains difficult. After all, single-use utensils in a school environment have been the norm for most students since kindergarten. For this reason, the SFS club plans to expand this program across the school district in the coming years. Not only will this save hundreds of thousands of disposables a year, but the hope is to also normalize reusables for students at a young age. As a community focused on the environment and one that thrives off of our national parks and forests, our schools should echo the responsibility to preserve what we have in every step of education.

AUTHOR BIOS Sienna Taylor is a senior at Jackson Hole High School and is one of the leaders of the Students for Sustainability club. She has committed to Western Washington University with hopes of studying environmental economics and policy. Elsa Knoke was born in Jackson and has been attending JHHS for four years. She is currently a senior and a leader of Students for Sustainability club. Next year she is attending the University of Southern California and plans to continue to focus on sustainability on the college campus. Sophie Parker was born and raised in Jackson Hole, which cultivated her love for the environment. She is now one of the leaders of Jackson Hole High School’s Students for Sustainability club and plans to study environment science in college. 15


NEW FRAMEWORK FOR SUSTAINABLE RECREATION GUIDES BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST By Linda Merigliano, Bridger-Teton National Forest

Sustainability. The concept is simple: meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The goal is to seek the sweet spot at the intersection of environment, social, and economic considerations. In Bridger-Teton National Forest, this pursuit is ongoing. Challenged by declining budgets, aging infrastructure, and changing visitor needs and expectations, early sustainability efforts within the Forest Service focused on campgrounds and buildings. Talk of sustainable trails referred only to the level of erosion and how well they functioned for their intended use. This narrow lens fell short of addressing sustainable recreation as a whole. In 2010, shifts in traditional ideology gave birth to an updated and more dynamic Framework for Sustainable Recreation. This new approach was a way to align the entire recreation program. Sustainable recreation explores how we can provide opportunities for people to connect with the land and enjoy the benefits of being outdoors, while also ensuring ecological, social, and economic sustainability for present and future generations. Sustainable recreation acknowledges the hard truths and challenges we face, but also provides optimism that there is a path forward. It requires changing our collective focus from ME to WE. It changes how we approach our work internally and emphasizes public engagement and partnerships to create a focused vision for the future and

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shared action to steward the land and water we all love. The path towards a sustainable future begins with understanding the Forest’s history and role in the larger landscape. Did you Know that the Bridger-Teton National Forest... · Contains 3.4 million acres that are integral to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem? · Is home to numerous wildlife migration corridors, 315 miles of Wild and Scenic rivers, 3 national system trails, and over 2 million acres of wilderness and backcountry? · Provides a wide range of diverse recreation opportunities? · Attracts 2.2 million annual visitors who contribute substantially to the local economy through outfitterguide services, guest ranches, mountain resorts, and those here to, “live the dream” or fulfill a livelihood that is in their blood?

The Forest’s history and role are embodied in its vision: “The Bridger-Teton is home to world-class headwaters, wildlife, wilderness, and wildlands. Providing for year round recreation and sustainable uses, while conserving these values is our legacy.” Click to hear more from Tricia O’Connor

Forest Supervisor for Bridger Teton National Forest


Within this vision, the Forest contains very diverse landscapes, each with its own history, assets, and values. Consider the Wind River Mountains known for stunning peaks and large glacial lakes, the Wyoming Range known for mule deer hunting and cutthroat trout fishing, areas valued by snowmobilers or skiers for powder snow, the Teton Wildernessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to absorb multi-day pack trips, and areas adjacent to town providing accessible backyard adventures. Lessons learned from other managed areas suggest that a focused and well-aligned program is a sustainable program, thus the first step is to develop clear focus and priorities for each unique landscape.

The six foundational principles that underlie the Framework for Sustainable Recreation:

The next step is to assess where we are now. How are we doing relative to resource protection, providing quality visitors experiences, and economic capacity to meet basic operational tasks and deliver public benefits? The recreation program is multi-faceted, so sustainability needs to be assessed for a variety of program areas such as access (roads and trails), dispersed summer and winter recreation, river and lakes, and wilderness.

Considering the BROADER LANDSCAPE.

Even after this initial assessment work, important questions will remain. For example, how will we address gaps and opportunities identified in the assessment? What new workforce skills and training are necessary? What does success look like and what metrics will be used to measure it? How will we adapt over time to evolving recreation trends?

CONNECTING people with their natural and cultural heritage. Promoting BENEFITS through outdoor recreation. INTEGRATING with other uses and resource values to derive sustainable recreation outcomes. ENGAGING the public.

Understanding the 3 interconnected aspects of SUSTAINABILITY: ecological, social, and economic.

FUN FACT: We all know Yellowstone as the first National Park, but did you know that part of the Bridger-Teton and Shoshone comprised the first national forest established in 1891?

Photo Credit: JH Wildlife Foundation

As we begin the journey towards a more sustainable future, one thing is clear. Our National Forest System of public lands is a treasured resource owned by all of us. As celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day continues, we encourage robust public conversation around sustainable recreation guided by a collective sense of the legacy we hope to leave for future generations.

AUTHOR BIO Linda Merigliano is a Recreation/Wilderness program manager on the Bridger-Teton National Forest where she has worked for the past 30 years. She also serves as a member of the Interagency Visitor Use Management Council. For more information contact: Linda Merigliano, Bridger-Teton National Forest linda.merigliano@usda.gov|(307) 739-5500 www.fs.usda.gov/main/btnf/home

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RRR BUSINESS LEADER NEWS RRR BUSINESS LEADERS AND HOTSHOTS ZOOM INTO ACTION The RRR Business Leaders is a sustainability training and recognition program for Teton County businesses, nonprofits, and government agencies. For nearly a decade, the RRRBL program has provided outreach, education, and recognition for local organizations wishing to: minimize waste, conserve energy, make a positive environmental and community impact, and reduce costs and increase revenue. There are currently 170+ members and over 15 annual certified green events. Hotshots The Hotshots 2020 program is a partnership between Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling and the Riverwind Foundation’s Jackson Hole and Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program that provides additional staff to recruit and register new members. The Hotshots offer in depth program instruction and one-on-one application assistance. Quaran-Green Jh During COVID-19, the Hotshots turned their energy toward a social media campaign to encourage those with time on their hands to Quaran-Green while quarantined. Visit the six weeks of posted sustainability tips and strategies by searching #quarangreenjh. Thank you QuranGreenJH partners: Teton County ISWR, Energy Conservation Works, Teton Conservation District, Yellowstone Teton Clean Cities, and the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole. New RRR Business Leaders The Hotshots are continuing new member surveys via Zoom and are delighted to welcome this spring’s new RRR Business Leader members: Beyond Efficiency Catch and Release JH Darwin Ranch Duffel Donkey Exum Mountain Guides First Republic Bank JH Public Art JH Reuse KHOL Radio Knobe’s Radio Shack

Love Schack Architecture Miazga’s McDermott Financial Orijin PRESeNT LLC St. John’s Episcopal Church Silicon Couloir Teton Adaptive Sports US Bank Workshop

More information on membership benefits and how to schedule a Hotshots appointment at roadtozerowastejh.org


FEATURED INFOGRAPHIC: ALTERNATIVE FUELS

ALTERNATIVE FUELS

Electric

Biodiesel

CNG

Propane

Average GHG emission reduction per mile (B20 blend level for biodiesel)

96%

14%

13%

$1.80

$2.97

12%

Vehicle Type

Price per gasoline gallon equivalent (gasoline: $2.70 and diesel: $3.29)

$.50

$3.31

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MINI-FILM FESTIVAL AND ANNOUNCEMENTS Slow Food in the Tetons

• Slow Food in the Tetons Online Marketplace provides a platform to connect local producers and consumers during this critical time, bringing fresh, healthy, locally & regionally grown and produced food on a weekly basis. Shop weekly from Monday at 5pm- Wednesday at 5pm. Pickup is Friday 3pm - 6pm at the Slow Food Farm Stand (next to Twigs in the Movieworks Plaza). The online market will remain open through the spring and early summer. • The Jackson Hole Community Gardens are now a program of Slow Food in the Tetons. May Park and Blair Gardens provide 125 plots for individuals, families and groups of friends to grow food, flowers and more. Click here for details or to add your name to the wait list. • The People’s Market is scheduled to open up on Wednesday June 10th. Remember, 4-7pm at Snow King all summer long! • Food and fun abound this spring in socially-distanced, online cooking classes for kids, (see GM mini-flim festival)! Ian McGregor is teaching from his home with help from Blair and their newborn, Isla. This season’s classes are full, but keep an eye out for new sign-ups later in the year.


Hole Food Rescue

New This Summer: Hole Food Rescueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sprout Mobile - Starting June 15th, Hole Food Rescue is implementing a new summer program providing free healthy meals and books for any child that shows up to take home. The Sprout Mobile will travel to six locations throughout the week: Blair Place Apartments, Evans Mobile Home Park, Mike Yokel Park, Powderhorn Park, Teton County Library and The Timbers at Jackson Hole. Visit www.holefoodrescue.org/sprout for the most up-to-date details and delivery schedule.

Energy Conservation Works

Free Energy Efficiency Kit - No Strings Attached! Lower Valley Energy will provide one free Energy Efficiency Kit to residential members who request one. This kit includes: (8) (2) (4) (1) (1) (1) (1)

A-lamps - for general purpose (11W) A-lamps - for general purpose (15W) Reflectors - for flood lights or recessed fixture (8W) Advanced Power Strip Thermostatic Valve 1.5 GPM Shower head Kitchen Aerator 1.5 GPM Bath Aerator 1.0 GPM

https://bit.ly/LVE_EEKIT Installing and using these items in your home is a great way to lower your energy use and your power bill.

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Teton County Integrated Solid Waste & Recycling

In Teton County and elsewhere, COVID-19 has brought into question the safety and viability of community recycling programs. Fortunately, in Teton County, the Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling department (ISWR) maintains a safe, successful, and economically sound program. Here’s how... • ISWR accepts only high value materials that are collected from the community, sorted for the removal of trash and non-recyclables, and successfully sold to recycling processors. • ISWR is known for its high standards of clean, quality materials and maintains positive relationships with recycling processors. • The community can help by understanding that, although many items have labels and markings that indicate recyclability, their material quality is low, and the infrastructure and technology necessary to effectively reprocess them is not widely available. View the recycling photo series to learn more about what is and isn’t a high quality recyclable! • Where funding is concerned, recycling does not divert general fund resources away from health and safety. ISWR is an enterprise fund, which means it’s a business within the county that has self-supported funding mechanisms. Funding for recycling comes from the sale of recyclables, Transfer Station tip fees, and additional grants and fundraising. In recent years, ISWR has received SPET tax money for capital improvements.

SEND QUESTIONS, COMMENTS, AND TOPIC SUBMISSIONS TO MARIALLAN.HANNA@GMAIL.COM

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Green Matters in Jackson Hole Spring / Summer 2020 Edition  

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