Green Matters in Jackson Hole Issue 9 Winter/Spring 2021

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in jackson hole

issue 9

winter/spring ’21

Inside this issue FUTURE OF TOURISM • BEAR-PROOF TRASH CAN INITIATIVE • UPDATES FROM THE ROAD TO ZERO WASTE & JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE • RRR BUSINESS LEADERS 2.0 • MINI-FILM FESTIVAL …AND MORE!


TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MEET THE CONTRIBUTORS TIM O’DONOGHUE

MARI ALLAN HANNA

RIVERWIND FOUNDATION

RIVERWIND FOUNDATION

4 THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF THE FUTURE OF TOURISM COALITION 6 GIANT TROLL LINKS JACKSON WITH OTHER COMMUNITIES STEWARDING RESOURCES & CREATIVITY 8 GLOWNIGHTS 2021

CARRIE GERACI

ENERGY CONSERVATION WORKS

Photo Credit: Fischer Creative

9 MORGAN’S NATURE NOTEBOOK: WINTER TRACKING 10 JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE UPDATE 11 BEAR-PROOF TRASH CANS: KEEPING HUMANS AND WILDLIFE SAFE

PHIL CAMERON

JH PUBLIC ART

TETON CONSERVATION DISTRICT

NANCY SHEA

JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE

12 DOWNLOADABLE SUSTAINABILITY MAP 14 ROAD TO ZERO WASTE ANNUAL REPORT & LOOKING AHEAD

18 BEST PROGRAM FEATURE: SIGNAL MOUNTAIN LODGE

CHELSEA CARSON JH CONSERVATION ALLIANCE

CARRIE BELL TETON COUNTY ISWR

Photo Credit: Carson Meyer

16 ANNOUNCING RRR BUSINESS LEADERS 2.0

19 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY 20 MINI-FILM FESTIVAL AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 23 ACHIEVEMENTS IN SUSTAINABLE DESTINATION MANAGEMENT 2

ON THE COVER “Undercurrent” by CLB Architects for JH Public Art GlowNights Photo Credit: Aaron Kraft


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Green Matters is pleased to be following along as Jackson Hole continues to pivot and persevere through the challenges of 2020 and into the promise of 2021. We are growing more comfortable with an all-digital platform and noticing that our contributors are too. This ninth issue is more visual, more varied, and reflects the ingenuity and creativity that’s become so valuable as we learn how to convey information from a distance.

issue also offers an exciting first look at the changes coming to the RRR Business Leaders program. With help from the partnership between Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling and the Riverwind Foundation, this nearly 20-year-old program is finding renewed relevance and bringing its members new opportunities to learn from each other and support the work of a collective sustainable business community.

We are pleased to feature sustainability-on-screen and bring readers what we hope is an interactive, inspiring, and rewarding experience. Even in a time of rapid change and new platforms, the needs of people and planet are ever the priority, and these are the stories that reflect our community’s commitment to the ongoing work of sustainability.

Articles from the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance and Teton Conservation District provide outreach via video on wildlife initiatives for all ages, and, last but not least, the Back-Page-Mini-Film-Festival returns. Here, readers will find announcements, photos and videos that highlight additional programs and projects underway within local organizations who continue to do the work of sustainability.

This issue opens with an explanation of the local ties to the Future of Tourism Coalition’s Guiding Principles and the hope that, as tourism trends unfold in a postCovid era, Jackson Hole will continue to strengthen our interdependent environmental, community, cultural, and economic practices in partnership with the international community. Speaking of visitors, Jackson Hole is expecting a troll! Read more about artist Thomas Dambo and how his Giant Troll will highlight resource recovery and connect our town with others that are embracing the nexus of stewardship between art and the environment. Updates from Teton County’s Road to Zero Waste and the JH Climate Action Collective remind us of the long term planning and incremental progress being made, as well as the goals on the horizon. This

Happy spring from Green Matters! We’ll return in the fall with more articles and updates. In the meantime, keep an eye out for this summer’s Sustainable Business Guide. This guide will provide a comprehensive list of businesses and organizations working to lead the effort in our community to achieve recognition as a sustainable destination by strengthening their environmental stewardship, social responsibility, and economic vitality. Enjoy and be well!

Tim O’Donoghue, Executive Director, Publisher

Mari Allan Hanna, Editor

TH AN K S TO OUR SPON SOR S

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF THE FUTURE OF TOURISM COALITION

ByByTim O’Donoghue, Carrie Geraci, JHRiverwind Public ArtFoundation

In early 2020, the Riverwind Foundation joined a coalition of international organizations calling for a rebalance of the tourism sector as it recovers from COVID-19. The Future of Tourism Coalition was created by Center for Responsible Travel (CREST), Destination Stewardship Center, Green Destinations, Sustainable Travel International, Tourism Cares, and the Travel Foundation, with the guidance of the Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC). Twenty-two founding signatories including the Riverwind Foundation and over 200 additional organizations and businesses who represent a diverse cross-section of key industry stakeholders have committed thus far. They are influencers in the movement, demonstrating leadership and adherence to the Guiding Principles in their product and business practices. They will provide guidance to the Global Coalition as plans are put in place to support travel and tourism entities long-term in their strategy to place destinations and communities at the core of their work. The Riverwind Foundation anticipates that this partnership will benefit our community with guidance, best practices, and practical strategies for protecting the very reasons why we live here and visitors come: our wildlife, wild lands, and community character. Decades of unfettered growth in travel have put the world’s treasured places, including Jackson Hole and the greater Yellowstone region, at risk – environmentally, culturally, socially, and financially. While the global travel and tourism industries face a precarious and uncertain future due to the COVID-19 global pandemic, it’s clear that visitation and its attendant impacts will continue in Jackson Hole and Yellowstone. As tourism moves forward and recovers, re-centering around a strong set of principles is vital for long term sustainability and equitable growth. To rally global change, the Coalition has put forth Guiding Principles that outline a bold vision for tourism’s path forward. The first three of these principles are described below.

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PRINCIPLE #1: SEE THE (JACKSON) WHOLE PICTURE Most tourism by its nature involves the destination as a whole, not only industry businesses, but also its ecosystems, natural resources, cultural assets and traditions, communities, aesthetics, and built infrastructure – our place and people. Our tourism businesses rely on the character, appeal, and resources of the destination as a whole. For us, it’s the interwoven elements of wildlife, scenery, natural and recreational resources, and western community and culture. All of these elements together constitute a sense of place for all of us. Planning for the future of our tourism requires thinking beyond business recovery and success, and building a solid, holistic foundation for visitor and destination management. Securing the future of tourism requires investing in the long-term health and vitality of all of the different elements that comprise our lands and region as a whole. Questions to Consider in Seeing the Whole Picture: • Where does money from tourism dollars end up? • What kind of tourists are arriving now and in the future? • What are the hidden environmental, social, and economic costs? • Who makes decisions within our community and destination, including who and what defines “success”?

PRINCIPLE #2: USE SUSTAINABILITY STANDARDS Teton County was selected in 2012 by the Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC) as one of the first six early adopters worldwide of sustainable destination criteria. The assessment conducted by the GSTC resulted


in a baseline of our community/destination’s sustainability performance. This baseline assessment served as the basis for the inception of the Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program in 2014. Then, Teton County became the first destination in North America to be certified by EarthCheck in 2020 based on the GSTC accredited EarthCheck sustainable destination standard and criteria. The GSTC and EarthCheck standards and criteria have provided Teton County with guidelines, a structure and process for improving our local sustainability performance, striving toward our sustainability policies and goals as described in the Jackson/Teton County Comprehensive Plan, and realizing the vision approved by the Town of Jackson and Teton County for Jackson Hole to be a world-leading sustainable community and destination.

PRINCIPLE #3: COLLABORATE IN DESTINATION MANAGEMENT A higher functioning destination seeks to develop all tourism through a collaborative management structure with equal participation by government, the private sector, and civil society organizations that represent diversity in communities. Such management and governance structures are often called a destination management organization, destination management and marketing organization, or destination stewardship council. Without holistic management that includes equal participation and representation from the private and public sector in the decision making process, difficulties can easily arise, and have - overtourism, stress on our services and infrastructure, disruption of resident quality of life, cultural degradation, exclusion and inequity of our workforce, and various environmental problems. A well-managed tourism can enrich our communities,

improve public awareness and education, help sustain our wildlife and natural habitats, and support our historic and contemporary community and culture. Questions to Consider in a Collaboration Around Destination Management: • Who is involved in tourism planning and management decisions? Are individuals and entities both within and outside of the tourism industry engaged? Is the diversity of our community represented and do they have an equal voice? • Is tourism meeting the needs of residents? If so, how, and if not, why? • Is/should there be a centralized entity that ensures tourism efforts are environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable and coordinated across government agencies, sectors, community groups, etc.? In summary, Teton County has made progress in understanding our holistic sustainability performance relative to international standards and our challenges and opportunities to meet these standards and our local aspirations for sustainability. One significant challenge and opportunity is to commit to an inclusive, well planned and coordinated course of action to manage tourism, not just drive it. Our community must be at the heart of determining the future of tourism here. Let’s learn from our peers and come together to create a management plan and collaboration that priorities environmental stewardship, lessens tourism’s burden on our community and stakeholders, and creates equity and economic resilience for all. As the Global Sustainable Tourism Council said in 2012, “Teton County more than any other place in the world has the potential to become a leader as a sustainable destination” and that we have “the natural capital, human capacity, and financial resources to realize this potential.”

AUTHOR BIO Tim is the Executive Director of the Riverwind Foundation where he leads the Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program. He also serves as a sustainability consultant for several international conservation and tourism organizations and their members.

For more information contact: Tim O’Donoghue, Executive Director, Riverwind Foundation | riverwind@wyoming.com (307) 690-3316 | www.sustainabledestination.org

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GIANT TROLL LINKS JACKSON WITH OTHER COMMUNITIES STEWARDING RESOURCES & CREATIVITY By Carrie Geraci, JH Public Art

This spring, Jackson Hole Public Art will bring a Giant Troll to life for all to enjoy. Artist Thomas Dambo - a highly acclaimed recycling artist - is traveling to Jackson from his native Denmark to construct a site-specific, immersive art installation, set within the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s beloved community conservation property, Rendezvous “R” Park. What’s perhaps most exciting is that the statue will be built entirely from recycled wood and locallysourced materials.

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To educate local youth about the importance of reuse, reduce and recycle, JH Public Art has teamed up with Subaru America, Grand Teton National Park, National Parks Conservation Association, and the Teton County Integrated Solid Waste & Recycling Center’s “Zero Landfill’’ initiative to offer an exciting STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) project facilitated with support from the pARTners program. Throughout the next few months, local youth in first and second grades will participate in an artist challenge to create their own


mini-troll out of recycled and repurposed materials. Mini-trolls will be displayed in troll villages that will pop-up around the community during the building process. “The Recycling Center is thrilled to partner with JH Public Art and the other team members to support the education and highlight the importance of reuse. The Giant Troll and mini-trolls are excellent examples of the amazing things that can be created with reused materials and we are excited to see the finished products!” says Carrie Bell, Waste Diversion and Outreach Coordinator, Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling. Jackson’s new giant troll (name to-be-determined) will stay on location for 3-5 years. Each of Dambo’s trolls are incorporated into an ever-evolving folklore, “The Great Story of the Little People”, building upon their inherent mystery and whimsy. The modern tale connects over 55 trolls scattered throughout the world, uniting us as stewards of sustainability, nature-lovers, art enthusiasts, and adventurers of all ages. The goal is to create a piece of art that inspires people to go explore, have outdoor adventures, and consider their environmental impacts. JH Public Art is working closely with the Jackson Hole Land Trust to avoid disrupting important ecological areas of R Park such as the wetlands and the areas of concentrated wildlife habitat. Both organizations will also work to actively address visitation concerns for as long as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our community and our world. A fundraising campaign began on December 1, 2020. LEARN MORE

ARE YOU A LOCAL CONTRACTOR? WE ARE SEEKING TOOLS, MATERIALS AND 150 DECONSTRUCTED WOOD PALLETS AS TROLL BUILDING BLOCKS. CONTACT ALEX POPE, JH PUBLIC ART PROGRAM MANAGER ART TO CONTRIBUTE!

AUTHOR BIO + CONTACT INFO Geraci founded JH Public Art in 2010. Since then, JH Public Art has installed multiple public permanent and temporary installations totaling over $700,000 in value. JH Public Art has developed public art plans for the Town of Jackson, Teton Village Association, and St. John’s Medical Center; and produced the Public Art & Placemaking Toolkit for Rural Communities in the Intermountain West, a resource for communities looking to launch public art and creative placemaking programs. Geraci served one term on the

Americans for the Arts council. Formerly a full-time artist Carrie Geraci used to show her artwork at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery. She lives in Jackson with her husband and two boys who are attending University of Wyoming and University of Utah. For more information contact: Carrie Geraci, Executive Director | carrie@jhpublicart.org | 307-413-1474 | www.jhpublicart.org

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GLOWNIGHTS 2021 By Phil Cameron, ECW Executive Director

GlowNights 2021 returned this December with a monthlong exhibit of original, light-based installations inspired by ENERGY: how we use it, where it’s from, and where it will go. Energy Conservation Works (ECW), partnered with JH Public Art to provide messages for the public via augmented reality at each installation. GlowNights artworks activated pedestrian spaces and inspired wonder in both Teton Village and the Town of Jackson from December 18, 2020 through January 2021.

“We’re very excited to partner with JH Public Art on this year’s GlowNights, to raise awareness about the importance of energy efficiency and Green Power. We hope that pairing the powerful and creative visuals of this project with the programs and successes of ECW and its partners, will encourage the community and visitors to action.” – Phil Cameron, ECW Executive Director

AUTHOR BIO + CONTACT INFO As Executive Director since 2014, Phil oversees all aspects of Energy Conservation Works. Prior to this, he was Executive Director of Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities where in 2011, the Department of Energy recognized Phil as a ‘Rising Star’ in the National Clean Cities program for his work on a $500,000 transportation efficiency project across Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. His past experience

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includes environmental education, monitoring, and resource management. Phil received his B.A. in Geology from Amherst College and completed the Teton Science Schools’ Environmental Education Residency program in 2007. Phil, his wife Robin, and two sons live in Jackson. For more information, contact pcameron@energyconservationworks.org www.energyconservationworks.com


MORGAN’S NATURE NOTEBOOK: WINTER TRACKING By Teton Conservation District

Winter tracking is an art! For all you non-tracking-artists out there, enjoy these beginner tips for learning to recognize stories written in the snow by animal tracks and signs.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES IF YOU WANT TO BECOME AN EXPERT TRACKING ARTIST, A GOOD PLACE TO START IS THIS U.S. FOREST SERVICE CHAPTER BY HALFPENNY, THOMPSON, MORSE, HOLDEN, AND REZENDES ON SNOW TRACKING. ANOTHER GREAT RESOURCE TO LOOK FOR AT THE LIBRARY OR BOOK STORE IS MAMMAL TRACKS & SIGN BY MARK ELBROCH.

With sub-zero temps and a deepening snowpack, it’s becoming more important to give wildlife space. The energy an animal expends running from a person, dog, or car is energy they might have a hard time replenishing with limited browse and forage available over the winter. But, learning to identify tracks is a fun way to connect with the natural world and wildlife without needing to get close to them, or even see them at all!

` AUTHOR BIO + CONTACT INFO Teton Conservation District. “Since 1946, Teton Conservation District has worked with the community to conserve and steward natural resources through local projects, partnerships, research, and education.” Contact info: www.tetonconservation.org | info@tetonconservation.org

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JH CLIMATE ACTION COLLECTIVE UPDATE By Nancy Shea, JH Climate Action Collective

A CAP (Climate Action Plan) is a community planning tool intended to provide a guiding framework for for reducing GHG emissions across all sectors while supporting community goals for climate justice, environmental health, economic prosperity, and quality of life. It is based on local priorities and uses greenhouse gas emissions inventories and other data as a foundation to create local climate goals.

ensure the CAP reflects the needs and priorities of local government and is well-integrated with other goals such as housing and transportation. The CAP Leadership Council and Technical Advisory Committee listed below are embarking on an 18-month timeline to meet the January 2022 target.

In Teton County, the goal of developing and adopting a local CAP by January 2022 has been adopted and is included as a priority in the Comprehensive Plan. The JH Climate Action Collective is helping to lead this community-wide collaboration, launching a public-private partnership, with the non-profit sector taking the lead and working in close cooperation with the Town of Jackson and Teton County. The collaboration envisions a co-creative process to

JOIN US

or find us on Facebook, Instagram, and jhclimateactioncollective.org

CURRENT CAP LEADERSHIP COUNCIL:

THE TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE:

JH Climate Action Collective

Energy Conservation Works and Lower Valley Energy

Riverwind Foundation Legacy Works Group

Town of Jackson

Sunrise Movement of Jackson Hole

Teton Count

University of Wyoming HAUB School of Environment and Natural Resources

Teton Conservation District

START Bus

Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities

AUTHOR BIO + CONTACT INFO Nancy Shea, PhD is on the organizing committee of JH Climate Action Collective. She is a consultant to Mountainside Institute and runs Tetons True Nature. She is adjunct faculty for University of Wyoming and Southern Oregon University. To contact Nancy, reach out to her over email at nhshea@gmail.com

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BEAR-PROOF TRASH CANS: KEEPING HUMANS AND WILDLIFE SAFE By Chelsea Carson, Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance

A special part of calling Jackson and Teton County home is living closely with wildlife. Of the many species that we consider our community members, bears may be one of the most revered and controversial. We live amongst both grizzly bears and black bears here in Teton County, placing us in the heart of bear country. Unfortunately, human behavior, like leaving out attractants such as garbage, dog food, or bird feeders, leads bears into our neighborhoods and often ends negatively for the bear. In 2019, WY Game and Fish officials captured and relocated 20 black bears and euthanized 11 of those after they returned for human food. With the exponential growth of people and development Teton County is experiencing, the Alliance along with many other organizations, agencies, and local government have discussed increasing proactive measures that could mitigate these interactions. While there are many strategies to mitigate conflicts between wildlife and humans, one of the most straightforward and effective tactics is the use of bear-resistant trash cans.

As part of a forward thinking initiative in 2008, Teton County used data collected from organizations, such as WY Game and Fish, to proactively map bear conflict areas, or “areas that overlap with, lay adjacent to, or are in close proximity to known bear-use areas.” The effort was in anticipation of an increase in the number of grizzly bears and black bears in proximity to town limits, as well as an expanding human footprint. The forecasted increase was realized, as we experienced this fall when grizzly 399 and her four cubs came further south than ever before and into residential areas. Increased proactive mitigation measures like wildlife feeding regulations and bear-resistant trash cans are necessary to keep our wildlife and our human community safe. Please help keep our community, humans and wildlife, safe and follow the wildlife feeding regulations and consider renting a bear-proof trash container through your local trash hauling company, even if you’re outside the conflict area!

Outdoor trash storage is an attractant for bears and other wildlife who can easily tip and open standard trash cans. Bears can become habituated to accessing this food source, and this often results in monitoring, relocation, and/or euthanizing the bear. Bear-resistant trash cans prevent bears from accessing trashed food, eliminating that incentive to frequent residential areas, which protects both humans and bears.

AUTHOR BIO + CONTACT INFO Chelsea Carson is the conservation program manager at the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, where she leads their wildlife and wildlands campaigns. If you are interested in learning more about bear-proof trash cans, please reach out to her at chelsea@jhalliance.org | jhalliance.org

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TO GTNP VIA SOUTHERN GATE north u.s. hwy 89/191 to grand teton national park: elk refuge inn flat creek ranch jackson lake lodge jackson hole airport Xanterra Yellowstone National Park Lodges Signal Mountain Lodge

JACKSON HOLE MOUNTAIN RESORT

THE ASPENS

STILSON public parking

deloney ave

TOWN SQUARE

millward

pearl

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

simpson

hansen

CACHE

aspen

RODEO GROUNDS

maple

karns

snow king ave.

PARKS & REC

POST OFFICE

HIGH SCHOOL BUTTE

POST OFFICE

kelly

karns meadow dr.

SONS ALBERT

ss rd.

virginia ln

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scott LN.

flat creek dr.

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jackson hole wildlife safaris

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JACKSON MIDDLE SCHOOL

crabtree ln.

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loop south park

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JW GROCER

spruce

bl

russ gar

S. hwy 89

gregory

rd.

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JACKSON HIGH SCHOOL

south park loop rd. / hwy 221

high school

SNOW KING RESORT

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gam e tra creek ilhe ad

dr. 3 creek

south park loop rd.

TETON COUNTY INTEGRATED SOLID waste and recycling center

fla t cr eek

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JACKSON REC CENTER

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king

teton ave

deloney ave

ST. JOHNS HOSPITAL

willow

nelson dr. rancher dr.

pioneer ln.

redmond

gros ventre

jean

TOWN HALL

hall

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broadway

TEAR OUT MAP GUIDE TO GOING GREEN

cache creek

RECYCLING LOCATIONS START BIKE LOCATION EV CHARGING STATIONS JH20 WATER BOTTLE REFILL BIKE PATH SLOW FOOD FARM STAND BEST CERTIFIED BUSINESSES

CLICK HERE TO

DOWNLOAD THIS MAP


ROAD TO ZERO WASTE ANNUAL REPORT & LOOKING AHEAD By Carrie Bell, Teton County ISWR

Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling (ISWR) released the 2020 Annual Report in January which examined how Covid-19 affected Teton County’s ability to manage solid waste and continue waste diversion. While most of the Covid-19 impacts were operational pivots to keep employees as safe as possible, the public saw increased safety precautions at the Trash Transfer Station. As of August 2020, those stricter precautions were lifted, and relatively normal operations ensued. Covid-19 was not the only thing that happened to ISWR in 2020, in fact it was a significant year for the department in very positive ways. First and foremost, the nearly 10-year long project “Taming the Wild Waste” was completed. Over the course of the last decade, the old landfill was excavated and relocated, and three buildings were constructed to serve the community more efficiently and safely. Another success from 2020 was the Reusable Water Bottle Round-Up. Jackson Hole Middle School and ISWR partnered to collect water bottles from the community to

support in-person learning and avoid single-use water cup waste. Over 600 water bottles were collected. The year 2020 is behind us, and we have a lot to look forward to in 2021. ISWR expects to make significant electrical upgrades to the Recycling Center so a more efficient baler and sort system can be installed. ISWR is planning to conduct a waste characterization study on Teton County’s trash to evaluate what is being thrown away, be able to better educate the community, and plan for 60% landfill bound waste diversion by 2030. Food waste composting got off the ground on February 1st to self-haulers. A larger food waste collection program is expected to roll out in 2021, but in the meantime residents and businesses who are able to haul food waste to the facility are welcome. ISWR is excited for what is to come in 2021 and beyond. We expect significant increases in our diversion rate, expanded programs and services, and a more sustainable Jackson Hole.

AUTHOR BIO Carrie found her passion for waste diversion and sustainability after going to school for something completely different. She enjoys educating the community and working with community partners on waste reduction. For more information contact: Carrie Bell, Waste Diversion and Outreach Coordinator, Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling | cbell@tetoncountywy.gov | (307) 733-7678 |www.roadtozerowastejh.org


ISWR BY THE NUMBERS

32.5%

DIVERSION RATE 5 year average

9,236.8

40,000

30,000

20,000

TONS COMPOSTED

4,328.9 TONS RECYCLED

10,000

0

FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020

LANDFILL BOUND TONS RECYCLED TONS IN FY 2020

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ANNOUNCING RRR BUSINESS LEADERS 2.0 THE NEXT CHAPTER IN SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES, RESOURCES, & PARTNERSHIPS By Mari Allan Hanna, Riverwind Foundation

The RRR Business Leaders (RRRBL) program is Jackson Hole’s green business recognition program and membership-based association that has been managed by Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling (ISWR) since 2006. The program has experienced a surge in membership in recent years, primarily due to its partnership with the Riverwind Foundation. Riverwind’s infusion of resources, including a rotating team of “Hotshots’’ recruiters and trainers and the option for advanced certification through the Business Emerald Sustainability Tier, or BEST Program. This renewed focus on the sustainable practices underway within local businesses and organizations has highlighted the potential that exists in the Jackson Hole community to do more. “There are nearly 200 current members poised to lead the way,” explains Riverwind Foundation Executive Director, Tim O’Donoghue. “All they need is an organizing framework to guide their efforts and channel their energy. RRRBL 2.0 provides that framework.” Teton County ISWR and the Riverwind Foundation have enlisted a steering committee of veteran RRRBL members from local businesses, nonprofits, and government entities to help design and lead the next chapter of the program. The committee’s vision for this next iteration is one in which the RRR Business Leaders becomes an actively engaged, self-sustaining, professional organization dedicated to sustainable business practices in Jackson Hole.

Welcome newest RRR Business Leader Give’r

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Specifically, the goal for RRRBL 2.0 is to create a program that: • is useful to members and positively impacts their ability to incorporate sustainable business practices • provides information and resources in all areas of sustainability (i.e. waste, water, transportation, energy, etc.) • generates support and member benefits in the areas of training, information/resources, marketing, and funding/grants • reaches out to new audiences and attracts new members • is coordinated with other community sustainability, resiliency, and climate action initiatives

INFO SESSION - SAVE THE DATE Learn more about RRRBL 2.0 April 20, 2021 11am-12pm via Zoom Open to members and non-members Watch for announcements and contact cbell@tetoncountywy.gov for more information.


Program Focus

Program Description

RRR Business Leaders Current Program

RRR Business Leaders 2.0

A sustainable business recognition program

Self-sustaining professional organization dedicated to sustainable business practices in Jackson Hole. Members are actively engaged in the leadership and direction of the program, and the focus is shifted toward information and resources.

• Membership-based association for businesses, nonprofits and government agencies.

• Membership-based association for businesses, nonprofits and government agencies.

• Managed by Teton County ISWR with support from the Riverwind Foundation.

• Managed by a committee of members in partnership with Teton County ISWR supported by the Riverwind Foundation.

• Member organizations receive community recognition and a variety of networking benefits.

Program Benefits

• Member organizations receive community recognition, a variety of networking benefits, quarterly information sharing presentations, and an annual internal grant award(s).

• Use of storefront decal signifying membership.

All previous promotional benefits, as well as:

• Use of an electronic logo signifying membership.

• The opportunity to actively engage with a membership of like-minded, sustainable businesses to identify resource topics and participate in quarterly information sharing presentations.

• Promotion via print, online, and radio media channels. • Recognition in regular RRR Business Leaders press releases and newsletters. • Listing in the online Road to Zero Waste Business Leaders Directory, including a link to your website. • A highlighted RRR listing in the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce Membership Directory. • Support and recognition for Zero Waste Green Event hosting, including zero waste advising, resources, and use of RRR Business Leaders banner and supplies.

• Eligibility in an annual internal grant award(s) in which a portion of membership dues are awarded to a member business(es) in support of expanded sustainable practices. • The opportunity to participate in the leadership and direction of the RRR Business Leaders program to voice the interests, goals, and needs of your organization in pursuit of more sustainable practices.

• Networking benefits, including invitations to annual RRR Business Leaders networking and educational events. • Eligibility for advanced recognition and sustainability certification through the Business Emerald Sustainability Tier or BEST program. • A 15% discount on electronics recycling, household hazardous waste disposal, and shredding services at the Teton County Recycling Center.

More information on membership benefits and how to schedule an appointment for a membership survey is available here. DOWNLOAD THIS PROGRAM FLYER


BEST PROGRAM FEATURE: SIGNAL MOUNTAIN LODGE ACHIEVES BEST CERTIFICATION

Forever Resort’s Signal Mountain Lodge has achieved the Business Emerald Sustainability Tier (BEST) level of sustainability performance from the Riverwind Foundation, originator of the BEST Program. The standards in the BEST program are comparable to the world’s most rigorous and comprehensive environmental, community, and economic sustainability criteria. Signal Mountain Lodge joins a growing group of businesses and organizations to achieve this third-party sustainability certification. The BEST program was created to provide an opportunity and platform for those Reduce, Reuse, Recycle (RRR) Business Leaders that want to elevate their sustainability practices to higher levels of environmental stewardship, social responsibility, and economic vitality. ”We commend our entire team on their efforts to create

a culture of sustainability over the last 20 years,” said Jason Ryan, general manager, Signal Mountain Lodge. “We appreciate Employee Health and Safety Coordinator Eric Hatch’s work toward spearheading and successfully completing the lengthy assessment process in his first year of leadership.” “Signal Mountain Lodge is a long-time sustainability leader that has shown innovation in its environmental management policies in its operations, staff training, and guest education” says Tim O’Donoghue, Executive Director of the Riverwind Foundation and coordinator of the Jackson Hole & Yellowstone Sustainable Destination Program. “In particular, Signal Mountain Lodge has led the way in normalizing best practices including but not limited to its management of purchasing and waste, natural resources and energy, and carbon emissions.

Curious about Signal Mountain Lodge’s Sustainability efforts? LEARN MORE

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MINI-FILM FESTIVAL AND ANNOUNCEMENTS Slow Food in the Tetons

Slow Food Online Marketplace Slow Food in the Tetons is pleased to announce that the Online Marketplace will officially continue into spring, summer, and fall 2021 and run concurrently with the Summer People’s Market and Farm Stand. We look forward to these and more opportunities to connect through local and regional, good, clean and fair food. Find out more about upcoming spring and summer programming at tetonslowfood.org

Slow Food Kids Cooking Classes and Summer Camps Year-round education programs for 3rd-8th graders. More information and registration at www.tetonslowfood.org/cooking-classes

Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling

Get a closer look at Teton County’s Road to Zero Waste. Thank you for Reducing, Reusing, Recycling, and Composting and helping to make Jackson Hole a more sustainable community!

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Hole Food Rescue Hole Food Rescue Reminder: Tips to reduce food waste... 1. Create an eat first zone in your fridge 2. Buy imperfect looking produce 3. Plan meals, make deliberate shopping lists 4. Make soup, casserole or quiche out of wilted produce 5. Freeze leftovers 6. Don’t misinterpret expiration labels, research what these mean. Remember the nose knows! 7. Learn tips to extend the shelf life of food at SaveTheFood.com 8. Compost

Yellowstone Teton Clean Cities Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities, Energy Conservation Works and the Town of Jackson held a ribbon-cutting celebration in January for the two new DC Fast Charging stations located in the parking garage in Jackson Hole, WY. This virtual event also marked the Town of Jackson’s commitment and progress regarding the adoption of electric vehicles.

Energy Conservation Works Lower Valley Energy and Energy Conservation Works have helped install more than 75,000 LED’s in our community. Make the switch to a smaller energy footprint today!

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ACHIEVEMENTS IN SUSTAINABLE DESTINATION MANAGEMENT IN JACKSON HOLE

SEND QUESTIONS, COMMENTS, AND TOPIC SUBMISSIONS FOR GREEN MATTERS TO MARIALLAN.HANNA@GMAIL.COM


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