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Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011

% of People Cycling to Work in Variuos LGAs 0.5 1.1 0.6

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Coolamon Griffith Gundagai Junee Lockhart Narrandera

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Tumut Shire Wagga Wagga

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Adopted by Wagga Wagga City Council at the April 2011 Council Meeting

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Contents Executive Summary 1. 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Introduction Background Our Vision Our Mission Aims Objectives

5 8 8 9 9 9 10

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Benefits of Cycling 2.1 Quadruple Bottom Line approach 2.1.1 Environment 2.1.2 Economic 2.1.3 Social / Health 2.1.4 Governance 2.2 Transport

11 11 11 11 12 13 13

3.

Bicycle Plan 2011 Context 3.1 Previous Bicycle Plan 3.2 National, State and Local Strategies

15 16 16

4.

Characteristics of the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area General Trip Generators 4.2.1 Main Shopping Centres 4.2.2 Transport Facilities 4.2.3 Schools and Educational Establishments 4.2.4 Sports Grounds and Recreational Area 4.2.5 Hospitals, Doctor and Dentist Surgeries 4.2.6 Places of Employment 4.3 Road Hierarchy

18 18 20 22 22 22 25 26 26 26

4.1 4.2

5. 5.1 5.2

6.

Data Collection and Analysis Journey to Work Data Reported Accident Analysis 5.2.1 Bicycle Crashes in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area 5.2.2 Accident Locations

Stakeholders and Community Consultation 6.1 Stakeholder Consultation 6.1.1 Bicycle Wagga Wagga 6.1.2 Wagga Wagga Cycling Club 6.1.3 Mountain Bike Wagga Wagga 6.1.4 Lake to Lagoon Family Cycle 6.1.5 Neighbouring Councils 6.2 Community Consultation 6.2.1 Community Workshops

29 29 31 32 32 35 35 35 35 36 36 36 37 37

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7.

6.3 Community Survey Results 6.3.1 Community Survey Results 6.3.2 Bicycle Plan Management Team field trip

37 37 39

Current Bicycle Network Issues 7.1 Generic Network Issues 7.2 Issues 7.2.1 Carriageway Shoulders 7.2.2 Intersections 7.2.3 Unclear Road Markings 7.2.4 Link from off-road to on-road Bicycle Lanes 7.2.5 Shared Road Shoulders 7.2.6 Signage

40 40 41 41 42 44 45 47 49

8. 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 9.

Maintenance of Bicycle Facilities Initial poor construction standards Bicycle lane and shared path cleaning Signage and Lane line / symbol marking Bicycle Lane/Shared path damage Other network maintenance considerations Bicycle Hazard Reporting

Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan Proposals and Design Guidelines 9.1 Bicycle Network Design Guidelines 9.1.1 Carriageway Shoulders 9.1.2 On-road Bicycle Facilities 9.1.3 Off-road Bicycle Facilities 9.1.4 Off-road to bicycle path to on-road bicycle lanes (shoulder lanes) transition 9.1.5 Treatment at Intersections 9.1.6 Green Cycle Surfacing 9.1.7 Signalised Intersections Storage Boxes 9.1.8 Roundabouts 9.1.9 Drain Covers 9.2 Bicycle Signage Plan 9.2.1 Types of bicycle signage 9.3 Links to New Development Areas 9.3.1 Estella West 9.3.2 Lloyd 9.3.3 Forest Hill / Brunslea Park 9.3.4 Springvale / Glenoak 9.4 Riverina Highlands Rail Trail

51 51 52 53 53 55 55 56 56 56 56 58 60 60 60 61 61 63 63 64 69 69 70 71 71 71

10. Bicycle Parking / End of Trip facilities 10.1 Location 10.2 Bicycle Parking Facilities 10.3 Parking Quantity

73 73 73 74

11.

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Bicycle Trail Routes

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12.

Funding and Costs 12.1 Existing Council Funding 12.2 External Funding Solutions

78 78 78

13.

Implementation Plan 13.1 Selection and Prioritisation 13.2 Implementation 13.2.1 Recommendations to expand the Bicycle Lane/Road Shoulder network. 13.2.2 Recommendations to expand the Shared Path network 13.2.3 Recommendations to develop Bicycle Parking facilities 13.2.4 Recommendations to install Bicycle Warning signage on long distance bicycle training routes

80 80 80

A Cycling Promotion Plan 14.1 Providing information to make it easier and safer to cycle 14.2 Encouraging Children to Ride to School 14.3 Encouraging Bicycle Tourism

84 84 85 86

14.

15.

80 82 82 83

Appendices

Appendix A

National, State and Local Strategies

Appendix B1-6

Bicycle Trip Generators

Appendix C

Existing and Proposed Bicycle Network Map

Appendix D

Current Bicycle Network issues / assessment

Appendix E

Location of existing and Proposed Bicycle Facilities within Wagga Wagga Suburbs

Appendix F

Bicycle Plan 2010 - Toolkit

Appendix G

Bicycle Signage and Pavement Markings

Appendix H

Proposed linkage of existing bicycle facilities

Appendix I

Recommendations to expand the Bicycle Lane network / Recommendations to expand the Shared Path network

Appendix J

Initial Aims, Objectives and Actions document

Appendix K

Community Survey Result

Appendix L

Mountain Bike Trail Maps for Willans Hill and Pomingalarna Park

Appendix M

Bicycle Parking information

Appendix N

Long Distance Cycling routes

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Executive Summary The primary focus of Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan is to set the Bicycle Network development priorities for the next 5 years and the standard to which they need to be carried out to. The Plan seeks to consider, and where possible address, the needs of the many types of cyclists that use the bicycle lanes, shared paths and roads in the region. Recommendations in relation to the development of the on-road Bicycle Lane / Shared Road Shoulder lanes, as well as off-road Shared Paths has been provided for the next 5 years (refer to the below tables). However, the initial focus should be on making the current on-road lanes compliant with RTA and Austroads standards. In order to do this an initial estimated expenditure of approximately $65,000 will be required to provide the necessary lane lines, symbol marking and signage required to make the existing lanes compliant. Further to the above, in order to provide a more complete on-road Bicycle Lane / Shared Road Shoulder network it is recommended that where possible without a significant requirement to change the nature of the road operating area new on-road bicycle lanes be marked in the identified locations within the map provided in Appendix C. This will result in the establishment of approximately 43km of new Bicycle Lanes/Shared Road Shoulder lanes in Wagga Wagga at an estimated cost of approximately $50,000 (excluding survey and design costs). Five (5) year Bicycle Lane development priority list Priority Bicycle lane / Road Shoulder location order 2011 / 2012 1 Kincaid St - Approximate length: 2km 2 Beckwith and Murray Streets - Approximate length: 2.3km 3 The Esplanade / Ivan Jack Dr / Morrow St - Approximate length: .920km 4 Brookong Ave - Approximate length: .740km 5 Travers St - Approximate length: 1.650km 6 Railway St - Approximate length: 1.050km 7 Macleay St - Approximate length: 1.500km 2012 / 2013 8 Gurwood Street - Approximate length: 1.8km 9 Mitchelmore St / Northcott Pde - Approximate length: 2.3km 10 Trevor St / Heath St / Macquarie St - Approximate length: 1.7km 11 Urana St - Approximate length: 2.120km 12 Wall St - Approximate length: 3km 2013 / 2014 13 Bourke Street service lanes – from Red Hill Rd to Fernleigh Rd - Approximate length: 1.950km 14 Fernleigh Road - Approximate length: 4.060km 15 Meadow St - Approximate length: .970km 16 Grove St / Warrawong St - Approximate length: 1.3km 17 Mount St / Kenneally St / Sherwood Ave / Kilpatrick St / Borona St Approximate length: 1.410km

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Priority Bicycle lane / Road Shoulder location order 2014 / 2015 18 Ziegler Ave - Approximate length: 1.200km 19 Fay Ave - Approximate length: 1.640km 20 Ashmont Ave - Approximate length: 1.260km 21 Bulolo St - Approximate length: .870km 22 Tobruk St - Approximate length: .900km 2015 / 2016 23 Henwood Ave - Approximate length: 1.090km 24 Stanley St - Approximate length: 1.320km 25 Avocet Dr - Approximate length: .950km 26 Gunn Dr - Approximate length: .730km 27 Berembee Rd - Approximate length: .750km 28 Bourkelands Dr - Approximate length: .870km Five (5) year Shared Path development priority list Priority Shared path location / Comments regarding required works order 2011/12 1 Riverside levee bank path - Approximate length: 3.620km 2012/13 2 Kooringal Road between Wagga Wagga Christian College and Lake Albert – Approximate length: 3.5km 2013/14 4 2014/15 5 6 2015/16 7 8 9

CBD to CSU – Stage 1 – Approximate length: 2.5km CBD to CSU – Stage 2 – Approximate length: 2.5km Edmundson St / Best St – Approximate length: 1.5km Glenfield Rd between Fernleigh Rd and Urana St Approximate length: 400m Leavenworth Drive between Malaya Dr and Bourke St – Approximate length: .740km Kooringal Rd from Lake Albert Road roundabout to Plumpton Road Roundabout – Approximate length 400m

In addition to the above further recommendations in relation to the cleaning of the network and the provision of Bicycle Parking infrastructure has been provided. Within the Plan it is recommended that a budget bid for the amount of $7000 be provide to allow four (4) full cleans of the entire existing bicycle network per year. Also, it is recommended that an amount of $10,000 per annum over the next five years be allocated to the development of Bicycle Parking facilities with the focus being on the provision of bicycle lockers in the CBD area to cater for commuter cyclists who require secure longer stay parking. It should also be noted that the existing sealed Shared Path network requires lane lines and symbols to be marked on the pavement, and where appropriate signage is not already in place this element to be addressed also. Given the surface finish of the

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majority of the Shared Paths in Wagga Wagga with a crushed granite surface, which is not particularly suitable for line marking, it is estimated that approximately only 5km of Shared Paths require marking currently. This length of line marking and the marking of on pavement symbols would come to an approximate total cost of $14,000. Finally, it is recommended that the installation of Bicycle Warning Signage on identified rural roads should occur. In addition to Bicycle Warning Signage the future installation of simple destination maps providing information on cycling distances at pre-determined intersections is recommended to provide for cycling tourism opportunities, in addition to catering for long distance and/or training cyclists. It is recommended that an amount of $10,000 per annum over the next five years be allocated to the development of Bicycle Warning Signage and destination maps on long distance cycling routes.

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1. Introduction The City of Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 builds on the Wagga Wagga Bikeway Plan 1998. The 2011 Plan includes surveys of the existing network, community and stakeholder consultation and a review of background documentation, plus bench marking with other regional cities of similar demographic nature. The Wagga Wagga Bikeway Plan 2011 consolidates previous bicycle strategies for Wagga Wagga prepared in 1992 and revised in 1998. The principal aim of the Wagga Wagga Bikeway Plan 2011 is to review the status of the bicycle facilities in Wagga Wagga and to identify the work required to provide an improved network of bicycle facilities within the Wagga Wagga region. The development of some on and off road facilities has come about as a result of the earlier 1998 Bikeway Plan. However, considerable barriers remain to cycling in Wagga Wagga, including major roads, rail lines, creeks and rivers, intersections, traffic volumes, speed and lack of continuity and accessibility to the existing bicycle network. It is a combination of these factors and limited funding for maintenance and improved infrastructure that causes most difficulty for cyclists. The preparation of the 2011 Plan will allow Council to integrate bicycles into current planning and development frameworks with the potential to instigate major changes in transport management and land use, such as CBD development and the growth of various subdivisions. Special thanks is extended to the Bicycle Plan Management Team which consisted of a group of Councillors, Volunteer local cycling enthusiasts and Council officers that met on a regular basis to help guide and formulate the 2011 Plan in line with the RTA How to Prepare a Bicycle Plan – An easy 3 stage guide.

1.1 Background Council can contribute significantly to making cycling within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area safer and easier, not only through improved infrastructure and maintenance, but just as importantly through educational and promotional initiatives. Council’s aim is to encourage more cycling for all purposes, particularly for local trips where the use of vehicles increases pollution and congestion unnecessarily. Although it is noted that the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area presents many challenges for cyclists, it is still important that Council makes appropriate provision for cyclists and raises its priority to better reflect Council and the State Government policies for a sustainable environment and a better integrated transport system. With the provision of necessary funding Wagga Wagga City Council can substantially raise the profile of cycling and the use of bicycles within the area. The objective of Council is therefore to develop a Bicycle Plan for the Wagga Wagga area that reflects the current needs of the community through providing a program of works and maintenance for the next 5-10 years.

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It should be recognised that a member of the Bicycle Plan Management Team prepared a comprehensive list of potential aims, objectives and actions for the Team to consider and which formed the foundation for the development of the below items. Refer to Appendix J for a copy of this document.

1.2 Our Vision The vision for cycling in the Wagga Wagga City Council area is: “To create an environment where cycling is an easy, enjoyable and convenient way to get about, where there are no barriers, and everyone has the confidence and desire to simply “pick up a bike and go” whenever they feel like it. “ To achieve this vision will require a prolonged effort from Council and other interested stakeholders in order to increase the levels of cycling within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area.

1.3 Our Mission To provide a foundation plan which fosters the development of integrated bicycle facilities for the City of Wagga Wagga that links suburbs and destinations, and ensures that current and future development and planning makes provision for a bicycle friendly city. Provision of a plan for maintenance of the network and to help grow Wagga Wagga as a bicycle friendly city is also required.

1.4 Aims The aims of the Plan are to: • Develop and maintain a high quality network of bicycle routes which cater for a range of cyclist types, connect to the main trip generators and are easy and safe to navigate; • Remove major barriers to cycling through the development of bicycle infrastructure proposals; • Provide an appropriate level of signage for the proposed bicycle network which is easy to understand, designed to current standards, consistent in its implementation and does not cause unnecessary street confusion; • Promote the positive benefits of bicycle usage to the community and specific community groups, particularly for shorter trips, as well as cyclist safety and protection; • Ensure that current and future city suburb development and planning makes provision for suitable shared paths/bicycle lanes; • Ensure that all future traffic management proposals are bicycle friendly in their design and implementation;

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• Provide an appropriate level and standard of bicycle parking and other facilities; • Adhere to the RTA and Austroads (Part 14) guidelines for shared paths and on-road bicycle lanes;

1.5 Objectives The key objectives of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 are: 1. Improving the continuity, safety and accessibility of cycling (through improved maintenance of the bicycle network); 2. Improving linkages between communities and key destinations within the city. 3. Meeting the directions and outcomes of the Wagga Wagga Integrated Movement Study (2008) and Community Social Plan 2009 – 2013. 4. Raising community awareness of the importance of cycling and encouraging community involvement in planning for and providing bicycle facilities. 5. Promote the enjoyment of cycling for health, friendship, recreation and transport in the community. 6. Promote recognition of cyclists’ needs, rights and responsibilities. 7. Promote cycling safety through the education of all road users. 8. Increase the number of cyclists. A high quality and highly visible cycling network around and through the City will invite people to consider cycling for their transport needs in this area.

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2.

Benefits of Cycling

Wagga Wagga City Council recognises that cycling is one of the most efficient forms of transport that exists, having significant health, environmental and economic benefits. On this basis some further information in relation to the benefits associated with cycling are provided below.

2.1

Quadruple Bottom Line approach

Wagga Wagga City Council takes what is called a Quadruple Bottom Line approach when reviewing the pro’s and con’s associated with a particular topic or initiative. The Quadruple Bottom Line approach ensures that the following areas are addressed / considered prior to proceeding with such an item: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Environmental Economic Social Governance

Each of the Quadruple Bottom Line items is addressed below in relation to the Bicycle Plan. 2.1.1 Environment Motor vehicles are a major source of air and noise pollution in Australian cities. About half of the greenhouse gas emissions produced by an average Australian household each year are from transport. Cycling is one of the ways that a household can significantly and effectively reduce its contribution to the pollution that causes climate change. The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions has become an issue of primary concern in the community and amongst all levels of government. Cycling is an ideal contribution to overcoming this problem. It represents a zero emission form of transport and is therefore capable of providing significant environmental benefits. 2.1.2 Economic Cycling provides economic benefit in terms of improved public health, reduced levels of traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as reductions in expenditure on transport fuel. Vehicle expense (15.5 per cent) is second only to food (18.2 per cent) as the largest item of household expenditure in Australia. The family car costs up to 55 cents per kilometre to run. In comparison, the cost of buying and maintaining a bike is around one per cent of the cost of buying and maintaining a car. * Cycling 10km each way to work each day will save approximately $1700 per year in transport costs (including all running costs and depreciation). Also, bicycle parking is usually free, easily accessible and more convenient than car parking. * * Reference: Department of Transport and Main Road

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Bicycle events such as Mountain Bike and Road Race events can attract large crowds of participants and accompanying partners alike, and as such can generate substantial tourism income into the local economy. Additionally, the tourism income generation potential of having easily access recreational bicycle trails (such as rail trails that are in operation in other states in Australia) has proven economic benefits for local communities. 2.1.3 Social / Health Cycling enables people to interact socially and feel more at home in their local community. Increased cycling and walking provides people with additional opportunities for social interaction on the streets and this enhances a sense of community. Additionally more bicycle usage in a neighbourhood provides a safer road environment by reducing traffic.* Cycling can provide economic and independent travel for those who might otherwise have their travel options restricted. It offers increased mobility to many groups of the population with low rates of car ownership, such as low income earners, unemployed people, seniors and those under 18 years of age.* Shared cycling and pedestrian facilities also create benefits for pedestrians and people with disabilities by providing an increased network of paths and improved road crossings. Cycling enables people to interact socially and feel more at home in their local community. With increased incidence of obesity in the community in all age groups there is a strong need to ensure that not only the promotion of cycling as an alternative mode of transportation occurs, but that the opportunity to cycle to various destinations is made as convenient as possible through the development of the bicycle network.* * Reference: Department of Transport and Main Road A significant proportion of the population does not participate in the necessary levels of physical activity to protect against sedentary lifestyle diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Cycling has been shown to significantly reduce the chance of developing these and other types of disease. Integrating cycling into everyday life, by using the bicycle as a form of transport has been shown to be a very sustainable method of regular physical activity.* In recent decades, changes in Australian lifestyles, urban environments and transportation systems have led to changed physical activity patterns among children. A substantial number of Australian children are insufficiently active. The Australian Department of Health and Ageing recommends that children should accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day.* Active transport has a potential to make a substantial contribution to children’s daily physical activity. Children who actively commute to school have higher levels of physical activity, improved cardiovascular fitness and better maintenance of healthy weight compared to those who do not walk or cycle to school.* * Reference: ‘Active Transport: children and young people’ 2009.

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2.1.4 Governance The 2011 Plan has been put together through the efforts of the Wagga Wagga Bike Plan Management Team which consists of community representatives from different areas of expertise and involvement in the bicycle world, as well as Councillor and Council officer representation. It is important to recognise the efforts of this group who gave their time and input freely to help develop the new 2011 Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan. The formation of the 2011 Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan came under the responsibility of the Parks and Recreation Division of Council which sits under the Environmental & Community Services Directorate. Implementation and development of the recommendations of the Bicycle Plan with respect to physical assets (i.e. development of shared paths, bicycle lanes, road markings, signage etc) will be the responsibility of the Infrastructure Services Directorate. Implementation and promotion of Bicycle Plan initiatives/recommendations (i.e. promotion of cycling, future planning of links between destinations etc), as well as assisting Infrastructure Services with planning for the development of the physical assets will be managed through the Parks and Recreation Division of Council. In addition to the above, regular liaison with the Town Planning section of Council will be required to ensure that consideration is given to the provision of sufficient space for bicycle infrastructure as part of any new development / subdivision or road. It has been suggested that this initiative goes as far as making it compulsory for all new subdivisions/developments to have well constructed bicycle paths/lanes and footpaths throughout and connecting their subdivision to surrounding suburbs which the developer pays for. It is recognised that there are numerous existing documents both within Wagga Wagga City Council and external that either promote the benefits of more bicycle usage and developing comprehensive bicycle networks. A list of those documents is provided below in section 3. To ensure that the new Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan remains a “living� document and the recommendations and initiatives listed within such remain current, and are implemented, continued community involvement will be necessary. In order to achieve this is it recommended that annual meetings of the Bike Plan Management Team occur to assess the progress of the Bike Plan recommendations, provide feedback and to assist with the forward planning of identified shared path/bicycle lane developments.

2.2 Transport Maintaining and improving the transport network costs the Australian government an average of $27 million every working day. The estimated costs of congestion are $5 billion per year. More bikes and less cars on the road can reduce this congestion and its associated costs.* Bikes and cycling facilities can extend the catchments of existing public transport services. On average, 10 times more households are within cycling distance of public transport than are within walking distance.*

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The majority of car trips to school are within walking distance. Cycling or walking these trips significantly reduces congestion around schools and improves safety for children. To achieve a 75 per cent increase in cycling trips, each person in Australia would have to substitute only two car trips per month with cycling.* Bicycles offer door-to-door service because they can be parked closer to destinations than cars. They are often quicker than cars over short distances of up to 5 km.* * Reference: Department of Transport and Main Road

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3. Bicycle Plan 2011 Context In Australia the policy focus on the climate, pollution, the promotion of local accessibility, and on personal health, has been continuously highlighted in recent years. An increase in cycling can be a central factor in offering an environmentally sustainable and health promoting local transport option. Over the years moves to highlight the role of cycling in the community have been considered in a series of key strategic Government policy documents and guidelines as follows: • • • • • • •

National Cycling Strategy 2005-2010 NSW Bike Plan 2010 NSW Action for Bikes 2010 The Bicycle Parking Handbook Planning Guidelines for Walking and Cycling (Department of Planning) RTA (NSW) Bicycle Guidelines AustRoads Part 14 – Bicycles

At a local level Councils are also developing policies and plans which aim to encourage and promote cycling or reduce dependency on car travel. Some of the local level Council documents that were reviewed as part of the research for the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 are: • • • •

Albury Bicycle Plan 2009 – 2014 Greater Shepparton Bicycle Strategy 2006 Sydney Bike Plan Junee Bike Plan 1999

Key Wagga Wagga City Council documents which are related to the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Integrated Movement Study 2008 Community Social Plan 2009-2013 Bikeways Plan 1998 Section 94 Contribution Plan Recreation and Open Space Strategy 2005 – 2015 Pedestrian Access and Mobility Plan 2010 (PAMP) Discovering Wagga Wagga Bikeways (2000) Riverside Wagga Wagga City Council 2010 Which Way Wagga Vision 2030 Tourism Strategy 2007 – 2010 Community Survey Results 2009 Grow Wagga Wagga 2008 – 2018 Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010. Draft Footpath Plan 2010 Wagga Wagga Spatial Plan 2008 Council’s Asset Management Plan

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3.1 Previous Bicycle Plan The City of Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 builds on the Wagga Wagga Bikeway Plan 1998. The development of this Plan has included detailed surveys of the existing network, community and stakeholder consultation and a review of background documentation. The principal aim of the 1998 Bikeways Plan was to review the status of the bicycle facilities in Wagga Wagga and to identify the work required to provide an improved network of bicycle facilities within the Local Government Area. The Bikeways Plan 1998 put forward a number of recommendations, the three (3) priority recommendations from that document were: 1. To recommend the implementation of at least 15 bicycle routes and parking/end of trip facilities within a five to ten year period, 2. To fund the proposed bicycle facilities jointly between Wagga Wagga City Council and other sources such as the RTA, Department of Sport, Arts and Environment, the corporate sector, community groups and service clubs, 3. Once the facilities are provided, establish an ongoing maintenance and sweeping program to remove hazardous debris. The 1998 Plan recommended the following on-road and off-road bicycle routes: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

CBD to Kooringal, Alternative route Lake Albert access, CBD routes, Charles Sturt University / North Wagga to CBD, Bourke Street, Forest Hill to Lake Albert, Glenfield Park to Turvey Park, Wagga Wagga to Mount Austin, Kapooka to Wagga Wagga, Mount Austin to Glenfield Park, Ashmont to Turvey Park and CBD, Glenfield Park to Lake Albert, Recreational Routes (Lake Albert, proposed Northern Lake, Apex Park, Willans Hill, Botanical Gardens, Memorial Gardens, Wollundry Lagoon, Rawlings Park), • Gregadoo Loop

3.2 National, State and Local Strategies The Commonwealth and New South Wales Governments have produced a number of documents that support the development of sustainable transport networks and promote the use of public transport, walking and cycling as alternatives to the use of cars. Refer to Appendix A for relevant National, State and Local Transport Policies, Legislation, and other documents.

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Guidance documents for the development of the 2011 Bicycle Plan are: • AustRoads Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice – Part 14 Bicycles; and, • Relevant Australian Standards, with particular reference to bicycle parking and signing (AS2890.3 and AS1742.9).

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4. Characteristics of the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area 4.1 General The Wagga Wagga Local Government Area (LGA) is located in the Riverina Region in south-western New South Wales (NSW), and has a population of approximately 60,600 people. It has a total land area of 486,600 hectares of which 98 percent is used for agricultural purposes. The LGA is made up of the City of Wagga Wagga and the villages of Collingullie, Currawarna, Galore, Humula, Ladysmith, Mangoplah, Oura, Tarcutta, Uranquinty and surrounding farmland. Wagga Wagga is well placed, being strategically located between Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. Its location provides a significant central distribution point with good road and rail infrastructure to the major cities in south eastern Australia. Wagga Wagga plays a major regional service centre role with significant business and retail activity, as well as, providing significant social and economic infrastructure such as hospitals, education and social services. Wagga Wagga continues to be the regional focus for major businesses attracting new industries, regional government offices, activities associated with the Charles Sturt University, health facilities, the RAAF Base at Forest Hill and the Kapooka Army Base, and has strong retail and agricultural sectors. In addition, it also has major regional cultural and social facilities such as, the Oasis Regional Aquatic Centre, Civic Theatre and Wagga Art Gallery. Refer to Map 4.1 below for an image of the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area.

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Map 4.1

Wagga Wagga Local Government Area

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4.2 Trip Generators Bicycle trip generators are defined as locations where cyclists like to cycle to, such as parks, recreation facilities, shopping centres, educational establishments, places of work and recreational cycling tracks. The main trip generators for the Wagga Wagga LGA and nearby surrounds were identified through discussions with members of the cycling clubs, consultation with the community at the public workshop and during the various site visits when compiling the Bicycle Plan. Local trip generators are important items to consider within the context of the Bicycle Plan and were identified prior to the review of the bicycle network. This will ensure that the bicycle routes will, where possible, pass trip generators and will therefore be used by cyclists. Some key bicycle trip generators in Wagga Wagga include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Murrumbidgee River Wagga Wagga Beach Wagga Wagga Swimming Centre – Oasis Bolton Park Skate Park Charles Sturt University Kapooka Army Base Wagga Wagga RAAF Base, Forest Hill Lake Albert Foreshores, recreational path and exercise equipment Apex Park, Lake Albert Wiradjuri Walking Trail Botanic Gardens Wagga Wagga CBD and Shopping Centre Kooringal Shopping Centre South City Shopping Centre Bolton Park Willans Hill Jubilee Park Wagga Cricket Ground / Wagga Cycling Track All local schools TAFE NSW Riverina Institute

Refer to Map 4.2 below for an image of the majority of the primary Trip Generators in the Wagga Wagga area.

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Map 4.2

Wagga Wagga Trip Generators

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4.2.1 Main Shopping Centres The main shopping centre for Wagga Wagga is the Baylis Street area which becomes Fitzmaurice Street at the northern end. Together with other surrounding streets Baylis Street forms the central business district which includes two shopping centres (Wagga Wagga Marketplace and Sturt Mall) and also many cafes, bars and restaurants where Wagga Wagga community members do their general shopping but also where they come to socialise. In the southern part of Wagga Wagga there are many suburban shopping centres such as the South City Shopping Centre in Glenfield Park, the Turvey Tops Shopping Centre in Turvey Park, the Lake Village Shopping Centre in Lake Albert, the Tolland Shopping Centre and the Kooringal Mall. There is also a shopping centre in Forest Hill, and a new shopping centre planned for Estella. Refer to Appendix B-1 for a map of the locations of the main shopping centres. 4.2.2 Transport Facilities There are three main transport facilities within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area where bicycle access should be maximised: • Wagga Wagga Railway Station on Station Place – which provides fast rail connection with Sydney and Melbourne. • Bus/Coach Terminal on Station Place. • Wagga Wagga Airport at Forest Hill has scheduled daily flights to Sydney and Melbourne through two carriers, Regional Express and Qantas-Link. Additionally, Busabout Wagga Wagga provides bus services from most Wagga Wagga suburbs to the CBD, and Wagga Radio Cabs run taxis 24 hours a day throughout the city with taxi ranks located at Station Place, Forsyth Street, Gurwood Street, Wagga Wagga Base Hospital and the Kooringal Mall. Refer to Appendix B-2 for a map of the locations of transport facilities. 4.2.3 Schools and Educational Establishments There are 27 schools within the Wagga Wagga area. Four are located in Wagga Wagga, one in North Wagga, one in Boorooma, one in Kapooka, two in Ashmont, one in Tolland, one in Tatton, two in Lake Albert, five in Kooringal, six in Turvey Park, three in Mount Austin, and one in Forest Hill. Refer to Table 3.2.3 for a list of all schools within Wagga Wagga. A major provider of higher education in Wagga Wagga is the local campus of the Charles Sturt University, located on the outskirts of the suburb of Estella. The TAFE NSW Riverina Institute also has its headquarters in Wagga Wagga. The National Aerospace Training Centre of Excellence, at the Forest Hill RAAF Base provides training support to the Australian Defence Force Aerospace traineeship program. The University of Sydney provides medical training at the Wagga Wagga Base Hospital.

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Schools and other educational establishments represent an area of real importance and opportunity for cycling, as encouraging and promoting cycling at an early age can lead to a continuation of cycling in future years not to mention the immediate health benefits. Refer to Table 4.2.1 below for a list of the schools in the Wagga Wagga LGA. Table 4.2.1

Wagga Wagga Local Government Area – List of Schools and educational establishments

School Name

Location

Suburb

Bardina St

Ashmont

2. Collingullie Public School

Urana St

Collingullie

3. Forest Hill Public School

Sturt Hwy

Forest Hill

4. Henschke Primary School

103 Fernleigh Rd

Mount Austin

5. Holy Trinity Primary School

13 Bardina St

Ashmont

6. Humula Public School

School St

Humula

7. Kapooka Primary School

Sturt Ave

Kapooka

8. Kildare Catholic College

Coleman St

Turvey Park

9. Kooringal Public School

Lake Albert Rd

Kooringal

10. Kooringal High School

Ziegler Ave

Kooringal

Main St

Lake Albert

Kyeamba St

Mangoplah

328 Gregadoo Rd

Lake Albert

1. Ashmont Public School

11. Lake Albert Primary School 12. Mangoplah Public School 13. Mater Dei Catholic Primary School & College

23


14. Mount Austin Primary School

Bourke St

Mount Austin

Leavenworth Dr

Mount Austin

Hampden Ave

North Wagga

235-245 Lake Albert Rd

Kooringal

129 Fernleigh Rd

Turvey Park

19. South Wagga Public School

140 Edward St

Wagga Wagga

20. St Joseph’s Primary School

Johnston St

Wagga Wagga

White Ave

Kooringal

22. Tarcutta Public School

Centenary Avenue

Tarcutta

23. The Riverina Anglican

Farrer Rd

Boorooma

Hawkes Pl

Tolland

31 Halloran St

Turvey Park

26. Uranquinty Public School

Pearson St

Uranquinty

27. Wagga Wagga Adventist

75 Coleman St

Turvey Park

401 Kooringal Rd

Kooringal

Coleman St

Turvey Park

15. Mount Austin High School 16. North Wagga Public School 17. Sacred Heart Primary School 18. Shepherds Park School

21. Sturt Public School

College 24. Tolland Public School 25. Turvey Park Primary School

Primary School 28. Wagga Wagga Christian College 29. Wagga Wagga High School

24


30. Wagga Wagga Lutheran

1 Tamar Dr

Tatton

Gurwood St

Wagga Wagga

Lord Baden Powell Dr

Kooringal

Boorooma Street

Estella

Macleay St

Turvey Park

Gurwood Street

Central

School 31. Wagga Wagga Public School 32. Willans Hill School 33. Charles Sturt University 34. TAFE NSW Riverina Institute 35. Blessed Mary McKillop

Refer to Appendix B-3 for a map of the location of the main educational establishments within the Wagga Wagga area. 4.2.4 Sports Grounds and Recreational Areas The Wagga Wagga Local Government Area offers a large range of sporting facilities for residents and visitors, including athletics, Australian football, basketball, cricket, equestrian, golf, netball, rugby league, rugby union, soccer, softball, swimming and tennis amongst others. There are over 100 community sports and recreation clubs which utilise grounds and facilities directly managed by Council, private sports clubs, sporting associations/leagues, schools or the private sector. Refer to Appendix B-4 for a map of the locations of the main sports grounds and recreational areas. The Wagga Wagga Local Government Area also offers a large range of recreational open space areas, such as parks, reserves and gardens, which include major car parking infrastructure, picnic/BBQ areas, attractive landscaped areas, shade structures where natural shade is not available, and a major all-age playground. One such area is the Lake Albert recreation precinct. It is a popular place for boating, fishing, swimming, walking/cycling & children’s play. Lake Albert is the perfect place for family activities. Other examples of open space areas within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area are: • • • • •

Botanic Gardens & Zoo Victory Memorial Gardens Wagga Beach Wollundry Lagoon Pomingalarna Park / Brick Kiln Reserve / Willans Hill / Plum Pudding Reserve / Silvalite Reserves

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• The Murrumbidgee River • Wiradjuri Walking Track 4.2.5 Hospitals, Doctors and Dentist Surgeries Doctors and dentists surgeries have been recognised as trip generators across the area and with numerous providers distributed throughout Wagga Wagga, there is the likelihood for trips to be of a short distance and suitable for travel by bicycle by some patrons. Refer to Appendix B-5 for a map of the locations of the main hospitals and doctors surgeries. 4.2.6 Places of Employment Wagga Wagga is the regional hub for public and professional services throughout southern NSW and is the business capital of the Riverina region. Major industries in the City include Retail, Defence, Health, Education and Agriculture and with a large population catchment, small business opportunities abound for self-employed people or those contemplating starting their own business. Major international and national companies such as Buckman Laboratories, Cargill Australia, Heinz Watties, Toll, BOC Gases, Vinidex, and Charles Sturt University have a presence in Wagga Wagga and are major employers. So to are jobs provided by the regional headquarters for TAFE; various State and Federal agencies; private, public and allied health providers; Army, Navy and Air Force; agribusiness providers and an extensive list of institutions providing primary and secondary education. Refer to Appendix B-6 for a map of the locations of the main places of employment.

4.3 Road Hierarchy Road transport planning professionals recognise several different road classification systems and road types. In the development of a road hierarchy, generally four main classifications of roads are considered. These are: 1. State/Arterial Roads – Predominantly carry through traffic from one region to another, forming principal commuting avenues for urban traffic movements. Smooth and safe traffic flow is the priority on these roads. 2. Regional/Sub Arterial Roads – connect the arterial roads of development and carry traffic directly from one part of a region to another. They may also relieve traffic on arterial roads in some circumstances. 3. Collector Roads – connect the sub arterial roads to the local road system. 4. Local Roads – access roads to properties. The City of Wagga Wagga is supported by an appropriate road network system. The Sturt Highway functions as a major east-west corridor while the Olympic Highway provides a major north – south connection. These routes also provide regional and

26


interstate connections. North – south movements within Wagga Wagga are supported by a number of roads such as Holbrook-Glenfield Road, Bourke – Docker Street, Plumpton – Lake Albert Road and Kooringal Road as well as Hampden Avenue and Byrnes Road. Other roads such as Lloyd Road, Gregadoo Road, Brunskill Road, Red Hill Road, Leavenworth Drive, Fernleigh Road, Ashmont Avenue, Kincaid Street, Travers Street, Urana Street and Gardiner and Mill Streets provide connections for east-west movements. The street pattern within Wagga Wagga indicates that the north-south links are more direct and well established in comparison to east-west connections where routes are generally limited between two major streets. Refer to Map 4.3 below for an image of the Main Road Hierarchy within the Wagga Wagga LGA.

27


Map 4.3

Main roads in Wagga Wagga Local Government Area

28


5. Data Collection and Analysis This section provides valuable supporting information for the development and justification of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011, in particular it gives an indication of the current level of cycling in the Wagga Wagga area. Background data has contributed to the development of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011. This included accident analysis and a review of available ABS Census and Community Survey information.

5.1 Journey to Work Data Journey to work data was obtained from the New South Wales Government – Department of Transport website at http://www.transport.nsw.gov.au/tdc/statistics-lgamurrumbidgee.html. This data was prepared in 2006 by the Bureau of Transport Statistics for Murrumbidgee Statistical Division (SD). The data showed that 1.1% of people in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area travelled to work by bicycle this is compared to 0.5% of people in the Coolamon area, 0.6% in the Griffith area, 0.5% in the Gundagai area, 0.2% in the Junee area, 0.8% in the Lockhart area, 0.5% in the Narrandera area and 0.4% in the Tumut Shire statistical area. Table 5.1.1 below provides comparison data between Wagga Wagga and adjacent areas on the methods people use to travel to work, additionally Table 5.1.2 below shows the percentage of people that travel to work by bicycle in the Wagga Wagga and adjacent areas. Table 5.1.1

Method of Travel

Comparison of the number of people travelling to work within the Wagga Wagga and the adjacent Local Government Areas.

Coolamon

Griffith

Gundagai

Junee

Lockhart

Narrandera

Tumut Shire

Wagga Wagga

Train

-

-

4

-

-

-

3

3

Bus

7

48

7

3

-

-

9

215

Taxi

-

27

-

-

-

6

10

Car, as driver

878

7,264

882

1,151

676

1,416

2,814

17,757

Car, as passenger

96

861

104

152

49

144

368

1,876

Truck

43

204

50

46

37

51

122

345

Motorbike

12

107

10

6

14

14

51

224

Bicycle

6

58

6

3

8

9

14

260

Walked

132

513

113

154

147

213

297

1,642

Other

14

101

23

21

15

27

41

245

1,188

9,183

1,199

1,536

946

1,880

3,729

22,643

TOTAL:

76

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Table 5.1.2

Percentage of people travelled to work by bicycle in Wagga Wagga and adjacent Local Government Areas.

% ofCycling PeopletoCycling WorkLocal in Variuos LGAs Areas % of People Work into Various Government 0.5 1.1 0.6

Coolamon 0.5

0.4

0.2

0.5

Griffith Gundagai Junee Lockhart Narrandera Tumut Shire Wagga Wagga

0.8

Source: Key Socio-Demographic and Transport Indicators by Local Government Areas (LBA),2006. NSW Government – Department of Transport.

The following table (Table 5.1.3) provides figures for comparison between Wagga Wagga and other regional centres within New South Wales and Victoria. While it is difficult to determine if those centres listed have a similar standard of Bicycle Network to Wagga Wagga without thorough research and comparison, it is reasonable to mention that Shepparton in Victoria has a very comprehensive Bicycle Strategy and it would be reasonable to suggest that this is having an influence on their figures being better. Table 5.1.3

Comparison of Wagga Wagga’s percentage of people that travel to work by bicycle with other similar sized cities (Source: 2006 ABS Census information) Location Population LGA % people travel to work via bike (2006 ABS Census (2006 ABS Census information) Information) Wagga Wagga 57,012 1.1 Albury 46,282 1.7 Armidale 23,368 1.4 Ballarat (Vic) 85,194 1.5 Bathurst 37,508 1.9 Bendigo (Vic) 93,253 1.5 Coffs Harbour 64,911 1.4 Orange 35,338 1.1 Shepparton (Vic) 57,089 2.22 Tamworth 53,592 0.8

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The following table (Table 5.1.4) provides some examples from overseas of the impacts of sound and persistent Bicycle Planning and the resulting increases in bicycle usage, and riding to work. Table 5.1.4 Examples of overseas efforts to increase bicycle usage (Source: http://www.virgin-vacations.com/11-most-bike-friendly-cities.aspx) Location Example Copenhagen, Currently 32% of workers ride to work and 50 percent say they Denmark ride to work because it is fast and easy. The city's bicycle paths (Population: 1.8M) are extensive and well-used. Bicycle paths are often separated from the main traffic lanes and sometimes have their own signal systems. One city neighbourhood is completely car-free. Boulder, Colorado, Great public programs that help promote safe biking and USA (Population: encourage its use such as Boulder Safe Routes to School pilot program. One school reported that 75 percent of their students 101,500) walked or biked to school — a 620 percent increase from before the pilot. More than 4,000 people participate in Boulder’s Bike to Work Day. Davies, California, This city has over 100 miles of bike lanes and bike paths. 17% of USA (Population: Davis residents commute to work on bicycles. Davis was one of 65,000): the first cities in the U.S. to actively start planning for and incorporating the bicycle into its transportation infrastructure. Portland, Oregon, Portland’s bicycle network has grown from 60 to 260 miles since USA (Population: the early 1990s. Bicycle use has quadrupled over the same 533,000) period without any increase in crashes. The city still has 38 miles of bike lanes left in order to achieve its master plan. But in some neighborhoods bike commuters are as high as 9%.

5.2 Reported Accidents Analysis The crash statistics recorded by the Roads and Traffic Authority, and included in this Bicycle Plan, are confined to those crashes which conform to the national guidelines for reporting and classifying road vehicle crashes. The main criteria are: 1. 2. 3. 4.

The crash was reported to the police The crash occurred on a road open to the public The crash involved at least one moving road vehicle The crash involved at least one person being killed or injured or at least one motor vehicle being towed away.

It is recognised that a substantial proportion of non-fatal bicycle crashes are not reported to the police. As the NSW Police Force is the only source of crash notification used, crash statistics recorded by the Roads and Traffic Authority relating to bicycle crashes may not accurately reflect the actual situation. In accordance with ‘Road Traffic Crashes in NSW 2008’ information prepared by the New South Wales Centre for Road Safety there was 42,833 recorded road crashes in NSW during 2008 (374 persons were killed and 24,048 were injured). During 2008, in

31


bicycle crashes in New South Wales 8 persons were killed and 1,121 were injured. Four of those 8 killed cyclists, and at least 17% of those injured failed to wear a helmet. 5.2.1 Bicycle Crashes in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area Bicycle Casualty Accident data for all accidents involving a cyclist for the five year period from 2004 to 2008 inclusive, was analysed. The information was derived from RTA Statistics, accident statistics and mapping programs. Over the five year period between 2004 and 2008 there were 51 injury accidents involving cyclists in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. None of these accidents resulted in the death of the cyclist but all 51 resulted in serious and less severe injury. Refer to Table 5.2.1 below for bicycle crash figures for the years between and including 2004 to 2008. Table 5.2.1

Number of bicycle crashes in Wagga Wagga LGA over the period from 2004 to 2008.

Bicycle Crashes in theCrashes Wagga Wagga Local Government Bicycle in Wagga Wagga Area LGA(2004 – 2008)

14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

13

Number of Crashes 12

10

10 6

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Year

5.2.2 Accident Locations Of all recorded bicycle accidents 56.9% (29) occurred at intersections, 43.1% (22) occurred at other locations on the road. All accident sites are shown graphically on Table 5.2.2a. The site with the greatest number of accidents is the Best Street / Thompson Street & Bourke Street / Urana Street intersections where 2 accidents on each intersection occurred. Several accidents were recorded along all the main roads within the municipality, specifically the Sturt Highway, Olympic Highway, Lake Albert Road, Bourke Street and Fernleigh Road. Of all recorded 29 bicycle crashes, which occurred at the intersections, roundabout intersections accounted for 34.5% (10), T-intersections accounted for 55.2% (16), Cross intersections accounted for 6.9% (2) and L-type intersections 3.4% (1). Table 5.2.2b provides an image of the above information.

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Number of bicycle crashes which occurred at different types of intersection. 1 10 16 2

T- intersection

Table 5.2.2a

Traffic lights intersection

Roundabout

Other intersections

Number of bicycle crashes which occurred at the intersections between 2004 - 2008.

% of bicycle accidents which occured at different types of intersection

6.9 T- intersection 34.5

55.2

Traffic lights intersection Roundabout Other intersections

3.4

Table 5.2.2b

Percentage of bicycle crashes which occurred at the intersections between 2004 - 2008.

Refer to Map 5.2.2 on the following page for an image of the locations where reported crashes occurred in Wagga Wagga between 2004 to 2008.

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Map 5.2.2

Reported Accidents in Wagga Wagga LGA between 2004 to 2008

34


6. Stakeholder and Community Consultation To inform the development of the new Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011, and raise awareness of cycling amongst the local community a program of community and stakeholder consultation was undertaken.

6.1 Stakeholder Consultation During the course of the study the following stakeholders where consulted with: •

Bicycle Wagga Wagga

Wagga Cycling Club

Mountain Bike Wagga Wagga,

The Lake to Lagoon Fun Run and Family Cycle, and

Neighbouring Councils including Shire of Lockhart, Shire of Narrandera, Shire of Coolamon, Shire of Junee, Shire of Gundagai, Shire of Tumut, Shire of Tumbarumba, Shire of Holbrook and Shire of Greater Hume.

6.1.1 Bicycle Wagga Wagga Bicycle Wagga Wagga (BWW) comprises cyclists who enjoy cycling as a social activity and want to promote cycling as a safe and responsible mode of transport. BWW was involved in the development of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 1998 and continues to lobby Wagga Wagga City Council for the development, construction and maintenance of bicycle facilities in the city. BWW promotes safe cycling through consultation with Wagga Wagga City Council and the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority. Safety campaigns have been conducted, the most notable of which has been the Be Safe! Be Smart! Be Seen! campaign encouraging cyclists to increase their on-road visibility by choosing to use light coloured clothing and reflective materials. The Club hosts regular week day and weekend rides, as well as weekend away rides to regional areas. 6.1.2 Wagga Cycling Club The Club prides it's self on providing competitive track and road racing for all ages. The Club has produced numerous state and national champions and hosts several road events throughout the year being the: • • • •

Gwen French memorial 2 day Junior Tour Butch Menz Memorial handicap 62km The Riverina Championships (Scratch Races and Individual Time) McDonald's Classic 100km State open handicap + Criteriums in the CBD

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6.1.3 Mountain Bike Wagga Wagga Mountain Bike Wagga Wagga (MTB) was formed in July 2005. As of November 2010 they have over 90 members. The emphasis is on both social and competitive Mountain Biking and junior participation. Mountain Bike rides take place at Pomingalarna Reserve, Willans Hill, Livingstone National Park, the Wiradjuri Trail, Plum Pudding Reserve, Tumut Bike Track, among other locations. Many of these areas offer great single trail riding through native bushland. MTB Wagga has achieved: • • •

Inclusion of mountain biking in the draft Livingstone National Park Management Plan. Partnership with Wagga Wagga City Council which provides access to Pomingalarna Reserve. Re-establishment of the “Friends of Pomingalarna” to protect the reserve and maintain a sustainable multi-use trail network.

6.1.4 The Lake to Lagoon Fun Run and Family Cycle The event hosts the largest participation ride in the region. Over 1,000 family cyclists are part of the 40 year old iconic event held on the 2nd Sunday in September. 6.1.5 Neighbouring Councils Stakeholder consultation with the adjacent Local Government Areas was undertaken to understand the existing and proposed cycling provision and any connections with the Wagga Wagga area. • Lockhart Shire Council - is currently in the process of creating their new Bicycle Plan. The Plan does not envisage any connecting routes to the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. • Narrandera Shire Council - has no Bicycle Strategy in place. • Coolamon Shire Council - has a Bicycle Plan in place. The Plan does not envisage any connecting routes to the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. • Junee Shire Council - In 1998 Junee Shire Council decided to develop a Bike Path Plan, with the main focus of moving towards general health and fitness - as well as the road safety issues to be considered for young children to both ride and walk to various points around the town. Council also worked with local cyclists and the Safer Routes to School Program Committee to develop the route plans. These were primarily located to get children from the schools to the CBD and to the sporting venues around town. It was also decided to construct the bike paths off-road as much as possible – both for safety reasons and to enable users of the pathway to have a more enjoyable experience without the stress of vehicles travelling close to them. Junee Shire Council has

36


achieved its main purpose of connecting sporting fields, CBD and schools together with the bike path network. • Gundagai Shire Council - has recently developed the "Gundagai Bike Plan". This plan is a long term plan to provide safe, convenient and connected bicycle routes which will encourage people to walk and ride their bikes rather than use their cars. Each year Gundagai Council in conjunction with the Healthy Shires Committee and GundaBUG (Gundagai Bicycle Users Group) celebrates Bicycle Week by hosting "The Gundagai Healthy Shires Bicycle Challenge and Ride". This event consists of novelty activities in a park and a Bicycle Ride and endeavours to encourage people to hop on their bikes. • Tumut and Tumbarumba Shire Councils - Tumut Shire Council has no Bicycle Strategy in place but along with Tumbarumba and Gundagai Shire Councils has developed the Road Safety Strategic Plan 2005 – 2010 which includes safety improvement for cyclists. • Greater Hume Shire Council - has adopted a Bicycle Plan but all bicycle routes within this Shire are restricted to within town boundaries e.g. a recreational cycleway around its golf course or a shared path between the shopping centre and one of its main retirement villages. • Riverina Eastern Regional Organisation of Councils The Riverina Eastern Regional Organisation of Councils (REROC) is a voluntary association of 13 General Purpose Councils and two water county councils located in the eastern Riverina region of NSW. The members of REROC are the councils of: Bland, Coolamon, Cootamundra, Corowa, Greater Hume, Gundagai, Junee, Lockhart, Temora, Tumbarumba, Tumut, Urana, Wagga Wagga, Goldenfields Water and Riverina Water.

6.2 Community Consultation 6.2.1 Community Workshops Community Workshops for the Draft Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan occurred during the Public Exhibition period in January 2011. The two (2) workshops provided the public with the opportunity to ask questions and make comments on the Draft Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan. Through this forum those wishing to clarify any points prior to making a written submission were given the opportunity to do so. Additionally, Council had on hand an officer to take notes at the workshops to capture any issues raised for potential consideration in the Plan.

6.3 Community Survey Results 6.3.1

Community Survey Results

Council conducted a Community Survey throughout September / October 2010 to obtain feedback on the types of issues facing Wagga Wagga’s bicycle network and cyclists

37


(refer to Appendix K to view a copy of the full survey results). A number of the more significant results from the survey have been summarised in the below dot points: • 71% of respondents who do not currently ride a bicycle do not ride because they think it is too dangerous to ride on the road. • The top 2 reasons respondents gave for cycling was for exercise (highest majority) and to get to work or school. • The majority of respondents preferred using Off-road Shared Paths and Bicycle Lanes as opposed to either roads with no bicycle facilities or unpaved trails or dirt paths. • The two primary items that would encourage respondents to cycle were the presence of bicycle lanes (on-road), paths, routes, and the condition of the bicycle path, roadway (pavement quality). • The two primary items that would discourage respondents from cycling were High traffic volumes/speeds, and Poor motorists’ behaviour. • When provided with a list of possible bicycle route development options respondents choose in top three (3) priority order the following as the most needed: 1. An alternative route to the University/Estella via the Gobbagombalin Bridge 2. A complete loop around the City, Kooringal Road, Red Hill Road, Sturt Hwy/River 3. A cycleway along Lake Albert Road linking the CBD and southern suburbs • When provided with a list of possible cycling route development options outside of the city area respondents choose in top three (3) priority order the following as the most needed: 1. Rail Trail (Central Wagga Wagga - Ladysmith) 2. Gregadoo Loop (Main St, Lake Albert – Gregadoo Rd – Elizabeth Ave – Inglewood Rd – Mitchell Rd – Brunskill Rd) 3. Wiradjuri Walking Trail (shared path) • The highest ranked item that would encourage respondents to cycle more often is the provision of safer routes to work/major destinations. • When given the opportunity to provide an open response to where respondents would like to see new bicycle facilities developed in Wagga Wagga (either at/to a Street, School, Park, Other Public facility, or Type of Bicycle facility) the top responses to each of the respective sections was as follows: 1. Street - Lake Albert Road / CBD / Gregadoo Road 2. School – CSU / TRAC 3. Park – Pomingalarna Reserve / Jubilee Park / Victory Memorial Gardens 4. Other – CSU / Oasis / Wagga City Library 5. Type – Bicycle Lanes / Bike Parking / Shared paths • When given the opportunity to provide an open response to where respondents would like to see new bicycle parking/racks developed in Wagga Wagga the top three responses were: 1. CBD / Main Street 2. Major Shopping Centres / Suburban Shopping Centres 3. Parks

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6.3.2

Bicycle Plan Management Team field trip The Bicycle Plan Management Team conducted a field trip around Wagga Wagga on Tuesday 10 November 2009 to review local cycle routes, corridors and problem locations. Several locations were visited to identify issues and to consider the development of proposals for the improvement and expansion of the bicycle network. Items such as the lack of connectivity within the existing network between Bicycle Lanes and/or Shared Paths, the need for treatment at intersections (particularly roundabouts), the need for lanes to be remarked / made compliant and other issues were highlighted during the field trip.

39


7. Current Bicycle Network Issues A number of site visits within the Wagga Wagga area were undertaken to develop the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 by Council officers. These site visits were used to gain an understanding of the issues with the existing bicycle network and to investigate any further route options or issues with particular paths/lanes. A map of existing and proposed bicycle facilities within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area has been attached in Appendix C. A description of the existing bicycle network including some solutions / comments in relation to the major issues within such has been provided in Appendix D. Maps providing details of the locations of bicycle lanes and shared paths in Wagga Wagga’s suburbs is provided in Appendix E.

7.1 Generic Bicycle Network Issues The Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 makes recommends for the improvement of bicycle facilities within the following main categories: 1. Network proposals for construction of: • • • •

Road shoulders On-road bicycle lanes Shared paths Safety treatment at intersections

2. Specific bicycle network proposals - which respond to identified issues throughout the course of this Plan. These include on-road bike lanes and shared paths within the Wagga Wagga CBD linking developing areas, recreational facilities and activity centres (schools, shops etc). 3. Signage Schemes - consistent signage and road pavement markings are significant factors for bicycle network safety, especially at intersections. 4. Bicycle parking - appropriate types and locations of bicycle parking facilities will maximise convenience for cyclists. 5. Development Planning Controls - the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 sets out proposals for the development of the existing network, facilitating greater use by all cyclists regardless of journey purpose and ability. The integration of the Plan with Council’s Planning Controls will assist in ensuring the development of bicycle facilities and the network, particularly in conjunction with new developments.

40


7.2 Issues Following the review of the current Bicycle Network, data analysis, consultation, surveys and site visits a series of issues were identified for the Bicycle Plan to address as per the following: • Safety issues at certain intersections/roundabouts due to intersection/roundabout design or conflict with traffic • Missing links and lack of continuity identified in the current network (off/on road cycle paths) • Missing or inadequate signage/road markings • Need for upgrading some existing cycle paths and facilities • Need for more bike parking and end of trip facilities • Poor maintenance of bike (off/on road) shoulders and lanes causing difficulty for cyclists • Most current bicycle paths do not meet Austroads 14 and NSW Bicycle Guidelines standards • Consideration in the town planning/engineering sections in the early stages of suburb development • Need for education of both cyclists and motorists regarding good road behaviour, particularly during heavy traffic periods • Need for bike hire depots that bikes can be hired at one location and returned at another 7.2.1 Carriageway Shoulders Poor surfacing of the road shoulders occurs on many of the main roads in the area (e.g. Lake Albert Rd, Kooringal Rd) and was raised on numerous occasions during the public consultation. The poor road surface on the shoulders prevents cyclists from using the full carriageway width. There is a need to ensure shoulders are of the same quality as the carriageway surface and this should be achieved during initial road establishment, or during maintenance of the roadway.

41


Photo 7.2.1.a

Poorly surfaced shoulders on Lake Albert Road (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.1.b

Poorly surfaced shoulders on Kooringal Road (August 2010)

7.2.2 Intersections There are some good quality on-road bicycle facilities throughout the Wagga Wagga area. However at signalised and roundabout intersections these on road cycle facilities frequently stop before the intersections or are unclear through the intersection. At priority controlled intersections the on-road bicycle lanes are sometimes unclear. Cyclists are most vulnerable at intersections and there position at an intersection should be made clear. At the example locations below at the intersection of Murray Street / Morgan Street or Fitzmaurice St / Crampton St roundabouts or T-intersection of Dalman Pkwy / Pinaroo Dr the on-road bicycle lanes end before the intersection and then continue again after the

42


intersection or are not linked further to any existing bicycle facilities. Another example of where this problem occurs is the T-intersection of Fitzmaurice Street / Travers Street.

Photo 7.2.2.a

Roundabout intersection of Murray Street and Morgan Street (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.2.b

Roundabout intersection of Fitzmaurice St / Crampton St (August 2010)

43


Photo 7.2.2.c

T-intersection of Dalman Pkwy and Pinaroo Dr (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.2.d

T-intersection of Fitzmaurice Street and Travers Street (August 2010)

7.2.3 Unclear Road Markings Some of the on-road bicycle lanes in the Wagga Wagga area are not marked clearly. This can cause confusion to both cyclists and motorists on the road. Some examples of where road markings are either unclear or have faded over time within bicycle lanes include: Kooringal Road, Fernleigh Rd and Murray St, amongst others.

44


Photo 7.2.3a

Murray Street (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.3b

Kooringal Road (August 2010)

7.2.4 Links from Off-Road to On-Road Bicycle Lanes Where a bicycle route comprises both off-road and on-road facilities the transition between the two facilities should be seamless. Where the off-road path crosses or joins the on-road lane, very often no warning signage is provided. Additionally, the shared offroad path ends with no link to facilities on the other side of the road or to the on-road bicycle lanes. Example 1: Where the existing off-road shared path along Lake Albert Rd crosses Lake Albert Rd heading towards Lakeside Dr. Refer to photo 7.2.4a below for an image of the example.

45


Example 2: Where the off-road shared path along Glenfield Rd crosses Dalman Parkway - there are no cyclist warning signs for motorists in place, or Give Way signs for cyclists using the off-road path. Refer to photo 7.2.4b below for an image of the example.

Photo 7.2.4.a

The off-road shared path along Lake Albert Rd crossing Lake Albert Rd into Lakeside Drive (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.4.b

The off-road shared path along Glenfield Rd that crosses Dalman Parkway (August 2010)

Another example of where an existing off-road shared path abruptly ends is on the western side of Glenfield Rd. The path ends at the intersection with Fernleigh Rd and no further bicycle lanes/paths exist either on Fernleigh Rd or Glenfield Rd. Refer to photo 7.2.4c below for an image of the end of the path on Glenfield Rd.

46


Photo 7.2.4.c

The existing off-road shared path on the western side of Glenfield Rd ends at the intersection with Fernleigh Rd (August 2010)

A similar situation occurs where the existing off-road shared path on the southern side of Leavenworth Dr ends at Malaya St and it does not link to any existing bicycle lanes or paths. Refer to Photo 7.2.4d below for an image of the end of the Leavenworth Dr shared path at Malaya St.

Photo 7.2.4.d

The existing off-road shared path on the southern side of Leavenworth Dr ends at the intersection with Malaya St (August 2010)

7.2.5 Shared Road Shoulders A number of shared road shoulders in the Wagga Wagga area are narrow and leave little room for cyclists when cars are parked in them. Additionally, many are poorly

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marked and do not clearly inform motorists or bicycle users alike of the existence of the shared road shoulder. Examples: Shared road shoulder on Kooringal Rd between roundabouts at Plumpton Rd and Lake Albert Rd – refer to Photo 7.2.5a, and Kooringal Rd between Lake Albert Rd roundabout and Fay Ave – refer to Photo 7.2.5b.

Photo 7.2.5.a

Shared road shoulder on Kooringal Rd (between roundabouts at Plumpton Rd and Lake Albert Rd), that stops abruptly (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.5.b

Car parked in shared parking cycle lanes on Kooringal Rd between Lake Albert Rd roundabout and Fay Ave, leaving little room for cyclists. No clear lane marking to inform cyclists and motorists of the shared shoulder. (August 2010)

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7.2.6 Signage Signage throughout the bicycle network is of differing standards. On some bicycle routes both statutory and directional signage is provided however this is not the case throughout the entire bicycle network. Examples: blue bicycle directional sign on Kooringal Rd and at the intersection of Kooringal Road / Copland Street – at the roundabout there is no warning signage for cyclists using the off-road shared path and crossing Copland St in this location. Also where the existing off-road shared path on the western side of Kooringal Rd joins the on-road bicycle lane on Kooringal Rd there is no warning signage for cyclists or motorists. Refer to Photos 7.2.6a/b/c for images of the above mentioned examples.

Photo 7.2.6.a

Signage at the intersection of Kooringal Road and Copland Street (August 2010)

Photo 7.2.6.b

Blue bicycle signs at the roundabout of Kooringal Rd / Copland St. (August 2010)

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Photo 7.2.6c.

No warning signage for cyclists and drivers where the existing off-road shared path on the western side of Kooringal Rd joins the on-road bicycle lane on Kooringal Rd (August 2010)

Very often there is a lack of correct pavement markings on existing shared road shoulders or bicycle lanes. Refer to the below example in Photo 7.2.6d of the Shared road shoulders on Dalman Parkway which lacks the necessary pavement markings.

Photo 7.2.6.d

Lack of PS-2 pavement symbols marked on Dalman Parkway (August 2010)

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8. Maintenance of Bicycle Lanes, Shared Paths and Other bicycle facilities Poor maintenance of bicycle facilities can reduce the effective path width. In addition, signs of neglect can discourage users and validate undesirable behaviours such as graffiti and vandalism. It is extremely important that Wagga Wagga’s Bicycle Network is maintained to a high standard to ensure it is safe and encourages usage. Maintenance activities for bicycle facilities can be divided into three main types: • programmed maintenance, e.g. upgrading, reconstruction, rehabilitation and resurfacing. • planned routine maintenance, e.g. weed control, grass cutting, litter collection, sign cleaning. • responsive and/or emergency maintenance which may result from inspections, complaints or in response to major events.

8.1 Initial poor construction standards It is important that the initial establishment of bicycle lanes / shared paths are of a high standard to ensure that future maintenance is not required in an earlier timeframe than what would normally be expected. The provision or planning for proper drainage is a prime example of the need to design bicycle lanes and shared paths carefully while consider the surrounding area to avoid future issues. Refer to Photo 8.1 below for an image of a shared path which required drainage to be provided after establishment.

Photo 8a

Poor drainage design and/or maintenance, resulting in water pooling, can adversely impact the continuity and safety of cycling routes (August 2010)

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8.2 Bicycle lane and Shared path cleaning The Wagga Wagga Bicycle Network in its entirety is currently not incorporated into the street sweeping schedule as a dedicated maintenance item. While some of the network may be cleaned inadvertently via regular scheduled street sweeping it is necessary to establish a dedicated program of bicycle network cleaning in order to make the network more attractive and safer to use. The build-up of rubbish, grass clippings, broken glass, leaves, branches, road surfacing materials (aggregate primarily), dirt and other items can all create an unsafe bicycle surface and potentially result in flat tyres or creating a hazard that could make a cyclist come off their bicycle. Information on which areas of the bicycle network currently get cleaned on a regular based through Council’s Street Sweeping program will be obtained from Council’s Infrastructure Services directorate and factored in when determining which areas require a dedicated cleaning regime to be implemented. Where possible those areas that are currently serviced on a regular based via Council’s existing Street Sweeping program will not be incorporated into the cleaning regime in order to save costs. Wagga Wagga currently has an approximate total of 26km of On-road Bicycle Lanes and 19km of sealed Shared Paths, making for a total of 45km of sealed surfaces as part of the current bicycle network. An estimate to do one street sweep of the entire network based on figures provided by Council’s Infrastructure Services directorate came to approximately $1700 (figures at 2010). Given there isn’t a current budget for this item it is recommended that a budget bid be put to Council for the 2011/12 Financial Year to consider regular cleaning of the bicycle network. It is recommended that the budget bid be for the amount of $7000 to provide for four (4) full cleans of the entire existing bicycle network per year. The impact of the initial cleaning regime will be assessed and the subsequent following build-up of debris in the bicycle lanes/paths over the proceeding 12 month period to determine if a more regular cleaning regime needs to be implemented and as such if further budget provision is required. Refer to Photo 8.2 below for an example of debris build up in a Bicycle Lane.

Photo 8.2

Example of dirt and gravel build up in a Bicycle Lane (October 2010)

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8.3 Signage and Lane Line/Symbol marking The assessment of the current bicycle network highlighted the need for the existing lanes and paths to be made compliant through the provision of correct signage and lane/path markings in accordance with RTA and Austroads Part 14 guidelines. In many cases the current network has signage and lane/path markings that do not meet the required standards or have faded/been destroyed or vandalised over time. In other cases the original signage and lane/path markings were either non-compliant with current standards or simply inadequate. It is estimated that within the current bicycle network the majority of Bicycle Lanes need to be either re-marked (lane lines and/or on-road symbols) and/or have new signage erected on them. An indicative estimate from Council’s Infrastructure Services directorate of the cost to establish a Bicycle Lane from scratch is approximately $1300 per kilometre. A further indicative estimate from Council’s Infrastructure Services directorate of the cost to establish a Shared Road Shoulder lane from scratch is approximately $1000 per kilometre. It is estimated that approximately 60% of the on-road network requires lane line remarking or new lines to be provided, and that approximately 90% of the on-road network requires replacement or new on-road symbols to be marked. In addition to the above it is estimated that approximately 90% of the on-road network requires entirely new signage. Based on the above initial rough assessment it is estimated that expenditure of approximately $65,000 will be required to provide the necessary lane line, symbol marking and signage required to make the existing Bicycle Lanes and Shared Road Shoulder lanes compliant with RTA standards. In order to provide a more complete on-road Bicycle Lane / Shared Road Shoulder network it is recommended that where possible without a significant requirement to change the nature of the road operating area new on-road bicycle lanes be marked in the identified locations within the map provided in Appendix C. This will result in the establishment of approximately 43km of new Bicycle Lanes/Shared Road Shoulder lanes in Wagga Wagga at an estimated approximate cost $50,000 (excluding survey and design costs). In addition to the above all of the existing sealed Shared Path network requires lane lines and symbols to be marked on the pavement, and where not all already provided, appropriate signage. However, given the surface finish of the majority of the Shared Paths in Wagga Wagga with a crushed granite surface, which is not particularly suitable for line marking, it is estimated that only approximately 5km of Shared Paths require marking currently. This length of line marking and the marking of on pavement symbols would come to an approximate total cost of $14,000.

8.4 Bicycle Lane / Shared path damage Damage to the existing network can occur due to numerous factors. The impacts of tree roots, growth of grass and weeds, drainage issues, failure of the road surface or other factors can all contribute to the destruction of the existing bicycle network and make cycling on such unsafe and/or less enjoyable. Through the implementation of the Report a Hazard tool on Council’s website it is hoped that members of the public will have a useful tool to help report such issues to Council. It will then be up to Council to ensure

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that these issues are dealt with in a timely manner and rectified in order to ensure the operational capacity of the bicycle network. In addition to receiving valuable feedback from the public Council will also need to ensure that it conducts condition assessments of the bicycle network on a regular basis (Note: Council’s Asset Integrity team currently inspect paths, including bicycle paths once per year). This will help to not only identify areas that need repair and maintenance, but also help with the scheduling of works to replace lanes or paths as they naturally deteriorate over time. Refer to Photo 8.4a and 8.4b below for an example of damage sustained to a Shared Path.

Photo 8.4

Photo 8.4b

Example of damage to a Shared Path from a heavy vehicle and weed growth (October 2010)

Councils need to assess the level of risk posed by conditions such as cracked pavements in the above example photo, and determine the appropriate maintenance level (August 2010)

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8.5 Other network maintenance considerations Other network maintenance items will also need to be taken into consideration when trying to provide to safe and attractive bicycle network to the public. Assessment of current issues as well as the on-going review of the following items (to name but a few) is recommended in order to ensure that the experience of using the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Network is a safe and enjoyable one: • • • •

Mowing / Spraying at the edges of bicycle lanes / paths Removal of low hanging tree branches near lanes/paths or those that obstruct network signage Provision of appropriate Pram Ramps / connection between roads / lanes and paths. Consideration of the placement of non-bicycle network signage or other infrastructure away from lanes/paths to avoid potential injury to cyclists if they fall/stray from the lane/path.

As mentioned above through the implementation of the Report a Hazard tool on Council’s website it is hoped that members of the public will have a useful tool to help report such issues to Council. Additionally, it is recommended that Council’s Asset Condition officers inspect the entire Bicycle network twice yearly to ensure that the network is monitored and risks are identified.

8.6 Bicycle Hazard Reporting There are many hazards that are easily identified by road and pathway users, which may not yet have been noticed by the relevant road authority. If these hazards are not reported there may be the potential for a crash or injury. Each year crashes and road related injuries cost our community at many levels, not just financially. It is only through a coordinated commitment by the community, and leading road safety and management agencies that real outcomes can be achieved to reduce the occurrence, risk and cost of injuries to our community. Wagga Wagga City Council has "signed up" to the Report-A-Hazard website. This website was established in June 2006 to assist members of the community in reporting hazards which might affect cyclists, pedestrians, motorcyclists and drivers. A community member simply visits the website: www.reportahazard.com.au and completes the information requested in the appropriate hazard report and the report is automatically forwarded to the relevant road authority for inspection. Additionally, it is recommended that an iphone application be made available for reporting hazards so that people can send a picture of the hazard and other information while out cycling. Responsiveness to hazards includes: removing critical obstacles, provision of temporary alternatives, and hazard reporting systems. Hazards such as rubbish, sand/glass/stones on paths, overgrown vegetation/tree roots, lighting defects and car/service vehicle parking on/over paths/lanes should be promptly dealt with.

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9. Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan Proposals and Design Guidelines 9.1 Bicycle Network Design guidelines One of the aims of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan is to create a network of consistent and safe bicycle facilities which will conform to current Australian Standards. All works within the bicycle network, including signposting and pavement markings should comply with the current Australian Standards described in the Austroad Guidelines – Part 14. Additionally, the design of all future on-road Bicycle Lanes/Shared Road Shoulder lanes and Shared Paths will be required to meet RTA and Austroads Guidelines in order to comply with current and future regulations. Through the development of this Plan a number of similar issues have been identified at multiple locations within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. This section indicates how these generic issues may be overcome. In addition to the above it is important that Wagga Wagga strives to become a leader in the development of cycling and pedestrian infrastructure in the region, state, and even country. In order to try to achieve such a high bench mark it is recommended that Wagga Wagga draws on the examples of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure design and practice in world leading areas such as the Netherlands, Denmark and Norway. Several examples and case studies were proved by local cyclists who have experienced these European examples first hand and contributed details of such during the public exhibition period. Through the information provided by these members of the public it is recommended that the future design and development of the bicycle network address equity issues within the community, and becomes more inclusive acknowledging the rights of young children, teenagers, the elderly and disabled amongst others. In addition to the above and as suggested through the public exhibition period it is recommended that future bicycle network design be part of an integrated traffic planning approach for all traffic, bicycle paths, foot paths etc, as a whole of community traffic network. In order to measure the success of the development of the network the usage / potential increased usage or otherwise of such by women and children has been suggested as the best measure of success. This is suggested on the basis that if women and children feel comfortable and safe using the facilities then the majority of other members of the community will also, and thus increased usage will follow. 9.1.1 Carriageway Shoulders While a number of roads in Wagga Wagga could be ideal for cycling due to their width, the poor road surface of the shoulders prevents cyclists from using the full carriageway width. There is a need to ensure road shoulders are of the same quality as the carriageway surface and as such they should be resurfaced to the same standard as the main carriageway during resurfacing maintenance work. Some examples of poor road shoulder surfaces are: 1. Southern side of Lake Albert Rd between Eastlake Drive and Lakeside Dr (damaged by tree roots and general wear). 2. Some sections of Kooringal Rd, e.g. at the KRS Medical Centre.

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3. Road shoulders of Lake Albert Rd between Sturt Hwy and Copland St are cracked and uneven. 9.1.2 On-road bicycle facilities The existing street system within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area comprises many relatively wide streets with ample room to cater for a shared parking/cyclist kerbside lane (shared road shoulders). This option should be used at locations such as moderate traffic residential streets with speeds up to 60km/h, or between collector roads where the volume of traffic is low and the maximum speed limit is 80 km/h. Shared road shoulders should be delineated by an unbroken white line along the edge of the travel lane and a dashed white line separating bicycle traffic from parked cars. The shared road shoulder should have bicycle logos (PS-2) painted on the pavement at 75m intervals. No regulatory signposting (R7-1-4) is required. If possible to provide a further barrier between cyclists and traffic it is recommended that a physical barrier be installed between the cyclists and moving traffic for added safety.

Shared road shoulder

Photo 9.1.2.b

An example of a shared road shoulder

An option for roads with a high volume of traffic and higher speed limits is to create onroad bicycle lanes for cyclists. The bicycle lane is a visually separated operating space

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for cyclists on the roads. Bicycle lanes should be delineated by two unbroken white lines - one along the edge of the travel lane and a second one should separate bicycle traffic from parked cars. A minimum width for a bicycle lane should be 4.0m to allow drivers to alight from a vehicle without causing a cyclist to veer into the travel lane. The bicycle lane should have bicycle logos (PS-2) painted on the pavement at 75m intervals and regulatory signposting (R7-1-4).

On-road bicycle lane

Photo 9.1.2.a

An example of on-road bicycle lane

9.1.3 Off-road bicycle facilities Generally, Council should aim to separate cyclists from vehicular traffic as much as possible, for the safety of both users, particularly when considering connectivity from suburbs/residential areas and schools. In a low volume traffic area the most practical and economic type of off-road path would be a shared pedestrian/cycle path. A recommended width for this type of bicycle facility is 2.5 – 4.0m. Off-road shared paths should be delineated by regulatory signposting (R8-2) and PS-3, PS-4 pavement symbols at 70m intervals. An S5 separation line should be used to separate opposing flows of riders.

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Off-road shared path Table 9.1.3 below summarises a list of examples of on-road and off-road bicycle facilities that should be considered when designing new roads, or can be installed within the carriageway of existing roads. Table 9.1.3 Example types of on and off Road Bicycle Facilities Type of facility

Description

Degree of separation

Bicycle path (in a road reserve)

An exclusive bicycle path physically separated from the road area by the median strip or kerb. The lane is indicated by regulatory sign R8-1 (bicycle only) and two unbroken E7 lines. Additionally PS-3 pavement symbols are used at 75m intervals or adjacent to intersecting streets.

High. Suitable for regional and local bicycle network routes.

Bicycle lane (on road)

A separate lane (visual separation) that can only be used by bicycles. It is a part of the road, usually at the kerbside. The lane is regulated by the sign R7-1-4 (bicycle lane) and two unbroken L5 lines. Additionally PS-2 pavement symbols are used at 75m intervals or adjacent to intersecting streets. L5 lines should be broken (C4 line) at minor side streets and exits. Cyclists must be able to keep a safe distance from opening parked car doors without deviating from the lane. To give cyclists that protection 0.4 – 1.0m clearance between the bicycle lane edge and parked vehicles is recommended.

Medium to High. Suitable for regional and local bicycle network routes.

Road shoulder lane (on road)

A shared (with stationary vehicles) bicycle lane (usually adjacent to kerbside parking), regulated by one continuous L5 line, which defines the road shoulder, and one dashed C4 line separating bicycle traffic from parked cars. PS-2 pavement symbols are used at 75m intervals and before and after intersecting streets. Green coloured pavement may be used in special circumstances to increase lane visibility. No regulatory signposting is required.

Medium. Suitable for narrow streets where vehicle speeds and volumes are moderate (low volume roads with speeds up to 80 km/h or moderate volume roads with speeds up to 60 km/h)

Off-road shared paths

A shared (with pedestrians) operating space for cyclists and pedestrians on off-road areas, such as parks or reserves and drainage easements. Shared paths are regulated by the sign R8-2, pavement symbols PS-3 & PS-4 at 75m intervals and pavement arrows PA-1 at 200m (max) intervals to indicate travel direction. An S5 separation line is used to separate opposing flows of riders.

High. Suitable for regional and local bicycle network routes.

Source: NSW Bicycle Guidelines

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9.1.4 Off-road bicycle path to on-road bicycle lanes (shoulder lanes) transition Where off-road bicycle paths have to move on-road to become bicycle lanes or shared road shoulders it is necessary to provide an engineering treatment and correct signage to permit a safe and smooth passage for riders.

Photo 9.1.4

An example of transition from on-road to off-road lanes

9.1.5 Treatment at Intersections Most reported bicycle crashes occur at intersections, involve cars and are of a serious nature. This is not surprising as intersections are where there is considerable conflict between different road users. The most significant causes of bicycle/motor vehicle crashes are: • Cyclists not being noticeable; • Incorrect perception of intent of cyclist; and, • Behaviour of cyclist contrary to expected pattern. There is therefore a need for improved education of both motorists and cyclists. Physical improvements at intersections are also important as these can provide space for cyclists, heighten awareness of cyclists towards motorists and enable motorists to better predict cyclist movements. AustRoads Part 14 provides guidelines and best practice for designing intersections to safely accommodate cyclists, and treatments than can be applied to existing intersections. Treatments that can be applied to existing intersections are summarised below. 9.1.6 Green Cycle Surfacing Wagga Wagga has a substantial network of on-road bicycle lanes that cross side roads or run through intersections. Green surfacing can make the cycle lane more prominent to motorists and reduce the risk of conflict.

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Green surfacing for cycle facilities is expensive and as such is not considered necessary at all locations. It is however considered necessary at locations where the safety of cyclists is of concern and is effective in highlighting the presence of cyclists at potential traffic conflict locations. The use of green surfacing at locations such as bicycle lanes across intersections, contra flow bicycle lanes and storage boxes at signal intersections can provide major benefits for cyclists. This “specific use” approach is recommended for the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area.

Photo 9.1.6

Example of green surfacing application used at an intersection.

9.1.7 Signalised Intersections Storage Boxes Storage boxes or advance bicycle stop lines allow cyclists to position themselves ahead of the traffic queues at signalised intersections. It is common practice for cyclists to wait in front of queuing traffic and storage boxes formalise this practice. The position of the cyclist in front of the traffic queue makes the cyclist more noticeable to motorists and allows the cyclist to proceed through the intersection more quickly. AustRoads Part 14 and the NSW Bicycle Guidelines give guidance on storage boxes for cyclists. AustRoads Part 14 shows various advanced stop line treatment options. It is recommended that in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area options (b) – (d) from the Austroads Part 14 guidelines are generally used as intersections in the area controlled by signals which are generally busy and dangerous for cyclists. On road bicycle lanes in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area should be continued up to all signalised intersections and storage boxes with green coloured surfacing should be provided. 9.1.8 Roundabouts Roundabouts remain one of the most difficult traffic management measures for cyclists to negotiate, particularly in relation to the conflict between left turning traffic and straight

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through cyclists. On major roundabouts there is often a case for taking cyclists off the roadway, making use of the existing footpaths and pedestrian crossings to negotiate the roundabout safely. Roundabouts can be made safer for cyclists through implementing measures to reduce traffic speeds on the approach and through the intersection. This can be done by making changes to the roundabout geometry to reduce the overall diameter of the intersection. At larger roundabouts cycle paths can be provided for less confident cyclists to negotiate the roundabout. The Olympic Hwy / Edward Street intersection would be an example of where this treatment type would be more appropriate. Where on road bicycle lanes approach the roundabout the bicycle lane should be taken off road before the intersection and drop kerbs (pram ramps) and pedestrian refuges at the islands should be provided. Give way signs for cyclists should be provided on the bicycle lane at the drop kerb and cyclist warning signs should be provided for motorists at the roundabout approaches.

Photo 9.1.8a

Roundabout Treatment Example

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Figure 9.1.8.b

Example solution for larger roundabouts such as Kooringal Rd/Plumpton Rd. Reference: RTA Guidelines.

9.1.9 Drain Covers Drain covers with slots parallel to the direction of travel are dangerous to cyclists. It should be ensured that drain covers are consistently placed so slots run perpendicular to the flow of traffic or are replaced with grid style drain covers, guarding against the possibility of bicycle wheels becoming caught. Example - drain covers on Lake Albert offroad shared path. The toolkit included in Appendix F has been developed to provide an indicative range of facilities and treatments that are available to Council when implementing the Bicycle Plan 2011.

9.2 Bicycle Signing Plan In order for the bicycle network to be navigated effectively, a coherent and easy to understand signing system is required, as it is a crucial part of an effective network. It is considered that improved signing will increase the number of people cycling and enhance their enjoyment of the experience. The provision of signing relating specifically to cyclists and the use of roads by them is an important aspect of this plan. Signs need to be located so they are visible but not in the way of cyclists, allowing for minimum recommended height and width clearances from the bicycle travel lane.

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There are three categories of bicycle signage used in NSW – regulatory, warning and directional. Please refer to Appendix F for a details regarding correct usage of bicycle signing and road markings in NSW – in accordance with Austroads 14. 9.2.1

Types of bicycle signage a. Regulatory Signs

Regulatory signs will generally define the type of bicycle facility provided. AustRoads Guidelines – Part 14 and NSW Bicycle Guidelines clearly define the regulatory signs in use for bicycle facilities and supplementary plates for use in conjunction with regulatory signs. Regulatory signs define the start and end of facilities. The Guidelines make it clear that regulatory signs should be carefully located so as not to cause confusion or ambiguity. The number of signs and their location should be based on the individual situation and reflect sightlines and visibility.

Table 9.2.1.a

Regulatory Signage for Bicycle Facilities

Photo 9.2.1.a

Example of regulatory sign which has been used on existing off-road shared path on the northern side of Red Hill Road. (August 2010)

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b. Warning Signs Warning signs are diamond-shaped yellow signs, and are used to warn cyclists of changed or particularly hazardous conditions. They are also used to warn other road users of bicycle movements. The NSW Bicycle Guidelines offer advice on the use of warning signs, as well as guidance signage and advisory signage. Some of the most commonly used warning signs for the bicycle network, which may also be used on the general network, are shown in Figure 7.4.1.b

Table 9.2.1.b

Warning Signage

Photo 9.2.1.b

Example of warning sign on Bruce St (August 2010)

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Photo 9.2.1.b1

Example of warning sign on Dalman Parkway (August 2010)

c. Directional Signs A key element of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan is the development of the directional signage component. It is important that directional signage is consistent throughout the network, and at all relevant intersections, to direct cyclists. Care should be taken during signage placement to avoid becoming lost in the clutter of other signs, or confusing motorised traffic, particularly for on-road routes.

Photo 9.2.1.c

Example of Local Route signage (August 2010)

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Photo 9.2.1.c1

Example of directional sign on existing off-road shared path on the northern side of Red Hill Rd (August 2010)

Photo 9.2.1.c2

Example of directional sign on existing off-road shared path on the western side of Kooringal Rd (August 2010)

d. Behavioural Signs Signs can be utilised to enhance pedestrian and cyclist behaviour on shared use paths, promoting consideration of other users and generally improving safety for all users. Signs should encompass all groups likely to use the path, such as dog walkers, skateboarders etc and reflect road rules and accepted priorities. Behavioural signage can be designed to suit the off road route and incorporate interpretive information. Wagga Wagga should look to provide visually engaging and entertaining signage to educate cyclists on how pedestrians feel when cyclists do not ring their bicycle bell or speed past them on narrow areas of the footpath. The signage should also remind pedestrians that cyclists use the shared path too.

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Photo 9.2.1.d

Behavioural signage on existing off-road shared path at Lake Albert (August 2010)

e. Pavement Markings The use of pavement markings and coloured surfaces can assist cyclists in way finding and raise the awareness of motorists to cyclists and their use of the road network. In some situations pavement markings can provide reminder signage along the bicycle route, avoiding the need for signs and additional streetscape clutter. Pavement markings are also easily observed by cyclists and unlikely to be hidden behind trees or parked vehicles

Photo 9.2.1.e

Faded pavement marking PS-2 on Kooringal Rd (August 2010)

AustRoads Part 14 notes that a safety strip is desirable in certain situations between parked vehicles and bicycles where there are:

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• Bicycle / parking lanes with parallel (kerbside) parking, • Bicycle / parking lanes with angle parking, and • Contra flow bicycle lanes. AustRoads Part 14 provides guidance on the detailed design of safety strips. Safety strips are designed to remind drivers about the potential presence of cyclists. The accident analysis within this study identified a number of accidents related to vehicle parking movements. Bicycle and pedestrian symbols are useful for advising users of the presence of cyclists and pedestrians and indicating permitted users of paths. AustRoads Part 14 details the correct dimensions of pavement symbols. Coloured surface treatments can be used to identify bicycle facilities, particularly where the traffic environment is complicated. Surface colour raises the awareness of motorists to the potential presence of cyclists. Consideration should be given to the use of green surfacing in some situations, for example, to identify advance storage boxes at signalised intersections and bicycle lanes across intersections with side roads as discussed in section 7.1.5. Relevant bicycle signage and pavement markings guidance in accordance with Austroads - Part 14 are reproduced in Appendix G.

9.3 Links to New Development Areas Wagga Wagga is a growing area with a number of new suburbs recently developed or being developed. It is important that these new areas of development are linked to the existing bicycle network. Currently some of these areas are not linked or are poorly linked. The following paragraphs highlight these areas. 9.3.1 Estella West In 2008 Wagga Wagga City Council prepared and proposed the Traffic Management Planning Study for Estella West. Estella West is a relatively large area on the northern side of Old Narrandera Road and extends to the existing development at Estella. Old Narrandera Road runs generally along the northern side of the river connecting villages such as Euberta and Currawarna to Wagga Wagga via the Olympic Highway. Pine Gully Road runs parallel to and west of Boorooma Street and provides access to the western portion of Charles Sturt University. Harris Road is a two-lane sealed road that connects Old Narrandera Road and Pine Gully Road. There are three existing off-road shared paths in Estella: 1. Along the western side of Boorooma St between Charles Sturt University and the Olympic Hwy Ramp. This is a sealed off-road shared path with a good surface condition and regulatory R8-2 signs in place. 2. Along Doman Street between Gunn Drive and Boorooma Street. This is a dirt offroad shared path, the surface is in good condition given it is a dirt path.

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3. Parallel to Pugsley Avenue between Gunn Drive and Pugsley Avenue. This is also a dirt off-road shared path. The existing off-road shared path on the side of Boorooma St is linked (although not well) to the existing on-road bicycle lane on Boorooma St and further to the on-road bicycle facilities on Gardiner St and Wall St, and continues to North Wagga Wagga and the CBD. There are also a number of proposed bicycle facilities in Estella and Boorooma such as: 1. Off-road shared path on the southern side of Farrer Rd, which will provide future access for cyclists to The Riverina Anglican College and Amundsen Street. 2. Off-road shared path on the southern side of Estella Rd, which will provide access to Pine Gully Rd and link the existing off-road shared path along Boorooma St with the proposed on-road bicycle lane on Pine Gully Rd. 3. On-road bicycle lane on Pine Gully Rd, which will provide the linkage with Old Narrandera Rd on one side and Prices Rd on the other. 4. Shared road shoulder on Gunn Dr, which will link the existing off-road shared paths with the proposed off-road shared path along Estella Rd. 5. Shared road shoulder on Avocet Dr, which will link the existing on-road bicycle lane on Boorooma St, existing off-road shared path along Boorooma St and other existing and planned bicycle facilities within Estella. 9.3.2 Lloyd The Lloyd area is bound by the Main Southern Railway Line and the Olympic Highway to the west, the existing urban development areas of Glenfield Park to the north and Bourkelands to the east. Red Hill Road is an east-west arterial road that skirts the southern suburbs of Glenfield Park and Tolland connecting the Olympic Highway to Kooringal Road. The north-south running arterial roads Glenfield Road, Bourke Street and Lake Albert Road intersect Red Hill Road. Glenfield Road and Bourke Street meet Holbrook Road south of Red Hill Road. Dalman Parkway is a sub-arterial road connecting Red Hill Road to Glenfield Road through Glenfield Park. There is an existing off-road shared path which runs along the northern side of Red Hill Road between Yentoo Dr and Bourke St. which extends along Holbrook Rd up to Clifton Street. New bicycle paths in Lloyd should connect with the existing network in Glenfield Park and along Holbrook Rd and provide safe and convenient crossings through Red Hill Rd to the west of the Hudson Drive intersection and crossing through Holbrook Rd. A correct warning sign for cyclists and drivers is necessary. The existing off-road shared paths on the Lloyd boundaries may be connected to the CBD through the existing off-road shared paths on the western side of Glenfield Rd. Further bicycle route development is necessary.

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9.3.3 Forest Hill / Brunslea Park Forest Hill and Brunslea Park are large suburbs on the eastern and western side of Elizabeth Ave and southern side of the Sturt Hwy. There are several important areas of public use in Forest Hill such as the Wagga Wagga Airport, Forest Hill Public School and the RAAF Base. There is only one partially existing bicycle facility in Forest Hill / Brunslea Park currently which is an on-road bicycle lane on the western side of Elizabeth Ave. The Draft Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan proposes that in the future Elizabeth Ave will connect Forest Hill / Brunslea Park with other suburbs within Wagga Wagga. Proposed on-road bicycle lanes on Elizabeth Ave will link to the proposed on-road bike lanes on Inglewood Rd, Mitchell Rd, Brunskill Rd and Lake Albert Rd. There is a significant need to link Forest Hill / Brunslea Park with the CBD either through the development of a section of proposed Rail Trail corridor between Forest Hill and the CBD, or via considering an alternative development along the Sturt Hwy. It is recommended that Council await the outcome of State Government legislation in relation to possible Rail Trail developments prior to determining which option it should pursue into the future. 9.3.4 Springvale / Glenoak This is another growing area within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. It is bounded by the existing urban development areas of Bourkelands/Hilltop/Lloyd to the north, Lake Albert to the east, and Kapooka to the west. There is just one existing dirt off-road shared path in Springvale which starts from Ironbark Place and heads north towards Featherwood Rd.

9.4 Riverina Highlands Rail Trail The Riverina Highlands Rail Trail proposal is an existing, inactive 130 km long stretch of railway corridor which has the potential to link the Wagga Wagga CBD with Tumbarumba. Opening this corridor would provide many benefits for the City including a boost to recreational cycling facilities and tourism. The first stage of the proposal would also create a convenient link from the CBD to Forest Hill and further to Ladysmith, for those who cycle and walk. As there is currently not a safe or dedicated shared path or bicycle lane between these areas it would be a welcome development within the network. The development of part or the entire trail would have a huge impact on the improvement of safety for cyclists and walkers who wish to travel between the CBD and Forest Hill. However, it is recognised that there is a certain amount of opposition to the proposal from local adjoining land owners, as well as the need for State Government legislation to be passed first in order to provide access to the rail corridor.

In June 2006 the Riverina Regional Development Board adopted the recommendations of a feasibility study into a plan to convert the 130km Wagga Wagga to Tumbarumba unused railway line into a rail trail. Primarily adjoining land holders concerns relate to the need for the rail corridor to be fenced which would deprive them of easy access to their properties, the potential for people to access their properties and trespass / cause

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damage or tamper with livestock, or the possible spreading of diseases to livestock or crops through transference. In order to be able to consider development of the rail trail in the future, the rail corridor first needs to be transferred to the Land and Property Management Authority from the Australian Rail Track Corporation, and then put into the control of Council via a lease/trusteeship arrangement. Following this first step, discussion with adjoining land owners along the route would be required to resolve concerns and logistical issues relating to access across the rail corridor and any other logistical or property management / farming practice concerns. For further information on the proposed Riverina Highlands Rail Trail refer to Riverina Highlands Rail Trail website: http://www.riverinahighlandsrailtrails.com/feasability-study

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10. Bicycle Parking / End of Trip facilities Provision of secure bicycle parking and end of trip facilities is an important element in encouraging the use of bicycles as a mode of travel for shopping, work and recreational trips. To be effective, bicycle parking needs to be secure, capable of supporting the bicycle without damage and be located where it is accessible to cyclists, in public view and where it does not inhibit pedestrian flow. End of trip facilities such as change rooms, showers and lockers should be provided at places of employment, education or near trip generators to encourage bicycle use. Successful commuting by bicycle is only possible when parking is available at several destinations and cyclists are assured that bicycle parking is easy to use and provides security for their bikes.

10.1 Location The locations for bicycle parking should be based on analysis of local destinations, recognising that cyclists will look to park close to their destination. Bicycle parking should be located in convenient and easily accessible locations but not where it will cause an obstruction to pedestrians. Parking destinations should include cafes, supermarkets, banks, community buildings, sports facilities, open space and parks, transport interchanges, car parks, shopping centres and general retail strips. A list of current Bicycle Parking locations is provided in Appendix M. The bicycle parking locations should be monitored on a regular basis and additional bicycle parking initially be provided in prioritised order as per the below table. Refer to section 9 below for a list of the proposed locations for the development of new Bicycle Parking facilities.

10.2 Bicycle Parking Facilities Bicycle parking stands should allow the bicycle frame and wheels to be locked to it securely and also support the bike ensuring it does not fall over. Manufacturers offer a number of parking rail products in a variety of colours and finishes that enhance the visibility of the rails for pedestrians and cyclists. These products meet the AustRoads guidance and Australian Standards. In most locations within activity centres bicycle parking will be associated with cafes, shops and leisure facilities and will be short stay.

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Photo 10.2 a/b

Examples of bicycle parking racks

There will also be a demand for longer stay parking and a greater level of security, particularly close to workplaces, stations and at certain recreational facilities. Bicycle lockers are ideal for longer stay bicycle parking at locations such as stations and in activity centres, particularly where those individuals that have more expensive bicycles may wish to ensure their asset is protected (i.e. the Oasis Aquatic Centre would be a good location for short stay Bicycle lockers).

Photo 10.2 c

An example of a Bicycle locker

10.3 Parking Quantity Consideration should be given to providing a small number of bicycle parking rails in many locations, rather than large central banks of parking rails. This will maximise convenience to cyclists. Generally it is not recommended that more than four parking rails (with space for eight bicycles) are implemented in a single location. This number of parking rails should only be located in popular locations, for example at shopping

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centres or outside a leisure facility. In most places one or two rails, depending on available street space, will suffice, particularly if there is no bicycle parking already at the location. Regular monitoring of bicycle parking to identify dumped bicycles, maintenance problems and parking congestion should be incorporated into regular Council activities. This will assist in identifying locations where additional stands are required.

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11. Bicycle Trail Routes In the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area there are several bicycle trails available for mountain bikers. There are multi-use trails available at Willans Hill as well as the Wiradjuri walking track, Plum Pudding and Brick Kiln Reserves. Refer to Appendix L for maps of the Mountain Bike Trails at Willans Hill and Pomingalarna Park. • Willans Hill Reserve Willans Hill Reserve is a natural area located in the middle of the Wagga Wagga city landscape. It is surrounded by the suburbs of Turvey Park, Mount Austin, Tolland and Kooringal. There are major roads running through the Park including Lord Baden Powell Drive, Captain Cook Drive, Red Hill Road and Leavenworth Drive. It is highly elevated and visible from most of the surrounding urban area. The Park is connected to numerous civic areas such as the Botanic Gardens, Music Bowl and Museum. The Willans Hill Reserve forms part of an interconnected natural corridor which connects from Willans Hill around the southern edge of the Wagga Wagga urban area to Pomingalarna Park then down to the Murrumbidgee River. Willans Hill Reserve is Wagga Wagga’s most popular and significant bushland recreation area. People use it for walking, jogging, fitness, mountain biking, dog exercise, and picnicking. It is used by a range of age groups including BMX enthusiasts, downhill mountain bike users, bushwalkers, and running and orienteering clubs. Some of the trails are quite fun with nothing too challenging so it is a good place for beginners. • Wiradjuri Walking Track The Wiradjuri Walking Track follows a 30km trail around the city of Wagga Wagga. It is a multi-use track that caters for walkers and bikes. For the most part it is a non-technical but enjoyable ride. The walk is easily found near the centre of Wagga as it skirts the banks of the Murrumbidgee River and goes right past Wagga Beach. Maps and details can be obtained from Wagga Wagga’s Visitor Information Centre on Tarcutta Street. • Pomingalarna Park Pomingalarna Park is a bushland reserve and forms an important part of Wagga Wagga’s landscape. Its highest point is 298 metres above sea level which provides a good vantage point overlooking the city. Pomingalarna Park forms part of the Wiradjuri Walking Track which connects Willans Hill, the southern edge of the Wagga Wagga urban area, Silvalite Reserve and the Murrumbidgee River. Most of the current users are mountain bike riders. There is a dedicated 10.5km cross country mountain bike track in the Park which is used on a daily basis. The local mountain bike club also holds major mountain bike events at the Park. • Plum Pudding Reserve Plum Pudding Reserve is on the right hand side of the Wagga-Mangoplah Road 13km south of the Red Hill Rd roundabout in Wagga Wagga. This area of native bushland contains around 10km of single track and is a regular venue for MTB Wagga club events. The trails are not overly technical and it is a good area to explore.

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• Brick Kiln Reserve This is a relatively small riding area in a reserve to the east of Wagga Wagga near the Eunony Bridge Road at Gumly Gumly, just behind the Carriage House Motor Inn. The trails weave through the bushland on the banks of the Murrumbidgee River. • Livingstone National Park Livingstone National Park is an area of native bush approximately 30km south of the city. While it is only 6km long and 3km wide, it contains enough riding to keep cyclists going all day. The park is crossed with fire trails but the main attraction for mountain bikers is the single track. Over the years local dirt bikers have made a number of single tracks that link one fire road with the next.

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12. Funding and Costs It would not be reasonable to expect Council to fully fund the proposals identified within this plan as they benefit not only the Wagga Wagga Community but also visitors to the Local Government Area and others within NSW. It is therefore essential that Wagga Wagga City Council maximise the use of the many funding sources available both at a State and Federal level so that the implementation of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 is achieved.

12.1 Existing Council Funding Council currently has an annual allocation of funding towards the development of new bicycle lanes / paths totalling approximately $135,000, which is supplemented with $30,000 annually through the RTA Grant program for shared paths. Through the development and adoption of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011, and a prioritised list of bicycle network developments, it is hoped that weight will be added to future budget bids within Council to obtain additional funding to further improve and develop the network at a faster rate. The range of funding sources currently available to NSW Councils for walking and cycling facilities include: • Council rates • RTA bicycle grants to councils on a dollar for dollar basis • Other NSW Government grants • Commonwealth Government grants, e.g. Roads to Recovery funds and Australian Greenhouse Office grants • Private sector grants and community funds • Developer contributions

12.2 External Funding Solutions / Options Within NSW there are limited opportunities to obtain additional significant levels of funding for the development of bicycle paths/lanes currently. As highlighted above funding is currently obtained on an annual basis from the RTA on a dollar for dollar basis. With the adoption of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan and a prioritised list of bicycle network developments is it hoped that Council will be able to demonstrate the need for additional funding and potentially be in a position to access such. In addition to obtaining RTA funding, NSW Government grants or Federal Government Grants will be investigated as potential sources for funding the development of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle network. In many cases applying for funds through such grants can be a very competitive process not only against other Councils and Community organisations, but also against other worthwhile and competing needs/projects within Wagga Wagga City Council itself. Again, with the adoption of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan and a prioritised list of bicycle network developments, further weight will be added to the need for Bicycle Network funding to be given a higher priority.

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Council also has the services of an internal Grants Officer and this position is constantly on the look out for new grant opportunities for the organisation and will be fully utilised in an attempt to obtain further funding. For information on what funds Council currently has allocated to the development of the Bicycle Network refer to Table 12.2 below. Table 12.2

Bicycle Network Funding items in Council’s Proposed 10 Year Capital Works program

Project Description Riverina Highlands Rail Trail Cycleways Program Farrer Rd Shared Path Cycleways (SRV)

10/11

11/12

12/13

13/14

14/15

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

$30,000 $77,221

$30,000

$30,000

$30,000

$30,000

$82,551

$85,927

$89,405

$92,987

$96,677

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

$30,000

$30,000

$30,000

$30,000

$30,000

$100,477

$104,392

$108,424

$112,576

$116,854

Table continued

Project Description Riverina Highlands Rail Trail Cycleways Program Farrer Rd Shared Path Cycleways (SRV)

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13. Implementation Plan 13.1 Selection and Prioritisation The implementation of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan 2011 has been staged into five (5) prioritised stages over a period of ten years. The staged implementation of the Bicycle Plan will provide for both on-road and off-road bicycle routes, bicycle parking and end of trip facilities. The specific criteria used to stage the implementation of the Bicycle Plan was developed in consultation with the Bicycle Plan Management Team and assesses the use of the proposed routes, the probable type of cyclists who will be using the route, the number of land-use generators along the route and the potential for bicycle routes to encourage bicycle use. Proposed stages: 1. Providing better maintenance of the existing network. 2. Improvement of all existing on and off-road facilities within the Local Government Area to ensure compliance with regulations (bringing up the standards of signage, markings, surface, crossings through intersections etc). Refer to Appendix D. 3. Linking of existing bicycle facilities by creating new on and off road bicycle routes, with a focus being on providing off-road shared path access to schools as a first priority. Refer to Appendix H. 4. Provision of new on and off-road bicycle facilities for different types of users (commuter routes, recreational and training bike facilities) integrating off-road proposals with the PAMP schedule. 5. Providing better end of trip facilities and bicycle parking.

13.2 Implementation The following tables provide suggested implementation plans for the improvement and development of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Network over the next five (5) years based upon the current levels of funding available of approximately $135,000 annually. If Council is successful in obtaining additional funding either internally, or through external sources, then the priority items identified in Appendix I will then work their way up the priority list. 13.2.1 Recommendations to expand the Bicycle Lane/Road Shoulder network The following priority listings for a five (5) year period are based on lanes that require little assessment to begin with, making existing lanes compliant, or complete lanes / provide linkage between existing lanes firstly. Additionally, priority will be given to establishing lanes within Central first where theoretically traffic volumes are higher, and therefore the risk to cyclists is higher, then working out into the suburbs. Establishment of new lanes / linkages will be given a lower priority initially.

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The initial priority listings for each financial year period will be based on the current available / total budget of $135,000. While the below table is based on a 5 year implementation period it is recommended that Council look to address the marking/signage of the entire Bicycle Lane/Road Shoulder in the 2011/12 Financial Year to make the existing network compliance with RTA and Austroads standards. For a further more detailed breakdown of the requirements for the proposed recommendations / works and the full priority list please refer to Appendix I. Table 13.2.1 Five (5) year Bicycle Lane development priority list Priority Bicycle lane / Road Shoulder location order 2011 / 2012 1 Kincaid St - Approximate length: 2km 2 Beckwith and Murray Streets - Approximate length: 2.3km 3 The Esplanade / Ivan Jack Dr / Morrow St - Approximate length: .920km 4 Brookong Ave - Approximate length: .740km 5 Travers St - Approximate length: 1.650km 6 Railway St - Approximate length: 1.050km 7 Macleay St - Approximate length: 1.500km 2012 / 2013 8 Gurwood Street - Approximate length: 1.8km 9 Mitchelmore St / Northcott Pde - Approximate length: 2.3km 10 Trevor St / Heath St / Macquarie St - Approximate length: 1.7km 11 Urana St - Approximate length: 2.120km 12 Wall St - Approximate length: 3km 2013 / 2014 13 Bourke Street service lanes – from Red Hill Rd to Fernleigh Rd - Approximate length: 1.950km 14 Fernleigh Road - Approximate length: 4.060km 15 Meadow St - Approximate length: .970km 16 Grove St / Warrawong St - Approximate length: 1.3km 17 Mount St / Kenneally St / Sherwood Ave / Kilpatrick St / Borona St Approximate length: 1.410km 2014 / 2015 18 Ziegler Ave - Approximate length: 1.200km 19 Fay Ave - Approximate length: 1.640km 20 Ashmont Ave - Approximate length: 1.260km 21 Bulolo St - Approximate length: .870km 22 Tobruk St - Approximate length: .900km 2015 / 2016 23 Henwood Ave - Approximate length: 1.090km 24 Stanley St - Approximate length: 1.320km 25 Avocet Dr - Approximate length: .950km 26 Gunn Dr - Approximate length: .730km 27 Berembee Rd - Approximate length: .750km 28 Bourkelands Dr - Approximate length: .870km

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13.2.2 Recommendations to expand the Shared Path network The following priority listings for a five (5) year period are based on completing linkage to the CBD and/or existing shared paths to suburbs/destinations firstly. Shared paths that require less complex/expensive engineering solutions will be given priority unless they are deemed to be a more important linkage. The initial priority listings for each financial year period are based on the current available / total budget of $135,000. In terms of the surface finish provided for Shared Paths within the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area it is recommended that Council move away from the current practice of using a two coat crushed granite seal. A higher standard and more durable shared path network needs to be established as the current crushed granite finish is prone to wear and erosion too easily. While the exact standard to be implemented for all new Shared Paths will need to be determined with Council’s Infrastructure Services Directorate the initial recommendation will be that the surface be the same/similar to that provided for bitumen roads with a finer grade asphalt stone used. For a further more detailed breakdown of the requirements for the proposed recommendations / works and the full priority list please refer to Appendix I. Table 13.2.2 Five (5) year Shared Path development priority list Priority Shared path location / Comments regarding required works order 2011/12 1 Riverside levee bank path - Approximate length: 3.620km 2012/13 2 Kooringal Road between Wagga Wagga Christian College and Lake Albert – Approximate length: 3.5km 2013/14 4 2014/15 5 6 2015/16 7 8 9

CBD to CSU – Stage 1 – Approximate length: 2.5km CBD to CSU – Stage 2 – Approximate length: 2.5km Edmundson St / Best St – Approximate length: 1.5km Glenfield Rd between Fernleigh Rd and Urana St Approximate length: 400m Leavenworth Drive between Malaya Dr and Bourke St – Approximate length: .740km Kooringal Rd from Lake Albert Road roundabout to Plumpton Road Roundabout – Approximate length 400m

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13.2.3 Recommendations to develop Bicycle parking facilities There is a need to develop a mix of safe and secure bicycle parking facilities within Wagga Wagga in order to help promote the use of bicycles as a mode of transportation. Both standard bicycle racks as well as bicycle lockers should be installed throughout the city in predetermined locations where the demand for such is high. It is recommended that an amount of $10,000 per annum over the next five years be allocated to the development of Bicycle Parking facilities with the focus being on the provision of a mix of bicycle racks and bicycle lockers in the CBD area to cater for both short stay cyclists and commuter cyclists who require secure longer stay parking. The provision of Bicycle Lockers in ideal locations may require negotiation with businesses to enable such to be located in the most suitable areas for commuters. An example is the possibility of putting Bicycle Lockers underneath the Wagga Wagga Marketplace Car Park area which provides good shelter out of the elements. Refer to Appendix M for a review of Bicycle Parking in Wagga Wagga and initial recommendations for the placement of bicycle parking. 13.2.4 Recommendations to install Bicycle Warning signage on long distance bicycle training routes. In order to help improve safety for long distance cyclists and to increase motorists awareness of cyclists in those areas it is recommended that the installation of Bicycle Warning Signage on identified roads occur. In addition to Bicycle Warning Signage the future installation of simple destination maps providing cycling distances at predetermined intersections is recommended to provide for cycling tourism opportunities in addition to catering for long distance or training cyclists. It is recommended that an amount of $10,000 per annum over the next five years be allocated to the development of Bicycle Warning Signage and destination maps on long distance cycling routes. Following is a list of those road routes most commonly used by long distance / training cyclists where Bicycle Warning Signage and/or destination maps should be installed: •

Gregadoo Loop - (Main St, Lake Albert - Gregadoo Rd – Elizabeth Ave - Inglewood Rd Mitchell Rd – Brunskill Rd)

Harefield loop - (North Wagga Wagga - via Shepherds Siding - Harefield – Bomen)

Ladysmith Loop - (Wagga - Gregadoo - Ladysmith)

Wantabadgery out and back - (Wagga Wagga to Oura to Wantabadgery and back)

Millwood Rd loop - (Wagga - CSU - Coolamon - Millwood Rd - Euberta – Malebo)

Currawarna loop - (Wagga - Collingullie - Currawarna - Millwood - Euberta - Wagga)

Wagga loop - (Wagga - Uranquinty – Mangoplah)

Refer to Appendix N for maps of the locations of the above road routes.

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14. A Cycling Promotion Plan The purpose of this section of the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan is to identify a strategic direction for promoting cycling in and throughout the Wagga Wagga City Council area. Additionally, this section aims provide a framework within which Wagga Wagga City Council, either alone or in conjunction with other authorities and organisations, such as the RTA, Health Authorities, Wagga Wagga Police Service, local schools, and bicycle user groups, can work towards making cycling safer and easier for more people. The principal goal of the Promotional Plan is to encourage more people to take up cycling, especially for local trips which tend to create more pollution, use valuable road space for parking and generate traffic congestion in our area. The provision of appropriate infrastructure is important to get more people to ride bicycles for either leisure or transport. However, it is not enough to simply provide the facilities to cycle; it is equally important to support people who are already cycling and encourage non-cyclists to want to cycle to their chosen destination as well as encouraging those that cycle occasionally to cycle more often. The nature of cycling ensures that it is widely available to the majority of the community at low cost. It also offers a number of positive benefits including improving personal health and engendering friendly and open communities which can contribute to greater local prosperity.

14.1 Providing information to make it easier and safer to cycle. Improvements in infrastructure are critical to making cycling easier and more attractive. However, cycling can also be made more convenient and safer by providing appropriate information. • Information about the bicycle network The most important stimulant to local cycling will be the expansion of bicycle routes. The routes consist of off-road shared paths, signed and pavement-marked on-road facilities, and accompanying bicycle parking. The information about routes, signs and parking locations is of key importance and needs to be clearly communicated in a number of formats and locations such as the Visitor Information Centre, Newsagencies, Post Offices, Bicycle shops and other locations. The production of a readily available Bicycle Map for the city and surrounds showing off-road and on-road bicycle paths with roads highlighted in designated colours indicating there stress or difficulty rating for cyclists will be a useful resource. Additionally, a Bicycle Map providing information on long distance cycling routes which includes bicycle friendly accommodation options, routes that favour quiet scenic back roads, terrain profiles, location of facilities, cycling specific signage etc could help to assist in the promotion of tour cyclist tourism. • Information about cycling Information to assist novice cyclists and cyclists new to the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area needs to be made readily available. This information can include a list of bicycle groups in the area, a list of local bicycle shops and other supporting services. Council’s website and community centres are well placed to provide this valuable

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information in supporting and developing cycling habits and the enjoyment of recreational cycling. • Road Safety and Cycling Traffic speed is a critical factor in road safety. Many road crashes could be avoided if drivers were to keep to the speed limits. Lower travelling speed is of benefit to all road users, especially those more vulnerable such as pedestrians and cyclists. Monitoring speeds is an important task for identifying problem areas that may require street calming measures. Educating drivers to appreciate the benefits for them of having more bicycles and fewer cars on the road could be identified as a key strategy for addressing this concern. Equally important however is the need to promote bicycles as a legitimate transport vehicle, and as such this requires that people riding bicycles, like car drivers also conform to the Australian Road Rules. Some specific areas in which it may be beneficial to educate drivers in relation to cyclists could include safe overtaking of cyclists and looking behind when opening car doors amongst others. There are a large number of road safety messages which are relevant to cyclists. These include cyclist information in respect to hazardous locations, grates, riding abreast, position on the road, defensive riding, and visibility (clothes, flashing lights etc). Similarly road safety messages to vehicle drivers relate to cyclist awareness on the road (opening car doors, making left turns, cyclist weaving up-hill) as well as speed differences and presence of young/child cyclists. It is suggested that education forms part of the plan to promote cycling and that programs targeting schools including possible presentations to students, and consultation with school principles be undertaken to determine the best method of getting the message to the target audience/s. • Cycling and Pedestrians The road rules allow children aged 12 years and under, and any other person accompanying them, to ride on public footpaths. In the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area, especially along the main streets, which are characterised by strip shopping and outdoor dining areas there is much competition for footpath space. This can sometimes create tensions between different users. Both pedestrians and cyclists need to be encouraged to share the footpath and to appreciate and respect each other’s needs.

14.2 Encouraging Children to Ride to School Schools in Wagga Wagga should be actively promoting cycling as a sport and this will be made more achievable with the implementation of the Bicycle Plan. The Bicycle Plan proposes to act as a mechanism to increase the number of children riding to school by providing bicycle links to Wagga Wagga’s schools. A major consideration of bike route planning is not only the safety of the routes to schools but also the perceived safety by children and their parents.

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Parents who consider a route to be adequate in safety will be more inclined to allow their child to ride to school unaccompanied.

14.3 Encouraging Bicycle Tourism There is great potential for Wagga Wagga to become a bicycle tourer’s destination once the bicycle network is better developed / implemented. Presently, Wagga Wagga is popular due to it being the largest inland city and regional centre in NSW servicing over 150,000 people. Maps and brochures presently distributed, such as the Wiradjuri Walking Track map could also include the location of the existing and proposed bicycle network. Other brochures could highlight places of interest for cyclists, historical buildings, picnic locations and future bicycle network links. Tourism Wagga Wagga could highlight the bicycle routes and grade them based on the amount of time the ride is expected to take at a riding speed of 15 kilometres per hour. The preparation of the promotional brochure could be used to highlight the benefits of cycling, safety tips and the cycling routes. The brochure distribution points could include the Tourist Information Centre, Wagga Wagga Market Place, Bicycle shops and the Oasis Aquatic Centre amongst others.

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15. Appendices Appendix A

National, State and Local Strategies

Appendix B1-6

Bicycle Trip Generators

Appendix C

Existing and Proposed Bicycle Network Map

Appendix D

Current Bicycle Network issues / assessment

Appendix E

Location of existing and Proposed Bicycle Facilities within Wagga Wagga Suburbs

Appendix F

Bicycle Plan 2010 - Toolkit

Appendix G

Bicycle Signage and Pavement Markings

Appendix H

Proposed linkage of existing bicycle facilities

Appendix I

Recommendations to expand the Bicycle Lane network / Recommendations to expand the Shared Path network

Appendix J

Initial Aims, Objectives and Actions document

Appendix K

Community Survey Result

Appendix L

Mountain Bike Trail Maps for Willans Hill and Pomingalarna Park

Appendix M

Bicycle Parking information

Appendix N

Long Distance Cycling routes

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Bicycle Plan