Page 1

Active Travel Plan Cycling September 2016


1

2

3

4

5

Introduction ___________________________________________________________ 2 1.1

Background _____________________________________________________________ 2

1.2

What is the Active Travel Plan for Cycling? ____________________________________ 3

1.3

What does the ATP do? ___________________________________________________ 4

Why an Active Travel Plan? _______________________________________________ 6 2.1

What is Active Travel _____________________________________________________ 6

2.2

What an Active Travel Plan can do for Wagga Wagga ___________________________ 6

Strategic Directions ____________________________________________________ 11 3.1

Existing Bicycle Network__________________________________________________ 11

3.2

The Future Plan _________________________________________________________ 12

Implementation _______________________________________________________ 19 4.1

Recommended Network__________________________________________________ 19

4.2

End of Trip Facilities _____________________________________________________ 22

4.3

Implementation Schedule ________________________________________________ 23

List of Attachments ____________________________________________________ 24 Attachment 1: Local MP Letter of Support from Daryl Maguire ____________________________ 24 Attachment 2: Moving Forward Together Workbook ____________________________________ 24 Attachment 3: Detailed Principle and Route Analysis ____________________________________ 24 Attachment 4: Design Costs ________________________________________________________ 24

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

1


1 Introduction 1.1 Background In 2011 Council adopted the Wagga Wagga Bicycle Plan following extensive community consultation. In 2015 Council was successful in obtaining funding from Transport for NSW to build on the Bicycle Plan and produce an Active Travel Plan (ATP) for the city. The ATP has taken an integrated approach to infrastructure development with other transport modes. This has been achieved by including it as an extract of the Wagga Wagga Integrated Transport Strategy (WWITS). With the key objective of removing motor vehicles off the road and increasing commuter cycling the ATP has subsequently recommended five (5) key corridors for detailed design that link trip generators and attractors throughout the city. The ATP will form the basis of Council’s application to Transport for NSW under the Cycling Towns funding program. Figure 1 demonstrates where this application fits within the commuter cycling project schedule for Wagga Wagga.

Figure 1 – Commuter Cycling Project Schedule for Wagga Wagga

Planning 2015/2017 Current Project Status WWCC Cycling Towns $785k application

Design 2017-2018

Construction 2018-2019

Evaluation 2020

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

2


1.2 What is the Active Travel Plan for Cycling? The Wagga Wagga Active Travel Plan – Cycling (ATP) is a council initiative and was jointly funded under the RMS’s “Non-Infrastructure Projects Connecting Centres for Cycling” funding program. The ATP is fundamental to achieving the goals of the Council’s Community Strategic Plan 2013 – Ruby and Oliver for a “healthy and connected city”. The ATP is part of an overall vision and strategic transport framework for the City of Wagga Wagga that has been developed as part of the Wagga Wagga Integrated Transport Strategy (WWITS). The WWITS, when adopted will provide a major new strategic approach to meeting future transport needs for the city as well as informing the future growth and development of the city. A key consideration of the WWITS is the recognition that there is a strong correlation between low-density sprawling suburbs, low levels of physical activity and poor health outcomes. Fostering healthy and active transport options can markedly improve community health and wellbeing. The development of cycling infrastructure to support cycling as an alternative mode of transport is fundamental to achieving an increase in the use of active travel. The ATP identifies a principal bike network for consultation and detailed design which will provide a significant increase in the attractiveness of cycling as a mode of transport in Wagga Wagga; it will fill the gaps in the existing network and complement the existing network of trails and paths. The ATP essentially presents a clear vision for cycling as an attractive and safe mode of travel for a wide range of trip types and users in Wagga Wagga. Figure 2 - Example of Active Travel Vision

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

3


1.3 What does the ATP do? Planning for a healthy and connected city provides an exciting opportunity to extend the benefits of cycling to all. The ATP acknowledges the work done in the 2011 Bicycle Plan and builds on this work by providing an improved response to the issues facing people moving around Wagga Wagga today and into the future. The ATP has considered the role of cycling as a legitimate mode of transport in an integrated way with all other modes of transport and considers land use. In response to the feedback received from the community during the engagement phases of the WWITS, the ATP focuses on those areas where it is critical to provide safe, connected and direct routes. The focus is on developing high quality networks and facilities for cyclists as well as ensuring that local planning and transport plans are fully integrated. The ATP proposes 45 km of bike routes that are direct, safe and close gaps in the existing network. The ATP is consistent with the principles of the WWITS. These principles were developed and tested during the WWITS Moving Forward Together process. The feedback from the Moving Forward Together (Attachment 2) confirmed community support for the guiding principles which were: • • •

Reduce reliance on private motor vehicles, and instead, encourage walking, cycling, public transport, healthy people and healthy places Provide connections and ease of movement between all centres and neighbourhoods Develop and maintain an economically viable transport system based on long term usage and informed by life-cycle costing and resource availability

It is clear that when considering cycling road safety remains a significant concern for many people and more needs to be done to address these concerns and make people feel the environment is safe enough to ride. The ATP will propose a robust and well evaluated network of cycling infrastructure that can be funded through a range of sources including the Transport for NSW’s Walking and Cycling Programs. In essence the ATP: • • • •

Promotes cycling as both a viable and safe mode of transport for Wagga Wagga Proposes a rationalised network of safe and quality routes to cycle and endof-trip facilities Considers and addresses cycling needs as part of the overall integrated transport vision for the city; and Puts forward nationally consistent and best practice bicycle facility design considerations

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

4


To deliver on these outcomes the ATP: • • • •

Provides an evaluation of the existing and future conditions impacting on where cycle ways are proposed (e.g. origins & destinations, existing routes, topography, traffic) Worked in collaboration with the community to understand existing issues and opportunities (noting that the ATP will target potential cyclists as well as current ones) Identified and evaluated major route options along five (5) potential corridors to determine the preferred alignments for consultation and detailed design Outlines and broadly costs the identified bicycle routes and facility types

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

5


2 Why an Active Travel Plan? 2.1 What is Active Travel Many people walk and ride to local destinations such as shops, cafes, parks or the post office. Others walk and ride on a daily basis to their school or workplace. Most public transport journeys start and end with a walk from the bus stop to the final destination. Cycling and walking are becoming increasingly important as a form of transport. These modes of travel are sometimes referred to as ‘active travel’, or ‘active transport’. While, for some people, these terms imply an aspect of healthy living, active forms of transport offer a broad range of benefits. These benefits can include: • • • •

increased capacity, and reduced congestion, in the overall transport network reduced environmental impacts improved public health and reduced healthcare costs improved community wellbeing and social cohesion

Figure 3 – Benefits of a Cycling City Liveability: Reduce the stress, noise and potential pollution, the impacts of excessive car use on our neighbourhoods. Give people more opportunities for interaction, recreation and access to open space

Environment: Reduce emissions, prevent loss of bushland to sprawling development and improve stormwater quality and flow by reducing the extent of paved surfaces and polluted road runoff

Cost Effectiveness: To make better use of public land, road systems and public transport infrastructure and to reduce household transport costs

Safety: Getting people out of cars onto cycling is an effective means of reducing the road toll, and crime can be reduced by providing opportunities for passive surveillance

Equity: Give young people, older people and others without a car better access to employment, education and other urban services

Health: Promote physical activity to lower the incidence of obesity, depression and other illnesses related to sedentary lifestyles

2.2 What an Active Travel Plan can do for Wagga Wagga Against a city backdrop of a growing population, high levels of obesity and chronic heart disease, and emerging patterns of congestion on some roads, cycling offers a wealth of benefits to the City of Wagga Wagga. Increasing commuter cycling will provide commuters with an additional form of exercise and a sustainable mode of transport. Active Travel Plan - Cycling

6


An identified opportunity for Wagga Wagga is many households already own a bike and it is a growing recreation activity. The number of bikes sold by the 3 specialty stores annually has increased by 17% between 2007 and 2013. Consultation undertaken has identified that 70% of Wagga Wagga residents said that they would ride as a form of transport if it was safer to do so. With improved cycling infrastructure it is expected that commuter cycling will increase significantly. “The fact is that cycling has never had so many benefits – for the health of the population, its bank balances or for the planet; there are many reasons why it makes sense to cycle”. (Source: The Australian National Cycling Strategy 2016).

Figure 4 - Bikes sold in Wagga Wagga between 2009 and 2013

Number of Bikes Sold in Wagga Wagga Annually 3000 2900 2800 2700 2600 2500 2400 2300 2200 2009

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

2010

2011

2012

2013

7


2.2.1 Urban spaces and traffic congestion Increasing cycling can reduce traffic congestion and improve the quality of life in our city. Congestion is an emergent issue for the city with key routes already seeing signs of reduced level of service. The heavy reliance on the car (e.g. between 74% and 80% of trips to work are made by car in Wagga Wagga (reference ABS 2011) is responsible for traffic congestion and has the potential to make our transport system vulnerable Modelling undertaken for the WWITS identifies that a small number of routes such as the Sturt Highway, Olympic Highway and Glenfield Road are showing early signs of congestion. This congestion will increase significantly by 2025 to 2030 if Council does not undertake any changes to current growth policies, the density of scale of development and transport infrastructure provision. Bicycles are considered to impose 95% less traffic congestion than an average car. Furthermore, many people tend to overestimate travel times by bicycle. In Wagga Wagga, 67% of the city’s employment occurs within the Sturt Highway CBD catchment. Given that cyclist’s typically travel on average at 15-20km/h, they can travel 3.0km in 10 minutes. This indicates there is great scope to increase the number of trips being made by people by bike if high quality cycling routes were established within a 3km radius of the CBD. Figure 5 –3km Catchment for employment nodes in CBD and on Sturt Highway

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

8


Traffic modelling undertaken for the WWITS clearly identifies that the majority of trips by car in Wagga Wagga are short trips and contained well within the urban areas. Many of these short trips are suitable for cycling; assuming safe and connected facilities are available. In addition, Wagga Wagga has a large quantity of wide, low volume roads. As such, there is an ability to undertake “road diets” (figure 6) and provide separated bicycle facilities within the existing road carriageway. The ATP when recommending onroad cycling facilities has suggested the possible use of road diets for consideration and consultation during the detailed design phase of the project. Initial Traffic modelling undertaken for the WWITS indicates that the use of road diets on the identified routes would not adversely affect traffic flow and confirms that some CBD and central streets could be used to provide a substantial network of safe, connected and separated cycle ways. Figure 6 – Road Diet: Providing safe separated bike paths on wide road reserves Note the car in the left hand lane is incorrectly parked – it’s facing the oncoming traffic

2.2.2 Improving Health By increasing people’s physical activity, cycling can help reduce pressure on health services. Globally, physical inactivity is estimated to cause two million deaths each year, representing between 10 and 16% of cases of breast cancer, colon cancers, diabetes, and over 20% of heart disease cases. (Australian National Cycling Strategy 2016). The scene in Australia is similar with approximately 16,000 deaths each year attributable to physical inactivity.

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

9


Inactivity and obesity are linked, with an estimated 61% of adults currently being identified as overweight or obese. According to the Heart Foundation, the Riverina region, including Wagga Wagga, has the highest proportion of obese residents with 81% not completing the two and a half hours a week of moderate to vigorous physical activity considered necessary for good health. As well as helping to address obesity, regular physical activity can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. It can also improve mental well-being by reducing feelings of stress, anxiety and depression. Cycling to work, school or study offers people an opportunity to undertake regular activity while not cutting precious free time. Cycling is currently recognised as the fourth most popular physical activity in Australia. Motor Vehicles are major contributors to the production of air pollutants such as carbon oxides and sulphur oxides, which are widely known to contribute to chronic diseases and respiratory ailments. The National Cycling Strategy 2016 outlines that between September 2008 and 2009 transport was responsible for almost 15% of Australia’s carbon emissions and pollution. As a zero pollutant mode of transport cycling is a key component of strategies aiming to reduce pollutions into the atmosphere as even a small reduction in short vehicle trips can generate a significant reduction in pollution.

2.2.3 Personal Benefits Individuals cite a variety of reasons for the use of bicycles, but the repeated themes are exercise/health reasons and proximity to home or work/study. Cycling can save people time, can provide an opportunity to meet new people, and can help build a community’s social capital. Whilst consultation and evidence demonstrates that there is a wealth of reasons to get on bikes, the low numbers of people cycling in Australia indicates that individuals are still reluctant to do so. It is recognised that the ease and benefits of cycling are highlighted through education and that investment in infrastructure be supported by a range of behavioural change strategies to encourage people to cycle, such as the Ride 2 Work and Ride 2 School initiatives. 2.2.4 Cost Savings Cycling can save people money. It has been estimated that the cost of operating and maintaining a bicycle is around 5% of the equivalent costs for a motor vehicle. When combined with the significant health and wider societal benefits, switching to cycling can dramatically reduce an individual’s expenditure. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the savings are likely to grow in light of a probable rise in fuel prices. Active Travel Plan - Cycling

10


3 Strategic Directions 3.1 Existing Bicycle Network The current bicycle infrastructure in the Wagga Wagga LGA is only provided within the City and proximate suburbs, with cyclists needing to ride on-road to access more rural areas. Most of the formal bicycle facilities are off-road shared paths which have a loose gravel surface. This limits their use by road, and to a lesser extent, hybrid bike types. Currently the extent of the network is largely unconnected. This requires users to use a range of facilities, and at times mix with traffic between major trip generators and attractors. Figure 7 shows the proposed network as recommended by the Wagga Wagga Bike Plan 2011. It includes existing paths (green) and proposed paths (pink).

Figure 7 - Existing and Proposed Cycleway Network - 2011 Bike Plan

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

11


This ATP has built upon the research of the 2011 Bike Plan to identify 5 principle corridors. These corridors have become the focus of the ATP with the goal of providing quality and safe cycling routes from all sides of the city to the CBD and major employment centres.

3.2 The Future Plan 3.2.1 The Process The ATP has been developed as part of the broader Wagga Wagga Integrated transport Strategy. The project methodology is outlined in Figure 8 below and has included several opportunities for community engagement.

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

12


Figure 8 - Wagga Wagga Integrated Transport Strategy project methodology

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

13


The community engagement undertaken for the WWITS included a visioning workshop, drop-in Speak Out sessions, an online survey and an online interactive mapping exercise. Following on from these preliminary sessions the ideas and opportunities to emerge from the consultation were further tested in the Moving Forward Together process (Attachment 2). During the initial consultation phase of the WWITS community consultation seven main themes emerged (Table 1). Cycling issues came out as the number one theme.

Table 1 - Top 7 issues raised during WWITS Community Consultation Concerns

Number of concerns

Number of opportunities

Total

Rank Order

Cyclists, Cycle Ways and Rail Trials

78

76

154

1

Public Transport

37

57

94

2

Roads, road conditions, access, roundabouts and signage

34

56

90

3=

Shared cycling and footpaths

41

49

90

3=

Parking

42

23

65

4

Congestion, pollution and reduced car reliance

54

10

64

5

Safety

29

5

34

6

Driver behaviour and education

23

10

33

7

This consultation process identified the negative perception the community currently has of the city’s cycling infrastructure. The main concerns centred on safety, connectivity and maintenance. Additional issues identified included: • • • • •

Inadequate path surfaces Lack of end-of-trip facilities Lack of separation between cyclists and vehicles Lack of signage that raises awareness of cyclists for drivers Current facilities are generally of a low cost marked lane type

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

14


The community also recognised potential opportunities for cycling in Wagga Wagga, including providing educational programs, raising awareness of cyclists and increasing the provision of supporting facilities, such as secure storage and showers. Other opportunities identified include: • • • • •

Providing high quality off-road facilities along levy banks and potentially the unused rail corridor and its alternatives Developing standard designs for active transport facilities to be progressively implemented from the CBD out and along key access routes Developing and incorporating holistic network blueprints so they have statutory weight, which will then help ensure that new developments are required to tie into and / or provide active transport facilities Changing development control plans and the Section 94 Plan to require active transport facilities as part of all development applications, including end-of-trip facilities Tourism related opportunities, both from a holiday and organised events perspective, with the implementation of high quality active transport facilities and supporting information that provides links to the many natural attractions in the area

In addition, the consultation demonstrated that the community is aware of and supports the proposed high quality cycleway corridors as had previously been identified in community consultation (Figure 9).

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

15


Figure 9 - Wagga Wagga high quality cycling corridors

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

16


3.2.2 The Principal Bike Network The essence of the ATP is the identification of a Principal Bike Network (PBN) for the City of Wagga Wagga. This PBN has been developed based on the consultation and detailed investigation of the existing network and a series of new proposed key routes. The PBN and route analysis undertaken to determine the key corridors is identified in Attachment 3 Design Principles and Route Analysis. The proposed routes identified within the PBN are recommended for consultation and further investigation during the detailed design phase of the project. In identifying the PBN key active travel principles were essential in guiding the selection and identification of the 5 key routes. They were: • • • •

Develop a strategic network of safe, separated, connected and affordable cycling routes, utilising excess road space where appropriate. Develop high quality recreation and tourism circuit that complements the commuter cycle ways. Provide connectivity between cycle ways, establish links and networks. Prioritise implementation of quality cycling treatments over quantity.

The priority for implementing the PBN will be determined by the next phase of the project which is to undertake a detailed design of each of the key routes. Once detailed design and further consultation has been completed council will be in a position to prioritise the delivery of each of the routes. The assessment to determine the priorities will be based on an assessment of which routes achieves the best outcomes for the city. In particular it will review: • • •

The impact the route will have on car dependency in areas where congestion is beginning to appear; The overlap between the PBN and some of the key designated pedestrian paths The ability for the route to link to potential regional recreational /tourism links such as the Wiradjuri trail along the river and the potential rail trail to Ladysmith.

3.2.3 Cycling Projects & Programs To support the effective implementation of the PBN additional cycling infrastructure and policy will be required to be implemented. This will include: •

The provision of end of trip facilities at key locations inclusive of centralised bike parking and associated facilities such as showers. This will assist in the attractiveness of key destinations as well as support cycling as a legitimate mode of transport.

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

17


•

When reviewing the Wagga Wagga Local Environment Plan (LEP) and Development Control Plan (DCP) Council should integrate cycling policies into these instruments. Actions for integrating the ATP into the planning instruments include: o Ensuring LEP objectives reflect bicycle objectives; o Ensuring detailed provisions of the ATP are included in DCPs, such as including end of trip facilities and determining bicycle parking provisions in a car parking DCP o Ensuring precinct master plans for growth areas identify cycling routes and connections to the five (5) key routes outlined in this ATP; and o Ensuring developer contributions plans fund works identified in bicycle and pedestrian plans.

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

18


4 Implementation 4.1 Recommended Network The 2011 Bike Plan recommended over 100km of cycleways in Wagga Wagga. The recommended principle network as shown in figure 10 for active travel is 45km. An outcome of adopting this network will be that some of the proposed pathways recommended in 2011 bike plan will not be built. Additionally some existing on road routes will be phased out when they come to the end of their useful life. This will ensure the network is more financially sustainable in the future as the Council will have a better capacity to maintain the smaller but higher quality network.

Figure 10 - Wagga Wagga Principle Bike Network for Active Travel

This network was determined using a comprehensive route analysis. (Attachment 3)

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

19


Table 2 - Trip attractors connected in the high quality cycling corridors TRIP ATTRACTORS – CENTRAL LINK Hospitals Commercial / Retail Areas

Aged Care

Schools

Recreational Facilities

Calvary Private Hospital Wagga Wagga Rural Referral Hospital Tolland Shopping Centre Turvey Park Shopping Centre South Wagga Shopping Centre Central Wagga Shopping Precinct The Haven RSL LifeCare Mary Potter Tolland Public School Mount Austin High School Henschke Primary School Turvey Park Public School Wagga Wagga Public School Northside Shopping Complex St Joseph’s Primary School South Wagga Public School Jubilee Sporting Complex (Touch, Rugby Union, Hockey) Kessler Park French Fields Harris Park Gissing Oval Wagga Wagga Showgrounds (Trotting track) South Wagga Tennis Courts Collins Park Wagga Wagga Cricket Ground Victory Memorial Gardens Cabarita Park Wagga Wagga Beach Oasis Swimming Complex Bolton Park Sporting Complex

2

4

2

8

14

30 TRIP ATTRACTORS - KAPOOKA LINK Commercial / Retail Ashmont Shopping Centre Areas Northside Shopping Complex Aged Care Loreto Home of Compassion Schools Kapooka Public School Ashmont Public School Holy Trinity Primary School Wagga Wagga Public School St Josephs Primary School Recreational Facilities Jack Misson Oval Wagga Wagga Cricket Ground

2 1

5

2 10

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

20


TRIP ATTRACTOR - NORTH SOUTH LINK (combine with south) Universities / Tafe

Charles Sturt University

1

Commercial / Retail Areas

Marketplace Shopping Centre Sturt Mall Shopping Centre

2

Schools

Lake Albert Public School Kooringal Public School Wagga Wagga Christian College St Joseph’s Primary School The Riverina Anglican College

5

Recreational Facilities

Apex Park Lake Albert Paramore Park Netball Centre Bolton Park Robertson Oval Oasis Swimming Complex Victory Memorial Gardens Cabarita Park Wagga Wagga Beach Wagga Wagga Cricket Ground

10

18 TRIP ATTRACTORS – FOREST HILL LINK Forest Hill Public School Schools Wagga Wagga Christian College Commercial / Retail Forest Hill Shopping Centre Areas Forest Hill Oval Recreational Facilities Paramore Park

2 1 2 5

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

21


4.2 End of Trip Facilities Identified during the public consultation was the need for end of trip cycling facilities. In Wagga Wagga many workplaces have space for bike storage and some have shower facilities. However it has been identified that end of trip facilities are required to be provided for commuters and cyclists whose destinations do not provide these facilities. Three locations have been identified for needing end of trip facilities (figure 12). They are the health precinct, Bolton Park/Oasis complex and the Civic Centre precinct. From these location cyclists will be able to access all areas of the CBD. The design features recommended for these facilities are: a) Caged area for bike security and regular uses b) Swipe card entry for regular uses c) Non fenced area for casual users d) Be a roofed structure e) Inclusive of the provision of closed circuit TV f) Be lit g) Aesthetic compatible with the surround environment.

Figure 11 – Example of an End of Trip Facility

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

22


Figure 12 - Wagga Wagga End of Trip Facilities in the CBD

4.3 Implementation Schedule Table 3 below provides a high level project implementation schedule.

Table 3 – Implementation schedule Project Phase Planning

Financial Years 2015/16 and 2016/17

Design

2017/18

Implementation

2018/19 and 2019/20

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

Budget $117,000

Funding Comments Completed. Was funded by TforNSW Non Infrastructure Projects and WWCC $785,000 Proposed funding from TforNSW Cycling Towns ($785k) and WWCC ($73k) $10,458,000 Proposed funding from TforNSW Cycling Towns, WWCC and other sources

23


5 List of Attachments Attachment 1: Local MP Letter of Support from Daryl Maguire Attachment 2: Moving Forward Together Outcomes Attachment 3: Detailed Principle and Route Analysis Attachment 4: Design Costs Attachment 5: WWITS Technical Report (Draft for discussion)

Active Travel Plan - Cycling

24

Active Travel Plan 2016  
Active Travel Plan 2016