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Friday, March 26, 2021 • Vol.113 No. 29 • Rivers, Manitoba

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Serving the Rivers, Rapid City and Oak River areas for 113 years

Poppy Fund brings a smile to local veteran

r

Gazette-Reporter

Former local pens second book

Serving the Rivers, Rapid City and Oak River areas for 109 years

March 30, 2018

Volume 110, Issue 37

89¢ + tax

Submitted Sheila Runions

played in their lives. The Thankfulness Project and women I met and the stor- that was to “share these ies they shared taught me incredible women’s stories It was in early 2013 that that thankfulness is one of in hopes that people would Derek Bradley authored his the most important tools in see themselves in them in Back row L/R: Meghan Knelsen, Erich Schmidt, first book, Don’t Blame the building and maintaining a some way, and consider to Thom Heijmans, Heather Children: a father’s journey fulfilling life. intentionally choose to find Gray, Liliane Dupuis. Front row L/R: Minami Kijima, Haile of learning to unlearn. Eight “I hope you’re inspired the good located in all we Hubbard, Chassidy Payette, years later, he has a second by the gift of their stories have endured — inclusive Morgan Ramsay, Bryce title to his credit: 365 1/4: as much as I was and that of the infamous 2020 — by Summers, Quinn Hrabok. A Thankfulness Project, each one will find its way redirecting their focus to which became available to those who may feel stuck living a more grateful life.” through Derek in March and need a gentle nudge If you would like a gentle and can also be purchased to move forward from a thankfulness nudge to assist from Amazon, Chapters/ challenging circumstance. with this type of perspective Indigo, Word Alive Press These stories will help those shift, why not support a forbookstores or as an ebook. who may need to reconnect mer local and buy his book? This title is most befitting with life’s blessings through Derek lived in Rivers from for the Covid times in which the gift of being thankful.” 1975 until his RCI graduaRunions we are living; the 170-page All the women he inter- tion in 1990. Photo He by is Sheila the son soft cover features short viewed agreed to share their of Lynn Bradley, who still stories from women and stories in hopes that one day calls Rivers home, and the their perspective on how their experiences may help late “Right Honourable” choosing to be grateful in and empower other people, Ed Bradley. By Sheila Runions all things have benefitted of all walks and Banner Staff their lives. ages, to be more cans from the school foyer into and Chimo Beach areas for con- put away in the proper place on s r e p or t e d i n t he tion to the schools. The book’s jacket asks The Pupils co-ordinated the entire the church basement the thankful. after- tributions from the community. the shelving units. They were March 9 edition, the several self-reflective quesstories he heard Grade 12 Interdisci- month-long promotion, which noon of March 21, where the When all was said and done, fantastic! We are very, very food weighed and sorted. the scales at Riverdale Harvest pleased.” plinary Studies in Science class culminated in a ceremonious tions such as:wasHave you and wrote range noted a total of 434 pounds, “a Elementary school staff mem20 found to Although the project a sen- interviews at Rivers Collegiate planned a presentation on March ever yourself facingwas from project for Riverdale Harvest. Riverdale Harvest president ior students brainstorm, the en- fabulous amount,” says Heather. ber/Harvest volunteer Yvonne a tough circumstance and, with Olympian tire high school was encouraged “We are so pleased they decided Crouch initiated a similar camDubbed the Boat Load of Food, Heather Gray and Liliane. nomelted matter to how hard youThe try,collegiate Janis Kelly to we serve. A lot paign in her school. That threeto help those Because the snow had participate. students secured a canoe from you can’t seem to shake feelcancer survivor Rolling River School Division so much, the canoe could not hosted a poor boy floor hockey of times kids don’t get enough week effort simply encouraged but this group of students students to leave product in streetof to ingratitude? tournament in which toShawna play, credit with an intent to f ill it with be portaged across theings Derek PaulRiver- athletes had toquery pay with food for daughter certainly deserves some praise. the canoe; 87 pounds of food non-perishables. Although the Zion Church (home of responds to that Pake, campaign was fully organized dale Harvest). Rather, the teens the canoe. Some students also All students stayed behind to was collected from the younger by stating on the jacket, of Cliff and Judy by that class, the original idea carried bags, boxes and garbage canvassed Rivers, Oak River help check expiry dates, sort and group on Thursday, March 22. “That’s exactly what was Paul of Rivers. came from a suggestion made happening to me until I There are also by harvest volunteer Liliane Dupuis. had a chance encounter accounts from “I heard the idea at a meetwith a homeless woman a federal deping in Brandon. St. Augustine who motivated me to reflect u t y m i n i s t e r School had tried Fill a Canoe SUBMITTED PHOTO on what it truly meant to and Rivers’ own in conjunction with the 10-day Royal Canadian Legion Branch #75 recently used the Poppy Fund to purchase be thankful. For one year, Dora Irvine. Festival du Voyaguer in Wina new wheel chair for a local veteran, Patrick Wells. Pat is a resident of the nipeg in February. It was very 365 ¼ days, I interviewed Derek had Riverdale Personal Care home. He sayssuccessful that hisand room there is a step up from whenever I hear a variety of women about a goal in mind some he lived in during his long militaryfood career and is happy there. Keep bank, my earshe always perk their life experiences and when aut horup!” smiling soldier. the role that being thankful ing 365 1/4: A She then brought the sug-

Can collections for canoes

A

gestion to Riverdale Harvest, which supported the idea and asked her to present the promo-

The canoe at Rivers Elementary School was adequately filled.

The Banner will have an Early deadline due to Good Friday, be sure to have ads in by Monday at 2 p.m.

Photo by Heather Gray


A2 Rivers Banner March 26, 2021

C-19 lockdown could be handled better I

think just about everyone is at the end of their patience with COVID-19 and it’s hard to blame them. I strongly believe that C-19 is real and especially real for people who have lost loved ones to the virus. We do, however, have to understand that only 129 more people died in Manitoba in 2020 than in 2019. It remains to the researchers to find out why that is the case. A lot has been learned about C-19 and how to handle it all. Unfortunately, that knowledge came too late for the people who died. There are some things I think should have been done and still need to be done. Care homes are understaffed and underfunded. The underfunding has been going on for at least 20 years. As I said in a previous column, that means the Liberals and Conservatives are to blame at the federal level and the NDP and the Conservatives at the provincial level. Lots of blame to go around. At the risk of hurting some feelings, I

think there could be better policies and more opportunity for training. It goes without saying that any organization can be improved at any time. That is in no way meant as an insult, especially to front line workers. As is often the case, the foolishness comes to the surface at the top and there have been some serious mistakes in how policy is developed and how it is administered. When all hell broke loose in some care homes, it has to be asked, “What could have been done better?” When care home residents were severely stressed, why weren’t ambulances and paramedics called in sooner? I can’t understand that. If someone was in emergency medical need at home, you would call an ambulance. If someone was under medical stress at the workplace or at the grocery store, you would call an ambulance. Why not at the care homes? Why did several people have to die before ambulances were called? Care homes are often short staffed. If that’s the case, somebody should be

RIGHT IN THE CENTRE

Ken Waddell held accountable. If care homes failed inspections, where are the repercussions? If people have been fired, then we haven’t heard about it. Anecdotal results tell us that some deaths may have happened because of dehydration. Nobody should die of dehydration. And when death comes, nobody should die alone. Letting people die alone verges on criminal. But what about the world outside the care homes? Haven’t we gone far enough with lockdowns and staying at home? Between what happened in Manitoba with lockdowns and what happened in South Dakota with few lockdowns,

there has to be some middle ground. I think the biggest mistake was the unfairness of the lockdowns. It is impossible to explain why a cannabis store or liquor store can be open, but not a clothing store. Even harder to explain was how you could buy some clothes in a department store, but not other clothes. It was insane to imagine and even more insane to try and administer. All stores should have been allowed to stay open at 50 per cent or whatever capacity. We will never be able to explain how Walmart could stay open, but the nail technician, the dress shop and hairdresser had to close.

What Is Easter? Part 2

We begin part two with the completed verse referring to the Lord Jesus Christ from last week’s letter. Philippians 2:6-8 - “Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to His own advantage; rather, He made Himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming - ‘obedient to death - even on a cross.’” Before discussing His crucifixion, let’s have a brief glimpse into His life. Jesus was raised in the town of Nazareth in Galilee (Israel) and the Gospel of Mark (chapter 6:3) says He was a carpenter by trade. At the age of 30 (Luke 3:23) He left Nazareth and headed south for an encounter with John the Baptist. In the wilderness of Judea, John was telling the people to repent and be baptized, for the Lord was coming to establish His Kingdom, and John had been appointed the herald of the King. Listen to the words of John: John 1:23 - “I am the voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Make way for the Lord.’” When He sees Jesus, John cries out: John 1:29 - “Look, the Lamb of God. who takes away the sin of the world!” John baptizes Jesus and He receives the anointing of the Holy Spirit to commence His ministry (Matthew 3:16,17.) Matthew 4:17 - “From that time on, Jesus began to preach, ‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.’” During His ministry, Jesus calls His disciples, proclaims the good news of the gospel - that He is the only way to eternal life in heaven - and asserts that He is the Son of God with power and authority.

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STAFF

He doles out a blistering condemnation against the self righteous Jewish leaders who refused to accept that they were as sinful as the beggar, drunkard, thief, and the prostitute, and in just as much need of a saviour; which is why they conspired to kill Him. With His ministry at its end, Jesus makes His final trip to Jerusalem. Let’s have a look at the events laid out in Matthew, chapters 26 and 27. Matthew 26:17-29 - Jesus and His disciples partake of the final Passover, or the last supper, eating bread and wine which are symbolic of His body and blood. During the meal, Judas Iscariot leaves to betray Jesus into the hands of His enemies. Matthew 26:30-56 - Jesus and His disciples go to Gethsemane, located on the Mount of Olives, where He prays to the Father to be strengthened for the task at hand. Judas appears with a group of men armed with swords and clubs to arrest Jesus. Matthew 26:57-75 - Jesus is taken to the Jewish leaders who ask Him if He is the Messiah, the Son of God, to which Jesus replies that He is indeed. On this statement, He is charged with blasphemy and is mocked, slapped, punched and spit on. Matthew 27:11-26 - Jesus is taken to Pontius Pilate who has the authority to have Him put to death. Pilate finds Jesus guilty of no crime, but the leaders continue to call for His crucifixion. Afraid of a revolt, Pilate has Jesus f logged and hands Him over to be crucified. Matthew 27:27-31 - The governor’s soldiers strip off Jesus’ clothes, place a crown of thorns on His head and a staff in His hand while crying out “Hail, king of Jews.” They continue to spit on Him and strike Him in the head again and again with the staff, then lead Him off to be crucified.

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Matthew 27:32-44 - As Jesus hung on the cross in humiliation, people continued to throw insults at Him and challenged Him to come off the cross if He truly was the Son of God. Matthew 27:45-56 - From noon until three in the afternoon, darkness came over the land and Jesus cried out “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me.” Immediately after, Jesus cried out in a loud voice and gave up His spirit which was followed by an earthquake. Matthew 27:57-65 - As evening approached, a man named Joseph of Arimathea asked Pilate for Jesus’ body. Joseph wrapped the body and placed it in a new burial tomb. The Jewish leaders, afraid some of the disciples will steal the body and claim that Jesus had risen from the dead, asked Pilate to place guards at the tomb and have it sealed, making it impossible for the body to be taken. My friends, the Son of God could have come off that cross with but a word, but do you realize that if He did, the penalty for sin would not have been paid and each one of us would have been condemned to eternal punishment. Redemption and eternal life is available only to those who believe in their hearts and confess with their mouths that Jesus is Lord (Romans 10:9,10.) Next week we’ll discover what happened at the tomb. In the meantime, please contact me if you have any questions, comments or concerns at jgklassen@ icloud.com

PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AD DEADLINE: TUESDAY 12 PM PRIOR TO ISSUE DATE Rivers Banner does not guarantee publication of any submitted articles or pictures. Such submissions, if printed, will appear at the discretion of the managing editor or publisher and only when time and space permit. We are not responsible for fax and e-mail transmissions which are not confirmed either in person or by phone.

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March 26, 2021 Rivers Banner A3

Home Bodies By Rita Friesen Ramblings….

G

ardening is an ever learning curve for me. Truthfully, I have learned a great deal. There was the year I attempted to store carrots in a carton of barley. Having heard tales of root vegetables being safely stored in a grain bin, probably wheat, and being firm and crisp by spring, I deduced that if I brought grain inside and stored the whole kit and caboodle in the cold room, the end results should be the same. No. By January, there was a distinct malt odour in the basement and further examination located a puddle of brew seeping from the carrot carton. It was not a pleasant task to haul a weeping, sagging box upstairs and outside. Never did that again. So it was not a total lost cause, I learned one more how not to. I also reasoned that bringing down more potatoes than I would need, or use, in one winter, simply meant extra work in the spring, once again lugging sprouted, softened root vegetables up and out. I do hear witness that both of these root crops can be wonderfully stored and amazingly fresh until spring. I do hear that... Last fall, I decided to try something here in my home with no basement, only a crawl space. Selecting

a number of geraniums– those bearing my favourite coloured blossoms– I pulled them, allowed them to partially dry, cut off the tops and placed them with crumpled, dampened newspaper in a five gallon pail in the crawl space. Not wanting to start the regrowth too early, I waited until the first week of March and pulled them up. They had not been watered all winter, looked half alive, and so four of them where started in potting soil. Another one was placed in water to see if the roots would enliven. Within days, there were fresh sprouts on all four in the soil, and a strong discolouration in the water around the bare roots. It is a delight to watch the steady growth, promise of healthy plants for summer. I had/have one broken stem from another plant I have nurtured in the living room, all winter! And that one rooted well and now is also a good looking possibility. Not that I love geraniums, they are hardy and bright, and I have memories of many a farm kitchen cheered by a lanky geranium, often planted in a coffee tin, but I was curious if the crawl space would allow roots to stay safe and alive for a winter. Because– I want to plant dahlias this summer and hope to keep those roots for years to come. It should work. Gardening is good for body and soul. Soil under the fingernails, aches in the knees and a sense of having worked with the earth to make the world a better place. True story– I can clean stalls, dig in the dirt and generally muck about and never feel sullied. Should I get any batter on my hands, or, heaven forbid, grease or yolk, I can’t wash it off quickly enough. Yucky. Long may I garden and long may I continue to learn.

From last week's front page From last week's front page

Observation

By Addy Oberlin Rivers Banner

T

he month is nearing its end. We went through a time change and an equinox and Spring is now beginning. We have had some beautiful days here. It is amazing that even in this time with many perils, like the pandemic and reaching as many people as possible with the Covid vaccine, that nature is just running its course the way God created it. Oh yes, and I heard the honking of some geese flying over the other day. Little birds are singing away in the trees and I can actually see some grass. God is good. He will restore our land. I will always remember a verse in the Bible that was hanging in a church that I attended. The Lord told Solomon in 2 Chronicles 7:14 “If My people, who are called by My name, will humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” In verse 15, the Lord says that His ears will be attentive to the prayers. Let us not forget to keep on praying.

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Rivers Community Church 447 Edward Street, Rivers

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We are holding services each Sunday at 10:30 a.m., in accordance with current government regulations. PLEASE JOIN US! If you are more comfortable sharing in our service from the safety of your home, watch our Facebook page: Rivers Community Church

By Chad Carpenter

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A4 Rivers Banner March 26, 2021

COVID-19 pandemic – Lessons to keep

As we approach the one-year anniversary of pandemic lockdowns, COVID-19 fatigue has set in for most. We want to see our families again. We want to have a barbeque with our neighbors. We want to be able to meet a group of friends at a restaurant. While we don’t want to talk about positives coming out of the COVID-19 experience, there are lessons for our relationship to agriculture and food that need to be remembered after the pandemic response ends. One of the foremost lessons we have learned during this pandemic is the importance of people on the front lines. There are too many “front lines” to list. I am grateful for them all. I would like to focus on the front-line workers of Canada’s food supply. Being able to put food on the table depends upon staff at grocery stores being willing to come to work every day despite the risk of infection. Having full grocery shelves would not be possible without truckers who are willing to make the long haul, even with restaurants and rest facilities closed across the country. Farmers from coast to coast continue to produce healthy and nutritious food. We would be lost without them. We cannot forget the workers who keep our processing plants running. These jobs might have been taken for granted in the past, but we need to acknowledge their importance. It would only be a matter of days before meat counters were empty if processing plants were forced to close due

to labour shortages. Canada’s agriculture supply chains have proven to be incredibly resilient during the pandemic. Demand from domestic consumers continues to be met, and we are seeing record export levels for agriculture commodities as countries around the world turn to Canada as a reliable supplier. We should honour the people who have created and maintain this reliability. We can do this by giving priority vaccine access to those employed in critical infrastructure and essential services. The second key lesson from COVID-19 is the importance of biosecurity. How do you stop a pandemic (no this is not the beginning of a bad joke)? The best way is to prevent the virus from spreading from one host to another. We have spent a year physical distancing, limiting contacts outside of our home, not travelling, and wearing masks. These lessons apply to raising livestock too. Foreign diseases are one of the biggest threats to the animals under producers’ care. Like COVID-19, these diseases are spread from contact with someone who has travelled to an infection zone, contact with infected animals, and contaminated equipment, feed, and clothing. African Swine Fever (ASF) is one example of a virus that has devastated the pork industry around the world. For the past fifteen years, the disease has spread across Africa, central Asia, and several European countries. Some estimate that more than

200 million pigs in China were lost in the first year of the outbreak there. There is no cure for the disease and there is no vaccine to protect animals. How do we keep ASF out of the Canadian swine population? Through rigorous adherence to biosecurity protocols, similar to steps taken to limit the spread of COVID-19. Animals that are brought into barns screened to be disease free, as is the feed used to raise healthy animals. Pork producers also restrict contact with the outside world through carefully limiting barn access to only those who provide animal care. The threat of disease outbreaks is why we are seeing provincial governments across the country pass legislation that impose penalties for those who trespass onto farm operations. This legislation is a necessary step to protect animals, and helps producers ensure that disease outbreaks like ASF do not happen. Gratitude for front line workers that keep our grocery shelves full. Understanding the reasons for enforcement of strict biosecurity requirements that keep livestock safe from devastating foreign animal diseases. These are two lessons from the global pandemic that should not be forgotten after we are vaccinated, and the lockdowns are finally lifted. Cam Dahl, General Manager of Manitoba Pork

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Manitoba remains at ‘critical’ on pandemic response system

Based on feedback from Manitobans, concerns over rising variants case numbers and the need to maintain the stability of the health-care system, the Manitoba government is making minor changes to the current public health orders and will remain at the ‘critical’ (red) level on the #RestartMB Pandemic Response System, while continuing to balance the needs of the health-care system, Premier Brian Pallister and Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba’s chief provincial health officer, announced today. “At every step of the way throughout this pandemic, we’ve endeavored to reach out directly to Manitobans to get their input and perspectives on a variety of measures and their comfort level with learning to live with this virus. Once again, I want to thank Manitobans for providing their feedback for the next stages of our gradual reopening,” said Pallister. “As more Manitobans get back to doing some of the activities they love and have missed over the

past few months, it is crucial that we continue to follow the fundamentals and avoid the activities that are known to cause the greatest risk.” Following feedback from Manitobans, only a limited number of the options proposed late last week will be implemented in the next round of public health orders. The following changes to public health orders go into effect on Friday, March 26 at 12:01 a.m. and will expire on April 15: • increasing gathering limits at outdoor public places to 25 from 10 people; • increasing gathering limits at weddings and funerals to 25 from 10 people; • maintaining the capacity limits for retail stores at 50 per cent, but expanding the in-store limits to a 500-person capacity, whichever is lower, with other public health measures still in effect; and • relaxing rules for drive-in events to allow people to leave their vehicles while still observing public health measures. Roussin noted that changes

to indoor or outdoor gathering sizes at personal residences or in restaurants will not be introduced, as prolonged contact has a higher risk of transmitting the virus. “We are carefully monitoring our hospitalization data and case numbers of cases linked to variants of concern to ensure that as we gradually reopen, we continue to have capacity in the system,” said Roussin. “That said, we are going to see more cases and more exposures as we slowly reopen. COVID-19 will be here to stay for awhile, and we need to work together to manage its effects and protect our most vulnerable. We can continue to do this by following the fundamentals including mask wearing, frequent handwashing, staying home when sick and getting vaccinated when eligible.” Additional changes may be considered after spring break, Passover and Easter if data supports making further reopening efforts, Roussin said. The new public health

orders follow priorities set out by Manitobans in response to the survey launched on March 18 with proposed changes. Nearly 32,000 responses were provided on the proposals and preliminary results indicated: • 53 per cent of respondents felt increasing gathering limits at outdoor public places to 25 people is an appropriate next step; • 48 per cent of respondents felt increasing gathering limits at weddings, funerals and other gatherings to 25 people is an appropriate next step; • 45 per cent of respondents felt expanding capacity limits for retail stores to 50 per cent or 500 people, whichever is lower, is an appropriate next step; • respondents indicated that their top priority of the proposed public health changes was increasing gathering limits at an outdoor public place to 25 people; and • 39 per cent of respondents indicated that bigger changes should wait until after Passover and Easter or later to prevent further spread of COVID-19.

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March 26, 2021 Rivers Banner A5

Spruce Plains RCMP report

By Cpl. Jacob Stanton Spruce Plains RCMP

During the week of Mar. 15 to Mar. 21, Spruce Plains RCMP dealt with 43 police activities. Mar. 15: RCMP received a complaint of an erratic driver in the RM of Oakview traveling at a high rate of speed. Police made patrols for the suspect vehicle but were unable to locate it. Police conducted a Covid compliance check at a residence in Minnedosa. All person(s) were found complying with quarantine regulations. Police received a report of a hit and run to a vehicle in Gladstone; there was insufficient evidence to proceed further. Mar. 16: RCMP responded to a report of an abandoned vehicle parked on a lot in Minnedosa. After investigation it was learned that the vehicle was stolen out of Saskatchewan; the investigation is ongoing. Police were dispatched to a chimney fire at a residence in Kelwood. The fire was contained to

the stove and chimney; there were no other damages to the residence or reported injuries. It was determined the fire had likely started due to the drastic fluctuation of outside temperatures. RCMP conducted 13 traffic enforcement actions during this reporting period. Public service announcement If you have any information about these crimes or any other crimes, please contact your local RCMP Office or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477. Due to the on-going COVID-19 Pandemic, the Neepawa and Minnedosa RCMP detachments advise they will be limiting front counter services at the detachments until further notice. We request that you contact each detachment at 204-4767340 (Neepawa) or 204-8672916 (Minnedosa) to inquire about criminal record checks or to file a report. Leave a message if needed and it will be checked the following business day.


ready for a tornado?

A6 Rivers Banner March 26, 2021 onrmed touchdown Environment Canada is the authority on weather Killarney. If there is bulletins, though we may also hear from Manitoba er the past few weeks Weather Network and other local media outlets more pen here. There were immediately. A tornado watch is issued when weather over the weekend as conditions are favourable to produce a tornado; however, a warning is more serious. A warning indicates that a g was issued for your tornado has occurred or has a high likelihood of being do? Are you familiar about to occur. esponse plan and the The safest place to be during a tornado is a low spot at is included in that in an interior room away from windows, such as an inwith that document ner room in the basement or underneath the stairs to the our family safe. basement. Rooms that have extra support in the walls da sees the most tor- such as bathrooms are also ideal as bathroom pipes focused on southern provide extra support to the walls. Mobile homes and nces. With the peak camper trailers are very unsafe places to take shelter as y time between April they are not anchored to the ground. heart of a potential Get informed and stay safe. For more information 43 tornadoes occur visit: Public Safety Canada http://www.publicsafety. gc.ca/res/em/nh/to/index-eng.aspx or Environment een a weather watch Canada http://www.ec.gc.ca.

Continued look back from last weeks paper

21034ww1

IRECTORY FINGERTIPS ANDREA ADAMSON

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ALEXANDER ELECTRIC 204-721-4320

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Frame and Stud Fra Post Farm Buildings me

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Jeannie Bos

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Johan’s Construction Ltd. 204-745-7628 cell Rivers MB,

“Building for all your farm needs!”

Hunt, Miller & Co. LLP

Jack Cram, Lawyer Phone 204-727-8491 or 204-328-7540 (Thursdays, 2-5 p.m.) for appointments.

WWW.KROEGERBACKHOE.CA EXCAVATION-GRAVELACREAGE DEVELOPEMENTSEPTIC SYSTEMS 204-761-8765

Way-Mor Agencies Ltd. Ph. 204-724-6870 Fax 204-328-4407 alepp@redlinetransport.ca Dry bulk transportation

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Phone 204-328-7540 204-566-2490

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Brandon - Rivers

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March 26, 2021 Rivers Banner A7

RIVERS

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

PLACE YOUR AD BY:

PHONE: 204-328-7494 FAX: 204-328-5212 E-MAIL: info@riversbanner.com

DEADLINE: TUESDAY AT NOON Minimum charge: $5+GST Extra insertions: 1/2 original price

Help Wanted

Obituaries Lorne Murray Radcliffe

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Lorne Murray Radcliffe on Thursday, March 18th, formerly of Cardale and most recently, Minnedosa. Lorne was born on the farm in the Moline district to John and Clara Radcliffe on December 30th, 1934. He attended Moline school and helped on the farm until the family bought and moved to the farm at SW 31-14-21 in the Cardale area in 1945. Lorne completed his schooling at Cardale and then was convinced by his good friends Bill Ransom and Ralph Lowes to register for the Agricultural Diploma course offered through the Agricultural Extension Center in Brandon and then a year in Winnipeg at the University of Manitoba. Shortly after completing his schooling Lorne met his future wife, Frances Philp at MFA Camp (Camp Wannakumbac). They started their life of 59 years together, renting rooms in the former Riddick home in Cardale before moving to the old brick house on the farm. During those early years, Lorne enjoyed curling, going to hockey games, and working on the farm. He traveled on the road with Lyle Baker teaching welding courses across the province. Many times growing up Dad would tell us kids as we were driving through a small Manitoba town that he had stayed in this motel or taught a course in that particular building with Lyle. This led to Dad selling for Kruschel and Sons (LKS) for a number of years. Lorne also enjoyed Square Dancing with Frances. They were regular attendees at the Newdale Hall and traveled to Jamborees around the countryside. Dad even managed to call a few dances himself when the occasion arose. He spent many hours keeping time in a lot of cold country rinks at hockey games and worked a lot of games for the Bobcats taking money at the door. He loved to go to the mall and not shop, but to sit and visit with people. Through his schooling, farming, teaching welding, serving on numerous boards, and trading for stationary engine and tractor parts brought Dad into contact with people from across the country and beyond. Many lasting friendships were made that continued throughout his lifetime. Some things he was very proud of were working tirelessly to bring more affordable and better phone service to rural westman residents and selling memberships for an infant KAP organization. He was a dedicated Wheat Board man to the last as many will remember him. As a father, Dad loved camping and hauled us to many a memorable venue. He enjoyed returning to Camp Wannakumbac and reuniting with old friends. As farming slowed down, Dad took more and more pleasure from tending the garden and keeping the yard neat and tidy. Hours were spent mowing and trimming the acres of grass around the farm buildings. In the evenings, Dad liked playing crib with Mom, working on a jigsaw puzzle, and of course, conversing on the phone with his many friends. He enjoyed telling stories behind each antique engine or tractor he had and took great pride in restoring them to look better than when they were first sold. Going to the Pioneer Power and Equipment Club shows in Brandon was something he really looked forward to. His collection showpiece was the 1925 Model TT truck that he recovered and restored from the farm at Moline. Lorne is survived by his wife, Frances; son Terry (Melanie) and daughter Wendy (Bruce); grandchildren Connor, Tegan (CJ), Ali (Dawson), and Bryton, and numerous nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents John and Clara Radcliffe and his brother Robert (Bob). Lorne was interred at Pettapiece Cemetary on Sunday, March 21st, with a family graveside service, conducted by Linda Clark. People wishing to make a donation in memory of Lorne may do so through the Cardale United Church Memorial Fund or to a charity of your choice. Funeral arrangements were made through White’s Funeral Home of Minnedosa. www.whitesfh.ca

ANDREW THOMAS WOLLBAUM MARCH 18, 1944-MARCH 22, 2021 With sadness in our hearts we announce the death of our beloved Andrew, who peacefully went home to be with the Lord in heaven on Monday, March 22, 2021 at the age of 77 in Portage la Prairie. He was born to his parents John and Barbara on March 18, 1944 in Regina, SK. He was a beloved husband, father, grandfather and uncle for our family. Andrew was predeceased by his parents John and Barbara, his brothers Ed, Robert and David and sisters Pauline and Monica. Andrew is lovingly remembered by his wife of 54 years Marlene, their children Fr. Michael Wollbaum, Deborah Wollbaum, Angela (Scott) Hues and Edward (Angela) Wollbaum, along with the grandchildren Teagan, Brody, Leah, Olivia and Benson, Andrew’s brother Paul, many nephews, nieces, grandnephews and grandnieces, and several brothers-in-laws and sisters-inlaw. Andrew had many occupations over his long life: house builder, assistant loan manager, TV repair man, florist, and was a catalogue service merchant for Sears Canada. Dad gave to his community in Rivers as well as a volunteer firefighter and ambulance driver for many years. Just as important was that he was a faithful husband, father and grandfather to the family. He was a man of integrity in his work and a man of great faith in God. His faith touched every aspect of his and his family’s life. He was very involved in the life of the Church as a Parish Trustee and Facilitator of the Pastoral Council of Immaculate Conception Parish in Rivers, MB for several years. He assisted with the local Ecumenical Youth Group in Rivers between the Anglican, United and Catholic Churches. He also was one of the leaders of the Rivers of Life prayer group, a catechist, would help to lead Sunday liturgies when the priest was unavailable. He believed in aiding the poor and was always ready to make time for those in need in any way he could. A private viewing will take place at McKenzies Portage Funeral Chapel, followed by a private family funeral at St. Charles Roman Catholic Church in Winnipeg. Interment to follow at Hillside Cemetery in Portage la Prairie. The family would like to thank the doctors and the nurses and health care aides on the Surgical Ward at the Portage District General Hospital for the loving, excellent care they gave to Andrew. Thanks to everyone, especially Archbishop Gagnon and the priests of the Archdiocese of Winnipeg for the many prayers and Masses that have been offered for Andrew and our family at this time. We know Andrew is safely and peacefully home with the Lord in heaven and we are wrapped in God’s love and grace in a profound way. Thanks to our friends and faith communities of Immaculate Conception in Rivers, Good Shepherd in Portage la Prairie, St. Augustine’s of Canterbury in Brandon and St. Charles in Winnipeg for all your love, prayers and support. In lieu of flowers, if you wish to remember our beloved Andrew, we invite you to give to a charity to help those in need such as Samaritan House (Brandon), Prairie Welcome House (Portage la Prairie), and Portage la Prairie Soup Kitchen. In the Winnipeg area, Villa Rosa Inc., Chez Nous, Rossbrook House, Harvest Manitoba, Missionaries of Charity, House of Hesed and CancerCare Manitoba. A tree will be planted in memory and cared for by McKenzies Portage Funeral Chapel. www. mckenziesportagefuneralchapel.com

RON RADFORD RADFORD: Ronald Cameron (1929-2021). Ronald Radford, beloved husband of Maxine, passed away at his residence, Hillcrest Place Personal Care Home, on Tuesday, March 9, 2021. Ron was the fifth son of Robert and Viola Radford of Keyes, Manitoba. He was born at Pine Creek, MB and attended Livingstone and Keyes schools while growing up in the Keyes area. Ron met Wilma Maxine Tennant of Russell in 1948 while Maxine was teaching at several schools in the Keyes and Neepawa area and they were married in Gladstone, MB in 1952. During the 1950s, Ron worked for Manitoba Hydro and the CPR, working out of Keyes, Gladstone, Woodside and Westbourne. Later, as he bid out as First Man, he worked at Elm Creek, Roland, Murray Park – Winnipeg, Emerson and Marquette. Ron and Maxine moved to Gladstone in 1958 and lived there until September 1963. In 1963, Ron started work at the United Grain Growers (UGG) Elevator, Gladstone with Howard Kerr. Ron and Maxine had their first two sons, Laurie and Douglas, while living in Gladstone. After 6 months training, he was moved to Strathclair as elevator agent. They had their third son Gerald while in Strathclair and spent ten years engaged and active in the community, their children’s education, music lessons, and sports. In 1973, they moved to Rivers where Ron spent 17 years as a UGG manager before retiring in 1990. They continued to live in Rivers where Ron enjoyed golfing, curling and playing music until 2012 when he and Maxine moved to Brandon. Ron was the President of the Rivers Legion for many years, a proud member of the Rivers Masonic Lodge, and was very active in all of the communities in which he lived: coaching hockey and baseball, helping with Scouts and church groups, driving his sons to their rock band rehearsals, and serving as the keeper of the knives and master carver for community banquets. Ron loved sports and was an avid golfer throughout his life, as well participating in curling and other community sports. He was also known as an accomplished and formidable cribbage player. Music was an important part of Ron’s life from an early age. He played guitar, piano, harmonica, and old-time fiddle but was best known for his accordion playing at dances, seniors’ residences, concerts, house parties and family gatherings. He often played accordion duets with his sister Muriel, with various bands in the communities in which he lived and was a long standing and valued member of the old-time band in Rivers, The Friendly Four. Ron and Maxine loved to travel and took their three sons on many camping trips throughout Manitoba and western Canada. In their later years, they traveled to the Maritimes, Québec, Ontario, British Columbia and Alaska to explore and visit family. Ron was a generous, loving husband, father and friend and leaves behind his wife Maxine; three sons Laurie (Miriam), Douglas (Cindy) and Gerald; two grandchildren Mikaela and Kesia; two brothers Barry (Norma) and Keith; sister-in-law Lorna; and many, many beloved cousins, nephews and nieces. The family will cherish Ron’s memory privately. We will all think of him and miss him dearly. Donations in memory of Ron may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Manitoba-Westman Region, 437-9th Street, Brandon, MB R7A 4A9. Expressions of sympathy may be made at www.memorieschapel.com. Arrangements with Memories Chapel, Brandon 1-855-727-0330.

To remind all citizens of Rivers That you must first obtain permission From Riverdale Municipality before Removing or trimming any trees or Shrubs from any public property within Rivers, including boulevards.

FOODS Meat Cutters/Production Personnel Our people, perseverance, integrity, and exceptional partnerships have led HyLife to becoming Canada’s leading pork producer and global exporter of high quality pork products. The growing demand for our pork in Japan and China means we need exceptional people to help deliver our company vision. We have expanded our Neepawa facility to increase our overall production by 15% and in turn created new jobs throughout the company. As a Meat Cutter/Production Personnel you will be a critical member of our team in the creation of our world class product. Our positions range from working on our slaughter production floor to shipping the final packaged product, with everything in between! With our wide variety of jobs, excellent people, and our drive for innovation you will certainly find a job that suits you! Responsibilities and duties include but are not limited to: • Slaughter and eviscerate hogs for further processing • Harvest and package edible offal • Process pork carcasses into primal cuts • Butcher and package pork primal cuts into value added specifications for local, national and international premium markets • Carry out other tasks related to processing of meat for shipping to customers or storage • Sanitation People who will succeed as members of our team will: • Enjoy working in a fast paced, stable long term work environment • Appreciate working in a culturally diverse workplace. We employ people from all over the world! • Treat people with dignity and respect • Open to working in colder/warmer environments • Physically Fit • Experience as an industrial butcher or trimmer is an asset

Current starting wage is $15.15/hour plus $1.00 per hour perfect attendance incentive! Wage scale extends to $22.10 per hour We believe that our success is founded on the strength of our team. As such, we place a great deal of emphasis on attracting, developing and retaining good people, and consider every one of our employees to be a highly-valued member of the HyLife family. To that end, we are committed to providing a working environment that not only fosters personal growth, but also recognizes our employees’ contributions towards the common goal of our company’s success because of this HyLife has been recognized as a Platinum Member of Canada’s Best-Managed Companies. If you have the qualifications and the passion to meet this challenge then we would like to explore your potential. Please apply online at http://hylife.com/current-opportunities/ or email to jobs@hylife.com or mail to PO Box 10,000, 623 Main St E, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0. We thank all applicants, however, only those under consideration will be contacted

Manitoba Community Newspaper Association Province Wide Classifieds

Notice

PUBLIC NOTICE RIVERS RESIDENTS

Classifieds MUST be PREPAID Visa/Mastercard accepted

NOTICES Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Manitoba Community Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising

Conditions on our website at www.mcna.com. URGENT PRESS RELEASES - Have something to announce? A cancellation? A change in operations? Though we cannot guarantee publication, MCNA will get the information into the right hands for ONLY $35.00 + GST/HST. Call MCNA (204) 947-1691 for more information, or email classified@mcna.com for details. www.mcna.com.

FOR SALE HAVING A SPRING ONLINE CONFERENCE OR VIRTUAL EVENT? Advertise it in the 37 MB Weekly newspapers and get noticed! Each week our blanket classifieds could be helping your organization get noticed in over 340,000 homes! It’s AFFORDABLE and it’s a great way to increase and connect with our 37 weekly member newspapers. For as little as $189.00 + GST, get your important messaging out! Call this

newspaper NOW to book or email classified@mcna. com for details. MCNA - Manitoba Community Newspapers Association (204) 947-1691. www. mcna.com FEED AND SEED FORAGE SEED FOR SALE: Organic & conventional: Sweet Clover, Alfalfa, Red Clover, Smooth Brome, Meadow Brome, Crested Wheatgrass, Timothy, etc. Star City, SK. Birch Rose Acres Ltd. 306-921-9942.


A8 Rivers Banner March 26, 2021

Notice

Help Wanted

Mid-West Weed District PUBLIC NOTICE REGARDING THE 2021 FINANCIAL PLAN

1. To control noxious weeds and brush on right's-of-ways within the municipalities of Oakview, Hamiota and Riverdale including all villages and towns within. The projected dates of application will be from May 1 2021 to October 31 2021. The herbicides that may be used include: -2.4D amine 600, Banvel vm, Navius, Truvist, Detail, Overdrive, Clearview, VP 480, Esplanade, Fiesta, Weed B gone.

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to subsection 162(2) of The Municipal Act that the Council of Riverdale Municipality intends to present its financial plan for the fiscal year 2021 at a public hearing on the 13th day of April 2021 at 7:00 p.m at Redfern Hall, Riverdale Community Centre, 101 Main Street. Council will hear any person who wishes to make representation, ask questions or register an objection to the financial plan, as provided.

2. To control noxious weeds on the Hamiota golf course. The projected dates of application will be from May 1 2021 to October 31 2021. Herbicides that may be used include: - Trillion, Par III.

Copies of the financial plan are available for review and may be examined by any person during the regular office hours of Riverdale Municipality at 670 – 2nd Avenue, Rivers, MB on or after April 6th, 2021

3. To control turf disease at the Hamiota golf course. The projected dates of application will be from May 1 2021 to October 31 2021. The fungicides that may be used include: - Instrata IIA, Trilogy, Interface, Mirage, Daconill ultrex. 4. To control grasshoppers. The projected dates of application will be from June 1 2021 to October 31 2021. The insecticide that may be used include: - Eco Bran.

The Public Hearing will be in accordance with MB Health Recommendations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

SUMMER STUDENT POSITIONS Maintenance Worker Assistant (8 weeks - July 5 to August 27, 2021) Mechanic Assistant/Detailer (7 weeks - July 19 to September 3, 2021) Positions are based at division offices in Minnedosa, Manitoba. For more details and application information, please visit our website at www.rrsd.mb.ca select Employment then Summer Student Positions. Thank you to all applicants for their interest in Rolling River School Division. Only those candidates selected for interviews will be contacted.

Persons intending to participate in the Public Hearing can do so by contacting the Municipal Office by 4:00 pm on Friday, April 9th, 2021 to allow for appropriate arrangements.

Contact: 204-328-5300 or cao.riverdale@ mymts.net

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Closes Wed Mar 31 @ 7:00 pm

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Closes Wed Apr 7 @ 7:00 pm

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Health HIP/KNEE Replacement? Other medical conditions causing TROUBLE WALKING or DRESSING? The Disability Tax Credit allows for $2,500 yearly tax credit and up to $50,000 Lump sum refund. Apply NOW; quickest refund Nationwide! Providing assistance during Covid.

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• Full Repair & Safeties • Vehicle Parts, Tires & Wheels • Trailer Parts & Batteries • Sales, Financing, Leasing & Rentals EBY Aluminum: • Gooseneck and Bumper Pull Cattle & Equipment Trailers • Truck & Service Bodies • Generation Grain Trailers

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The public may send written submissions or objections to specific control programs within 15 days of the publication of the notice to the department below:

Trucks, Trailers, Truckbeds & Tires

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Contact this newspaper NOW or MCNA at 204.947.1691 or email classified@mcna.com

Kat Bridgeman, CMMA Chief Administrative Officer

Auction McSherry Auctions

Rolling River School Division

PUBLIC NOTICE Public notice is hereby given that the Mid-West Weed District intends to conduct the following Pesticide control programs during 2021.

Announcement

21034gm1


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