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Helpful Hints for Your Home Sponsored by Capital City Ace Hardware, The Helpful Place

Securing Your Home, Keeping Your Family Safe With endless stories of neighborhood thefts, packages being stolen from the front stoop or you just want to feel a little safer in your home, here are some affordable suggestions to give you some piece of mind and hopefully keep you and your home from being a victim of a crime. Secure all your entry points. Doors and windows will always be the easiest way to enter. Make sure the locks all latch and can be locked. If not, replace them with entry locks from Schlage or Kwikset. Strengthen the door jambs using a 6” or longer brass strike plate. By using one of these and longer screws to secure into the door jamb forcing a door open is a lot harder and noisier. Make sure all firstfloor windows are locked, thieves look for opportunity and this is an easy spot to correct. Additional window locks can also be installed to offer a small opening for airflow but not allowing entry from a person. Lighting at night is critical, as stated above opportunities are what bad actors are looking for. A couple of timers with random patterns of on and off cycles will go a long way in making your home appear to be occupied. Exterior motion sensing security floods will not only surprise someone getting close to your home at night but provide you with needed illumination in the evening as well. Cameras, cameras, cameras. There are many options of camera to keep an eye on your home. So many options exist in this area, from simple WIFI cameras you can view from your smart phone to the Ring doorbell camera and add-on security lights with cameras. Systems from Nest and Ring have integration that communicates throughout the home and can alert you to any issues, including if you left the garage door open. The Ring products actually allow you to see what’s going on at your front or back door and you can audibly communicate with someone from anywhere in the world. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

your home so the top of each stairwell is a common recommendation. But think about this, if your bedroom is down the hall will the sound of the alarm wake you up if you're sleeping? You may want to take the U.S. Fire Administration’s recommendation which is to install them both inside and outside of bedrooms.

Alarm System. You can have one professionally installed in your home and then pay to have the home monitored. This is a small cost for peace of mind. A good budget option of simple sound alarm products come from Sabre. Their alarm options include those that are windows and entry ways to sense movement of those entry areas. Finally, be aware. We can get all wrapped up in our own lives that we sometimes forget to stop and look around. Law enforcement professionals tell us all the time, if you see something say something. It’s a simple reminder that we all have to participate in keeping where we live safe and sound. Smoke Alarms & CO Alarms How Many? Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors can save your life and your home and installing them is so easy it's almost a no-brainer. But here's what you might not know, the bigger your house the more alarms you will need. In general, install at least one type of alarm on every level of your home including the basement Did you know, when it comes to smoke alarms there are two types of technology available, ionization detectors sense flaming fires more quickly and photoelectric alarms detect smoldering fires more quickly. It's not a question of which type is better for your home because you should have both. Where to Put Them? You should have detectors on every level of

Now whether you put it on the wall or on the ceiling depends on the type you buy and the manufacturers recommendation. You also want to make sure you don't put it near something that can interfere with it like your oven stovetop or furnace, areas like bathrooms or laundry rooms that are humid or near windows and vents. Installation Installing an alarm is easy, most units include a mounting bracket that just screws into the wall or ceiling then install your battery and twist the alarm into the bracket. Some alarms just stick on with adhesive and you can find carbon monoxide detectors that plug into the wall outlets. Helpful Tips Here are a few more helpful tips. Test the alarm once a month to be sure it's working and replace your batteries twice a year. A good time to do this is when you change your clocks for daylight savings time. Lithium batteries can power an alarm for about eight to ten years and once the battery dies replace the entire unit. Carbon monoxide detectors should be replaced about every five years and smoke alarms every eight to ten years and when you buy a new one, write the date you installed it on the back. We’re always here to help. We welcome our neighbors in Montgomery! Capital City Ace is a local, family-owned hardware store ready to meet all your needs in any area of improvement in your home or property. Come see us today, we are just a few miles from your Montgomery neighborhood. Our Hours are: Mon - Sat: 8 am - 7 pm and ​Sun: 11 am 5 pm. Capital City Ace Hardware, 3215 Taylor Rd (1 block from Vaughn Rd.), Montgomery, AL. capitalcityace.com

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Genghis Khan Invades Downtown Mobile!

Discover the man behind the legend in the blockbuster exhibition experienced by over a million people around the world In the tradition of years past, the Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center is proud to announce a return to major blockbuster exhibitions in the Spring of 2019. On the scale of its China and Pompeii exhibits, the Exploreum invites visitors to take a journey back in time with one of history’s most prolific and controversial figures - Genghis Khan. Through artifacts, performers, artwork, and other historically significant items, discover the eye-opening story of the world’s most well-known conqueror, civilizer and innovator in the exhibition Genghis Khan: The Great Civilizer – opening at the Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center on Saturday, January 26, 2019. Curated and developed by dinosaur expert Don Lessem, the exhibition features more than 300 spectacular objects on display, including rare and sophisticated weapons, costumes, jewels, ornaments, instruments and numerous other fascinating relics and elaborate artifacts from 13th-century Mongolia. “I went to Mongolia to look for fossils and discovered the truth about Genghis Khan, a civilizing genius,” said Lessem. “It’s a great story best told in a major exhibition.” Experience life in 13th-century Mongolia, entering the tents, battlegrounds and marketplaces of a vanished world that was once the largest land empire in history. Explore Genghis Khan’s life and those of his sons and grandsons during the formation, peak and decline of the Mongol Empire. As the exhibit strikingly portrays, Genghis’s reputation as the greatest conqueror is well-deserved – he dominated three times more land in his lifetime than either Julius Caesar or Alexander the Great, a conquest attested to by the formidable array of swords, bows, arrows, saddles and armor included on display in Genghis Khan. In fact, the historic exhibition showcases hundreds of artifacts from Genghis’s 13th century Empire, the largest such collection ever to tour. However, this special exhibition presents a more complete image of the legendary leader whom Time Magazine and CNN named “The Man of the Millennium.” As visitors discover, Genghis not only created the nation of Mongolia and its written language, but his lineage established the modern borders of nations from India to Iran, Korea to China and opened the trade routes that united East and West, forever after. Visitors will experience the exhibition through the eyes of a Mongolian resident, receiving a civilian identity card at the beginning of their journey. From warrior to spy to princess, they will follow this character’s life throughout the rise of the great Mongol Empire across six key scenes: •The Grasslands: Discover the daily life of a nomad on the high plateaus of Central Asia and learn about the outcast Genghis Khan’s earliest struggles. Walk into an ancient Mongol ger (yurt) home. Stand in the midst of a herd of stampeding horses. • Rise of the Mongols: Learn how the young, charismatic Genghis Khan united warring tribes in order to form an unrivaled cavalry. Explore the equestrian culture and innovations in weaponry Genghis Khan mastered to conquer four times more land than any Empire in history. • The Walled City: Enter the recreation of Karakorum, the walled city, which became the capital of the Mongolian Empire after Genghis Khan’s son inherited the kingdom. See how life changed for Mongols once they had vanquished all of their enemies, and arts and diverse religions and cultures flourished as the need for war subsided. • The Silk Road: While Genghis Khan was a ruthless warrior, he was also a savvy statesman and benevolent ruler. He developed a written language and a sophisticated society with fair taxation, stable government, appreciation of the arts, religious freedom and open trade along the Silk Road. Explore this vital trade route which enabled the exchange of both goods and ideas between cultures. • The Palace of Kublai Khan - Enter the sumptuous Chinese palace of Xanadu, the center of the Empire of Genghis’s grandson, Kublai, who united China for the first time. See porcelain treasures and a sword with the emblem of a guardian of Marco Polo, among many others. • Mongolia Today: Trace the influence of Genghis Khan in images of modern Mongolian life. The distinctive horse-based culture of Genghis Khan’s time persists today as the nation and language he created lives on eight centuries after his rule. See how his legend lives on through the namesake of many modern Mongolian brands, and how he was revered as a god among the Mongolian people.

Plan to make the trip to Mobile to see this once in a lifetime exhibit, Genghis Khan, now showing through April 28, 2019.

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Montgomery’s 16th Annual Jewish Food Festival Sponsored by Temple Beth Or will be held on Sunday, February 24, 2019

~We look forward to coming every year. I get excited when I see the signs around town announcing the date.~ ~Love, love, love the food. I wish they would hold it every month!~

Comments by past visitors to Temple Beth Or’s Jewish Food Festival

MONTGOMERY – Once a year Temple Beth Or opens its doors for the community to eat ethnic Jewish food, learn about Judaism from Rabbi Scott Looper and buy unique items from the Treasure Market.

in pint and quart containers), homemade Challah bread, cabbage rolls, kugel (sweet noodle and egg casserole), rugelach, mandelbrot, curabies (traditional Sephardic sand tarts), praline matzo and strudel. Once again, the highly popular New Yorkimported Carnegie Deli cheesecake will be served by the slice or you will be able to purchase a full six-inch frozen cheesecake.

The 16th annual Jewish Food Festival & Treasure Market will be held on Sunday, February 24th at Temple Beth Or located at 2246 Narrow Lane Road beginning at 9:00 AM and continuing until 2:00 PM. The outreach event, which is the Temple’s only fundraiser, is free and attracts 2,000-plus attendees. “We are thankful for the generous support of the business community and the work of all the temple members who help out,” said Jenny Ives, a former Temple president and chair of the event. This year’s event will feature family musical entertainment by Dahlia Road and “for the first time ever we will be cooking fresh potato latkes on site with a customized outdoor griddle,” Ives said. Of course, there are toppings for the potato latkes – sour cream and applesauce. Also, Rabbi Looper will be giving sanctuary tours at 10:30 AM and 1:00 PM. “We have the Treasure Market which is made possible through generous donations of items from our members, so we are able to offer unique and beautiful treasures for sale,” Ives said.

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Those treasures will be in six rooms, which include two rooms for furniture; another room for books; and a children’s room. Other treasures include silver, jewelry, clothes, dishes as well as decorative items. After some serious shopping for those one-of-a-kind gifts or must-haves for your home, you’re in the right place at the right time to fill your hearty appetite with a wide variety of food choices. The food is the main attraction for many. Ethnic Jewish foods available are quajado (spinach, macaroni, egg and cheese), homemade matzo ball soup (frozen

In addition to takeout items, lunch plates are available. If you are looking for a hot-plate you’ll find it here - slow cooked beef brisket, carrots, quajado and Challah bread. In the market for a deli sandwich – check that box with a thin-sliced corned beef sandwich on rye bread, homemade slaw, pickle and chips. If you are a vegetarian, you will not be left out with. A veggie plate features quajado, kugel, potato latkes, slaw and Challah. Side items include stuffed cabbage, kugel or potato latkes. There is even an offering for those less adventurous who may prefer kosher hotdogs served with a bag of chips. After lunch, you will want to buy some of the traditional desserts such as rugelach, mandelbrot, curabies, praline matzo and strudel. For a menu or information, visit Temple Beth Or’s website at www.templebethor.net. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

February 2019 Volume 9 Issue 7

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom

C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

3 Securing Your Home, Keeping Your Family Safe 6 Genghis Khan Invades Downtown Mobile! 8 Jewish Food Festival 12 Publisher's Column 15 AUM OLLI BONUS OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND!

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Features

20 48 Questions to Ask Elderly Grandparents

28 19 Self-Employment Ideas for Retiree to Take Charge of Their Destiny

38 12 things in your attic worth real money

52 {12} Things For Active Boomers

50 Greg Budell “SILVER SWINGLES”

16 A Pair of Pears Anne Thomas Carr

48 Dismals Canyon, Alabama’s Primeval Treasure

18 One Exercise You Must Try Leigh Anne Richards

Departments 32 This and That Interesting Stuff

24 February Fun at Old Alabama Town 25 MACOA Culinary Caper 26 Weathering the Storm McDonald Hagen Wealth 30 How do I love thee? Ask an Elder Law Attorney 40 BOOM! Cover Profile

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44 Alabama Bright Lights Helping Children Hunt/fish 47 Mushrooms... merely food, or more? Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

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54 A Tale of Two Ghost Singers

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, P.O. Box 6203, Montgomery, AL 36106. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2019 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

Happy Aging! The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

My birthday was in January. I’m now 69 years old. Birthdays make you think. Forward and backward. It’s easy to have a backward mindset because most of our lives have been experienced so memories seem to matter more than what we have in front of us.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Kate Ashford Jeff Barganier Austin Barranco Karim Shamsi-Basha Tracy Bhalla Kimberly Blaker Greg Budell

Jim Watson, Publisher

I’m a forward kind of guy. When I look back in the rearview mirror of my life, I see moments of love, joy, pain, stupidity and satisfaction. It’s the satisfaction I relish most because it squeezes out the regrets and gives me a sense of what’s next going forward…For me, the aging process has always leaned on the “what next”, that forward-looking mindset to help me discover new experiences and new challenges. Experiences and challenges that will stretch me in a positive way, hoping to realize another piece of my potential.

Reflecting on my 69 years I can honestly say that in some way, every year I got older always seems better than the year before. Happy Aging!

Anne Thomas Carr Lew & Karen Nyman Karren Pell Leigh Anne Richards Nick Thomas Raley L. Wiggins

Cover Photography Shellee Roberts Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 Please Recycle This Magazine, jim@riverregionboom.com

This month’s cover profile is a couple of transplants who understood very quickly the quality of life here in the River Region, Lew and Karen Nyman. Transplanted from Boston, Lew and Karen came to Montgomery through a job opportunity. Lew was sent here to help build Patriot Missiles and it wasn’t long before they discovered the friendliest people in the world live in the South! They stayed and retired. How many of you know Ham Operators? You do now, Lew and Karen are both licensed amateur radio operators and stay active in the local group of Hams. I recently spent some time getting to know Lew and Karen, what a treat for me to meet other transplants (I’m from Cincinnati!). I know you will enjoy getting to know them as much as I did.

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There’s a whole lot more to read and relax with in this issue. Jeff Barganier is back with a travel experience that will delight if you’re into discovery like I am, it’s about Dismals Canyon. We also have a feature about the type of work retirees can pursue to earn some income and probably have some fun learning new skills along the way. Also, your attic may have some treasures, so check out the 12 things that might be worth something in your attic. Leigh Anne Richards shares some good info simple exercises that give back in a positive way when it comes to your fitness. Greg Budell has something to say about the aging process and finding a mate, most of us can relate! Take a few moments and enjoy your favorite beverage as you read through this month’s issue, hopefully you’ll discover a smile or two as you age! Please consider our advertisers when you have needs, they’re all on the right side of positive aging and would love to do business with each of you. Please share your thoughts on this issue or any other ideas regarding BOOM! I love to listen. Keep being the best you can be in 2019, Happy Aging!

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Thanks for Reading BOOM! Digital & Interactive

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AUM OLLI BONUS OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND! A basic annual OLLI membership fee ($39) provides the organization’s members with the opportunity to register for classes in different categories: study/discussion/ hands-on, and active. Registering in one or more classes does require an additional fee (depending on the number of terms), but the basic membership fee allows all OLLI members to register for BONUS OPPORTUNITIES. On the first and third Tuesdays of each month during a term, OLLI members may choose the OLLI BRAIN BOWL sessions or the TUESDAY BOOK DISCUSSION. In the former activity, OLLI members compete against each other in tests of knowledge. Brain Bowl coach Lynda Smitherman assures potential participants that “it’s not too hard.” Each session of the Tuesday Book Discussion, led by Nancy Grisham Anderson, is devoted to a different book, always announced ahead of time in the catalog listing for that term. Since each

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session focuses on a different book, members may attend any one or all of the sessions. OLLI also offers LUNCH PRESENTATIONS. During the break between second and third period classes (12:20 – 1:20 p.m.), members can bring their lunches and hear speakers on a variety of subjects. The 2019 winter term schedule for lunch presentations includes: • Jan. 30 Melissa Tubbs, “Celebration and Preservation Drawing Alabama’s Architectural History” • Feb. 11 Patti Callahan Henry, “Writing Fiction and Historical Fiction” • Feb. 13 Cecil Colson, “History of Transportation System in Alabama” • March 4 Coke Ellington, “Writing Cartoon Gags for a Lot of Fun and a Little Profit” • March 11 Informational Session on Field Trip: Selma Arts Reviving

This session is to provide details about the OLLI field trip scheduled for April 12. Another event during the lunch presentation time slot (12:20 – 1:20 p.m.) is the potluck lunch on February 6. OLLI schedules one potluck lunch during each term to give members a chance to visit and share culinary skills. Members bring a casserole or dessert to share; plates, utensils, and drinks are provided. Registration is requested for all of the above events because of the necessity of having the room set up and having adequate handouts and supplies. You can register for membership, for bonus opportunities, and for classes at www.aum. edu/OLLI. If you have any questions, please contact Brittany Thomasson at 334-244-3804 or bthomass@aum.edu

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By Anne Thomas Carr

A Pair of Pears My husband and I moved from Southern Maryland with snow on the ground to find flowers and trees blooming here. Our home was a charming Cape Cod style located at the back of a cul-de-sac on a pie shaped lot. The house set close to the street making the front yard small. The double concrete driveway and brick walkway took up more lawn space. There were seven yellow roses on a weathered cedar fence on the left side of the driveway along with three trees and a fig bush that add to the front yard clutter of plantings. On both sides of the walkway, the builder of this three-year-old home planted Bradford or Callery (Pyrus Calleryana) Pear trees. The first time I saw the pair of Bradford Pear trees, they were about nine feet tall. Our first Christmas in Montgomery, I strung the tree on the right with white lights. This was the end of my affection. They grew rapidly without any attention, and were pest and disease resistant. Pruning was necessary to remove cross branching and spur shoots. They began to grow with vengeance. The branches stretched from the street to the house. One had to duck to reach the front door. A professional tree service was called to prune both trees. The Bermuda grass

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years passed for the trees to reach 20 feet. They cost thousands of dollars in professional pruning, removal, and replacing the Bermuda grass lawn. In hindsight, we should have removed them as soon as possible. Why live with a tree or plant you do not find desirable?

was suffering under the large canopy of shade. A flush of white flowers on bare limbs signaled the arrival of spring. The pair of pear trees provided shade from the hot intense heat of summer. In the fall the dark green leaves changed to yelloworange announcing the end of summer; the autumn season was here. There was a mass of them on the ground begging to be raked to the curb. Guess what happened? The pair of Bradford Pear trees loved their “trim”. The growth was even more rapid. By now they were 20 feet tall. The view of the house from the street was blocked, and the grass was dead. I could only guess what the neighbors thought. Only twelve

Today the Bradford Pear tree has been identified as an invasive tree. Please do not plant them. Birds and animals scatter the seeds that spread the trees into unwanted areas. For the history of the Bradford (Callery) Pear tree, I found that an Italian-Frenchman, Joseph-Marie Callery (1810-1862), sent specimens from China to Europe. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System has research-based information about ornamental trees. This will help you make wise tree selections. Their web site is www.aces.edu. You may phone the Master Gardener Helpline at 1-877-252-4769 for home gardening questions. Anne Carr, a Master Gardener of Class 2018, lives in Pike Road. For more information on becoming a master gardener, visit www.capcitymga.org or email capcitymga@gmail.com.

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One Exercise You Must Try

What is the best exercise we can do for ourselves that trains the whole body? According to some recent research, pick up a weight and walk forward. Yes, you read that correctly. That is one movement that trains the entire body for ultimate functions, strength, and stability. It builds total body strength, improves posture, and even helps with grip strength. This lift and walk movement seems to be a better predictor of longevity than traditional health markers like blood pressure.

For such a simple exercise the list of benefits goes on and on. Chris Kolba, a physical therapist at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center states “ the carry exercise can help you develop core strength which assists in keeping the back and spine healthy; increase arm and hand strength, which improves your ability to lift, carry, push, pull and hold things; and strengthen the hips and legs for improved locomotion and direction change.” Research shows that this particular movement can also help with gait. A poor walking pattern puts extra stress on your joints and can increase your risk of arthritis. Training specialist,

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Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne Richards

Ryan Campbell reports that every step during a carrying exercise requires the base leg and hip to stabilize. This carry movement helps people walk better by stabilizing the hips instead of using momentum to stay balanced. This in itself can prevent falls. The carrying exercise also involves so many muscles that when you perform them over long distances, it is a great way to get the heart pumping so you receive the cardiovascular benefits as well. How functional is this movement in our everyday life? Every time you pick up your groceries and carry them into your house, you are

performing the carry. When you are carrying luggage on a trip, you are performing the carry. When you carry your grandchild, you are performing a type of carry.

The carry exercise is easy to add into your workout routine. It is suggested you start with 2-3 times a week. As with any exercise, follow any instructions from your doctor and start with light weight. As you gain more strength, you can gradually increase the weight or add longer distance carried. Gage yourself on the rate of perceived exertion scale. On the scale of 1-10, aim to work around a 7 which means it feels very strong and is challenging. On the RPE scale, one feels too easy and 10 would seem impossible.

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Six Carry Exercises to Try – These are to be performed with a kettlebell or a dumbbell. The Kettle Bell has the weight that hangs below the handle, making them mimic how we carry things in real life

shoulders. Your wrists should face each other, and your elbows pointed straight down. Walk forward as long as you can- aim for 30 seconds. This exercise creates more of a cardiovascular challenge too

1. Farmer’s Carry- Grab a pair of kettlebells or dumbbells and let them hang naturally at your side, palms facing in. Walk forward as long as you can- aim for 30 seconds. If you can walk longer than 60 seconds, add more weight. Remember your upright torso. Imagine a string at the top of your head pulling your head to the ceiling.

4. Single Arm Carry- This is the same movement as the above, but walking with a single weight on the shoulder. By holding only one weight, your oblique muscles on the opposite side have to work harder to keep you in the upright posture.

2. Suitcase Carry- Same type of movement as the farmer’s, except this time you hold weight in one hand at a time. Grab a weight and hold it like a suitcase. Walk 5-10 feet, then put it down and pick it up with the other hand and walk back. Repeat 2-3 times 3. Double Arm Rack Carry- Now we advance and raise both weights to the

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5. Double Arm Waiter Carry- This variation is holding the weights overhead and walking. This movement is more challenging and advanced. If you have back, shoulder, or neck issues, it is best not to perform this movement. 6. Single Waiter Carry- This is the same as the double arm carry, but with one weight. This requires more core strength and balance. Always remember the upright torso and not leaning to one side.

These carry exercises can be done anywhere with just some weights or kettlebells. It is really amazing the benefits with even getting a cardiovascular effect. Start with number one exercise listed and progress to all 6. I use these exercises with my Rock Steady class (Parkinson’s Class) but also use it in my traditional circuit strength classes. These exercises are great for every population. Give these a try. See your strength, posture, stability, gait and cardiovascular fitness improve with only these 6 exercises. Source: Silversneakers.com- The Most Deceiving (and Effective) Exercise of All Time. By K. Aleisha Fetters, October 3, 2018.

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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48 Questions to Ask Elderly Grandparents Where can you learn new things? School, right? That’s a great answer; however, your kids can also learn outside of the classroom – and they won’t have to do any homework! Next time they visit their grandparents, have them ask questions to learn about how they grew up and what they like and dislike. Those questions can be pretty much anything. We’ve given you 48 questions to get started. Make sure they grab a pen and paper (or record on their phone) so they can share the stories with you. Or go with them and add your own questions to the mix. You may learn something that surprises you! Asking Life Questions to Grandparents Asking grandparents about their lives and their loves should be a fun and rewarding task. People, generally, are quite pleased when someone shows an interest in who they are and what

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they do. Grandparents, however, may live far away from their family. Familial visits may be few and far between – meaning that children do not – and cannot – completely know their grandparents. When children question their grandparents about their own past, they can not only learn much about their family’s history, but they can help keep those important family stories alive. Once a grandfather or grandmother is gone, their stories can be gone as well – or at least become far more difficult to recover. Discussing matters of importance can also benefit grandparents. If grandpa or grandma is showing the early signs of dementia, talking with them can help them retain memories (or even spark new memories) before they are completely forgotten. Getting involved with conversations also helps grandpa or grandma remain social. Science shows

that socialization improves overall health and wellbeing. As for when and where to hold these conversations? Schedule a convenient time and remember that grandpa or grandma may be more alert earlier in the day. If your child will personally meet with a grandparent, choose a private, comfortable, and distraction-free room. If the conversation is recorded, keep in mind that a room with high ceilings can cause echo. Similarly, an empty room (with limited furniture) can also negatively affect a recording. Whether it’s a portable tape recorder or a phone that is used to capture the conversation, place this device closer to a grandparent. Their voices may not be as strong as they once were, and their answers may be too faint to hear. Children could also supply a grandparent with a couple of pillows (for support, if needed) as well as a glass of water or juice (for a dry throat).

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What are the Best Questions to Ask Elderly Grandparents? Here are some questions to get you started... Could you show me where you were born on a map? When were you born? How many brothers and/or sisters were in your family? What are your brother’s or sister’s full names? What are your parents’ full names? What were your parents’ careers? Did you have a nickname when you were young? Which do you like better – fruits or vegetables? What was your favorite gift you’ve ever received? What is your favorite color? What was your favorite school subject and why? What were you good at in school? Did you study for exams long before they happened? Or cram the night before? What were the most popular clothes in school? What were the most popular toys or gadgets? How did you meet your spouse? What did you do on your first date? How did you meet your best friend? What did you and your best friend love to do together? What is your favorite meal? What is your favorite dessert? Have you ever eaten your dessert before your meal? What type of music do you like the best? Did you play – or want to play – any specific musical instrument? What was the make, model, and color of the family car? Did your family go on many vacations together? Where did you spend your summers when you were a child? What was your best family vacation? Were you an obedient or misbehaving child? What kind of pet did you have and what was its name? What was your bedtime as a child? Did you ever break curfew or sneak out of the house? Did you receive an allowance? How much was your allowance? Did you save your allowance or spend it right away? When did you open your first bank account? What was your first job? What was your favorite Halloween costume? What sports did you like to play? What games did you like to play? Have you ever met someone famous? A celebrity? Who has made the most impact on your life and why? What was the most embarrassing thing that happened to you? Where is the most interesting place you have been to? What is your biggest accomplishment in your life? What was your favorite television show as a child? Who is your favorite actor and actress? What was the first movie you saw in a theater?

Start a conversation with your Grandparents and add some of your own questions...HAVE FUN!

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February Fun at Old Alabama Town By Karren Pell

The Old Alabama Town Revue presents its February show, “Smile.” The show is dedicated to our friend and supporter, Len Daley, whom we lost in an automobile accident right before Christmas. Len was a part of the Christmas show, and his last words to us all were to smile. So this show, since it is also in February, features fun songs about love and friendship.

their own congregation and built this church. Although judged a simple structure, Mary Ann writes of “notable architectural features including long windows shielded by louvered shutters and handsome cornice moldings.” Notice these when you come to the show!

With the help of the Black Culture Preservation Committee, under the guidance of Dr. Zelia Evans, the church was moved to Old Alabama Town. There was one other change. When the church became a part of Old Alabama Town, it had modern pews. Since the church was featured for its historical importance, these modern pews were replaced by older pews from a “small country congregation in a neighboring county.” So we can attribute the comfort level of the current pews to historical accuracy! The Landmarks Foundation dedicated the First Presbyterian Colored Church on December 4, 1977.

Come prepared to have a good time. We have old faves and original songs. Tim has worked up a Fats Waller song sure to get more than one chuckle. Toni is going classic with “Smile.” I’ll render an original called, “I’m a Lucky Dog,” which I certainly hope gets a howl or two! Singersongwriter Bob Corley will also be joining us. Tony Castaldo will keep the beat strong and Don Silman with keep the bottom end steady. The Pellets will fill out the middle! February is also Black History Month and provides a good time to appreciate the wonderful venue that hosts the Old Alabama Town Revue: First Presbyterian Colored Church (1885). In the words of another friend we lost in 2018, Mary Ann Neeley, “The one story frame building with long windows, cornice molding and a small steeple. . . served its congregation on the corner of Stone Street and Cleveland Avenue until the Interstate plowed through Montgomery in the 1960s.” The history of the Presbyterian community begins with the early days of Montgomery in 1824. During those times, black and white members worshiped in the same building, but the black congregation sat in a gallery. In the early 1880s, the African-American members wanted

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under its jurisdiction.” When the construction of I-85 destroyed the church’s site, the church committee approved the acquisition of a new church at the corner of Goode and Wade Streets. The community renamed their congregation the “Calvary Presbyterian Church.” Landmarks Foundation then stepped in and saved the old church building.

For several years the white Presbyterian Church remained involved with the black congregation, even hiring its black ministers. However, in 1888, the African-American church community asked to be separated, and the white Montgomery Presbyterian Session voted to ‘dismiss from this church the colored members that they might organize a church of their own officers and under the name of the First Presbyterian Colored Church of Montgomery.’ Mary Ann explains the next development: In 1966, the black Central Alabama Presbytery dissolved, and the East Alabama Presbytery received the Cleveland Avenue Presbyterian Church

This rendition of The Old Alabama Town Revue will be part of the new “Second Saturdays” at Old Alabama Town. Starting in January, the museum’s weekend availability is only the second Saturday of the month. However, that day’s entrance is free to the public. So come visit the wonderful buildings and take in the Old Alabama Town Revue at 2 p.m. in the First Presbyterian Colored Church on Columbus Street. So come be a part of our celebration of life, friendship, and love. Come and be prepared to smile — even laugh! And don’t forget your cushion. Karren Pell is a writer, teacher, and performer who lives with her husband, Tim Henderson, and an assortment of cats and dogs in Capitol Heights. She is the author of three books. Her musical compositions range from commercial songs to theatrical works, with five musical adaptations to her credit. Be Sociable, Share!

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Weathering the Storm

Brandt McDonald introduces his guest columnist, Austin Barranco… From time to time, I will be introducing several of our advisors through this column. They will share personalized insights into financial markets, financial planning, and overall wealth management concepts. At McDonald & Hagen, we have a deep bench of talent that is eager to serve our firm’s clients and our local community. This month’s column is written by Austin Barranco. Austin entered the financial industry in 2014 after earning a degree in Finance from The University of Alabama, with a specialization in Insurance and Risk Management, he has also earned the distinction of a FINRA General Securities Principal held with LPL. Austin and his wife Maghen live in East Montgomery with their dog Chip. In his free time Austin enjoys college football, golf, and traveling the world.

As Alabamians, we have become accustomed to dramatic changes in weather this time of year. One day it will be 75 and sunny, and the next day it will be freezing and flooding. As an Alabama native, I just assumed this is how weather works… Some days it’s good, then bad, then ok, then bad, then great, then… you get the point. The weather is unpredictable in the long term, and only slightly more predictable in the short term here in Alabama. With that being said, I don’t leave Alabama every time the weather gets bad, and come back when the weather is good. Like most reasonable people, I just wait for the sun to come out again. After all, Alabama has some of the best fall and spring weather. If I can make it through the winter storms and the summer heat, then I get to enjoy some of the best weather in the country during the spring and fall. The other alternative is to leave every time the weather gets rough, and come back when it’s favorable. This strategy is extremely costly though, so unless you have amassed enough wealth to ignore the constant cost of flights, hotel rooms, or second properties in areas with favorable climates, then this strategy is not practical. In conclusion, reasonable people wait for bad weather to pass, they do not upend their daily routine to avoid bad weather any time it may strike. I frequently use this example when coaching my clients on market volatility. Just like it’s not recommended to leave your hometown every time the weather gets bad, it is also not recommended to leave the market every time the market gets bad. Constantly going in and out of the market can be counterproductive and here’s why: An investor will incur fees to sell out of the market, and by the time the market rebounds, the investor will have missed the upward growth. Since the investor waited until the market recovered to buy back in, the positions they sold when the market was down will be more expensive to buy back. (Not to mention the trade fees required to buy back into the market). So, paying a higher price to buy back into the market PLUS the additional trade fees (fees to sell and fees to buy) add up to an unfavorable investment scenario. As a financial advisor, half the battle of teaching a new investor how to grow their

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Financial Thoughts

with Austin Barranco

wealth is what I call, “Behavioral Finance”. The art of managing your behavior to generate the best possible long term investment outcome. Human nature is to retreat when things get bad, and advance when things are good. Because this is how our brains are naturally wired, it should be no surprise that managing behavioral finance is extremely difficult at first. You have to convince yourself to go against your gut instincts. To make matters more difficult, the outcome of your choices will directly impact your retirement, or cash flow, or kid’s college savings, or whatever it may be that you are building towards. With so much at stake, it is imperative that your investment decisions be made from a position of confidence and sound logic, not a position of uncertainty and emotional distress. A common response I get when explaining this concept to clients for the first time is, “Well you didn’t live through the dot com bubble, or the ’08 housing bubble. People who didn’t get out in time lost half of everything they had.” My response is simple, “Look up a chart of the SP500. Tell me the value of the index at its peak in 1999 and 2007 right before each of the recessions that you have mentioned to me. Now tell me the value of the SP500 today.” The chart speaks for itself. If you bought into the market at its peak in 1999, and didn’t sell until today, you would’ve increased the value of your portfolio significantly. (In an effort to make this easy to understand for our readers, this example only pertains to the SP500 index). So, how does one train themselves to behave rationally in a market downturn? I use these three guidelines to keep our clients on track: 1-Decide what the purpose of the investment will be, and establish a time horizon for that investment. (Ex. If you are 35 and plan on retiring at 65, then you have a 30 year time

horizon for your retirement investments. If the market gets bad in year 5, you’ve got 25 years left to recover) 2-Before the initial investment, set a risk tolerance, and choose your investments based off the level of risk that you will be able to tolerate. (Ex. If you are extremely scared of losing money, then volatile investments are not for you, perhaps you should look for investments with a lower level of risk). By establishing your risk tolerance before making an initial investment, you should be able to keep the ebbs and flows of the market within a range that you are comfortable with. 3-Finally, in a market downturn, I tell my clients they should call me before making any emotional decisions. There are times where a simple conversation with a professional can allay fears and alleviate stress. No matter where you live, there will always be good days and bad days. Sometimes those bad days can turn into bad weeks or even months, but if you have a little patience, the sun will always come back out. The market works the same way. If you can remain rational and weather the storm, in time, the market will recover. It always has. This advice is general in nature, and not everyone’s financial situation is the same. If you would like a team of industry professionals to assess your long term financial strategy, please do not hesitate to give us call. Austin Barranco, Financial Advisor Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager www.mcdonaldhagen.com Direct comments and questions to Jennifer.Hunt@LPL.com or 334.387.0094 Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and may not be invested into directly. Investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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19 Self-Employment Ideas for Retirees to

Take Charge of Their Destiny By Kimberly Blaker

For a variety of reasons, many older Americans won't retire. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32% of Americans ages 65 to 69 were employed during the second quarter of 2017. In the 70 to 74 age group, 19% were employed. While financial necessity is one big reason many people won't retire, others are choosing to stay employed for as long as they can. According to Maurie Backman, in “3 Reasons to Work During Retirement,� generating extra income, saving on leisure costs, and warding off depression top the reasons many seniors choose to remain in the workforce. But working after retirement age doesn't necessarily mean seniors are punching time clocks. According to data from the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurship, in 2016, 24% of new entrepreneurs aged 55 to 64 years old. If you plan to remain in the workforce, the good news is, there are plenty of opportunities for self-employment that don't cost a bundle to get started. Here are 19 companies you can start from home, most requiring minimal to no investment to start up. Professional Organizer. Are you obsessed with keeping your cupboards, drawers, closets, and garage organized? If so, you might be surprised to learn that most people are not. Here's where your organizational skills can earn you a living. Between those who don't know how to organize and others who don't have the time to deal with it, there's a huge market in need of such services. Consulting. What's your area of expertise? Whatever it is, there are likely plenty of people or businesses that could use your advice. To get your brain churning, here are a few examples of consultant services to consider: financial, business, social media, legal, career, technology, public relations, human resources, strategy, marketing,

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information technology, management, childbirth, interior decorating, and the list goes on. Pet Sitting. For animal lovers, this has become a particularly popular form of self-employment. With the rising cost of pet boarding and pet owners' desire to reduce the stress their pets experience during owners' absences, many hire sitters and are willing to pay good money for the service. Tour Company. Whether you live in a big city, historical town, or scenic area with state parks and national monuments, there's likely a need or demand for tour guides, which can be a lucrative business. You can provide either walking or driving tours to visitors and residents while sharing your knowledge of the area and sights with them. Social Media Management. If you're savvy with social media, companies large and small are in need of your service. Social media management includes setting up social media accounts and writing ongoing interesting and shareable posts. You'll also respond to social media messages and comments to build and maintain the company's relationship with its followers. Blogging. If you love writing and have the skill to write ongoing engaging posts, you'll discover every type of business imaginable has or needs a blog. Just look for businesses related to your area of expertise. If you're an expert researcher, that's all the better, and the sky's the limit.

writers.

Content Writing. This is another highdemand writing job. Businesses of all kinds need well-written website content that describes their products and services as well as related content to increase targeted traffic. For most companies, search engine optimized (SEO) content is a must. So, if you have this skill, you already have the edge over many

Wedding Planner. Does the idea of helping couples with one of the most important and romantic days of their lives make your heart skip a beat? Wedding planners help couples with every aspect of their wedding and reception, from invitations and the wedding party's attire to the cake, reception hall, and entertainment. Event Planner. If you have excellent organizational and time management skills and business acumen, this might be the perfect fit. Event planners coordinate every aspect of a meeting or convention, and sometimes social events as well. Planners arrange the location, catering, speakers, and printed materials for events, and more. Home Staging Consultant. According to the real estate industry, well-staged homes sell faster and for more money. Yet, when it comes down to it, most people's homes are anything but showready. If you like home decorating and rearranging furniture, this might be right up your alley. You can offer consulting services or do the staging yourself. Travel Agency. Despite the ease and costeffectiveness of buying and scheduling travel online, there's still a good demand for travel agents. Many people prefer using an agent because of the travel advice agents offer as well as for arranging complicated travel plans. So, if you love to travel and helping people, this might be just the right business for you.

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Website Design. Have you built a website for yourself or someone in the past? If so and you have a knack for design along with excellent computer skills, this might be just the home-based career you've been waiting for. With WordPress, in particular, website design is relatively simple yet offers designers unlimited options. Project Management. If you're an idea person with good management skills, this career is worth looking into. Can you take a project and run with it and see it through to completion? As a project manager, your role is to put together and lead teams through projects. You'll also be in charge of creating project budgets and managing their costs, and ultimately, making most of the projects' decisions. Bookkeeping. Small businesses often have only a few hours worth of accounting per week or month. So it isn't feasible or necessary for them to hire an employee for the task. This is where you can step in and offer your services. Landing just a few business accounts could quickly provide you a full-time income working from home.

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Personal Trainer. If you're a fitness buff and enjoy motivating others, this might be just the career for you. Personal trainer certification programs run between $400 to $1,000. Upon completion, you can either work as a personal trainer for a fitness corporation or independently. Teaching Online Courses. Here's a wideopen opportunity because courses can be taught on just about anything. Do you have a passion for something? What are your areas of expertise, educational background, or special skills or talents? Chances are there's something you're great at and qualified to teach. Here are some ideas to consider: a hobby or craft, computer skills, photography, web design, writing, professional development, how to play an instrument, dog training, the list is endless. Recruiting Agency. Because of the challenges and time involved in finding qualified applicants to fill high-level positions, many companies now use recruiters to help fill the roles. With the current low unemployment rate, businesses are finding it increasingly

difficult to find qualified candidates on their own. So why not step in and help them? Catering. Do you live for making delicious and eye-appealing food? If you've got excellent culinary skills, you can offer your catering services for wedding receptions, corporate events, graduation parties, bar mitzvahs, luncheons, anniversary parties, and a host of other occasions. Life Coach. If you enjoy helping people better themselves, here's the perfect opportunity to make the most of your skill. Depending on where you live, there may be educational requirements for this career. So, do your research. But if you're good at setting goals and developing personal plans, solving problems, understanding people and what motivates them, and offering sound advice, this career is worth looking into. Kimberly Blaker is a lifestyle and parenting freelance writer. Copyright Š 2019 Kimberly Blaker, All rights reserved.

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways... The English poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning penned those famous lines around 1845 in a sonnet dedicated to her future husband, Robert Browning. The sentiment has been quoted so often it has become a part of our popular culture, seen in everything from Hallmark cards to Bugs Bunny cartoons. While most of us are familiar with the opening stanza of the poem, I suspect that few of us can recall all fourteen lines of the sonnet’s iambic pentameter. In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, take a moment to read the entire poem: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight For the ends of being and ideal grace. I love thee to the level of every day’s Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. I love thee freely, as men strive for right. I love thee purely, as they turn from praise. I love thee with the passion put to use In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death.

This poem is a love letter, written in an era where people sat in contemplation by candle light with nothing to distract them but books, lively conversation, or perhaps even pen and paper. Not a modern, cheap, disposable ball-point pen mind you, but a finely-tipped fountain pen which applies ink to paper via a method that is essentially a controlled leak. The ink, once applied to paper, would have to be blotted dry to avoid smears and smudges. When was the last time you sat down, shut out the distractions of modern society, and wrote a letter to someone you loved? Not an email, not a text, not a Facebook post or Tweet, but an honestto-goodness paper letter?

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We rarely take the time to express our feelings to our loved ones the way the future Mrs. Browning did when she wrote the lines quoted above. While we may not write many letters these days, an

Once we leave this earth, an estate plan is also an opportunity to give gifts of property to the people we care about. They may be sentimental gifts, like family heirlooms, or they may be monetary gifts. They may even be gifts of Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop education, ensuring that Wednesday, February 20: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 children or pm at 322 Catoma Street downtown Montgomery. This educational grandchildren workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, go to college. trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate You might even leave administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce a gift of and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid motivation— qualification. Registration is required. Call 334-625-6774 today to conditioning reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. such gifts on achieving certain goals, estate plan can be a final expression of like a minimum GPA, for example. love, a love letter of sorts, to the people we care about most. Every person’s estate planning goals will of course be unique. Every family is Think about it: the one person who will unique. That is why you, and only you, not be around to benefit from your estate can adequately craft a final expression of planning is you. Getting your affairs in love to the people you care about. Most order is not a selfish act, it is a gift to your love letters are written by the young, loved ones. And I’m not just talking about but you shouldn’t assume that estate monetary gifts. planning is only for the old, the sick, or the dying. To the contrary, the best time For example, what if you were in a terrible to draft your final love letter to your car accident, and your family had to family is while you are strong of body and make the decision whether to continue sharp of mind. to keep you alive using machines or other treatments that would serve to prolong This year, skip the flowers and chocolate, your life, but that would not cure you. turn off the TV, shut down the cellphone, In those conversations, the topic usually and write a letter to someone you love. turns to what you “would have wanted.” Without written instructions, your family Raley L. Wiggins is left to guess whether you would want Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC to be kept alive indefinitely, or whether 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com 322 Catoma Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, you prefer to be allowed to die a natural www.redoaklegalpc.com death. (If you’re familiar with the famous Terry Shaivo case from the 1990’s, her family spent several years debating whether Terry “would have wanted” to be kept alive using machines, even though she was permanently unconscious).

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Steve Miller Band Performing at MPAC in March

The Steve Miller Band has played to more than 15 million people in the last 20 years. In addition to touring with his band, Miller is also contributing his time to serving on the welcoming committee of the Department of Musical Instruments of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and as a board member of Jazz at Lincoln Center, where he curates and hosts shows at both institutions celebrating blues, jazz and early American music. In 2016, Miller presented five sold out shows at JALC: “Ma Rainey Meets Miles Davis” and “T Bone Walker – A Bridge From Blues to Jazz.” Performing at The MPAC on March 21, 7:30 pm. For ticket sales and info visit www.mpaconline.org or www.stevemillerband.com/

Ted, The Wine Guy Big Wine Bash Ted, The Wine Guy will host The Big Wine Bash on Friday February 22nd, 6 to 8 pm downtown Montgomery at 129 Coosa, above Central Restaurant. This year will be another wonderfully diverse wine tasting, with over 100 selections to choose from. $30 in advance, $40 at the door. Tickets are now on sale! We've also made them available on the web again this year through the Eventbrite website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/big-wine-bash-2019tickets-39851485867. In addition to our local sales reps pouring wines, we make an effort to get winery staff and reps here to better describe their wines. So far this year, we have commitments from these wineries: Wineries that we know are participating (more to be added later): Chateau Ste Michelle, Justin, Black Stallion, Concha y Toro, Klinker Brick, Brooks, Alexander Valley Vineyards, Austin Hope, Vineyard Brands (Italian and French selections), Jackson Family Wines (Freemark Abbey, Stonestreet, Bootleg, Hartford Court, etc.), Cardwell Hill, UVA Imports (Italian selections). This is shaping up to be an outstanding evening of wine tasting! Don't wait too long to get your tickets...we sold out two years in a row and had to turn folks away. For more info call 334.395.9911 or visit www.tedthewineguy.com

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Join the Road Trip to Girls Weekend at Wetumpka Depot Road trip with us for a Girls' Weekend! now showing February 7-9, 14-16, 21-23 at the Wetumpka Depot. In this lighting quick comedy, four women travel to the mountains to consume copious amounts of wine, trade stories and to chat about their book club's latest selection. However, after the third case of wine comes through the door, it becomes clear that book discussion is out and funny antics are in! The madcap, door slamming chaos comes to a head when Dot wakes up and discovers her girls' weekend is full of men! ​Directed by Brady Walker. Tickets available at www.wetumpkadepot.com

Wind Down Downtown with Windsync Windsync is an exciting group of talented musicians visiting Montgomery for one week only! Thanks to grants from CACF, ASCA, JLM and others, we are able to bring this ensemble to our area schools and directly to you! Join us downtown for a fun, vibrant, concert in the unique Warehouse space of the Alley, Friday February 22, 7-9 pm. Friends and family will complete the fun. Bring a group! You don't want to miss the music. Tickets available at www.clefworks.org. Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and French Horn on one stage makes for an incredible sound. Check out Windsync to learn more! And make sure you follow Clefworks on facebook and instagram to see pictures of our outreach all week long leading up to the concert, www.windsync.org. Call 334.603.2533 for more information or visit www.clefworks.org.

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Celebrate America's First Mardi Gras

Did you know that Mobile is the birthplace of America's original Mardi Gras? That's right, Mardi Gras originated in 1703 right here in our port city. It was revived after the Civil War when citizen Joe Cain, fed up with post-war misery, led an impromptu parade down city streets. They've been doing it ever since and we mark the annual occasion with majestic parades, colorful floats and flying Moon Pies. Mardi Gras celebrations begin two and a half weeks before Fat Tuesday and the Port City comes to life. Elaborate themed floats manned by masked mystic societies, mounted police and marching bands wind through downtown Mobile and surrounding areas, entertaining nearly a million revelers each year. Mobile's Carnival is a family-friendly time of parties, balls, parades and revelry. Find your spot and get ready to catch Moon Pies, beads and trinkets. And not to forget the man who kept Mardi Gras alive, Joe Cain Day is observed the Sunday before Fat Tuesday. Mobile Mardi Gras kicks off in Downtown Mobile on February 15 and ends on Fat Tuesday, March 5! Stay up-to-date on all things Mobile Mardi Gras by following @MobileMardiGras on Facebook and Twitter. And, for even more Mobile Mardi Gras information, visit The Mobile Mask! www.mobilemask.com or www.mobile.org

Downtown Montgomery's 6th Annual Mardi Gras Block Party & Cajun Cook-off Grab your beads and come out for DBA Montgomery's 6th Annual Mardi Gras Block Party & Cajun Cook-off, Saturday, February 23, 12-6 pm. This is THE Mardi Gras event in Montgomery, and you're invited! The event is free and tasting tickets available on www.Eventbrite.comwill be on sale for the Cajun Cook-off. Contact dbamontgomery@gmail.com for more information. All proceeds from Cajun Cook-off will go to That's My Child and Valiant Cross Academy, two local nonprofits that are changing our city for the better through education, equipping and empowering our youth. More Information on Website: www.facebook.com/events/2164040627255793/

Millbrook Mardi Gras The annual Millbrook Mardi Gras parade and festival will be early this year – Saturday, February 23rd from 9 until 3pm! This family-friendly event takes place in the lovely town of Millbrook at the Mill Creek Park on Main Street. Vendors will be ready and waiting with all kinds of arts and crafts, Cajun food, music, pony rides, zips lines and more. Designated as one of the “Must Attend” events in Alabama, the Millbrook Revelers Mardi Gras Festival & Parade brings Millbrook’s streets to life with parade viewers shouting for beads, moon pies and trinkets, lively tunes played by the colorful marching bands, and the infectious merriment that dominates the city all day. For more info www.millbrookrevelers.org

Prattville Mardi Gras Prattville’s 15th Annual Mardi Gras Parade and Celebration will be held on February 16. The good times will begin to roll with food vendors, arts and crafts vendors, inflatables, and other activities at 11 am and a car show starting at 8 am at the Public Safety Building. The parade will start at 2 pm at the Autauga County Courthouse. It will follow Main Street through downtown, turn right on Northington then left on Doster Road, ending at Stanley Jensen Stadium. For more information, call 334.595.0854.

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Roots & Wings Collection Exhibition In celebration of the Alabama Bicentennial and Black History Month, 21 Dreams Arts & Culture, Inc. in partnership with The AFFIRM Foundation Project presented by Designer Perry Varner will open the Roots & Wings Collection Exhibition in Montgomery, February 1, 2019. This visual arts exhibition is FREE to the public and will be held in the Warren Britt Gallery at the Tullibody Fine Arts Center on the campus Alabama State University through February 28. The exhibiting artwork created by Alabama artists depicts the lives and achievements of some of our most notable African-American natives. Alabamians who expanded the narrative of success in professional sports, arts, politics, science, and culture as well as those who broke barriers to entry in education and business. It is designed to adequately tell the story of Alabama’s rich cultural history and give recognition to some of the highest achievers who were all born in the great state of Alabama. For more info visit www.21dreamsmgm.org/rootswings

Caring for the Caregiver, Alzheimer/Dementia Support Group Meeting the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 1-3 pm at ChristChurch, 8800 Vaughn Rd. Montgomery, AL. A place for RESPITE: a pause or rest, EXCHANGING: practical information on caregiving problems, possible solutions, and resources in our community, SHARING: needs and concerns, TALKING: through challenges and discovering new ways to cope. Often, we hear caregivers say they are looking for support from people who “really understand because we have been there too.” This group offers just that-a safe place for caregivers, family and friends of persons with dementia to meet and develop a mutual support system. We welcome caregivers. For more info call 334.462.2613.

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This & tHAT

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More

PING PONG TOURNAMENT [all ages and abilities] 2019 Ping Pong is a sport that keeps older people who want to continue to stay fit “on their toes.” The low impact bending, reaching, squatting and eye-hand coordination keep the body tuned for daily life and for the occasional recreational challenge. The physical impact of ping pong may be low, but the charitable impact for Renascence keeps men with few support systems “on their toes” as they bounce back to a life out of prison. FRIDAY, MARCH 1 [PARTY] 6-9 pm; SATURDAY, MARCH 2 [TOURNAMENT] 9 am-3 pm at the ALCAZAR CENTER, 555 EASTERN BLVD. in Montgomery. The Tournament benefits Renascence and the men coming out of the prison system who need a hand up, not a handout, as they transition into society and employment. No other group in the city, and few in the state, provide safe, drug-free housing for male ex-offenders. Like a ping pong ball, the men of Renascence want to bounce back into productive lives. To register visit www.halfway-home.net to sign up for the tournament and/or the preview party. The cost is $10 age 18 and under, $20 ages 19 and over. PREVIEW PARTY COST: $45 per person includes food, beverages, dance band, silent auction and the opportunity to play ping pong. For more info call Renascence Re-Entry Community, 334.832.1402

Master Gardener Associations Presents Free Lunch & Learn Programs Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars, February 6, Native Plants: Bring on the Pollinators, Claude L. Jenkins, AL Wildlife Federation and March 6 All Veggies Love a Raised Bed, Mike Forster, Master Gardener. Autauga County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Thursday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 610 Fairview Avenue, Prattville 36066. Mark your calendars, February 7, 101 Questions, Don Armstrong, Master Gardener and March 7, Growing Herbs, Janell Diggs, Master Gardener. Elmore County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 2nd Tuesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the First Presbyterian Church, 100 West Bridge Street, Wetumpka 36092. Mark your calendars, February 12, Growing Camellias, Dr. Charles Mitchell, Retired Professor, AU. and March 12, Hummingbirds, Fred Bassett, Licensed Bander. For information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www.capcitymga.org.

2019 Home Building and Remodeling Expo The Greater Montgomery Home Building and Remodeling Expo is scheduled for February 1-3 at Montgomery Multiplex at Cramton Bowl. The 2019 Expo is a three-day event that will highlight the latest and greatest in home building and remodeling trends and technology. This year’s featured guest will be Chip Wade from HGTV. If you are looking to start your own home building and remodeling project the 2019 Home Expo is the place for you. Expo times will be Friday & Saturday 10 am to 6 pm - Sunday 12 pm to 5 pm. Regular Admission is $6, military Free Friday. Call 334.277.7766 for more information or visit www.gmhba.org

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Pike Road Arts Council's 8th Annual Art Market Call your friends for the Pike Road Arts Council's 8th Annual Art Market on Saturday, March 2nd from 9 am - 4 pm at Pike Road Town Hall (9575 Vaughn Rd). This event is free to enter and features artists and artisans from the River Region and beyond. Stay tuned for updates on who will be part the 2019 Pike Road Art Market! A local British Car Club will be showcasing their cars in the parking lot outside Town Hall during the event. For more information, contact Patty Payne: patty@pikeroad.us.

Montgomery Symphony Orchestra Presents A Night at the Opera Prepare for a lovely evening as soprano Mabs Seay performs with the MSO on Monday, February 18, 7:30 pm at the Davis Theatre, 251 Montgomery Street, Downtown Montgomery. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 and Schumann’s Symphony No. 4 will round out the evening. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 334.240.4004 or visit www.montgomerysymphony.org

Cloverdale Playhouse in February Before Rent, there was Tick… Tick... Boom! This autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson, the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning composer of Rent, is the story of a struggling composer and the sacrifices that he made in pursuit of his dream. His girlfriend wants to get married and move out of the city, his best friend is making big bucks on Madison Avenue and, yet, Jon is still waiting on tables and trying to write the great American musical. Containing fourteen songs, ten characters, three actors and a band, this rock musical takes you on the journey that led to a Broadway blockbuster. This story of self-discovery embraces the universal ideal of holding onto your dreams through life's most difficult challenges. For tickets or info visit www.cloverdaleplayhouse.org

A Kissing Story for Valentine's Day @ The Capri When renowned beauty Buttercup figures out servant boy Westley means something else when he says "As you wish," the love story sounds like it's going swimmingly. But that's just the first part of the story. If Buttercup and Westley want to make their relationship work, they've got to overcome pirates, princes, assassins, Rodents Of Unusual Size, torture, and death. (Correction: The person is only mostly dead.) A swashbuckling, fantastic tale for the ages, The Princess Bride is the perfect movie for your Dinner-and-aMovie romantic night. Showing Valentine’s Day at 7:30 pm. For more info visit www.capritheatre.org

Get Your Affairs in Order, FREE Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop

Wednesday, February 20: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm at 322 Catoma Street downtown Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334.625.6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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12 things in your attic that could be worth real money

Sometimes you can turn your decluttering into cold, hard cash

With decluttering the movement of the moment (thanks, Marie Kondo, who is having a resurgence due to her new Netflix show), you may be wondering if you can cash in on the stuff you’re shedding. That goes double if you’re cleaning out a big house.

director of the National Association of Senior Move Managers.

Unfortunately, demand for your discards isn’t what it used to be. “We’re seeing a very strong trend for simplification and downsizing, so between parents passing and selling their stuff, and selling our stuff as we downsize, the market is becoming kind of saturated,” says Julie Hall, owner of www.TheEstateLady.com.

If you want an actual appraisal, find a pro via the American Society of Appraisers at www.appraisers.org.

Not only is there too much stuff for sale, but tastes are changing. “What mom and grandma told us had value has truly declined, unless it is extraordinary,” Hall says. “Most things are not.” That means buyers may be scarce for your china, flatware, ornate silver tea sets, and formal furniture. But fear not. You may still have some things gathering dust in the attic that are worth taking the trouble to sell. Don’t see one of your finds on the list below? Check the internet. “If you go to an online auction site like EverythingButTheHouse, you can get a really good sense of what’s in demand,” says Jennifer Pickett, associate executive

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Ebay is another spot for research. But remember: The sales price, not the ask price, is the real measure of the market value.

Vintage toys If you have an original Star Wars toy or an early Spiderman or Batman, that’s a hot item. “Star Wars just gets more and more valuable,” says Roger Schrenk, co-owner of NOVA Liquidation in Luray, Va. “We sold a Millennium Falcon that had never been opened from the 70s for $1,500.” That’s not all. “I have heard there’s a market for Polly Pockets from the 1990s,” says Pickett. Like anything else, toys are worth more if they’re still in the original box. These five toy cars that sold as a set for $101 all had their original packaging. Antique trains are huge—as long as they’re in good shape. “If they have been stored in the attic, they’re probably not going to be in excellent condition,” Hall says. Pyrex This classic kitchenware is a collector favorite nowadays, but you can’t sell just

any old bowl or dish. “There are certain patterns and colors that are extremely desirable,” Hall says. In-demand vintage patterns, according to this rundown on estatesales.org, include the “Pink Daisy,” “Snowflake,” “Balloons,” and “Rooster Black.” This set of two Pyrex “Gooseberry” pattern bowls from the 1950s or 60s recently sold for $124 on www.EBTH.com. Mid-century modern furniture Mid-century modern furniture from the likes of the Eames, Noguchi, Jacobsen, Knoll, and Saarinen is desirable, although not as desirable as it was a few years ago. That’s because millennials can buy cheaper replicas at stores like Wayfair and West Elm. “They’re putting out these gorgeous reproductions with a little bit of a modern spin, so instead of teak legs, it might have brushed stainless steel legs,” says Hall. Nonetheless, there’s still a market for the chairs, sofas, tables, and credenzas your parents or grandparents picked up in the 1950s or 60s, particularly if the piece is branded with the manufacturer or designer’s name. “Some designers and some chairs are worth a fortune because they’re hard to find,” Hall says.

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Even later reproductions may have value, like this pair of white tulip style chairs that recently sold for $135 (by comparison, another seller is asking $450 for this vintage tulip chair by Eero Saarinen). Retro gaming systems All those hours you frittered away playing video games could pay off. Your old Nintendo, Atari, or SEGA gaming system from the 1970s or 80s—either the machine itself or the cassettes that go with it—could be worth money, especially if they are in good condition. (Bonus points if you still have the box.) This Atari 2600 game console with a stack of games recently sold for $110 on www.EBTH.com. Costume jewelry “Many people are shocked, but there are some very good and desirable pieces of costume jewelry that are still out there, like old Trifari,” says Schrenk says. “It’s really, really hot.” The Trifari jewelry line, launched in the 1920s, became closely associated with First Lady Mamie Eisenhower mid-century. If your Trifari brooch, necklace, or bracelet has a crown on top of the T, that’s Crown Trifari, and it will sell for sure. Other designers to look for: Christian Dior, Miriam Haskell and Chanel. Even nondesigner costume jewelry can find a buyer, like this no-name assortment that recently sold for $67. Men’s watches Got an old Rolex? Patek Philippe? Omega? Good men’s watches have exploded in value. “Some totally regular stainless-steel Rolex you got in ’83 or ’84 is worth a lot more money today than what you paid for it,” Schrenk says. “There are a lot of Rolexes made in the 70s that are now so desirable they’re almost untouchable.” If you can find the box and paperwork the watch came with, even better. Here’s a Rolex Milgauss Stainless Steel Wristwatch that recently fetched $4,503 online. Old family slides Open up any old boxes of slides you come upon. If they are Kodachrome and have a The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

red border, they’re extremely fine quality and could be worth something. On eBay, Kodachrome slides from the 1940s through 1960s can go for about $10 a piece. Even if the slides lack the red border, the subject matter could add value. Did your parents take any trips to big cities in the 40s or 50s and snap pictures of the airport or cars or people? “That stuff is gold,” Schrenk says. “People who are trying to remember what the urban landscape looked like always refer to those slides.” There’s also a market for old photos of trains or airplanes from that era. Vintage couture If you have a handbag or a gown made by Hermes, have it appraised. Frankly, if you have any gowns that were worn between 1960 and 1964, don’t just toss them. “Even if they’re yellowed from age, look at those labels,” Schrenk says. “An old Dior gown from 1965 could be $300 or $400 on Ebay as is.” This vintage Christian Dior coat recently sold for $182. A vintage Hermes silk neck tie went for $75. Coins If you come across a coin collection, have it appraised by a professional with expertise in this area. Keep in mind that your local coin store may be more interested in buying the coins than appraising them, says Hall. “You need it valued before anything is sold, especially if you have gold coins or silver coins.” All those foreign coins left over from overseas vacations, on the other hand, aren’t worth much. In general, a local appraiser can be a good resource for any potential valuable, with advice on where to sell, whether there’s an auction house that might take a piece, or whether you should consult with an estate sale expert. A set of 13 American silver quarters from the 1940s through 1960s recently sold for $46 on www.EBTH.com. Turntables and vinyl Everything old is new again. So, naturally, there’s a market for record players and records. Does this Pioneer turntable with a

walnut veneer base look like the one that sat in your old rec room? It fetched $185 at auction. “Even a medium-range turntable is now really desirable because so many have been destroyed and lost,” says Schrenk. As for records, you’ll have the most luck trying to sell old jazz and early rock, such as The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and The Doors. Precious metals Gold jewelry has held its value over the years. “In many cases that old gold necklace is now worth four times the value of the metal when you bought it, and even though it’s ugly, it’s worth some money,” says Schrenk. You may also be able to sell old platinum jewelry or anything with a large gem stone. Get valuations from two to three jewelers. With sterling silver, you may find that you’re better off selling it for scrap, or waiting for prices to rebound. If you do want to hawk the flatware, bowls, or tea set, even for scrap, they must be stamped with the word “Sterling,” the numbers “925,” or an English lion mark, which indicate that they are sterling silver and not silver plate. This 10-piece group of sterling silver baby spoons and folks brought in $211 on www. EBTH.com Firearms and military memorabilia There’s a healthy market for firearms and military items from almost any given war, including medals, knives, period photographs, and stuff like this Civil Warera field microscope that was bidded up to $140 in an online auction. “That doesn’t mean Grandpa’s uniform is worth a fortune,” Hall says. “It just means somebody needs to look at it.” Plus, she adds, one of the most important characteristics of value is condition.” You might have a genuine Civil War photograph in your hands, but if you can’t make out anyone in the picture it’s not worth much.

By Kate Ashford Source: www.considerable.com

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Lew & Karen Nyman, Hamming It Up

This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Lew and Karen Nyman. Lew and Karen are transplants from Boston…once they moved to Montgomery, they discovered just how friendly southerners can be and the cost of living was a bit friendlier than their hometown too! They both share a unique hobby, they’re both Ham radio operators. Ham radios are especially valuable during major catastrophes because communications can be established when other technology is unavailable. Lew spent weeks during Hurricane Katrina relief efforts helping the Red Cross and others get the supplies they needed. They are active in the local Ham operators club, working with the Red Cross and being on hand for special events. Lew is a retired Lt. Col in the Air Force who stays busy with other retired Air Force Officers serving our community in a variety of ways. They are also members of Temple Beth Or and will be helping in the annual Jewish Food Festival, which is a real treat to all the foodies in the River Region. Lew and Karen know how to age well, apparently the secret is staying busy and engaged, that’s how the Nyman’s do it and from the smiles on their faces, they’re doing a pretty good job! Of course, they are also friends with Greg Budell which has to provide some comic relief 5 days a week from his radio shows on Newstalk 93.1 We recently shared some time with Lew and Karen and hope you’ll enjoy getting to know them as much as we have.

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, what led you to the Montgomery area, careers, marriage, family, etc.?

retirement, and we decided to remain here in Montgomery rather than move back to Massachusetts with the ice and snow and high taxes. It was a smart decision for us.

Lew/Karen: We were both born and raised in the Boston area and moved to BOOM!: Lew, Montgomery Montgomery 23 years ago because of has been fortunate to have a Lew’s job. People often ask what brought strong U.S Air Force presence us to Alabama. My first answer is that in our community, both active I made a wrong turn on the highway. and retired. Then I tell them the real reason. It was Please a job relocation. I was an engineer share some for Raytheon Company, a defense of your contractor in Massachusetts. My first Air Force project that I worked on for Raytheon journey was the Navy’s Aegis guided missile with us? Do cruiser and destroyer program. Raytheon you fly any manufactures the radar fire control aircraft? systems for these ships. Later, I was assigned as quality engineer for the Patriot missile program. The Patriot air defense missile was the missile that affectionately was called Lew/Karen: I the “scud buster” during the Gulf graduated with a war in the early 1990s. The missile degree in electrical itself was being assembled here engineering from in Alabama at a Lockheed Martin Lowell Technological facility. They were a subcontractor Institute in to Raytheon for the missile final Massachusetts in assembly. We built over 600 1966. The school missiles. We sold our house, Karen was later renamed retired from her job in Boston and University of Raytheon moved us here in 1996 Massachusetts at Lowell. I took to work inside Lockheed Martin’s ROTC and was plant to oversee the assembly of commissioned a 2nd these missiles, and as necessary Lew getting ready for a Lt at graduation. solve any quality engineering issues Veterans Day Parade, that arose. This job brought me into wearing his original uniform! Although I

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Karen and Lew are both licensed amateur (ham) radio operators. Here they are enjoying a radio contact.

requested flight school the Air Force had different plans for me. I was assigned to Hanscom Air Force Base Electronic Systems Division in Bedford, MA just 15 miles from home. My assignment was to work with scientists and engineers from MITRE Corp, a think tank, and defense contractors to develop advanced electronic surveillance systems. It was a cold war assignment. I was given a topsecret clearance and told not to travel out of the country! I used to tell people that my job was so secret that even I didn’t know what I was doing. During those years Karen was working in the administrative Boston offices for ITEK Corp. and later Hewlett Packard Corp. After serving on active duty for four years I went into the Air Force reserve. I was given an assignment to advise and assist Civil Air patrol (CAP) in the northeast region. CAP is an auxiliary of the Air Force and is provided with equipment The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


and assistance by the Air Force since CAP conducts over 80% of the search and rescue missions in the U.S. In this capacity I got my private pilot’s license in 1984 and was part owner of a four Karen and Lew, enjoying a fine California restaurant with Lew's brother Allan and his wife, Roberta, their son, Michael, and his wife, Liz seat Cessna airplane. I many times. His shows are on 93.1 in the enjoyed flying for many years. mornings and in the afternoons. BOOM!: You are friends with Greg Budell and until recently his neighbor, can you tell us about your friendship with Greg and his wife Roz? Do you ever call in to his radio shows on News Talk 93.1? Was he a good neighbor?

BOOM!: Since Valentine’s Day is around the corner would you share with our readers your love story, how you met and some of the secrets to your marriage success?

BOOM!: You’re both members of Temple Beth Or and one of their great outreaches to the River Region is the Jewish Food Festival, can you share more about this special event and what it means to the cultural landscape of Montgomery?

Lew/Karen: We are members of

Temple Beth Or and each year we participate in the temple’s annual Jewish Food Festival and Treasure Market. Karen usually helps with serving food and Lew sells food tickets. It’s a great event and draws a big crowd. So many people from the community look forward to this event. Some of these visitors travel quite a few miles to attend. The food is prepared from old Jewish recipes and

Lew/Karen: Greg Budell and his lovely wife Roz have been good friends of ours for many years. We met Greg when he first came to Montgomery since he lived Lew/Karen: We met in our neighborhood. We visited with each other on a blind them quite a few times at their home, date while Lew was especially during the holiday season. still in college. It was Karen and Lew with friends Greg Budell and his lovely wife, Roz, at one of Greg's We occasionally stop into Baumhower’s "Baumhower's Gatherings", always a fun time! a friend of Lew’s he restaurant for Greg’s Wednesday night knew since the 7th grade who fixed us you cannot find such cuisine anywhere in gatherings of his friends and radio show up. He and his wife live in the Boston the local area. One of the more popular listeners. We’ve also been to their new area and we get together with them from items is the cheese cake which we have home for a Christmas open house. time to time after all these years. We shipped in from Carnegie Deli in New They were also vacation York. It’s decadent! Lew tells people such good with them it’s fat free, but no one believes him. neighbors and occasionally. Another of the popular items are the Greg would We’ve been delicious potato latkes (pancakes) which often mow married for can be topped with sour cream or apple his next-door 52 years! sauce. neighbor’s What makes lawn. The a marriage BOOM!: Being from the Boston neighbor was like ours area what is it about the south and an elderly successful particularly Montgomery that you like? woman. is that we What do we need more of? Greg is one do things of the most together compassionate Lew/Karen: We made the decision to and have a people we’ve retire here in Montgomery because the Karen’s twin sister Myrna with her husband Hal, respect for ever met. He climate is great, and the cost of living who live in Montgomery each other’s values his is low. Also, because Lew is retired needs and friendships from the Air Force, we frequently take interests. dearly. Lew has called into his show advantage of benefits we get from The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Maxwell Air the local club at www.W4AP.Org. Lew/Karen: We Force Base. are both licensed Karen very BOOM!: Besides ham radio, do you have amateur radio much enjoys the any hobbies or other activities that grab (ham radio) small-town type your attention? operators. Lew of atmosphere got his license as a here. teenager in 1957 Lew/Karen: Lew has been involved Montgomery and Karen obtained with a military organization for many has a lot to offer her license several years. He has been serving on the board its residents years later after for the Montgomery chapter of the and there are we were married. Military Officers Association of America. many cultural Amateur radio There are over 300 members in the local This is the historic Wayside Grist Mill in Sudbury, events to take chapter and about 400,000 members Massachusetts. Karen, a photography buff, photographed is a world-wide advantage of. hobby and hams nationwide. Members consist of active, this when living in the Boston area Many tourists communicate with retired, reserve and past military officers. are coming here taking the civil rights each other in many countries. Hams also The organization primarily lobby’s tour. This is a city full of history. provide emergency communications in Congress to protect the benefits of all times of disasters when other means military and veteran personnel. Our local BOOM!: What are you most passionate of communication are down. As an chapter also provides scholarship funds about? example, Lew along with some of the local radio club members provided communications Lew/Karen: Our passion is being with in support of the Red Cross good friends here in Montgomery and at a staging area here in travelling to visit with relatives and Montgomery for several weeks friends living out of town. Some are in after hurricane Katrina struck. Boca Raton in south Florida and others They were sending messages are in Massachusetts. Lew’s brother and back and forth from the gulf his wife live in Palm Desert, CA. and we coast. To get a license, one try to see them at least once each year. must pass a written exam and We also have enjoyed our neighborhood then is issued a call sign by gatherings where we get to meet many the Federal Communications of our neighbors both new and old. Commission. We are both active with the Montgomery Amateur While on a trip back to Boston, Karen and Lew toured this unique BOOM!: What are some of your favorite research submarine, USS Albacore, that pioneered the American Radio Club which has over 100 travel experiences? Favorite vacation version of the teardrop hull form of modern submarines. members. Lew is a past president spot? Any travel dreams planned? of the club and Karen was the publicity to many students going on to college. Karen enjoys visiting the Montgomery Lew/Karen: We both like to Museum of Fine Arts especially during travel. We’ve been on several the times when the new exhibits have cruises and frequently visit arrived. She also likes to take in some of Nashville and enjoy attending the local Estate Sales, mostly just to look country music shows. We also for those “hidden treasures”. Another love the beach and have been to hobby that she has is taking scenic Orange Beach and Fort Lauderdale photos both locally and on vacations. Florida many times. These are the types of places we enjoy travelling BOOM!: Many people over 50 to. experience a renewed sense of purpose, new goals, even new careers, how would BOOM!: You both are ham radio you describe this sense of renewal in operators, what is ham radio your life? Any advice for the rest of us (amateur radio) and how does it Military Officers Association of America Convention, Lew and seeking renewal? work? Would you please share Karen were on the organizing committee, Lew serves on the board for the Montgomery Chapter how you became involved in such a unique pastime? How are ham radio Lew/Karen: We continued to keep officer for many years. Information about operators valuable in disaster relief? How active and to pursue new interests in our amateur radio can be found on the would someone get started as a ham lives that will inspire us. Being retired American Radio relay League’s website or radio operator? has allowed us to do the things that we

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didn’t have time for during our working careers.

does technology make aging easier?

BOOM!: Lew and Karen, give us three words that describe you? Your marriage?

Lew/Karen: The three words that describe us are togetherness, respect both utilize our and loving. computers to stay in touch with friends BOOM!: and family. We As you’ve remember so aged, well the days how have when there was your nothing digital, priorities no computers changed? and no cell phones, not Karen in the Bahamas enjoying an early morning Lew/ even hand-held walk around the pool calculators. We Karen: take full advantage of the digital Our priorities now haven’t really changed world which certainly makes life very much. We still try to maintain a easier for us in many ways. Karen healthy lifestyle and to enjoy our many also enjoys looking for recipes on friendships. Volunteering our time has Karen and Lew on a recent trip to Nassau the Bahamas line and occasionally will prepare replaced working careers. with Boston friends Les and Sandy Awrach them for dinner. BOOM!: How do you like to relax and We want to thank Lew and Karen for sharing BOOM!: You have been retired for many wind down from a full day’s activities? some of their story for this month’s BOOM! years, what’s your secret to a successful Cover Profile. If you would like to learn more retirement lifestyle? Lew/Karen: We enjoy being at home about Ham Radio operators visit www.W4AP. most evenings. After a busy day we like Org. We also want to thank Shellee Roberts of Lew/Karen: To have a successful Total Image Portraits, www.totalimage.com, to watch a movie or do some reading. for her cover photo for this month's cover. If retirement lifestyle one needs to plan There are some TV shows that we’ll you have questions, comments or suggestions for retirement during the working years. watch also. We like the History Channel, about our cover profiles, including nominating We always had saved for our retirement. Food Channel, HGTV and others. someone, please send them to Jim Watson at These years should be the best years of jim@riverregionboom.com our lives. We must keep ourselves active BOOM!: Technology is rooted in almost Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at both mentally and physically in our later every aspect of our lives. What’s your www.riverregionboom.com/archive/ years and to enjoy the company of our relationship with the digital world? How friends.

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Carol and Rick Clark are Alabama Bright Lights helping children hunt and fish In Alabama, hunting and fishing feels like a birthright with outdoor places and opportunities so plentiful. Many are introduced to these activities at a Kidz Outdoors is a national program with six options that aims to provide outdoor young age and opportunities for sick or impaired children. (Karim Shamsi-Basha / Alabama NewsCenter) enjoy them the rest of their lives. Carol and Rick Clark answered But what about those children who are unable to hunt or fish because illness, injury or other impairment makes it too challenging?

that question by founding the Kidz Outdoors.

Kidz Outdoors is an Alabama Bright

Light connecting children with nature from Alabama NewsCenter. “My husband is an avid turkey hunter and was asked to guide a little boy with cancer during the hunt,” Carol said. “On the way home, we stopped the car because we had tears running down our face. We knew this was our calling, and our lives were changed that day.” Kidz Outdoors serves children like 15-year-old Colby Harris, who suffers from Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). Harris is extremely passionate about the non-profit. “Kids Outdoors has made a huge impact on my life,” he said. “Before I didn’t really get to do much outdoors, and I’ve never been that adventurous. I’ve made a lot of friends, it’s very special.” Colby’s father, Ronnie Harris, Heard about Kidz Outdoors at church and enrolled Colby in the program. “This was about a year ago. The trip was actually canceled a couple times because Colby was too sick to go, and the Clarks were so patient with rearranging schedules and working with us. We finally got to go on the trip six months ago, and we had a blast,” Ronnie Harris said. Another child who has enjoyed Kidz Outdoors is Rhae Busby, whose mother Dana loves what the program has done for her daughter. “Since we started attending, Kidz Outdoors has been amazing for our family,” she said. “We have always enjoyed hunting and fishing, but we never thought Rhae would be able to do it. She has Brittle Bone Disease. Now she’s been able to go hunting and fishing. My other son has found a love for turkey hunting through Carol and Rick. They have become like a family to us.”

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Sharing the touch with outdoors the child and with their family children for years is not the after they only goal hunt or fish for Kidz with us. In Outdoors. November, The we took 88 program’s kids on a mission hunt and (the Rick Clark works on hunting gear for Kidz Outdoors. (Karim Shamsi-Basha / Alabama NewsCenter) includes: year before “Forming that) 150 on the same too much,” he said. “If he was still bonds by hunt. We have chapters here, I could tell him that I now use linking across the Southeast, my hunting and fishing experience Carol Clark, left, co-founder of the Central Alabama family and and there is never a to touch the lives of these kids. To Chapter of Kidz Outdoors, hugs Rhae Busby, one of friends charge for a child and me, what we do with these kids is the program's participants. (Karim Shamsi-Basha / Alabama NewsCenter) to pass their family to come priceless.” on our passion for the outdoors to a hunt.” Source: www.alabamanewscenter.com new generation and raising funds for Alabama Bright Lights captures the stories, hospitals and research centers in hope Carol’s husband Rick Clark sums up the through words, pictures and video, of some of our state’s brightest lights who are working to make to find cures for cancer and other entire story of Kidz Outdoors with a Alabama an even better place to live, work and childhood diseases.” memory of his father. play. Award-winning journalist Karim Shamsi-Basha “We literally build families with Kidz tells their inspiring stories. Email him comments, as well as suggestions on people to profile, at Outdoors,” Carol said. “We keep in “My dad told me I hunted and fished karimshamsibasha@gmail.com.

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Mushrooms...merely food, or more? For thousands of years the people of Asia have eaten mushrooms for both food and medicine. Among them, the mighty Maitake mushroom reigns supreme. Significant research has been done regarding its medicinal benefits and I will elaborate on that later. First of all, know that all mushrooms have nutritional benefits and help us to expand our nutritional base. The greater the variety of foods we eat, the greater benefits we will get from our diet. Whilst eating spinach, for example, is great for many reasons, if we eat it every day we are limiting our source and range of nutrition from food. Variety is key, and many of us do not eat fungi regularly, if at all. I’m sure you’ve all tried the common white mushroom, even the crimini or baby bella, but how many of you have expanded your horizons to the Enoki, the Portabella, the Oyster, the Shitake and the Maitake? Unfortunately, I already know the answer, so I will now try to persuade you to expand your fungi horizons. As a food generally, all mushrooms are FAT FREE, SUGAR FREE and extremely low in both carbohydrates and sodium. This fact in itself makes them a great food choice. Now add to that the nutrients they contain – fiber, protein, potassium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, selenium, thiamin, vitamin B6, vitamin D and zinc. Now tell me why they’re not an everyday part of your diet…. Certain varieties of mushroom do have higher levels of certain nutrients than others, which is why they are known for certain medicinal uses. For example, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

the Maitake has extremely high levels of Vitamin D. Known as the sunshine vitamin - Your body is designed to get the vitamin D it needs by producing it when your bare skin is exposed to sunlight, or more specifically ultraviolet B (UVB). This is the most natural way to get

vitamin D. Unfortunately, most of us do not expose enough bare skin per day to produce the amount our bodies require. We can supplement it by eating certain foods, but there is a very limited range of foods which provide this very important vitamin: salmon, mackerel, egg yolk, milk, yoghurt, almond milk, orange juice, beef or calf liver, oyster, shitake and maitake mushrooms. Of these foods, (ignoring the mushrooms for a second) the oily fish are the winners by far, having 425 IU Vitamin D in 3oz. salmon, 547 IU in 3oz. mackerel. Now consider that in the same 3oz. serving of Maitake there is a whopping 943 IU of vitamin D. That’s 236% of the Daily Recommended Value. Now Vitamin D is an incredibly important and often overlooked part of our diet, mainly because people assume that we get it solely from the sun, but if we rely on that alone we are going to be severely deficient. Evidence continues to mount that the vitamin which has long been associated with bone health (which includes your teeth!) also helps to regulate the immune system, lower blood pressure, protect against depression, and reduce risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several kinds of cancer. A 2014 study

from the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine also found that people with low vitamin D levels were twice as likely to die prematurely. If that is not enough evidence to convince you to try a Maitake mushroom, then I don’t know what is! (PS. Supplements are a second choice, but should always remain a second choice as they are synthetic copies at best.) In addition to the vitamin D argument, Maitakes are also used to treat cancer and relieve some of the side effects of chemotherapy. Several researchers corroborate that maitake causes apoptosis (“programmed suicide”) of cancer cells and contains antiangionenesis properties. That means they can restrict the proliferation of blood cells that feed tumors. One reason may be that maitake mushroom fruitbodies are rich in complex polysaccharides, in particular the heavy and complex 1,3; 1,4; and 1,6 beta-Dglucans. Various studies also show its effectiveness in treating diabetes as it modulates glucose levels thanks to the α-glucosidase inhibitor they contain. (Care should be taken if consuming alongside other diabetes drugs, as they also do the same thing – compounding the effect could cause blood sugar to drop too low.) In addition to all of this, they are actually very, very tasty! I know they look a bit strange if you’re not used to them, but just cook them as you would a regular mushroom and be wowed by both the taste and the potential health benefits. Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/ tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have.

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Travel Experiences with Jeff Barganier

Dismals Canyon Alabama’s Primeval Treasure

Ever hear of glowworms? Did you know they’re indigenous to Alabama? It was only after receiving an “Instagram” over my i-phone that I even knew it existed. And if I, a life-long-Alabamian, had never heard of the place, I figured there must be plenty of others who were unaware of Dismals Canyon, too. I called a friend who liked spur-of-themoment adventures. We packed the bare essentials and headed for scenic Northwest Alabama. Dismals Canyon is located just minutes south of Russellville, near Phil Campbell, Alabama. From Montgomery, you take Interstate 65 to Birmingham, then I-22 toward Jasper. It’s an easy 3.5-hour drive. Cell coverage is spotty as you near the Canyon and our GPS was a tentative resource. So, it’s a good idea to write out your directions before you go. Dismals Canyon is a strikingly different environment compared to its sister, Little River Canyon, which is located on the eastern side of North Alabama (see March 2018 Boom). Little River is miles long, deep

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and treacherous. It’s viewed from the canyon rim as one drives along or by stopping at one of its many overlooks. Or you may take a strenuous hike deep into it for a closer look. Dismals, on the other hand, is about 1.5 miles long, and you don’t see it at all, until you descend

Photography by David Morefield-fluffyshotme.com

many steps to the canyon floor and suddenly find yourself in a primordial world. It’s like stepping down and down then back in time—perhaps to the time glaciers pushed deep into Alabama and prehistoric people sheltered amongst the labyrinth of mammoth boulders, ferns, big-leaf magnolias and exotic creatures— like its two-foot-long salamanders, and mosquito-devouring gnat-larvae that attract their prey by glowing from the dank darkness of rock walls. When you venture deep into this exotic ecosystem, you eerily expect to see a brontosaurus poke its head down through the trees and chew some nearby vegetation. Don’t worry, you won’t. Like the various tribes that once called the canyon home, they’re long gone. But don’t be surprised if a puddle you’re negotiating is formed by an ancient foot print of some such creature. Management has ended camping for environmental reasons, but we were fortunate to be able to hang our hammocks across the county road from the entrance gate. The gate is closed at 5:00. It only takes a couple of hours to walk the whole trail and we managed to get in a hike during daylight hours. But touring the canyon in the blackness of

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night is another experience altogether. At 8:30 that evening, we were given a private tour of the canyon by Britney, the resident biologist. During the tour, I spotted a rare, whitefooted mouse dashing along under a rock overhang. Our presence probably stirred him from a meal he was making of a caterpillar, his favorite food. Britney pointed out exotic plants, rock formations like Indian Head Rock and Witch’s Cavern, and discussed the probable geological explanations for the canyon’s creation— glaciers, earthquakes. But, perhaps most interesting, was our opportunity to view “dismalites” in action. Dismalites—or glowworms—are creatures unique to only certain places on earth like remote areas of New Zealand, Australia…or Alabama! They require that nature

provide a special environment for their survival; and Dismals Canyon is one of those rare habitats. In a strange sort of way, it’s fascinating to stand in the pitch-dark of the canyon, beneath ginormous rock formations and peer at thousands of twinkling lights— dismalites—

Photography by Jeff Barganier

clinging to rock walls. It’s akin to studying stars on a clear, moonless night. The larvae eventually become gnats that live but one day. The larvae, on the other hand, survive for weeks which explains, by the way, why there are zero mosquitoes in the canyon. Zero.

Dismals Canyon features a great little country store with gift and souvenir items, plus a bar that serves hamburgers, shakes and fries; and, oh yes, ice cream! There’s also a natural stone-bottom swimming pool formed by the force of water. And there are clean, hot showers and toilets on the premises. It’s no wonder scientists come from all over the world to study this remarkable canyon! And so, can you! If you depart early, you can be home before dark, or spend the night in Russellville. The northwest Alabama area is exceptionally pristine. The friendly people up there obviously take great pride in their respective communities. Haleyville and Double Springs are worth exploring. For serious campers, Double Springs is the gateway to the wild and scenic Sipsey Wilderness, featuring beautiful streams, waterfalls and towering old-growth trees. For more information, visit www.dismalscanyon.com.

Jeff S. Barganier is a freelance writer and manages Cindy Barganier Interiors LLC in Pike Road, Alabama. (www.cindybarganier.com) He travels far and wide upon the slightest excuse for something interesting to write about. Contact him at Jeffbarganier@knology.net. Follow him on Instagram #jeffbarganier.

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

“SILVER SWINGLES” I’m a shy guy. “BS”, you say. “How can a talk host be shy?” A good question for which I have a wretched contemporary term as an answer- it’s my safe space. This is not an unusual condition among people in personality driven media. “Studio Sanctuary”, we call it. It’s always been that way. I can easily speak to thousands of people I can’t see whereas I’m awkward as hell with one stranger. I’ve never been much of a party-goer either. When I did attend a party I was pretty much a wallflower, a behavior often mistaken for arrogance or aloofness. Those are two qualities I try hard not to embrace. Meeting someone special was tough, often an accident of fate. How do I meet someone?” I asked a mentor after another failed relationship. I received a great reply. “When you stop trying”, I was told. I wasn’t looking for anyone when I met my wife, Roz. I mentioned looking into a Costco card on the radio. She was in Costco marketing at the time, heard my

remark and came to the station to sign me up. While it did not add points to my Costco balance I’ve made out well on that deal. Shy BOOMers are being heavily targeted by dating sites that cater to people age 50+. I get it. We work through our teens and 20s to figure out approaches to our heart targets. Most succeed in figuring it out and coupling up. Many who then find themselves suddenly single at age 50+, realize they’ve lost the magic and are lost once returned to the Singles Arena. It’s an awkward time. We forget everything we ever learned. If we divorce, or sadly, our partner passes, we’re starting from scratch in the mating/dating game. I recently watched an ad on TV for the on-line dating site called “Silver Singles”, expressly designed for people over the age of 50. If you’re reading this at age 49, you’re basically screwed after your next birthday. Once 50, your body (the fun parts) shuts down, you lose all lust and desire and all you’re seeking is someone who’ll give you a decent burial sometime down the road, right?

Uh, no. The Silver Singles ad features a comely, exceptionally attractive female spokeswoman whose mere appearance blasts “50 ain’t so bad! Look at me!” Then, on the second or third or 80th time I saw the Silver Singles ad, I noticed a small disclaimer over Ms. Comely’s head proclaiming “Actor Portrayal”. How self-defeating is that? That infers that people actually using this site represent a dog pound of unwanted humans. They may as well say “we couldn’t find any clients we’d put in a TV spot so we hired a fake 50 year old”. Fake! Everything is fake these days! I’m sure Silver Singles is a fine company. I whole-heartedly advocate on-line dating. You can still choose to let fate deliver love to your life. Neither fate nor on-line dating guarantees the person you meet won’t turn out to be spawn of Satan. A comedian once said about dating- can we skip the preliminaries and get straight to the lies? Let’s be honest here. By 50, most of us have racked up our share of stupid decisions, bad choices- even brushes with the law! Setting up a dating profile

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management

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A great relationship, in its totality, goes far beyond how many mattresses we flatten.

won’t work if you include your Hall of Shame moments. Fifty is an age where urgency can provoke us into mistakes. Awareness of mortality- as we observe inevitable changes in our bodies- can be a very pushy influence. “I could be dead by this weekend! I better find a date before Saturday night”.

In this in 1986 photo, Greg is wondering what life after 50 might look like...

Can we be honest here? In our 20s and 30s most of us were not looking for matches with people past age 40, much less 50. It’s an understandable discrimination because we’re wired (believe it or not) to reproduce. That requires reproduction involving reproductable partners. In our 20s and 30s we’re seeking a partner to accomplish that natural goal.

years. 50 seemed old, a “million” years away. In a veritable blink, that day comes when 50 is the number screaming from your birthday card. For many, it’s not what we expected. It’s BETTER!

We’re supposed to perpetuate the species. That’s not a very Victoria Secrets way to describe the bottom line of life (though VS has done more for bottom lines than maybe any other company). It’s an anthropological truth.

Advances in medicine and cosmetic procedures help, because we have to feel attractive to be attractive. One of my greatest shrinks, however, once said “95% of sex is between the ears”. I believe he was 100% right.

BOOMers- think back to your “glory”

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

I’ll stick my neck out here with a betmost of you reading this have a better love life now, than then.

After 50, that’s where the most important changes occur- in our minds.

We realize life is short. If you have a great partner, it’s time to unlock some of the desires you’ve relegated to the shadows out of some silly shame, ingrained long ago, and invite your great partner to try something different. If you’re single, it’s not the end of the world if you spend Valentine’s Day alone. Go shopping on Silver Singles or a similar site and shop for someone ready for the real adventure to come. Just look for someone who doesn’t have “Actor Portrayal” over their name. Good luck. We’ll all be counting on you. Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since 1970, and is marking 12 years in the River Region in 2017. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

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February 2019

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Letters of the American South City Hall Auditorium, 103 Perry St Thursday,February 7, 7:30-9:30 pm

Letters of the American South takes a journey through first-hand stories of the Southern United States, placing Southern musical compositions in conversation with poems, letters, and literature from Southern writers. Woven together through the diverse abilities of two actors, a dancer, a pianist, a violinist, and a singer (all of whom share through more than one discipline), the program brings the beauty and poignancy of these art forms into the room, offering each audience member multiple pathways into the South's collective history. Performance is Thursday February 7th at Montgomery City Hall Auditorium, 103 Perry St, Downtown Montgomery. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students. Contact collaborativeartsensemble@gmail. com for more information.More Information on Website: www.facebook.com/events/2174889286161359/

PIKE ROAD, ALABAMA

The Long Road to Love The Crossroads Theater, Pike Road Town Hall, 9575 Vaughn Rd. Saturday, February 9, 7:30 pm On Saturday, February 9, join the Pike Road Arts Council as they present the 2019 Crossroads Theater production: "The Long Road to Love... stories of the human heart," presented by storyteller Elizabeth Vander Kamp. Renowned storyteller Elizabeth Vander Kamp exquisitely captures the complexities of love in this story of drama and discovery. In the setting of a theatre company, two people meet, and it is love at first sight. A prior engagement and an on-stage love story create suspense that carries you through the years of their entangled lives…How will this story end? Join us to find out! Showtime is 7:30 pm Saturday, Feb. 9, at Pike Road Town Hall (9575 Vaughn Rd) Tickets - $20, available now: http://bit.ly/PikeRoadArtsTix. For more info call 334.272.9883 or visit the website: www.facebook.com/events/339678270097589/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Cultural Crossroads XVIII: OLD FEDERAL ROAD Alabama Department of Archives & History Downtown Montgomery Saturday, February 9, 8:30-3:30 pm

Landmarks Foundation of Montgomery and the Alabama Department of Archives and History, with support from the Alabama Humanities

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Foundation, invite you to the eighteenth symposium in the Cultural Crossroads series. Join us on this journey as we study the Old Federal Road and its fascinating history. Topics are “Slavery and the Federal Road,” “Thirty-Five Years on the Road,” “Mary Ann Neeley, Lucas Tavern and the Power of Ideas,” “The Road that led to Destruction: The Federal Road and the Creek Indian Nation,” “Trails and Traces across Colonial America: The Old Federal Road and Its Predecessors,” and “Mapping the Old Federal Road.” Admission is free. Admission with lunch is $25. For registration online, visit www.landmarksfoundation.com/events/ upcoming-events/. Call 334.242.4435 for more information.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Four Little Girls: Birmingham 1963 ASF, Festival Stage Through February 13

Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley, and Addie Mae Collins. Four little girls who are multitalented and filled with promise share their hopes and dreams against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement. Produced in collaboration with Montgomery Public Schools. “What bothers me most is that their names have been virtually erased. They are inevitably referred to as ‘the four black girls.’” – Excerpt from Four Little Girls: Birmingham 1963 by Christina Ham For more information, call ASF 334.271.5353 or visit https://asf.net/four-little-girls-birmingham-1963/

PRATTVILLE, ALABAMA The Amen Corner Way Off Broadway Prattville Creative Arts Center February 14-March 3, 7:30 pm

Way Off Broadway Theatre presents The Amen Corner, by James Baldwin. The play will open on Thursday, February 14, and will run Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, February 15-17, February 22-24, and March 1-3, 2019. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door and can be purchased on line at cc.prattvilleal.gov or by contacting the Special Events Office at 334.595.0854.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

RON "Tater Salad" WHITE MPAC Thursday, February 14, 8 pm Comedian Ron “Tater Salad” White first rose to fame as the cigarsmoking, scotch-drinking funnyman from the Blue Collar Comedy Tour phenomenon, but now as a chart-topping Grammy Nominated The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


comedian and a feature film actor, Ron White has established himself as a star in his own right. White has always been a classic storyteller. His Stories relay tales from his real life, ranging from growing up in a small town in Texas to sharing stories of his daily life to becoming one of the most successful comedians in America. For ticket info visit www. mpaconline.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Nina Simone: Four Women ASF Through February 17, Various times

Nina Simone: Four Women by Christina Ham, directed by Lydia Fort. Performances January 30 – February 17 on the Octagon Stage, running 90 minutes, no intermission. Recommended ages 13+. Through storytelling and song, this production celebrates how Nina Simone helped define the sound of the Civil Rights Movement. Featuring powerful anthems such as “Mississippi Goddam,” “Old Jim Crow,” and “To Be Young, Gifted and Black,” Nina Simone: Four Women is a personal and provocative musical journey. “Music can’t just be about the art, but it has to be an expression of the good, bad, and ugly in life.” – Excerpt from Nina Simone: Four Women by Christina Ham. For more info visit www.asf.net.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA ArtTalk MMFA Thursdays, February 21, 6-8 pm

This friendly critique led by Museum educators is an opportunity for artists to share and receive feedback from their peers. Get an up-close look at artists, their work, and the creative process in this unique program designed for artists in the area as well as those interested in art. Participants are invited to bring one work of art to each ArtTalk session for discussion. Enjoy light refreshments, a cash bar, and networking with other professionals in this unique program whether or not you choose to bring artwork. Thursdays Feb 21, Mar 28, Apr 18, May 23, Jun 27, Jul 25, Aug 29, Sep 26, Oct 24, Nov 21, Dec 19 Time: 6–8 PM Cost: $50 for the series of 12 meetings or $5 drop-in fee for single meetings. To register, please contact Brandy Morrison at bmorrison@mmfa.org or 334.625.4365. www.mmfa.org/discover/ arttalk/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA The Big Wine Bash 129 Coosa, above Central

Friday, February 22, 6-8 pm A first-class wine tasting event by Ted "The Wine Guy" & Co. The The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Big Wine Bash will be held at 129 Coosa, the beautifully renovated space above Central restaurant in downtown Montgomery. There will be something for every taste, with 100+ wines open from regions such as California, Oregon, Washington, France, Italy, Australia, Argentina and Spain. Wines will be available for sale (with deep discounts!) by pre-order, and can be picked up at our store on Zelda Road about 1 week after the event. How Much: $30 in advance, $40 at the door. Tickets are now on sale at Ted the Wine Guy and online at the Eventbrite website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/big-wine-bash2019-tickets-53403292686

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Bluegrass Revival Winter Jam The Sanctuary, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, February 23, 1-5 pm

Mark your calendars now for the Bluegrass Revival Winter Jam, Saturday, February 23, 2019, 1-5pm, at The Sanctuary, 432 South Goldthwaite Street in the Cottage Hill area in downtown Montgomery, Alabama. Come join in a play along with some of the area’s greats or just come hang out and listen to some good ole bluegrass music. This will be an informal, fun, family-friendly event for all ages. Everyone and all skill levels are welcome!! For more information, call 334.245.4546. This is a free event. More Information on Website: www.facebook. com/events/308164143138367/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

First Friday Music: Cameron DuBois Common Bond Brewery, 424 Bibb Street, Suite #150 Friday, March 1st, 6-8:30 pm

Cameron DuBois is the featured musical artist for the March First Friday Music concert. A singer/songwriter hailing from right here in Montgomery, Cameron DuBois performs for two hours with a 30-minute intermission. Winner of the Most Promising Female Entertainer of the Year for NACMAI in 2017, she’ll play original and country and R&B cover songs. Follow Cameron on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. This is a free, family-friendly concert. Outside food welcome. For more info visit www.commonbondbrewers.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Alabama Dance Theatre, “Beauty & the Beast” Troy University’s Davis Theatre for the Performing Arts March 1-3, various times The Alabama Dance Theatre, in its 32nd season, will present the world premiere of “Beauty & the Beast” on Friday, March 1st at 7pm, Saturday, March 2nd at 2:30 pm and Sunday, March 3rd at 2:30 pm at Troy University’s Davis Theatre for the Performing Arts. Performance tickets are $15-$30. Ticket prices for children ages 12 and under are $15. For tickets, call 334.625.2590 or visit www.alabamadancetheatre. com. *Following the Saturday matinee children can meet Beauty & her friends onstage for an additional $10 charge. For more info visit www.alabamadancetheatre.com R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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Tinseltown Talks By Nick Thomas

A Tale of Two Ghost Singers India Adams and Annette Warren have a lot in common. Both now in their nineties, their career paths merged in the 50s when the pair were hired by studios to dub the singing voices of actresses as so-called ‘ghost singers.’

they were all there – Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel, even Joe E. Brown and Agnes Moorehead. I sang ‘Can’t Help

Adams sang for Joan Crawford and Cyd Charisse in films such as “The Band Wagon,” “Torch Song,” and “Johnny Guitar,” while it’s Warren’s voice heard for Ava Gardner in MGM’s musical “Show Boat” as well as Lucille Ball in several movies.

Adams has vivid memories of singing for Crawford and Charisse. “I worked a lot more with Joan than I did with Cyd who was cold and reserved although part of it might have been that she was rather shy,” she said. “Joan was very friendly and would invite me back to her dressing room. She had a passable voice, but they really wanted someone to provide a more professional edge.” Despite the obvious vocal talents of both singers who spent many years working in other areas of the entertainment industry, they were dedicated to raising their families.

“I was appearing at a club and someone from MGM asked me afterward if I’d “I never really promoted myself Early and more recent publicity photos of India Adams - provided by India Adams be interested in dubbing,” as much as I could have,” recalled Ms. Adams from her Los Angeles admitted Warren. “But I have never, ever Lovin’ That Man’ and when I finished home. “I did ‘The Band Wagon’ first, and felt any regrets about not becoming a Kathryn Grayson – who was a fabulous one of the songs for Cyd Charisse, ‘Twobetter-known singer. I was the happiest singer – walked up to me and said, ‘My faced Woman,’ was cut out but used for woman in the world raising a family.” dear, we could all learn a lot from you!’ Joan Crawford in ‘Torch Song.’ It’s the But Ava wasn’t happy because she “I always only time in motion picture history that wanted to two different actresses have lip-synched become a to the very same track.” really big Ms. Warren broke into Hollywood after star,” added seeing a Los Angeles Times ad. Adams, “but don’t believe “It turned out MGM was looking for a it would vocalist to dub Ava Gardner’s songs in have allowed ‘Show Boat,’” she recalled from her home me to have in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif. “That same the fulfilling night I was at a party and introduced family life myself to Marvin Saltzman who was an that I had. I’m agent and the son-in-law of Arthur Freed content to be who was producing the film.” a little star!” Early and recent publicity photos of Annette Warren - provided by Annette Warren

Saltzman helped Warren secure an audition – in front of the entire cast. “That never happened when you went for most dubbing jobs,” said Warren. “But

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wanted to sing in the movie. And to be honest, I couldn’t blame her because she had a fairly good voice herself.”

Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala, and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 700 newspapers and magazines.

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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February 2019

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Profile for Boomer Communities

BOOM!  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM!  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine