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4 Roadmap 2020 12 New Decade, New Campus 24 ROBS Homestyle

& BRANCH A publication of River Oaks Baptist School

Summer 2020

MAPPING OUR FUTURE


RIVER OAKS BAPTIST SCHOOL

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Mapping Our Future Roadmap 2020 New Decade, New Campus Globally Inspired Hard at Play ROBS Homestyle Award-winning Artists & Writers Art of the Self-Portrait Celebrated Athletes Distinguished Faculty Be the Example Portrait of a Graduate Alumni Class Notes Tour de Force Our Team


mapping our future from the head of school What a year. It never goes exactly as planned, but 2019-20 takes the cake. Unforeseen circumstances made for one of the most unusual, challenging, and formative years in ROBS’s history. Of course, I’m talking about the novel coronavirus that swept across the globe and effectively brought life on our campus to a standstill. But I’m also talking about the happy surprises. The astonishing strength and resilience of our teachers in learning a completely new way to teach. The remarkable patience and stamina of our parents who managed not just their children’s lessons, but their own jobs at the same time. The ingenuity of our volunteers, coming up with new ways to support programs interrupted by COVID… and by construction before that. On-schedule completion of our $65 million expansion project before school starts in August (I confess this did actually surprise me). Recognition from the U.S. Department of Education as a 2019 National Blue Ribbon School. Final blessing of the 2020 Strategic Plan (not surprising, but very exciting!). In other words, this year bred a lot of growth. Growth isn’t comfortable, but I’ve learned it’s smoother with practice. And we at ROBS are diligent practitioners of growth. Our strategic planning process, culminating in the Roadmap 2020 (p. 4), is a great example of practicing growth. The entire ROBS community engaged in dozens of discussions rethinking how to deliver our mission in a fast-changing world. The long and deliberative process required hours upon hours of design thinking. And because the plan is a living document, strategic planning never really stops. The promise of a superior educational program requires that we—both individually and collectively—are always learning, always innovating, always improving.

We have conditioned ourselves to ask: how do we adapt our program to achieve our mission? How do we have school without actually going to school? How do we celebrate our students without gathering in celebration? We have conditioned ourselves to learn, and the resulting growth still surprises me. I didn’t plan, for example, to learn so much about my implicit role as a white woman in the systems oppressing people of color as we explored diversity, equity, and inclusion as an educational priority. Or how demoralizing the term “colorblind” is, dismissing the rich beauty of our differences. The learning and unlearning that has stemmed from this initiative has been eye-opening for me personally and gamechanging for us as educators. Our students are the politicians, teachers, lawyers, front-line healthcare providers, and protesters of the future. It is our responsibility to keep learning for them, and for our own future. It is why our academic leaders participated in the People of Color Conference last winter and the Diversity Leadership Institute this summer. It is why we have engaged a curriculum consultant to work with our academic leaders on lessons in cultural competence and racial literacy. It is why we will always keep asking, how can we do things better? In this way, mapping our future means practicing growth. From long-range plans and bold visions to ROBS Homestyle and the Diploma Roadshow, I think you’ll see in this issue the many ways our community is mapping the future of ROBS. Onward,

Leanne B. Reynolds Head of School

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Effective strategic planning identifies an organization’s winning aspiration: who it is, what it is best at doing, and what it is passionate about achieving in the world. At ROBS, we know who we are. And we know we can always be better. With input from every stakeholder in the community, we developed the following strategic playbook to guide ROBS into the next decade. This is your vision.

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ROADMAP 2020 “We do not grow by knowing all of the answers, but rather by living with the questions.” –Max De Pree

How can we make learning more engaging and impactful?


Are we fulfilling the intellectual, emotional, physical, social, and spiritual needs of all our students?


How do we ensure every new and returning family feels seen, heard, and valued?


HOW DO WE TRANSFORM OUR SCHOOL, INSPIRE ONE ANOT The following roadmap responds to our strategic questions with clear, yet flexible direction in four priority areas: 1) differentiation; 2) diversity, equity, and inclusion; 3) wellness; and 4) programming and scheduling. These priorities promote healthy student growth and development considering research-informed best practices, relevant cultural influences, and of course, our faith-based mission. ROBS has always believed children’s intellect, spirituality, and character are inextricably intertwined. Our winning aspiration is to strengthen that twine so our students can thrive in a fast-paced and changing world. Our strategic initiatives compel us to nurture what is special in each of us, to build an even more welcoming community, and to create a learning experience that equips our children for a future we can only imagine. Together, we will thrive.

DIFFERENTIATION We will meet individual students where they are as learners, uniquely gifted by God. We will guide them to their full potential through differentiation. This means we will adapt subject-area content, teaching processes, classroom tools, and the learning environment to stretch each learner to his or her full potential. Action Steps ✶ Systematically identify each student’s learning profile and adopt a measurable system to cultivate the gifts of each from entry to exit ✶ Train faculty in differentiated instructional skills and techniques ✶ Use evaluation tools that better capture student progress, subject mastery, and skill development (for example, a journal, speech, or video instead of a written exam) ✶ Ensure the environment positively influences student performance and wellness ✶ Promote the use of growth-mindset strategies among all stakeholders

“In a growth mindset, people believe their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work – brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience essential for great accomplishment.” —Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., Stanford professor, author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION Diversity of backgrounds, experiences, and ideas enriches learning environments in powerful ways. Moreover, God calls us to love our neighbors—especially those who are different from ourselves. The School’s two-part mission reflects both these concepts. Only by ensuring equitable practices that value and support every student, parent, and employee can ROBS cultivate a community in which all can thrive. And only by building a shared sense of self-worth, respect, belonging, and synergy can ROBS ready the leaders of tomorrow’s world. Action Steps ✶ Actively work to recruit and retain families and faculty of color ✶ Provide adult education and professional development in cultural competency ✶ Promote teaching practices and curricula that reflect, engage, and enlighten all learners ✶ Create programs that foster community connection and inclusivity, especially attentive to new school families and families of color ✶ Formalize systems to restore connection with disenfranchised students and families ✶ Examine ways to ease accessibility for families and employees who live in outlying areas

“We know that when students feel valued by their teachers and peers, they will be more engaged in school. Unfortunately, we still have a long way to go before we engage all students. All students should have their moment where they feel listened to, respected for their voice, and chosen for something they never thought possible but we helped them achieve.” —Peter DeWitt, Finding Common Ground blog, former K-5 principal, author, consultant


HER, AND REACH NEW HEIGHTS WHILE STAYING FOCUSED ON OUR MISSION? The ROBS mission has always embraced the dynamic intersection of body, mind, and spirit. We also recognize that modern pressures on school-aged children (and educators) are threatening healthy student growth and development. We need to advance programming that promotes emotional, intellectual, physical, environmental, social, occupational, and spiritual wellness. Action Steps ✶ Examine and address root causes of student stress (i.e., workload, schedules, grading standards, and digital media) ✶ Empower students with knowledge and skills to make healthy choices through enhanced social-emotional learning curricula ✶ Evaluate student support office structure, identify gaps in services, and determine how to provide necessary resources ✶ Reexamine need and feasibility of providing childcare for employees

WELLNESS

PROGRAMMING AND SCHEDULING ROBS’s value proposition lies in its ability to offer best-in-class programming that nurtures healthy student growth and development, meets the needs of its families and their schedules, and advances the School’s relevance in a fast-paced and changing global market.

HOLDING THE LINE We will hold the line on ✶ Our deep commitment to character and spiritual growth that rears a lifetime relationship with God our Father;

Action Steps ✶ Adjust programs, schedule, and spaces as needed to maximize safety and accommodate additional enrollment

✶ Retaining, attracting, and nurturing the highest quality employees who possess the passion to fulfill, reflect, and sustain the School’s unique mission and culture; ✶ Ensuring the School’s financial stability by wisely managing our financial resources and cultivating lifelong relationships with our supporters; and

✶ Continue to refine and enhance curriculum redesign set in motion by the 2012 Strategic Plan “Ongoing research shows that adversity and high levels of stress in early childhood can have a negative impact throughout a person’s life. Stress in the very young may affect a child’s health, behavior, and ability to learn. However, adults can encourage resilience in young children and in themselves. Resilience is the ability to cope with the stress caused by challenging situations.” -Head Start Early Childhood Education and Learning Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Our four strategic priorities reflect areas where new or renewed attention is warranted. We also expect continuous improvement in a number of other areas central to the School’s identity and culture where we are already strong. We actively seek new, better, and more efficient ways to deliver on our promises to our community.

✶ Communicating effectively and transparently to strengthen connections with all constituents.

✶ Evaluate current after-school offerings and restructure programming ✶ Continue to assess interest in and capacity for current and potential athletic offerings, considering how to stay competitive among peer schools, the availability of oncampus and off-campus athletic facilities, and staffing

“Not only do extracurricular activities instill great values like teamwork, responsibility and a sense of community, they also have been proven to boost school attendance, academic success, and aspirations for continuing education past high school. Additionally, they are linked to healthier choices like avoiding drug use and maintaining a healthy body weight.” —“The Value of Extracurricular Activities,” National Education Association

“Every child is an individual, with special social, emotional, intellectual, and physical qualities. Children are unique. They are individuals, and no two children are alike: physically, emotionally, socially, and intellectually, each child is a unique individual. Because children are unique, even if there are common needs and characteristics that children of a particular age or stage of development share, they must be understood by their parents and teachers in their uniqueness, and their individuality must be respected.” —Multigrade Teacher’s Handbook, “Teachers Talking” online blog, UNICEF


THERE IS ONE BODY, BUT IT HAS MANY PARTS. BUT ALL ITS MANY PARTS MAKE UP ONE BODY. IT IS THE SAME WITH CHRIST. WE WERE ALL BAPTIZED BY ONE HOLY SPIRIT. AND SO WE ARE FORMED INTO ONE BODY. 1 CORINTHIANS 12:12-13

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NEW DECADE, NEW CAMPUS Excavators, bulldozers, cement trucks, and a 158-foot tall crane inhabited ROBS for the duration of 2019 and through the summer of 2020, as construction occupied nearly half of the School’s campus. Crews worked days, nights, and weekends to complete the Mosing Middle School Building and Sarofim Leadership Center in time for the start of school. When students arrive in August, the buildings won’t just look different, they will effectively change how we use our campus.

ROBS Kindergarteners cover the building’s largest beam with special messages when it arrives. The beam spans 47 feet in length, supporting the third floor terrace.

DEC ‘18

JAN ‘19

ROBS breaks ground on the expansion project that will double usable square footage on campus. 12

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APR ‘19

MAY ‘19

Preschool students take a field trip to check on the construction site, where 46 cement columns now support the lid of the underground parking garage.

MAY ‘19


ROBS won’t just look different. The expansion effectively changes the student and family experience.

AUG ‘19

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Steel delivery! Crews spend the next two months putting the steel frame together.

OCT ‘19

The 158-foot tall crane required clearance from the Federal Aviation Administration. It had to swing freely when not in use, becoming our very own giant weather vane. SUMMER 2020

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WHAT’S CHANGING •

More STEAM programming! Middle School will now have a maker space, robotics lab, instrumental and vocal practice rooms, and a blue box theater. That means more electives in performing arts, innovation and design, orchestra, speech and debate, and more. Bigger Lower School. Previous Middle School classrooms now belong to grades K-4. Renovations to the old Hightower entrance lobby and Admission area create an additional Kindergarten classroom, Lower School administrative offices, a new conference room, faculty work space, and storage closet.

Campus entry. During the school day, all campus visitors will enter campus from Westheimer, where they will check in at the new security command post. The Willowick entrance remains the primary entry to campus during carpool hours.

Parking. All surface parking spaces will now be available to families and visitors, as faculty and staff will park in the new underground garage beneath the Mosing Middle School Building.

Building access. The entrance at the Sarofim Leadership Center is now the School’s main entry point. An attached porte-cochère means protected carpool drop-off and pickup.

A second library. Middle School will have its very own library. The original library is now wholly dedicated to Preschool and Lower School learners. Think reading nooks, learning coves, and of course, more books!

NOV ‘19

JAN ‘20

Campaign chair Susan Cox signs an interior wall of the building at the topping off ceremony, which celebrates completion of the steel frame.

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MAR ‘20

APR ‘20

MAY ‘20


AUG ‘20

Leanne Reynolds and Todd Herauf cover the hearth on each floor with faculty and staff’s favorite verses of scripture.

Expansion project wraps up just in time for students’ arrival on the first day of school.

PRESCHOOL EXPANSION ROBS Preschool is growing too. We will welcome an additional Prekindergarten class this coming fall. Some design tweaks to the existing M&M room, furniture reconfiguration, and reorganization of grade-level clusters will accommodate the additional students. SUMMER 2020

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Globally Inspired FINE ARTS EXPANSION Can a building transform a community? That question inspired Fine Arts Department Chair Melinda Williams and Middle School Theater Arts teacher Luke Wrobel to seek a faculty grant that would take them on a life-changing adventure to Australia. The two were familiar with the story of how construction of the iconic Sydney Opera House ignited an arts renaissance in the surrounding area and beyond. In the years since its opening, the architectural masterpiece has reinvigorated artistic life Down Under, shaping not only opera and theater, but also museums, historical monuments, commissioned public artworks, parks, gardens, murals, and street art. Melinda and Luke envisioned that the distinctive Mosing Middle School Building might usher in a similar arts transformation at River Oaks Baptist School. With stunning new spaces for orchestra, choral music, theater, digital arts, and studio art, the facility—which is on track to open in August—redefines the possibilities for ROBS’s offerings. “Our trip to Australia was a 10-day conversation about arts and education. The creativity it unleashed has enabled our department to reimagine our approach to fine arts at ROBS,” says Melinda. “We rethought everything.” In addition to specialized spaces such as the blue box theater, a new Middle School schedule will afford time for expanded fine arts programming. Starting in fifth grade, all students will be introduced to choir and stringed instruments. From there, students may choose from a wider array of arts offerings including new speech and debate electives. “The changes made possible by the Mosing Middle School Building reflect a new level of commitment to the arts at ROBS,” says Luke. “This evolution will make fine arts another strength of the School, on par with academics and athletics. It throws down the gauntlet to us as arts educators. We’re motivated to live up to the promise of the new building.” As they relate their experiences in Australia to the future

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of the arts at ROBS, Melinda and Luke’s enthusiasm is palpable. “The arts are the heart of a community,” says Luke. “As the opera house shaped Australia’s identity, the Mosing Middle School has the power to transform ROBS’s identity,” Melinda adds. “The imagination that has gone into our new building opens up the world for our students. It gives all of us the freedom to soar.”


The faculty grant program enables ROBS teachers to bring ideas from around the world to our school and its students. Melinda Williams and Luke Wrobel received the Eighth Grade Faculty Grant, funded by the Class of 2019.

“As the opera house shaped Australia’s identity, the Mosing Middle School has the power to transform ROBS’s identity.”


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TRULY I TELL YOU, IF YOU HAVE FAITH AS SMALL AS A MUSTARD SEED, YOU CAN SAY TO THIS MOUNTAIN, ‘MOVE FROM HERE TO THERE,’ AND IT WILL MOVE. NOTHING WILL BE IMPOSSIBLE FOR YOU. MATTHEW 17:20 SUMMER 2020

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Hard at Play IT MAY LOOK LIKE THEY’RE JUST PLAYING, BUT EVERY MOMENT HAS BEEN CAREFULLY PLANNED. ROBS MASTER TEACHERS CRAFT LESSONS THAT BUILD SKILLS FOR LIFE.

NEGOTIATION “I’ll be the princess and you’ll be the police officer.” Preschoolers hone their negotiating skills during dramatic play time.

CREATIVITY AND COLLABORATION Assembling props, assigning roles, and imagining a scenario together strengthen creativity and collaboration—two of six skills identified by policymakers, business leaders, and economic development experts as essential for success in the 21st century.

EARLY LITERACY Students are actually building writing and reading comprehension skills, as they imagine their way through their own narratives.

EMPATHY Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes is a natural way to build empathy—a key ingredient of successful personal and professional relationships, according to social science research.

PROBLEM-SOLVING The teacher provides depth to the learning vignette by adding print when she hands the policeman a citation pad and pencil. She may throw in a plot twist as well, requiring the princess and officer to pivot cognitively with a creative solution.

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ENGINEERING Innovation & Design: With materials like notched building sticks (shown above), classic wooden blocks, gears, or magnetic tiles, students learn how to build bridges, towers, enclosures, ramps, and pathways. These friends are designing what looks like a prototype for a new preschool classroom! Physical Science and Geometry: Through trial and error, young engineers discover how to make their building stand up. They must determine which shapes contribute to sturdier bases by exercising critical-thinking muscles. How do mass and volume affect the strength of the structure? Algebra: Equidistant sides are needed for balance and strength. How many more notches does this stick need to equal the stick on the other side? The girls count the notches and measure their sticks to build a sturdy room. Writing: The sensory input of grasping, pinching, and building improve fine motor development, making handwriting easier and more efficient. Collaboration: As the young engineers negotiate how wide and tall their structure should be and which colors to use, they build oral language and social skills.

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SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Curiosity: Young learners are fascinated by hands-on experiments that introduce them to physical, life, and earth sciences. Children often dive into science concepts independently during center time when they explore color mixing with ice cubes or translucence at the light table. Chemistry: By experiencing the various textures of the ingredients in this investigation, children learn how substances like shortening and ice interact with each other to create new materials—like blubber! Knowledge retention: Students learn about the properties of objects by seeing, touching, and smelling them. Multisensory activities engage several areas of the brain at the same time. When all brain functions are interconnected, it reinforces neural pathways and helps form stronger memories.

STORY TIME Communicating with confidence: Story time is interactive time! Acting out stories gives children a way to express themselves. Even the shyest little ones develop into self-assured public speakers. Creativity: After reading Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Readiness students hunker down in their makeshift bear cave with their furry friends. As the focus book of the week, children act out the story and make it their own, sometimes changing the narrative entirely! Literacy: Using their training on translating early literacy research into the classroom from Rice University’s School Literacy and Culture, our teachers encourage a lot of story dramatization. It not only also gives children a deeper understanding of characters, setting, and plot development; research confirms that dramatization helps instill in children a true love of reading.

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S B O R

E L Y T S E M HO

Classrooms looked a little different during the final three months of the 2019-20 school year. Lessons moved from campus to living rooms and home offices, as teachers reimagined morning meetings, theater performances, science experiments, and chapel services for virtual delivery. We even recreated Bo Neuhaus Field Day so students could compete from their own back yards! In addition to their usual lesson plans, students and families participated in daily ROBS Homestyle challenges. They staged famous artworks using props found around the house, donned ROBS spirit wear to do their schoolwork, erected neighborhood art installations, cooked recipes from Chef Rylan, or simply got outdoors to breathe the fresh air.

HOW DID YOUR FAMILY DO ROBS HOMESTYLE?

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DIPLOMA ROADSHOW The coronavirus pandemic suspended all campus events and activities, including eighth grade graduation. But with a little ingenuity, we were able to preserve that magical moment of receiving your diploma with a smile and a handshake... or maybe an elbow bump. Head of School Leanne Reynolds, Head of Middle School Connor Cook, and Assistant Head of Middle School Jerrod Bain took the tradition on the road, personally delivering 80 diplomas to our graduates’ homes in nearly 20 greater Houston area zip codes.

PICKUP PARADES “The pickup parades sounded like a great way to tie a happy bow on a year that ended in a way no one could have predicted… and maybe check a few logistical boxes, as well. What I experienced today was something quite different, quite unexpected. Today, my family drove through a parking lot and basked in the love of Jesus through the hands and feet of the incredible and incomparable faculty and staff of River Oaks Baptist School. Today was really special. Thank you.” —Parent, grades K, 4, 6

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Award-Winning Artists & Writers THE SCHOLASTIC ART & WRITING PROGRAM IS THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS IN THE COUNTRY FOR YOUNG ARTISTS AND WRITERS WHOSE ENTRIES ARE JUDGED ON ORIGINALITY, TECHNICAL SKILL, AND PERSONAL VOICE OR VISION.

Every 2020 entry from a ROBS student received a Gold or Silver Key—the two highest awards bestowed within a category.

PERSONAL ESSAY AND MEMOIR National Silver Key Lucy Katz Regional Gold Key Camron Baldwin Lucy Katz Holman Rorschach Regional Silver Key Ben Who Nelson Wong

JOURNALISM Regional Silver Key Ben Who (x2)

DRAWING & ILLUSTRATION Regional Gold Key Ben Who

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PUBLISHER SINGLES OUT ROBS YEARBOOK TEAM After years of demonstrated excellence in designing and producing the ROBS yearbook, Balfour Publishing requested to use the River Oaks Baptist School 2019-20 yearbook as an exemplary model for schools across the country. “Stellar� will be used in yearbook training sessions and by sales representatives to showcase their product. Congratulations to co-editors Lucy Katz and Mary Caroline Sudduth, assistant editor Eloise Klaasmeyer, and staff members Jackson Herauf, Mary Shepherd, Halle Roy, and Zoe Chung.

SPECIAL NOTE: Scores of student awards blanket several pages of this book every year. Sadly, our students were unable to participate in programs like the Duke Talent Identification Program, the National Spanish Exam, and other esteemed national competitions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Expect to see the defending Quiz Bowl state champions, state chess medalists, and superstar mathletes in the Vine & Branch 2021 edition.

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A self-portrait not only says a lot about the artist. Self-portraits offer students powerful learning experiences. Even our Preschool teachers use the self-portrait to track development of fine motor skills, self-awareness, creativity, and confidence. As the students grow, so do their lessons. Eighth graders study Contemporary portraiture masters like Andy Warhol, Kehinde Wiley, Chuck Close, and Amy Sherald, examining the artists’ processes, techniques, cultural relevance, and what the pieces say about their subjects. Then the students create their own. The STEAM-rich lesson requires color valuation and mixing, proportional reasoning, photo editing, and painting. The lesson is completed with an Artist Statement—a final reflection of the portrait and its insight into the artist’s world.

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Celebrated Athletes CROSS COUNTRY Seventh & Eighth Grade Girls Tori Livingstone, First Place Sixth Grade Girls Team THIRD PLACE IN CONFERENCE Emme Neylon, first place Palmer Popov, third place Bryanna Micu, sixth place

SWIMMING Girls 50 Yard Backstroke Tori Livingstone, First Place Girls 50 Yard Butterfly Tori Livingstone, First Place Girls 200 Yard Freestyle Relay, Third Place Claire Field Lilly Mach Margaret Goydan Tori Livingstone

HOUSTON JUNIOR PREPARATORY CONFERENCE SCHOOLS Annunciation Orthodox School Duchesne Academy of the Sacred Heart First Baptist Academy The John Cooper School The Kinkaid School Presbyterian School River Oaks Baptist School Second Baptist School St. Francis Episcopal Day School St. John’s School The Village School

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BOYS VOLLEYBALL SECOND PLACE IN CONFERENCE


Undefeated TORI LIVINGSTONE IS ONE OF THE BEST PERFORMING ATHLETES IN ROBS’S HISTORY, FINISHING HER MIDDLE SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY CAREER UNDEFEATED. SHE IS THE DEFENDING CONFERENCE CHAMPION IN BOTH CROSS COUNTRY AND TRACK & FIELD FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS.*

2017-18 Cross Country Conference Champion 2018-19 Cross Country Conference Champion 2019-20 Cross Country Conference Champion 2017-18 Track & Field Conference Champion 2018-19 Track & Field Conference Champion

ROBS RECORDHOLDER Track & Field 800m (2:28.23) Track & Field 1200m (4:09.96) Track & Field 1600m (5:26.87) Track & Field 4x400m relay (4:23.31) Swimming: 50-yard butterfly (28.07) *2019-20 Track & Field season suspended

“Tori is a once-in-a-generation kind of athlete. She’s not only fast, she has a solid head on her shoulders and a tenacious work ethic. I can’t wait to see what she — Jesse Martin, athletic director does in high school.”

“Tori Livingstone is every coach’s dream. She’s coachable, passionate, hardworking, smart, and caring. I’m excited to watch her compete on a higher level. Keep your eyes and ears open for her in the future... watch out 2024 Olympics!” — Teresa Neighbors, coach

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Distinguished Faculty A QUALITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM CAN BE MEASURED IN LOTS OF WAYS— STUDENT OUTCOMES, TEST SCORES, CURRICULUM, FACILITIES. BUT RESEARCHERS AND PARENTS KNOW THAT IT’S THE TEACHERS WHO MAKE OR BREAK AN EDUCATION. ROBS TEACHERS STAND OUT FOR SEVERAL REASONS.

MODELS OF BEST PRACTICES ROBS faculty are invited to present at conferences for educators across the country who are eager to learn the ins and outs of successful teaching. Many are sought-after thought leaders in their area.

Head of Preschool Dawn Hanson served as Master Teacher at the Beginning Teacher Institute hosted by the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS).

Instructional coaches Sarah Graham and Kathy Hogan presented on weaving reading and writing into science and social studies investigations at Region 4 Education Service Center’s Reading and Writing Conference.

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Associate Head of School for Academics Dr. Todd Herauf presented at the Gulf Coast Regional TABS Convention on transitioning the middle school environment to a project-based, active learning space.

National Business Officers Association (NBOA) awarded Associate Head of School for Operations Paul Mayhew the Will Hancock Unsung Hero Award, which honors business officers who exemplify high standards of integrity, knowledge, and motivation.

Director of High School Counseling Gabriela FloresIrwin was selected to join an ISAS Accreditation Visiting Committee for her expertise in foreign language education and international programs and services.


Head of School Leanne Reynolds and Director of Development Paige Martin presented at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education’s annual conference partnership with NAIS. They were invited to speak about the success of the Hildebrand Challenge in closing out the Kids. Love. Learning. Campaign. HBU College of Education and Behavioral Sciences nominated ROBS Instructional Technology Curriculum Coordinator Katie Alaniz for the Piper Professor Award, bestowed to those who represent the very best in teaching and professional development. She is a prolific teacher, delivering several dozen presentations locally and nationally last year. National dining contractor SAGE Dining Services selected Chef Rylan Jeffries and her team at ROBS to highlight best practices in a promotional video distributed throughout the country.

LIFELONG LEARNERS Learning new skills and ideas keeps teachers at the top of their game. With 100 percent of ROBS teachers seeking professional development each year, our faculty bring fresh approaches to the classroom.

Middle School bible teacher Erin Woods completed a master’s degree in Theology and Ministry from Fuller Theological Seminary. Middle School science teacher Vu Ly earned a master’s in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Texas— Arlington. Director of Innovation Brian Mahabee, Head of Preschool Dawn Hanson, and Instructional Coach Sarah Graham earned the Leading Schools certificate from Harvard Graduate School of Education and Harvard Business School.

Preschool faculty Claudia Barrios, Sarah Graham, Holly Herauf, Mina Jaco, Betsy Jansa, Debra Luna, and Marie Michel completed the Early Literacy Summit at Rice University.

EACH YEAR FACULTY MEMBERS APPLY TO THE ROBS FACULTY GRANT COMMITTEE FOR TWO PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS THAT ALLOW FACULTY TO PURSUE LEARNING ADVENTURES AROUND THE WORLD. The committee awarded Lower School science teacher Lila Mazzone and Middle School science teacher Vu Ly a grant funded by past ROBS parent Johnny Carrabba to attend a workshop hosted by Europass: Teacher Academy in Florence, Italy. Preschool teacher Debra Luna received the Eighth Grade Faculty Grant, funded by the Class of 2020, to attend Glacier National Institute’s Birds of Prey class. It will be an experiential lesson in interacting with and understanding natural surroundings—a core teaching method for preschool science.

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LONGEVITY ROBS teachers stay for a long a time. In addition to connecting students across generations with a common experience, teacher longevity indicates that a school’s values are upheld for employees as well as students. The following teachers and staff members celebrated these milestones.

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YEARS Susan McDaniel retires this year after 40 years of service in the ROBS Preschool, touching the lives of close to a thousand children and their families. Head of Preschool Dawn Hanson says when Susan speaks, everyone listens. She is fondly known as “The Queen” because of her wise way with students and fellow teachers. We will let her keep that title.

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YEARS During her 25 years at River Oaks Baptist School, Gail Watkins has held many positions: registrar, technology curriculum coordinator, computer teacher. She leaves her official position at ROBS behind this year, but Gail will never outgrow her reputation as a servant-hearted friend. Longtime colleague Judy Adams says, “I was always struck by Gail’s willingness to help everyone at any time. She is a true friend to all of us.”

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YEARS Beloved Dolphin teacher Melanie Blair says goodbye to ROBS this year, after two decades with our Kindergarten students. Her students were always the envy of the other classes when she would let the birthday boy or girl dance on the table as the class sang. Melanie was one of those teachers who looked like God sent her to earth precisely to shepherd young learners in their first year of “big kid school.”

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YEARS Rachel Aden Teresa Grovas

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YEARS Ashley Mejia Sally Walker


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IDENTIFIES ROBS AS A MODEL FOR SCHOOLS ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

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Be the Example ROBS WAS ONE OF THREE HOUSTON AREA SCHOOLS AND THE ONLY PRIVATE SCHOOL IN TEXAS TO RECEIVE THE 2019 NATIONAL BLUE RIBBON AWARD.

WHAT IS THE NATIONAL BLUE RIBBON AWARD? Each year the U.S. Department of Education recognizes schools across the country for extremely high academic achievement or for closing achievement gaps among student groups. The Department of Education created the awards program in 1982 to facilitate the sharing of best practices within and among schools.

2019 National Blue Ribbon School

HOW DID ROBS QUALIFY FOR THE AWARD?

The national program measures a lot of data, including test scores, curriculum, community engagement models, and leadership structure. Just to qualify, a school must perform in the top 15 percent of a state or nationally normed standardized test. ROBS students take the ERB, which is the test taken in private schools across the country. ROBS was recognized in the Exemplary High Performing Schools category.

WILL ROBS ALWAYS BE A NATIONAL BLUE RIBBON SCHOOL?

The Department of Education considers applications from the same school only once in a 5-year period. ROBS will be eligible for the award again in 2024.

Only private school in Texas

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

Blue Ribbon status means that the Department of Education has identified River Oaks Baptist School as a model of best practices in education. It means ROBS is, indeed, THE EXAMPLE.

LEARN MORE AT WWW.ROBS.ORG SUMMER 2020

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PORTRAIT GRADUATE of a

RIVER OAKS BAPTIST SCHOOL PROVIDES STUDENTS THE FOUNDATION TO PERFORM WITH DISTINCTION AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL, TO BECOME ENGAGED AND RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS, AND TO LEAD SUCCESSFUL AND REWARDING LIVES BY PREPARING GRADUATES:

To think CRITICALLY, CREATIVELY, ANALYTICALLY, and INNOVATIVELY

To ACCESS, EVALUATE, SYNTHESIZE, and COMMUNICATE INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY

To DEMONSTRATE CURIOSITY, INITIATIVE, and PERSEVERANCE

To develop ROBUST INTERPERSONAL SKILLS including EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, EMPATHY, APPRECIATION FOR HUMAN DIFFERENCES, and COLLABORATIVE WORK HABITS

To UNDERSTAND THE CHRISTIAN FAITH, EXHIBIT STRONG MORAL CHARACTER, and MODEL THEIR LIVES ON CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLES.

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Graduate Honors and Awards Graduates from the ROBS Class of 2015 performed with distinction at the high school level before they headed to college last fall. We share their accomplishments with pride. Elizabeth L. Allen served as Student Council Vice President, captain of the field hockey team, and a National Honor Society member. In addition to making the honor roll her freshman and sophomore years, she received the Outstanding Geometry Student Award, Field Hockey MVP Award, and Athlete of the Month Award. Elizabeth also completed Houston Christian High School’s Passport to Lead program. Mary E. Ayers graduated as valedictorian from Episcopal High School, where she was awarded the Phi Beta Kappa Scholarship. Distinguished memberships included National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, National English Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, and EHS honor roll. She served as chair of the Honor Council, president of Model UN, and president of Students of Service. There she received the History Department Award, English Department Award, Sportsmanship Award on the JV Swim Team, and the Best Filmmaker and Most Promising Filmmaker awards. Outside awards included the UVA Jefferson Book Award, Distinguished Delegate (CTMUN) & Best Position Paper (HAMUN) for Model UN, the AP Scholar with Distinction award, and the National Scholastic Gold Medal in Film. Andrew J. Barber received a Trustee Scholarship from Trinity University following four years on the honor roll at St. John’s School. Patrick R. Bayouth was on the honor roll at Episcopal High School in grades 10 - 12. He was captain of the Varsity Football team and a member of the Honor Council. Patrick now a football player at the University of Texas. Matthew Boling graduated from Strake Jesuit as one of the most celebrated athletes in the country. There he became the first high schooler in the world to break 10 seconds in the 100-meter dash. He was named the

Gatorade National Boys Track & Field Athlete of the Year after his senior year. In addition, Matthew was a strong student. Matthew attends the University of Georgia, where he trains on the Track & Field team. Michael R. Boling graduated as valedictorian from Strake Jesuit after four years on the honor roll. In addition to serving on the National Honor Society, Michael received many academic awards—in Spanish 2, Accelerated Spanish 3, AP Microeconomics, AP Calculus BC, AP English Literature, and Senior Theology-Religious Themes in Fiction. Michael earned the honor of 2019 UIL-6A District 23 Pole Vault champion and Kairos Retreat Leader. Jessica L. Bonnen was on the honor roll at St. Agnes Academy all four years. She served as the Performance Workshop Dress Captain and Stage Manager. Jessica received the academic award in Genetics and the Voice Studio award. Walker P. Bunch was in the National Honor Society. He made the honor roll in grades 9-10 and the President’s Honor Roll in grades 11-12 at Strake Jesuit. Daniel H. Cai was in the National Chinese Honor Society and on the honor roll all four years at Episcopal High School. He earned the award for Excellence in the Study of Mathematics & Computational Sciences and a medal for Excellence in the Study of Science. Daniel was Track & Field Most Valuable Player. Mia R. Carrabba graduated from Episcopal High School with high honors following four years on the honor roll. She was a leader in Students of Service, Student Senate, and the Lacrosse team as its captain. She also served as an acolyte. Lillian K. Cone was in the National Honor Society, with four years on the honor roll at Episcopal High

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School. She was the captain of Varsity Cheerleading, Senior Class President, and a lay minister. Lilly received many awards, including Excellence in Geometry, Most Spirited Female, Most Improved in Repertory Dance, Excellence in Dance, Fiercest Dancer, and Dancer to Watch. Robert J. Day co-founded the Young Entrepreneurial Students club at St. John’s School and served as chairman of the Investment Club. Zachary A. Farnan was a member of National Honor Society and on the honor roll at Strake Jesuit all four years. He served on the Crusader Crew for school orientation and on staff at St. Dominic’s nursing home as the volunteer coordinator. He held several prestigious internships, both at NOA in London and the Ascot Insurance Company. He plays lacrosse at TCU. Annaliese C. Fowler received the Presidents Endowed Scholarship and National Merit Recognition Award at the Kinkaid School. In addition to membership in the Spanish National Honor Society and Cum Laude Society, she held leadership positions as president of the Engineering Club, member of the Fine Arts Leadership Board, president and vice president of the school choir, and leader of the alto section. Annaliese received the Katharine Wade Geometry Award, Junior Academic Merit Award, AP Calculus Award, 3 gold medals and 1 silver for the National Spanish Exam, Class of 1975 Senior Citizenship award, and the Choir Award. Anna E. Giesler is attending the UT McCombs School of Business Canfield Honors Business Program after graduating from Episcopal High School as a member of the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, National English Honor Society, and National Math Honor Society. She held leadership positions

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as the JV Cheerleading Captain, Varsity Girls Golf Captain, an Acolyte Officer, Girls’ State Representative, and a member of the Honor Council. Anna received the Exemplary Effort Awards for Mathematics and World History. She also received Most Improved Girls Golf Player in grades 9 and 11. The Girls Golf team came in first place for SPC and the Cheerleading squad received the 1st Team Award from NCA Lone Star Cheer Competition all four years. Anna also received the Presidential Service Award. Elise A. Gilchrist made the honor roll all four years at Episcopal High School, where she was also a member of the National Honor Society and president of the National English Honor Society. She was the production manager of the Literary Journal and represented her classmates on the EHS Student Council. Ellie received the Exemplary Effort Award for English, the Light and Shadow Award, the Creative Writing Award, the English Award for Seniors, the EHS Spirit Award for Seniors, the Sewanee Book Award for English, and a national Gold Key award for her creative writing entry. She also had the honor of serving as Senior Homilist. Sean H. Gilmore received a four-year scholarship to Hampton University. Austin C. Glickman was the editor of video news at Episcopal High School, where he also received the Best Graphic Design award for Blue Review. David A. Hammer received a Presidential Scholarship and Rawls College Undergraduate Scholarship to Texas Tech University. He was a Trustee Scholar his senior year at Trinity School of Midland. Aidan S. Hill was an honor roll student all four years at Strake Jesuit. He was the Tenor Section Lead for Choir in his senior year.


Harrison P. Inoff made the honor roll all four years at Episcopal High School, where he was a member of the National Honor Society and the National Spanish Honor Society. He received the Climb Award and the JV Basketball Sportsmanship Award. Harrison was JV Baseball MVP. Sadie P. Jensen received the Auburn University Academic Heritage Scholarship, following four years on the honor roll at Episcopal High School. She was a member of the National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, and Student Senate. Sadie was the photojournalism editor and Varsity Field Hockey CoCaptain. She received a National Scholastic Silver Key award for Photography. Claire K. Kardesch served as treasurer and secretary of the National Honor Society, in addition to serving on the National English Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, and National Math Honor Society at Episcopal High School. Leadership positions included Student Body President, Class President, and JV Cheer Captain. She received national recognition from the Scholastic Art & Writing program, the 2019 National Merit Scholarship program, and the AP Scholars program. Other awards included the Spanish II Honors Exemplary Effort Award, AP Environmental Science Exemplary Effort Award, English III Honors Exemplary Effort Award, an All-American Cheer nomination, the JV Cheer Most Improved Award, the EHS Art Show First Place for Photography, Presidential Service Award, National Charity League Mother Daughter Service Award, and the National Charity League 110% Award. Grace S. Lane was on the honor roll in grades 10 and 12 at Episcopal High School. There she served as captain of the Girls Varsity Tennis Team and an Acolyte Officer. She received the Effort Award, Climb Award, MVP and Most Improved Player in sports. Mary E. Leonard received the Rhodes Award Scholarship to Rhodes College. She was a member of the National Honor Society, captain of the Girls Varsity Lacrosse team, co-chair of Tour Guild, and captain of the Spirit Club. Mary earned the Sportsmanship

Award for Girls Lacrosse. Ultimately, she was named MVP for Girls Lacrosse, All Southzone G Lacrosse SPC in grades 11-12, and All State Girls Lacrosse in grade 12. Additionally, Mary received the James J. Murphy Award. Danielle C. Lurie was on the honor roll her senior year. She also served as captain of the Girls Volleyball team, received the Climb Award, and earned a National Scholastic Silver Key award for Photography. William W. Martinez was a member of the National Honor Society and was a straight A student all four years in the International Baccalaureate program at Lamar High School. He was the captain of the Varsity Football team, a member of the Lamar Football Leadership Council, a National Hispanic Merit Scholar, and a Touchdown Club of Houston Scholar Athlete of the Year finalist. Will received the Redskin Award for Leadership on the football team. He plays football at Rice University. Grace Z. Meng was on the honor roll all four years at St. John’s School. She was also the Yearbook Editorin-Chief her senior year and was the Yearbook Student Life Editor her junior year. Additionally, Grace was a Freshman Peer Leader her senior year, JV Cheer Captain, a National Cheerleaders’ Association (NCA) All-American Nominee in grades 10-12, and Presidential Service Award recipient in grades 9-11. Kate F. Peterkin received the Presidential Fellowship Scholarship at High Point University in North Carolina, following three years on the honor roll at Episcopal High School. She was a president of the National Arts Honor Society. She received numerous art awards, including distinction as Painter of the Year.

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Caroline L. Petersen was a member of the Cum Laude society and National Spanish Honor Society, achieving High Honor Roll all four years at the Kinkaid School. She was captain of the Varsity Cheer team and served on the Admission and Community Service councils. Kate received the AP Scholar Award, National Spanish Exam Gold and Silver medals, and the Presidential Volunteer Service Award. Caroline was a Celia Fitzpatrick Research Paper Finalist and an All-American Cheerleader. Luke O. Pugh was on the High Honor Roll in grades 1112. He received the Exemplary Effort Award for English and was the Most Improved Player for Varsity Tennis in grade 10. Stockton D. Shaffer received the TCU Faculty Scholarship, following four years on the honor roll at Episcopal High School. Leadership roles included captain of the Varsity Lacrosse team, president of the Ducks Unlimited Club, and Lead Crucifer for the Acolytes. Stockton received first place for a sports image he submitted to the Association of Texas Photographer Instructors. Carson A. Sherman was on the honor roll in grades 9-11 at Episcopal High School. There she served as the Students of Service Communications Minister. She received the Climb Award in Mathematics, the Effort Award in History, and the Community Service Award. Gabrielle E. Small graduated as salutatorian at Episcopal High School, where she served on the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, National English Honor Society, and Mu Alpha Theta. Gabrielle was vice president of the Freedom Club, a Repertory dancer, and a member of Student Senate. Gabrielle distinguished herself

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as an AP Scholar with Distinction, a National Merit Commended Scholar, Most Improved Varsity Field Hockey Player, NFHCA High School National Academic Squad - Scholar of Distinction, and Art Student of the Month for Dance. She received academic achievement awards in Mathematics, Science, and World History. Kathryn M. Taylor received the SMU Distinguished Scholar scholarship. She was a member of the National Honor Society and secretary of the National Spanish Honor Society. She was on the honor roll all four years at Episcopal High School. James M. Vaughan graduated magna cum laude from Strake Jesuit. He was a member of the National Honor Society and an Eagle Scout. Martha A. Welch graduated from the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut after distinguishing herself as a student-leader. Ashton was Head of Student Government Communications, Memorial Dorm Proctor (residential advisor), Head of Hotchkiss Gospel Choir, Head of Investments Club, Head Tour Guide, and Head of Blue and White Spirit Society. In addition to being a National Merit Semi-Finalist, she received awards for academic excellence in Spanish, History, and Computer Science. Athletic honors included the Coaches’ Award for JV Lacrosse, Coaches’ Award for Squash, Coaches’ Award for Soccer, and the Dwyer Award for Commitment to Sports and Spirit in Athletics. Ultimately, Ashton earned the Faculty Award, given by the faculty to the student who most highly promotes the values of the school. Hannah C. Witcher served as the Cheerleader Captain at Episcopal High School, where she was also named Cheerleading MVP.


High School Acceptances CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ROBS CLASS OF 2020!

St. Francis Episcopal

Bellaire High School

Lamar High School

Episcopal High School Choate Rosemary Hall

Strake Jesuit College Preparatory St. John’s School Phillips Andover

The Kinkaid School

Memorial High School

St. Paul’s School

Houston Christian High School St. Thomas High School The Woodlands High School

St. Agnes Academy

The Hotchkiss School

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CLASS OF 2015

COLORADO 1

CALIFORNIA 1 BOULDER, CO Rose Armstrong University of Colorado

CLAREMONT, CA Jessica Bonnen Scripps College

ARIZONA 1 TUCSON, AZ Alex Deutsch University of Arizona Sloane Storck University of Arizona

LUBBOCK, TX David Hammer Texas Tech University Jeb Spalding Texas Tech University

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AUSTIN, TX Patrick Bayouth University of Texas Walker Bunch University of Texas Daniel Cai University of Texas Kate Carter University of Texas Lilly Cone University of Texas Jack Day University of Texas Mac Frazier St. Edward’s University Anna Giesler University of Texas Ellie Gilchrist University of Texas Pate Herrold University of Texas Harrison Holmes University of Texas

Harris Inoff University of Texas Carter Kardesch University of Texas Gabriela Long University of Texas Grace Meng University of Texas Anish Nayak University of Texas Jack Panus Austin Community College Caroline Petersen University of Texas James Shepherd University of Texas Hannah Witcher Austin Community College

SAN ANTONIO, TX Andrew Barber Trinity University COLLEGE STATION, TX Elizabeth Allen Texas A&M University Sam Bell Texas A&M University Jim Briggs Texas A&M University Jack Dawkins Texas A&M University Annaliese Fowler Texas A&M University Aidan Hill Texas A&M University Becca Hughes Texas A&M University BRENHAM, TX Jack Snell Blinn College


EVANSTON, IL Luke Pugh Northeastern University Sophie Thomas Northwestern University Ashton Welch Northwestern University

CLINTON, NY William Gordon Hamilton College

NEW YORK, NY Anna Lauren Hanhausen New York University Benny He New York University Gaby Murra New York University Sam Smith New York University

HANOVER, NH Claire Kardesch Dartmouth College

NEW HAMPSHIRE 1 NEW YORK 2 PHILADELPHIA, PA Mea Ayers University of Pennsylvania

PENNSYLVANIA 1

WASHINGTON D.C. 3

ILLINOIS 1

VIRGINIA 2

TENNESSEE 2

ALABAMA 1 MISSISSIPPI 2

NORTH CAROLINA 1

HIGH POINT, NC Kate Peterkin High Point University

GEORGIA 2

ATHENS, GA Matthew Boling University of Georgia ATLANTA, GA Michael Boling Georgia Institute of Technology

DALLAS, TX Mia Carrabba Southern Methodist University Carson Sherman Southern Methodist University Kathryn Taylor Southern Methodist University

CORPUS CHRISTI, TX James Vaughan Texas A&M University

HAMPTON, VA Sean Gilmore Hampton University LEXINGTON, VA Sarah Martin Washington & Lee University

TEXAS 52

WACO, TX Carter Bunk Baylor University Kate Harris Baylor University Holt Johnson Baylor University Jillian Stewart Baylor University

WASHINGTON, D.C. Lethan Hampton Howard University Chandler Onyekwelu Howard University Lena Provenzano American University

FORT WORTH, TX Brooke Braniff Texas Christian University Worth Epley Texas Christian University Zak Farnan Texas Christian University Grace Lane Texas Christian University Tate Martin Texas Christian University Stockton Shaffer Texas Christian University Isabel Young Texas Christian University

AUBURN, AL Sadie Jensen Auburn University

UNIVERSITY, MS Dani Lurie University of Mississippi Serena Shannon University of Mississippi HOUSTON, TX Walker Glotfelty Houston Community College Parker Honn University of Houston Will Martinez Rice University

MEMPHIS, TN Mary Leonard Rhodes College NASHVILLE, TN Gabrielle Small Vanderbilt University

TYLER, TX Austin Glickman University of Texas at Tyler

SUMMER SPRING 2020 2019

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Class Notes

1987 Jennifer Wise Martinez of Jennifer Martinez Interiors was published in the fall/winter 2019 edition of Elegant Homes magazine.

1993 Knox Nunnally was featured as a Texas Rising Star in Super Lawyers magazine in 2019.

Caroline Brantley and husband Ward welcomed daughter Nora on December 18, 2019. Nora joins big brother Quinn.

2001

1995

Connor Tamlyn and Emily Brlansky Tamlyn ’04 welcomed son James Randall on February 8, 2019. Adrian Turnham and wife Lauren welcomed son Walker Crews on May 29, 2019.

Lee-Taylor Evans Sharman and husband Riley welcomed son Kirby on March 25, 2019.

2003

1996 Montana Lee Hooten and husband Ben welcomed daughter Margot James on November 8, 2019. She joins proud big sister Elliott. Shannon McIntyre wed Van Shannon on June 1, 2019 .

1997 Annie Blaylock McQueen and husband Tyler welcomed son Henning “Hank” Hughes on November 19, 2019. Hank joins siblings Lila, Cash, and Georgia.

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Kirsten Scott married Chris Bell in Kiawah Island, South Carolina on September 8, 2019—a day later than scheduled due to Hurricane Dorian. ROBS alumna Bobbi Porche ’02 served as a bridesmaid.

2004 Whitney Easterling Sharman is the Business Development and Marketing Associate at Berg Hospitality Group.


2009 Tyler Gauntt married Jordyn Beady in Aspen, Colorado on September 28, 2019. Sam Boyd ’09, Travis Gauntt ’07, Turner Gaunt ’13, and Jonathan Prather ’09 were members of the wedding party.

2012 Sara Bobb graduated magna cum laude from George Washington University with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. She was named Outstanding Senior in the School of Business. After an internship at Price Waterhouse Coopers this summer, Sara will return to GWU to obtain a master’s degree in accounting.

2014 Cole Hammer played on the USA team in the 2019 Walker Cup at Royal Liverpool in Hoylake, England. The team came in first place!

2016 Priscilla Mach’s art submission won Best in Show among 200,000 student entries to the Houston Livestock and Rodeo.

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Tour de Force Volunteers reimagine fun at ROBS Building construction, a global pandemic, prolonged campus closure—disruption after disruption threatened nearly every aspect of school life, from sports seasons to eighth grade graduation. Before you could say the word disappointment, our parents were reimagining opportunities to sustain meaningful ROBS traditions, protecting the joy that comes with community connection.

When Get the Scoop! Day split into two days, doubling the workload, twice as many showed up to work.

When the annual Fall Fair faced cancellation, they redesigned the entire day to preserve the tradition for our kids. Teachers chaperoned students through activity stations on a staggered schedule, giving every child from three years old to eighth grade a safe and fun way to enjoy the event.

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When Popsicles on the Playground events were displaced, they staged parties at Firetruck Park with decorations, coolers, and popsicles, of course!


When classes were canceled unexpectedly, they showed up with breakfast tacos and a coffee bar to fuel our teachers for the two-day remote learning training sessions. Hundreds of cards and thank you notes awaited the teachers at the surprise breakfast.

When the State’s directive to schools suspended graduation, they customized yard signs for each and every eighth grader and personally delivered them overnight.

When a global pandemic precluded continuation of the school’s only fundraising event of the year, they created an online auction that showcased the student artwork with full descriptions and videos of the process.

They are our volunteers. THEY ARE THE EXAMPLE. SUMMER 2020

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First grader LeReine Coxeff and her mom Lereca Monik lead the volunteers in prayer before they get to work at the Martin Luther King, Jr. All-School Day of Service.

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All-School Day of Service Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’” On the MLK Holiday, the ROBS community—students, parents, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni, and grandparents—answered Dr. King’s question with a resounding response.

YOU SORTED

YOU DONATED

12,240 POUNDS OF FOOD

3,279 CHILDREN’S BOOKS

(OR ABOUT 10,200 MEALS) AT THE HOUSTON FOOD BANK.

TO BOOKS BETWEEN KIDS AND SORTED EVEN MORE AT ITS WAREHOUSE.

YOU DELIVERED

YOU ASSEMBLED

23 CARE PACKAGES TO POLICE AND FIRE STATIONS

600 HYGIENE KITS FOR CCSC CLIENTS,

ACROSS THE HOUSTON AREA AND AS FAR AWAY AS CLEAR LAKE.

BOTH ADULTS AND FAMILIES.

YOU REPACKAGED

YOU BAGGED

1,500 POUNDS OF RICE, BEANS, AND FLOUR

2,650 BAGS OF DOG TREATS

FOR THE FOOD PANTRIES AT CCSC AND MISSION CENTERS OF HOUSTON.

FOR ANIMEALS.

YOU PACKED

YOU DECORATED

4,800 PAIRS OF UNDERWEAR

SCORES OF LUNCH SACKS

FOR UNDIES FOR EVERYONE.

FOR KIDS’ MEALS.

You sorted and packed up

THE ST. LUKE’S MERCY CLOSET in preparation for remodeling.

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES Jacques Hodges, Chair Jarod Bonine Jaime Casas Jacquelyn Cox Susan Cox Josh Davis Tim Day Angie Gildea Mignon Gill Scott Hill Terry Huffington, Emeritus Jakeen Johnson, M.D. Mark Jones, Ph.D. Brandt Leibe Tracy Livingston Butch Mach Nkem Omebere-Iyari, Ph.D. Dax Sanders Katie Stanton ’90 Gail Stewart Lois Wright, Emeritus

Ex-officio Leanne Reynolds

ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM Leanne Reynolds Head of School Todd Herauf, Ed.D. Associate Head of School for Academics Deborah Harper Associate Head of School for Advancement Paul Mayhew Associate Head of School for Operations Dawn Hanson, Ph.D. Head of Preschool Amy Womack Head of Lower School Connor Cook, Ed.D. Head of Middle School Brian Mahabee Director of Innovation & Technology Kristin Poe Director of Admission Meghan Blanton Director of Marketing and Communications

ACCREDITATION ISAS, ACTABS, Praesidium

PUBLICATIONS Managing Editor: Meghan Blanton Writers: Meghan Blanton, Melanie Hightower, Cherise Luter, Michelle Morris Photographers: Donna Donnell, Jan Edwards, Cherise Luter, David Shutts, Paul Swen, ROBS faculty and staff Designer: C2-Studios, Inc.

Paige Martin ’85 Director of Development Chris Baltazar Director of Safety and Security

We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in the magazine. If we have made an inadvertent error, please accept our apologies. You may contact Director of Marketing & Communications Meghan Blanton at mblanton@robs.org regarding ROBS publications. SUMMER 2020

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River Oaks Baptist School 2300 Willowick Houston, Texas 77027 713.623.6938 www.robs.org

be the example

Ambitious academics rooted in abiding Christian values WATERCOLOR TREE Alight with playful color, the watercolor tree represents the beautiful potential and possibility-filled expanse of a child’s life. ACADEMIC PATH Deliberately engineered, research-based, and comprehensive, the School’s thoughtful academic curriculum builds upon itself from grade-tograde, laying a self-reinforcing foundation for students to be ambitious, courageous, resourceful thinkers. FRUIT BUDS Growing naturally from the academic path, the fruit buds represent the practice-based, immersive character curriculum that permeates every lesson and action at ROBS. The nine fruit buds known as the Fruit of the Spirit nourish children’s lives well beyond their time at ROBS. STYLIZED TREE Fastening together the academic path and the fruit buds, the stylized tree presents a child’s journey through ROBS—the way ROBS guides students toward shaping life direction, forming connections, and preparing them for all that comes next. LAYERED IMAGERY Layering the artistry of the watercolor tree with the technological imagery of the stylized tree signifies the School’s commitment to Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, and Math—each a priority in our ongoing curricular enhancements and our new master campus plan.

Profile for River Oaks Baptist School

Rive Oaks Baptist School Summer 2020 Vine & Branch Magazine  

Rive Oaks Baptist School Summer 2020 Vine & Branch Magazine  

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