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JULY 11-17, 2018 I VOLUME 42 I NUMBER 28

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THE LEDE

PHOTO BY THEO WELLING

“Irememberasakidjustrunninguptotheice-creamtruckandlookingatthegrownupbehind youandhopinghe’dbuyyouone.Somekidsdon’tgetit,sothat’swhyIgottagiveittothem. Youknowit’sallrighttogiveawayafewBombPops.” Darrnell Williams, photographeD near ChippeWa anD gustine in June

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURE

12.

Primary Colors It’s Democrat vs. Democrat in the St. Louis County Executive race. Can Mike Mantovani take down Steve Stenger? Written by

PATRICK COLLINS

Cover illustration by

RONAN LYNAM

NEWS

ARTS

DINING

CULTURE

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The Lede

Calendar

Seven days worth of great stuff to see and do

Brick River Cider is a cider house that rules, writes Cheryl Baehr

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Photo Ops

Stage

Side Dish

After #ArchSoWhite embarrasses the city, black officials arrange for a do-over

Part one of the latest LaBute Festival is uneven, writes Paul Friswold

Good Fortune’s Corey Smale is happy to be the hype man

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First Look

Politics

A last-minute amendment brings pro-life language into the Missouri Democratic Party platform

Film

Leave No Trace impresses Robert Hunt

A new film explores what happens when haute cuisine comes to Small Town, Missouri

Media

JULY 11 - 17, 2018

Levant is serving the comfort of the Middle East in the Central West End

Media

Layoffs are averted, but the Post-Dispatch is still down a number of experienced reporters

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Cafe

Your friend or neighbor, captured on camera

Preview

After years of making Nelly sound good, producer Jay E is ready for the spotlight

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Homespun

Traveling Sound Machine just released its first new music in four years

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Out Every Night

The best concerts in St. Louis every night of the week

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This Just In

This week’s new concert announcements

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Savage Love

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Publisher Chris Keating Editor in Chief Sarah Fenske E D I T O R I A L Arts & Culture Editor Paul Friswold Music Editor Daniel Hill Digital Editor Jaime Lees Staff Writers Doyle Murphy, Danny Wicentowski Restaurant Critic Cheryl Baehr Film Critic Robert Hunt Editorial Interns Alison Gold, Mario Miles-Turnage, Lexie Miller, Camille Respess, Ian Scott Contributing Writers Mike Appelstein, Allison Babka, Sara Graham, Roy Kasten, Jaime Lees, Joseph Hess, Kevin Korinek, Bob McMahon, Nicholas Phillips, Tef Poe, Christian Schaeffer, Lauren Milford, Thomas Crone, MaryAnn Johanson, Jenn DeRose, Mike Fitzgerald Proofreader Evie Hemphill Cartoonist Bob Stretch

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NEWS

Arch Photo Is #SoWhite No More Written by

ALISON GOLD

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n July 3, an all-white group of city, state and federal officials gathered to cut the ribbon on the newly renovated grounds of the Gateway Arch. Three days later, a much more diverse group showed up, turning what had been ridiculed as #ArchSoWhite into a more accurate picture of the area’s leadership. The emcee, the Reverend Darryl Gray, referred to the redo as the “first inclusive” Arch ribbon-cutting. “If you look at the photos from last Tuesday, comparing it to the one in 1965, it doesn’t look any different. And in 2018, in 2018, that is unacceptable,” St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones said. “The Arch is here for the region, for the people, for all of the people.” When St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson tweeted the all-white photo, it caused a backlash. Black city officials organized the “Black Arch Ribbon Cutting Event” in response. “People thought today was about a photo, and it’s much bigger than a photo,” said one organizer, state Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. (D-St. Louis). “This speaks to a systemic issue

that we’ve been dealing with for a long time in the city of St. Louis. So what we wanted to do is make sure people understand how diverse St. Louis is, how colorful St. Louis is, how alive St. Louis is.” Organizers strove to include as many of St. Louis’ communities as possible.A manager at the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce joined two board members of its Asian American counterpart and the police department’s first Muslim chaplain as speakers. The audience was just as diverse. “I don’t know about you, but when I’m standing here in this space, I feel comforted because this is what I see when I walk outside my door, this is what I see at the grocery store,” said Cori Bush, who is challenging U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis. (Clay was invited to the original #ArchSoWhite ribbon-cutting, but was on vacation.) “This is St. Louis, not what we saw the other day. This is St. Louis and this is what we celebrate.” Speakers noted the Arch’s duality as both one of St. Louis’ most iconic landmarks and a visual representation of the city’s fraught racial history. Several invoked Percy Green’s 1964 scaling the Arch to protest the lack of black workers involved in its construction. Jones introduced the Gateway Arch Park Foundation’s executive director, Eric Moraczewski. The two had a long conversation in which they agreed to “work together to make sure stuff like this never happens again,” she said. “For years, we focused on making this museum the story of ev-

STREAK’S CORNER • by Bob Stretch

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Fixed it. Better late than never? | RICHARDREILLYSTUDIO.COM eryone involved in our community. That’s why we are so sorry the ribbon cutting on Tuesday did not reflect this commitment,” Moraczewski said. “We missed the mark.” Following the ceremony, a much

larger and much more colorful group than the original bunch stood just in front of the Arch for a rectified photo. And following that, they all gathered for a spirited chanting of “I know that we will win.” n


Big Tent on Abortion Angers Dem Faithful Written by

SARAH FENSKE

O

n June 30, the Missouri Democratic Party approved a new platform — one including a last-minute amendment welcoming “a diversity of views” on abortion. “We respect the conscience of each Missourian and recognize that members of our party have deeply held and sometimes differing positions on issues of personal conscience, such as abortion,” the amendment read. “We recognize the diversity of views as a source of strength, and welcome into our ranks all Missourians who may hold differing positions on this issue.” But while the addition earned relatively easy passage through the state committee, with a 32-25 victory according to an unofficial tally, it also set off a firestorm. Both some elected officials in the state and reproductive-rights advocates say they were “furious” about what they saw as women being thrown under the bus. Says state Representative Stacey Newman (D-University City), “Most of us who know about it are in an uproar.” “I’m so angry,” says Alison Dreith, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri. “I think it’s a slap in the face to the base voters of the party. And it’s sickening for the Missouri Democratic Party to put our lives on the line like this.” The amendment was introduced by Joan Barry. A former obstetric nurse and former state representative for south county, Barry is herself pro-life. She serves on the platform committee and originally sought to introduce similar language there. But after losing that battle, she contacted the party’s chairman, Stephen Webber, to try again.

Pro-lifers made a last-minute amendment to the Democratic platform. | DANNY WICENTOWSKI

Webber says he was determined to trust the grassroots of party membership with drafting the platform — and wanted to take a hands-off attitude with any amendments as well. If people wanted amendments, he says, they needed to draft them themselves. So they did. Mary Elizabeth Dorsey, the chairwoman of the St. Louis County Democratic Party, says that after talking to Barry, she sent her proposed amendment out over email on Friday afternoon. She claims she was personally not in favor of it, and thought the timing was in opposition to the party’s bylaws, but felt obligated to help Barry. The email with the amendment landed like a bombshell. Yet for many activists, its late arrival wasn’t nearly enough time to get to Jefferson City for the state committee meeting that Saturday (especially since many were already committed to various immigration protests). At the Saturday meeting, St. Louis Alderwoman Annie Rice, a state committee member, argued that if the party wouldn’t allow a “diversity of views” on labor issues, it shouldn’t allow them on

abortion rights. But her argument failed (Rice withdrew the motion after making her point), and after an effort to delay the platform vote also failed, the amendment found passage. Barry says the amendment’s success comes down to a simple fact: The party has plenty of pro-life members. And, she says, it could be more successful at the ballot box if more voters realized it. “We’re tired of being treated like second-class citizens in our own party,” she says. On the platform-committee conference call, Barry says another member shouted at her, “I would rather lose an election than have pro-life Democrats.” “That is crazy,” she says, noting her support for other key Democratic planks. “The way we feel about the elderly, the young, about education and labor — those are so important to me. And there are a lot of us who are like that.” Newman, who currently serves in the statehouse, agrees with Barry only to the point that she acknowledges that a half-dozen pro-life members are within the House Democratic caucus alone. But she finds their position incredibly problematic, especially in light of the large volume of bills being

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proposed every year governing everything from contraception to whether a pharmacist can opt out of, say, providing pills to a woman who’s had a miscarriage. “This is about much more than how you personally feel about abortion,” she says. “As a woman, that’s part of what makes me so angry. We’re putting policies in place that can’t be easily reversed. You can’t just come back and say, ‘Next year, we’ll change it.’” In a lengthy Facebook post Saturday, St. Louis Alderwoman Megan Ellyia Green raised the point made by her colleague, Rice, about the fact that Democrats would never tolerate dissension on rightto-work. “What other rights are we OK allowing for a diversity of opinion on? Children being put in cages? Muslims being banned from this country? Who has access to vote? Who is allowed to work? How can we say in one part of the platform that we support the Equal Rights Amendment yet not hold that our elected Democrats should vote to ensure that women can make the reproductive health choices that they need to make to insure that they can work? “How can we say that we support ‘the rights of all workers’ but not the ability for women to make personal decisions that impact their ability to work? Lack of consistency on issues is what frays trust in the party. Pandering to voters who are unlikely to Vote for us, while alienating the base, frays trust in the party. It’s also a losing strategy.” Several women publicly pledged on social media Saturday to no longer give any resources to the party. Speaking yesterday, those on the losing side acknowledged there’s likely little that can be done to change the party’s platform for now. But they spoke about other alternatives, like working to fund organizations that support prochoice candidates. And they continue to feel betrayed. Says Dreith, “I think it’s even more ridiculous that the party was able to be very bold and include ‘Black Lives Matter’ in the platform. Do they think rural voters won’t be upset about that? We don’t let Democrats vote their consciences on right-to-work, equal pay, marriage equality. We shouldn’t let them vote their consciences on abortion either.” n

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Buyouts Avert Layoffs at Post-Dispatch Written by

SARAH FENSKE

T

wo weeks after the St. Louis PostDispatch let five journalists know they were being laid off, most of those journalists are back in the newsroom: Four colleagues volunteering for buyouts, coupled with one already announced departure, mean that everyone who wants to stay can. But while staffers are pleased that their colleagues will be keeping their jobs after all, some seem a bit shell-shocked by the departures. Some big names, they note, are now on their way out the door. Post-Dispatch reporter Doug Moore is the secretary of the executive board of the United Media Guild, which represents most newsroom employees. “We’re happy that those who were laid off are getting their jobs back, but the reality is that our work force is reduced,” he says. “It’s going to make it that much more challenging to cover this city.” The recent departures include longtime editorial page staffers Kevin Horrigan and Deb Peterson. Horrigan was not union, but with Peterson accepting a

buyout, the editorial pages are left with just one designated employee, editorial page editor Tod Robberson. Meanwhile, longtime theater critic Judith Newmark has also accepted a buyout, while veteran photographer Chris Lee, acclaimed for his coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals, signed up to take a buyout. So did Kristen Taketa, a young education reporter who just took a job with the San Diego Union-Tribune. Lee, Peterson, Newmark and Taketa were all union members, and that means four of those targeted for layoffs will be able to return to the paper. And the fifth, of course, doesn’t want to — Mike Faulk had already put in his resignation when the paper put him on the layoff list. Spokeswoman Tracy Rouch wouldn’t comment on the bigger strategy, saying only, “At this time, three newsroom employees from the June 18 layoff have returned.” Those who are back on the job? Business reporter Bryce Gray, healthcare reporter Samantha Liss, and — for now — sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz. Ortiz had previously said he was taking a job in Houston, and has been up front about the fact that his family has relocated. But Ortiz is apparently going to remain on staff as a general assignment reporter during the process of transitioning to his new job in August. The only staffer whose status remains up in the air is Hillary Levin, a longtime

The Post-Dispatch newsroom is now an echo of its former self. | FLICKR/PAUL SABLEMAN photo editor who was put on the June 18 layoff list. Lee’s decision to give his notice saves her job, but Levin had a full week to decide if she wants it back. At this point, the resolution is not clear. The Post-Dispatch newsroom has suffered serious cuts since the paper was purchased by Iowa-based Lee Enterprises in 2005 — mainly because the new owners are still paying off the debt they took on to finance the $1.5 billion acquisition. Moore estimates that the newsroom is down to about one-third of

its size at the time of acquisition. For now, writers and editors are being close-lipped about what restructuring, if any, will follow the latest departures. An internal email said that staffers may apply for the open positions on the paper’s editorial pages. Robberson, the section’s one remaining staffer, declined an offer to talk about what changes, if any, he foresees for his section, stating only by email, “We will regroup, rebuild and continue delivering the same quality product.” n

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BY PATRICK COLLINS

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n an unseasonably warm afternoon in early May, Hazel Erby, who has represented the first district on the St. Louis County Council since 2004, stands before a small audience and announces that the time for a new county executive has arrived. After outlining a litany of current County Executive Steve Stenger’s shortcomings, which Erby says include bullying, lack of communication with the council, divisiveness, hostility and general dysfunction, the councilwoman says simply, “It’s time for a change.” The group — mainly African American Democrats from north county — applauds politely. The occasion, officially, is the

November 6. Mantovani and Stenger make for interesting rivals. They both grew up in working-class families in Affton and graduated from Catholic high schools — Mantovani from Saint Louis University High, Stenger from Bishop DuBourg — and they are both trained as lawyers. They’ve each moved up in the world, Stenger to Clayton, Mantovani to Ladue. Mantovani, who recently completed a Harvard fellowship, is known as an entrepreneurial former CEO. Stenger is a CPA who got elected to the county council in 2009 and became county executive in 2015. Mantovani and Stenger each have plenty to say about why the

a Republican won the race for county executive. Stenger’s claim is based largely on Mantovani’s $20,241 in donations to former Missouri Governor Eric Greitens, a rising star in the Republican Party (and champion of right-towork laws) until his ascent was aborted by personal and financial scandals that led to his resignation June 1. Mantovani says that he, like many others, was misled by Greitens, that he vehemently opposes right-to-work and that he’s donated to plenty of Democrats, including Hillary Clinton and Claire McCaskill. But Stenger insists the donations and Mantovani’s tweets in support of the former governor, which his campaign says were

y colors IT’S DEMOCRAT VS. DEMOCRAT IN THE ST. LOUIS COUNTY EXECUTIVE RACE. CAN MARK MANTOVANI TAKE DOWN STEVE STENGER ? grand opening of Mark Mantovani’s north-county campaign headquarters, a cramped affair situated in a strip mall on a winding, rural-feeling road north of Interstate 270 in Florissant. The real reason for the gathering, however, is that the Fannie Lou Hamer Democratic Coalition of St. Louis County, a group of elected African Americans that Erby chairs, is endorsing Mantovani. On August 7, Mantovani will face off against Stenger in the Democratic primary. Because the Republicans have not put forth a contender with significant name recognition, the winner of the primary will likely coast to a victory in the general election on

other should not run St. Louis County, which is home to nearly a million people (one-sixth of the total population of the state of Missouri) and boasts a 2018 operating budget of nearly $665 million. Mantovani echoes Erby’s dissatisfaction with the status quo and then some, citing, among other things, Stenger’s inability to work with the county council and the dark cloud of ethics-related controversies that seems to perpetually shadow him. Not one to be outdone, Stenger charges that Mantovani, who has never held elected office, is running as a Democrat only because it’s been almost 30 years since

Top left: Mark Mantovani speaks with kids at the Webster Groves Community Parade. | MONICA MILEUR Bottom left: Steve Stenger reads along with young students at the St. Louis County Library as part of last June’s Recycled Reads event. | KARA SMITH/ST. LOUIS COUNTY LIBRARY

lost when Mantovani’s personal account was merged into the campaign’s account, constitute an investment in right-wing ideology. Erby is unfazed. “Mark understands that when we all have equal access to opportunity, the entire region prospers,” she says. “When we don’t, our whole community fails.”

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rby, who toggles effortlessly back and forth between being Stenger’s most visible and vocal critic and Mantovani’s staunchest supporter, personifies the dilemma facing St. Louis County voters. Are Mantovani’s big, bold ideas enough to overcome his lack of elected experience in his quest to transform the region toward a brighter future? Or is he simply Continued on pg 14

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someone other than Stenger? One thing is certain: Erby is far from alone in her desire for a new executive. In April, led by Webster Groves Mayor Gerry Welch, nearly twenty elected officials, including the mayors of Cool Valley, Des Peres, Frontenac, Moline Acres, Pine Lawn and Rock Hill, threw their support behind Mantovani in an unusually public gesture. It’s second nature for local leaders to trash-talk each other behind closed doors and off the record, but Stenger’s adversaries express their desire to “get rid of the current dysfunction,” as former Clayton Mayor Linda Goldstein put it, in front of cameras and microphones. The concerns with Stenger expressed in April revolved for the most part around an inability — or unwillingness — to collaborate and a consistent lack of communication from the executive’s office. But it’s questions about ethics that seem to have the most tenacity. At the moment, Exhibit A in the case against Stenger’s reelection is his handling of leases at Crossings at Northwest, formerly Northwest Plaza, in St. Ann. Robert and P. David Glarner are brothers, developers and, since Missouri’s Amendment 2 does not apply to county or municipal candidates, major-league Stenger supporters — the $365,000 they’ve donated so far, in fact, is unprecedented in St. Louis County elections. While there’s nothing hidden or “dark” about the donations, it’s widely believed that the brothers’ patronage fits tongue and groove with the twenty-year lease of nearly 150,000 square feet of redeveloped office space the county entered into at Crossings at Northwest, which the Glarners happen to own. The deal will cost the county between $69 and $77 million. Mantovani has pounced on it — who wouldn’t? — referring to Crossings at Northwest as “the Glarner Mall.” Mantovani has also said that if he’s elected he will not accept any campaign contributions until the year of the next election arrives in 2022 and that he will never accept any money from any individual or organization doing business with the county. Others have questions about Stenger’s wheelings and dealings as well. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley filed a lawsuit against the county executive’s office, alleging violation of open-records law, and the St. Louis County Council,

after reviewing a report prepared by its ethics commission, voted 5-0 to request state and federal law enforcement look into the Crossings at Northwest leases. Stenger is equally critical of contributions Mantovani has accepted. Mantovani, who ponied up $1 million of his own money to run, is his own largest donor. The vast majority of other contributions are $500 or less and are from individuals rather than the LLCs that have donated so voluminously to Stenger. There are notable exceptions, however. Dave Spence, a 2012 Republican candidate for Missouri governor and an unabashed advocate for right-to-work laws, contributed $5,000; longtime Republican George Herbert Walker, who served as ambassador to Hungary during the administration of his second cousin, George W. Bush, has contributed $11,000. While Stenger points to donations and contributions as evidence that Mantovani is not really a Democrat — a distinction he says is important when it comes to the more difficult parts of the county executive’s job, such as balancing the budget — it’s important to note that the Republican Party is not entirely absent from Stenger’s list of donors, either. Stenger has accepted donations from former Missouri Governor and U.S. Senator Kit Bond and from Douglas Albrecht, chairman of the Bodley Group, who donated $160,800 to the Republican National Committee between 1991 and 2016.

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antovani’s single biggest criticism of his opponent isn’t the ethics issue but Stenger’s overall approach to leading the county. “Your average captain of a high school football team gets the kids together over the summer and sets the course,” Mantovani says. “I never hear any vision or agenda from him so far as aspiration for our community goes. His approach is very transactional.” He adds that the current executive had very little to do with his decision to enter the race. “I didn’t start this mission because of Steve Stenger,” he says. “I started it because I have concerns about my community.” His concerns can be summed up with one word: decline. At the dawn of the 1960s, as Mantovani was coming of age, St. Louis, with a population of 750,026, was the tenth largest city in the U.S. In the mid-1960s, when the McDonnell Douglas-made Gemini spacecraft was nudging


the U.S. ahead of the Soviet Union in the space race that garnered worldwide attention, Mantovani recalls classmates looking on nervously because their parents had worked on the project. On the ground, Busch Stadium II opened downtown in May 1966 with the Cardinals beating the Braves 4-3 in twelve innings. The following year, on June 10, 1967, the Gateway Arch welcomed its first visitors. During the 1960s two new professional sports franchises — the Blues and the football Cardinals — decided to settle down in St. Louis. And Mantovani’s favorite nugget of local lore: One of the six newspapers President John F. Kennedy read every day was the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “When I was growing up, this seemed to me like a place of prominence, a place that gave people the opportunity to achieve whatever they wanted,” he says. “When I talk to young people today about what it was like here, their eyes get big.”

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att Pijut, 32, is a member of the demographic Mantovani believes is critical to moving the region forward. He grew up in south county with Mantovani’s son, but when he got hired at Ansira shortly after graduating from the University of Missouri in 2008, he had no idea that his friend’s dad was the CEO. Ansira is the digital marketing agency that Mantovani took over at the request of a legal client. It grew dramatically, from 50 employees to more than 800, under his leadership. Mantovani took a tax credit on the building at Locust and Jefferson that he moved the agency into, but defends the decision by pointing to job creation and the rejuvenation the neighborhood has undergone since Ansira’s arrival. “The average employee age there was under 30,” Mantovani recalls. “I

Hazel Erby calls Stenger “an equal opportunity A-hole.” | COURTESY OF HAZEL ERBY thought I was going there to mentor young people, but I’m the one who learned.” Pijut, who lives in Glendale, believes that Mantovani is the right person for the county-executive job because he takes a holistic approach to learning about the needs of different communities, he’s not afraid of conflict and he’s endlessly curious. “His curiosity wasn’t always focused on how to be more profitable,” Pijut says. “It was focused on: Are we using the data and insight we are collecting in the best way possible?”

Regardless of who wins the election, Pijut fears for the region’s future for reasons that align with some of Mantovani’s priorities. Pijut grew up in south county and he loves living here, but his wife, who is not a native, does not share his enthusiasm. Like many, they are concerned about violent crime, especially now that they are parents. They welcomed their first child — a boy — the day that Eric Greitens resigned. The significance of the date in Missouri history is duly noted in their son’s baby book.

Whether mantovani is talking soccer or crime or the failure to make it past Amazon’s initial cut, his theme is that the area’s phenomenal degree of fragmentation is a real problem.

“It’s becoming harder to blindly defend St. Louis,” he says. “Crime used to seem highly prevalent in certain areas, and you could argue that crackdowns needed to happen in those areas. But just recently a young woman was mugged in a parking garage in Brentwood — an area that not long ago would have been deemed ‘safer.’” There’s something else that bothers Pijut: Indianapolis. When the cloud-computing company Salesforce located several hundred jobs there and put its name on the city’s tallest building, it stung. “Fifteen or twenty years ago, it would have been comical to think of Indy as ahead of St. Louis in terms of attracting major corporations and talent,” Pijut says. “So to see major corporations leave St. Louis while other major corporations set up a largescale presence in Indy is disheartening.”

U

nlike the blue wave Democrats are counting on in November, the one that will be powered by candidates who are younger, more female and less fair-skinned than ever before, Mantovani is an affluent white guy who wears tailored suits and has eight grandchildren. “But,” he says, holding his hand up as if to stop traffic, “I do not think like any 64-year-old I know.” He doesn’t always behave like one, either. After his stint as CEO of Ansira, Mantovani and his wife of 40 years, Patty, headed for Boston and a Harvard fellowship rather than retreating to Ladue. He developed a taste for how entrepreneurship and public service can intersect. He also began taking a closer look at other cities. Why does Boston take a completely different approach to policing? How does Atlanta leverage its racial diversity as a competitive advantage? What Continued on pg 16

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makes Chattanooga so attractive to startups? “I’m not suggesting that St. Louis try to become Boston,” he says. “But as county executive, I want to champion innovation. I think we can learn a lot from what works in other places.” Closer to home, Mantovani points to two issues that would have been handled differently had he been at the helm of St. Louis County: Major League Soccer and Uber. “We’re not going to attract young, innovative thinkers by opposing Uber the way we did when it first came to town,” he says. “Whether we were right or wrong is almost beside the point. You don’t make a national cause out of fighting a disruptive technology that’s viewed in a very positive way by young people.” In 2017, in an election that drew an unusually high turnout, voters in the city of St. Louis rejected the opportunity to help finance a soccer stadium. Mantovani believes the failure to build a 25,000-seat facility sends the wrong message to a demographic he believes is critical to the future of the region: males between the ages of 18 and 34, for whom soccer is an increas-

ingly popular spectator sport. The day after the election, Stenger told reporters that the county didn’t participate because it had never been given a proposal to evaluate. Mantovani insists the county’s lack of participation is the main culprit in a failure he says sends the wrong message. “This would have been a regional win, but the county stayed out of it,” he says. “The county was MIA.”

W

hether Mantovani is talking about soccer or crime or the failure to make it past Amazon’s initial cut, his foundational theme is that the area’s phenomenal degree of fragmentation is a real problem. From police departments to gaypride festivals (the region hosted three last month), to say that St. Louis lacks cohesion is in and of itself an understatement. The Meramec, Mississippi and Missouri rivers set the natural stage for obstacles, but it is the 1876 secession of the city of St. Louis from St. Louis County that Mantovani considers the most detrimental (and the most repairable) source of fragmentation. Mantovani believes that Better Together, the Rex Sinquefield-

funded effort to join city and county, has good intentions. But he doesn’t support the organization’s methodology, which would ultimately put the matter before voters throughout the state. He believes a better approach would be to convene a board of electors to draw up a plan for making St. Louis the 91st municipality in St. Louis County and then place it before both city and county voters. If approved, it would enable the city to get out of the business of being a county by centralizing functions such as tax assessment, moving them from Market Street to Clayton. Mantovani isn’t naive to the likelihood of resistance from entrenched city interests, but he believes the biggest challenge would be convincing voters in St. Louis County that they wouldn’t be taking on the city’s financial woes by reuniting. “Each municipality in St. Louis County is responsible for its own financial situation,” he says. “When the city of St. Louis becomes the 91st municipality, it will retain full responsibility for its budget.” Mantovani would also like to create an office of municipal affairs, which he says would require funding but would also

“We are a community that is deeply segregated,” says Mantovani. “Contrast that with Atlanta, which was smaller than St. Louis when I was a kid but seems to have done a much better job embracing diversity and being inclusive.”

Continued on pg 18

2018

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Downtown 2000 Market Street St. Louis, MO 63103 (314) 421-1388

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benefit the region by supporting the good work being done in a siloed fashion across the county.

T

rue to its St. Louis roots, the contest between Mantovani and Stenger is in some ways a racial one. In 2014, Stenger, then a member of the county council, challenged and beat the county’s first African American executive, Charlie Dooley, also a Democrat. Many, including Mantovani and Erby, recall Stenger’s campaign as a racially motivated undertaking disguised as a crusade against corruption. “That campaign was about criminalizing an African American incumbent,” Mantovani says. Erby believes Stenger is trying to make amends in time for the primary. “Right now he’s making the rounds at black churches, singing ‘Amazing Grace,’” she says. “It’s insulting.” Interestingly, as the incumbent in 2014, Dooley ran ads against challenger Stenger accusing him of being a pro-life conservative disguised as a Democrat. Four years later, Stenger, now in the incumbent’s seat, is lobbing the same charges at his challenger. Mantovani doesn’t sugarcoat the area’s penchant for putting its worst face forward when it comes to racial issues, whether it’s the cascading towers of Pruitt-Igoe or tear gas and tanks on the streets of Ferguson. “We are a community that is deeply segregated,” he says. “Contrast that with Atlanta, which was smaller than St. Louis when I was a kid but seems to have done a much better job embracing diversity and being inclusive. They’ve brought more energy to their challenges and progressed in ways we have not.” To move St. Louis forward in that area, Mantovani doesn’t offer quick fixes or talking points. Instead he suggests a more longterm approach centered around conversations that include voices of those who have not always been welcome. “You can’t lead a community if you don’t understand its components,” he says. “I can’t wait to work with all different kinds of people.” Erby has confidence in his ability to move the region in the right direction. “Steve Stenger doesn’t respect the black community, but I’ve been assured he doesn’t respect white communities either,” she says. “He’s an equal opportu-

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nity A-hole. Mark’s character, on the other hand, exhibits integrity. He’s very careful about who he aligns himself with.”

M

antovani’s concerns about pervasive racism, the city-county split and the region’s general decline for that matter are nothing new. But he thinks the timing is in his favor. “Communities reach a tipping point where everyone says enough,” he says. “And I believe we’re there. The NFL left town for the second time, we failed to attract a soccer team because the county was MIA, leaving all of the burden on the city’s shoulders, and Amazon didn’t even consider us seriously.” In some ways, though, the timing couldn’t be worse. Shortly after his swearing-in, in February 2017, a beaming Eric Greitens sat in an abandoned warehouse in Springfield and signed legislation that made Missouri the country’s 28th right-to-work state. Organized labor, seeking to freeze the law’s passage and put the issue before Missouri voters, leveraged a rarely used maneuver, the referendum petition, and proceeded to collect 310,000 signatures. But rather than place the rightto-work question on the general election ballot in November, the Missouri House and Senate voted this May to relegate the issue to the August primary. Many believe the presence of right-to-work on the ballot will draw organized labor to the polls in numbers that are unusually high for a primary — and, in the process, hurt Mantovani, who hasn’t been able to completely shake the association with Greitens that Stenger has emphasized since the beginning of the campaign. The other question, of course, is whether or not the voters are open to a political outsider like Mantovani. It’s 2018, and the air seems heavy with fatigue caused by a disgraced former governor and a president who was elected because he “tells it like it is” and promised to drain swamps in Washington — both figures who convinced voters that their lack of political experience was in fact advantageous. On the other hand, the race could come down to exactly what kind of credentials are most important to St. Louis County voters. Without a doubt, Mantovani is sorely lacking when it comes to political experience. But he’s also short on experience being investigated for ethics issues. It’s entirely up to the voters to decide which outweighs the other. n


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CALENDAR

BY PAUL FRISWOLD

Rusty and Clark Fairwood’s East Plains: Get Out is part of this year’s St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. | CINEMA ST. LOUIS

THURSDAY 07/12 350 Days Professional wrestlers aren’t made in the gym; they’re made on the road. Their lives are a series of one-night shows in VFW halls, high school gyms and county fairs, and every bout is a chance to work on their crowd skills, hone their patter on the microphone and, yes, actually wrestle. It’s a grinding, lonely life that requires 350 days of travel every year just to make a living. The new documentary 350 Days features legends of the ring such as Bret Hart, Superstar Billy Graham, Nikolai Volkoff and Wendi Richter all talking about what it takes — and what it costs — to be the best, as well as archival footage of some great matches. 350 Days gets a one-night-only screening courtesy of Fathom Events. You can see it locally at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 12, at the Marcus Wehrenberg Ronnies 20 Cine (5320 South Lindbergh Boulevard; www.fathomevents.com). Tickets are $12.50.

FRIDAY 07/13 Let Them Eat Art Friday the thirteenth has long been associated with bad luck and

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worst case situations, but Maplewood thumbs its nose at these superstitions with Let Them Eat Art, a tongue-in-cheek tribute to Bastille Day. This is the thirteenth time the city has held the event, so 2018’s iteration is doubly auspicious. More than 50 artists will create original works that explore the triskaidekaphobic theme, with their creations then displayed at local businesses along Sutton Boulevard and Manchester Road (www.cityofmaplewood.com). The Saint Boogie Brass Band, Farshid Etniko and Hobo Cane with Javier Mendoza will perform live on stages and in parks, and roaming entertainers and activities for the kids round out the evening. Let Them Eat Art takes place from 6 to 11 p.m. Friday, July 13, and admission is free.

Works from the Studios The Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance. org) serves as both a teaching institution and a gallery. Both facets are on display at Works from the Studios, a juried exhibition. The show features works by students and faculty in ceramics, metals, fiber and wood, among other media. Works from the Studio opens with

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a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, July 13, at Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org). The work remains up through August 13, and the gallery is open daily.

Art Hill Film Series The Art Hill Film Series has become incredibly popular in just a few short years, and it’s easy to understand why. A summer night out on Art Hill in Forest Park (www.slam.org/filmseries) with a favorite movie and your favorite people and it doesn’t cost anything to get in? That’s a winner. The 2018 series takes its cue from the current exhibition, Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds. Dubbed “epic quests,” this year’s films are all about the search for something and should be familiar to even the most casual movie watcher. The series starts with Raiders of the Lost Ark on Friday, July 13, and continues on successive Fridays in order with Hidden Figures (July 20), Dr. No (July 27) and The NeverEnding Story (August 3). Films start at 9 p.m., but at 6 p.m. food and drink are available from the museum’s cafe and the Panorama tent on the lawn.

Aalim Belly Dancing Troupe performs at Let Them Eat Art in Maplewood on Friday. | BILL WEBSTER


WEEK WEEK OF OF JULY JULY 12-18 12-18

St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase Musical duo Rusty and Clark Fairwood are a flashy act on the rise. With their smart suits (complete with bedazzled crosses and American flags) and massive coifs, they’re entertainers in the Grand Ole Opry style. When they audition to be hosts on the talk show East Plains: Get Out, the Fairwood boys are faced with a dilemma. The TV station that broadcasts the show pretty much runs the town of East Plains, but the owners are immoral sinners. Will the Fairwood Brothers be stained by filthy lucre, or will they fight for justice? The feature film exploring that question, East Plains: Get Out (directed by Renior Fairwood), screens at 9:15 p.m. Friday, July 13, the opening night of this year’s St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. In addition to twelve different programs of short subject films (including “Lingua Francas,” a documentary about fine dining in Springfield, Missouri, which is featured in the RFT’s Short Orders section this week), the festival also squeezes in eight feature films. Among them are the documentaries Gateway Sound and The Best of Us: 100 Seasons of Muny Magic. The former is an in-depth look at how a local recording studio has adapted to survive the transformation of the music industry. The Best of Us is an interview-intensive film about a more stable musical industry, the Muny. And then there’s writer/director Catherine Dudley-Rose’s film Parallel Chords, which began as a short subject featured in the 2015 edition of the showcase. DudleyRose has expanded the story into a full-length film about a young female violinist struggling to maintain her individuality under constant pressure from her father (a pianist) and the industry’s expectations for young women with talent. The director is a successful violinist in her own right, which no doubt informs the story. The St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase continues Friday through

Insight Theatre Company’s The Importance of Being Earnest opens this weekend. | JOHN LAMB Sunday for two weeks (July 13 to 22). All screenings take place at Washington University’s Brown Hall (Forsyth Boulevard and Chaplin Drive; www.cinemastlouis.org). Tickets are $10 to $13.

SATURDAY 07/14 Amazing Taco Race Bacon’s days in the spotlight are over, and the new food of the moment is the humble taco — but how far would you go to hunt down a great one? The Amazing Taco Race is a scavenger hunt that rewards the clever with tacos. From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, July 14, teams and individuals will attempt to solve a series of clues that lead them to the next delicious taco, each hidden in a business or restaurant along Cherokee Street. The event is a benefit for Casa de Salud, a local nonprofit that facilitates mental-health service for uninsured patients. Participants get their pick of three meat or vegetarianfriendly tacos, a dessert and the

option of adult beverages. Register at www.facebook.com/friendsdecasadesalud for more information about the starting point and other rules. Tickets are $20 to $35.

comedy of manners and language at the expense of that rarest of breeds, the upper-crust ninny. Insight Theatre Company commences with the drollery at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (July 12 to 22) at the Grandel Theatre (3610 Grandel Square; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $15 to $35.

SATURDAY 07/14 The Importance of Being Earnest WEDNESDAY 07/18 Algernon Moncrief is a member of London society at the end of Annie the nineteenth century, which means his job is mainly dressing well and maintaining an air of sophisticated boredom at all times. His friend Jack leads a similar life, only he does it from his country estate. Jack’s young female ward, Cecily, lives with him at the estate, and as an instructive measure he tells her stories of his “brother” Ernest’s debauchery. But Ernest doesn’t exist, and the exploits are actually Jack’s, who in truth is as idle as Algernon. When Algernon learns of Jack’s ploy, he sees an opportunity to get his foot in the door at the country estate. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 play The Importance of Being Earnest is a

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Annie, the musical story of a spunky, Depression-era orphan who awakens the paternal instinct of a millionaire industrialist just in time for Christmas, is a perennial favorite. It has two knock-out songs (“Hard Knock Life” and the relentlessly optimistic “Tomorrow”), a well-defined heroine and a charmingly retro setting. There’s also a role for a dog, and that never hurts a show. The Muny in Forest Park (www.muny.org) continues its 100th season with the heartwarming Annie. Performances are at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday, July 18, through Wednesday, July 25. Tickets are $15 to $100. n

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STAGE

Eric Dean White delivers a subtle, nefarious performance in “The Fourth Reich.” | PATRICK HUBER

[REVIEW]

Less Than Perfect This year’s LaBute festival gets off to an uneven start Written by

PAUL FRISWOLD LaBute New Theater Festival Part one presented by St. Louis Actors’ Studio through July 15 at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35.

A

fter five successful years of the LaBute New Theater Festival, St. Louis knows what to expect: a half-dozen new short plays from emerging and established playwrights, plus one from the fest’s namesake, presented by a “house company” in two separate programs. LaBute’s contribution is part of both. But this year provides something new: St. Louis Actors’ Studio artistic director William Roth’s pre-show remarks note that some of these plays are “works in progress.” I don’t recall similar warnings in previous years, and hear-

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ing that on opening night felt like a reminder to not judge a draft on the same curve as a finished piece. Unfortunately, the strange opening proved a necessary one; some plays definitely did not feel like complete thoughts. LaBute’s “The Fourth Reich” opens the show with a chill and a shudder. A man (Eric Dean White) dressed in tan and beige sits in a comfy chair and delivers a wellpolished series of statements about Hitler. He willingly concedes that Hitler lost the war because “he made some mistakes,” but takes mild umbrage that now he’s “the most maligned man in history.” White delivers these thoughts with a friendly smile and calm voice, reminding us of Hitler’s pre-war accomplishments and all he did for Germany. It’s an insidious monologue that relies on White’s kind face and smooth voice to mask the man’s own prejudices and racism. “I’m not shouting,” the man continually reminds us. He lists some other genocides and the bloody hands of some other great man, then circles back to disdainfully cry, “But the precious Jews!” It’s a momentary lapse into his true feelings that hammers home an ugly truth about our current state of affairs. Some of those “good people” on the other side can pass for human, if you only listen to how they state their beliefs and not what they’re

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Erin Brewer (center) is haunted by “might-have-beens” in “Shut Up and Dance.” | PATRICK HUBER actually saying. The next play, “Shut Up and Dance,” suffers for following such a crackling work. Barbara Blumenthal-Ehrlich’s story of a mother and daughter deals with fallout from a political protest. The daughter (Erin Brewer) is a Rockette, or recently was; she quit after refusing to perform at the Trump inauguration, or perhaps was forced out after she stated her opposition on social media. Now she’s driving aimlessly away from NYC, haunted by a pair of imaginary cheerleaders/dancers (Colleen Backer and Carly Rosenbaum, wearing tutus and “the future is female” shirts) and checking in with her mother (Margeau Steinau). Matters are derailed by a long conversation about a commercial that uses a Beyonce song and the singing of the song’s chorus. Things just taper off after that, wrapping up with what I’m guessing is the song under discussion. I understand that Beyonce is hugely empowering for women, but relying on her star power feels like shorthand for an actual ending. Norman Kline’s “Advantage God” is a farce about the day the 99 percent rise up to wage war on the one percent. Eric Dean White and Colleen Backer are a married pair of tennis-loving yuppies who react to the armed invasion of their gated community with the studied calm of the monied class.

After all, why should they care about economic oppression now — they’re rich, and that sort of thing never affects them. Kline has a keen ear for dialogue and a keener sense of the people he’s mocking. White and Backer are surrounded by insurgents, gunfire and explosions rock their home, and yet these two plan to go down swinging … tennis rackets. An unexpected bit of deus ex machina results in a lecture from God himself (Reginald Pierre provides the disembodied voice) about the meaning of life. It only gets stranger from there. Unfortunately, there’s still one more show to go. James McLindon’s “Hipster Noir” is a parboiled detective story about a private eye (Reginald Pierre) who works in a hip Brooklyn coffee shop. He’s hired to find the man who stole from an artisanal crafter of artificial beards (they’re for hipsters with alopecia). Pierre is one of St. Louis’ most powerful actors, but there’s not much for him to do here. He delivers some hardbitten narration and flirts with the bombshell who hired him (Carly Rosenbaum), but it’s a one-note story driven by hatred for hipsters — and that’s not enough to carry it through to the ending. It’s a soft thud of a finale for the first half of LaBute Fest. One can only hope the second half can carry a double load. n


FILM [REVIEW]

The Outsiders Debra Granik tells the story of a family gone off the grid Written by

ROBERT HUNT Leave No Trace Directed by Debra Granik. Written by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini. Based on the book by Peter Rock. Starring Thomasin McKenzie and Ben Foster. Now showing at the Landmark Plaza Frontenac Cinema.

I

t can only be coincidence that just a few weeks after the modest success of First Reformed, the summer of superhero-fueled carnage is again interrupted by a quiet, contemplative film about human behavior, one that says more by saying less. Leave No Trace is director Debra Granik’s first film since the acclaimed Winter’s Bone eight years ago. It is another intimate study of the kind of people who fall out of the range of most movies, though it has a slightly more optimistic tone. Based on Peter Rock’s novel My Abandonment, Leave No Trace is the story of father-and-daughter team Will and Tom, first seen living more or less comfortably off the grid in a makeshift tent in Oregon’s aptly-named Forest Park. When they’re discovered by the outside world and pulled back into society, they begin a journey that changes their relationship and raises questions about how and where (and why) people choose to live. Just as Will and Tom have survived by making a second nature of silence and a quick awareness of their surroundings, Granik tells their story through long quiet spells and observation of environmental details. As she follows them in and out of their wild world, she shows a natural landscape that remains self-sufficient but is slowly slipping away, showing felled trees, teams of loggers and the detailed process by which pine trees are chopped, processed

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and wrapped in plastic wire to be sold for Christmas display. In contrast, when the pair return briefly to Portland, Granik turns the city into a harsh terrain of steel and wires that could pass for the modernist utopia of a 1930s science fiction film, even taking advantage of the real but retro-futuristic air tramway that serves the city’s waterfront. The story is filtered through the perception of thirteen-year-old Tom, played by New Zealand-born Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie. McKenzie, who is actually about five years older than her character, gives an extraordinary performance, visibly transforming into a mature, self-aware adult as she gradually learns to navigate the chasm between her back-to-nature upbringing and the traces of the unnatural world around her. Tom’s awakening guides the film, but neither she or Granik 1301 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO lose sight of her father’s chosen path and his uneasiness. Ben Foster plays Will with a subdued, trapped-animal nervousness, and you can sense real disgust when, during a brief moment of confine16345 COMICS CENTRAL AD_RFT.indd 1 ment, he complains about “wearing their clothes and eating their food.” Tom realizes that her father is an outsider, a cultural anomaly, but neither she nor the film pass judgment. Though Granik provides just enough information to draw a few conclusions about his past — he’s a veteran and a widower — she avoids easy psychoanalysis. His unrest is purely existential. Granik is equally scrupulous about avoiding any trace of sentimentality or melodrama, even of anything that could be considered traditionally confrontational. Leave No Trace seems cool and casually observant for most of its 109 minutes, but that’s misleading. The film pulls the viewer into the lives of Will and Tom and their natural-yet-strange cultural collision so carefully that the ending sneaks up with a surprising emotional resonance. Granik and her cast so skillfully establish the way Tom and her father rely on each other that you can almost feel that weird combination of both traditional family bonds and a shellshocked cat’s cradle of spiritual co-dependency. n

JULY 14

10 A.M.–3 P.M. / CENTRAL LIBRARY

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CAFE

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[REVIEW]

Cider House Rules Brick River Cider brings a buzzy beverage to town — and a solid food menu, too Written by

CHERYL BAEHR Brick River Cider 2000 Washington Avenue, 314-224-5046; Tues.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight; Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. (Closed Mondays.)

R

uss John likes to tell the story of the two bottles of cider he has stashed at his apple orchard in southeastern Nebraska. Made during Prohibition by his great-grandfather, they would surely be vinegar if he cracked them open, but drinking them is not the point. Instead, they sit as a reminder not only of his family’s cider-making legacy but of what the beverage once was and could again be. That spirit animates Brick River Cider, the ciderworks, tasting room and restaurant John opened in February. Though it is John’s first restaurant, he is no stranger to business, having achieved success in everything from consulting to children’s retail. When his wife, Sharon Price John, was hired in 2013 as president and CEO of Build-a-Bear Workshop, John moved from Boston to St. Louis, continuing to run his toy company while doing some consulting for a local venture-capital firm. Cider, however, was in John’s blood, and he could not shake the feeling that he wanted to do something to honor that legacy. Living in the Midwest, he was much closer to his family’s 150-year-old Nebraska orchard. That connection inspired him to pursue his passion. Still, his cidery didn’t happen overnight. A consummate strategist, John spent four years analyzing the market before he committed to taking the leap. His research uncovered an industry poised for

Highlights at Brick River Cider include the house burger, cider-brined wings, “Damascus Flatbread” and, of course, a flight of cider. | MABEL SUEN

a comeback, one that had a storied history and even outshone beer in the pre-Prohibition days. It was only when militant teetotalers burned to the ground most of the country’s hard cider orchards in those dark, alcohol-free days of the 1920s and early ’30s that the industry screeched to a halt. It proved unable to recover. Beer did recover. It replaced hard cider as the country’s beverage of choice, a phenomenon that ultimately led to the craft-beer explosion of the last few decades. John, like many entrepreneurs on the coasts, sees cider as following that same path, especially as speculation grows that the craft-beer industry has become oversaturated. These entrepreneurs see cider as an opportunity to provide something equally artisanal but decidedly different. After deciding to take the leap in 2017, John scoured the city for the right location to open Brick River Cider’s production facility and tasting room. He found it in an old firehouse just west of downtown — a massive, two-story building that

took nearly a year to renovate. The space is stunning, its most striking feature the large, refurbished garage doors that give an indoor-outdoor feel to the downstairs tasting room. White vintage tile covers the walls, the bar sits to the back, and a mix of wooden communal and high-top tables provide seating. On one of those rare, cool summer evenings, a gentle breeze fills the room, making it one of the more attractive places in town to enjoy a beverage. The attractive downstairs space feels complete on its own, but it’s not the full package. Upstairs is a vast, open room filled with tables and historical photographs of the city’s brick-making heyday (the inspiration for Brick River’s name). It’s also the site of the kitchen, from which the cidery serves a simple menu of sharable plates, sandwiches and salads. Developed by chef consultant Chris Lee and currently executed by kitchen manager Samantha Lauer, the menu is a refined take on American pub fare meant to complement the real star of the show, the cider.

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Usually, it does that well, as in the case of the “Damascus Flatbread,” a rustic, crispy-edged crust bejeweled with candied apricots and spice walnuts. The sweet stone fruit cuts through the funk of the accompanying goat cheese for an appetizer that is every bit as bright as what’s being served on tap. The Brussels sprouts salad is another standout, not so much because it breaks any molds but because of how well its flavors embody the tart, refreshing spirit of cider. The sprouts are shaved thin and accented with pickled cranberries that almost pop with juice when bitten into. Candied pecans and coriander vinaigrette add spice and crunch to an excellent offering. Brick River’s burger is solid, consisting of two smashed patties that have a pleasant, crispy seared coating. Melted cheddar seals the patties, which are cradled in a pillow-soft brioche bun. It’s as quintessentially American as apple pie — or cider. The kitchen does Italian-

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Brick River’s mac and cheese combines three cheeses and cavatappi noodles. | MABEL SUEN

BRICK RIVER

Continued from pg 27

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inspired fare just as well. Mushroom risotto may be the cidery’s best offering, a flawless concoction of Arborio rice, peas and mushrooms that is a master class in the rice dish. The risotto is creamy but has texture, and little flecks of scallions, garlic and shallots provide pops of mouthwatering flavor. You’d be pleased if you were served this at an upscale Italian restaurant. Grilled cheese, dressed with truffle oil, mushrooms, spinach, gruyere, fontina and brie, is a sophisticated, all-grown-up take on a classic. Cider-braised pork shoulder on grilled rustic bread is tender and juicy. It was dressed with mushrooms and spinach, though these did not provide enough sweetness or oomph. It was good enough, but with a sauce or sweet condiment, it could be a standout. The “French Onion Chicken” sandwich has a similar issue. The flavors, as they stand, are excellent: Gruyere and sherry-caramelized onions are slathered atop grilled chicken, infusing the sandwich with sweetness and earth. I wanted more, though. Even with a basil-garlic remoulade coating the bread, the sandwich begged for more of that wonderful onion concoction. Give me a double scoop, and this might be my go-to order. Give me Brick River’s cauliflower risotto, however, and I might not notice anything else on the table. This luxurious side dish substitutes the vegetable for rice without skipping a beat, retaining a slightly crunchy texture. Diced

sun-dried tomatoes and scallions cut through the richness and infuse every bite with their flavor. Forget cider; John could rebrand as Brick River Risotto Works without skipping a beat. But then we would miss out on the exciting beverages that are Brick River’s true raison d’etre. Four options are currently on offer, the “Homestead” and “Cornerstone” serving as flagships. The former is a tart, cloudy farmhouse-style cider evocative of an apple-kissed unlfiltered wheat beer; the latter a dry, effervescent beverage that is an embodiment of craft cider. My favorites, however, were the two limited-edition ciders on tap. A hibiscus- and sour-cherryinfused rose-style cider could have doubled for a dry, sparkling rose wine, while the dry-hopped “Brewer’s Choice” is shocking in its ability to mimic a citrusy IPA. Head cider-maker Evan Hiatt has clearly found the winning formulas. John has as well. A businessman at heart, he clearly has his finger on the pulse of an industry that is on the cusp of exploding in this craft-beverage-loving city. But what makes Brick River so special is less about him seeing a potentially lucrative opportunity and more that he’s seized it in a way that honors his family. Even if he never cracks open those bottles of cider, you can taste his greatgrandfather’s legacy in what he has put together at Brick River Cider — and even though the cider may be off-dry, nothing tastes sweeter than that.

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SHORT ORDERS

watching so much television at a young age. Watching The Real World seasons one, two and three, listening to Andrew Dice Clay when I was six years old — I took a deep dive at a young age and was shaped by that.” In fact, that passion is what’s pushing Smale to look into launching a hospitality-consultancy firm, one where he’d use his skills at marketing to help others. Part of what is allowing Smale to consider this new project and rethink his role in the restaurant business is that he has a team he trusts. With chef Ryan McDonald competently running Good Fortune’s kitchen, Smale can be out front, working the room and generating enthusiasm. It’s a hustle he knows he is good at, even though he now realizes it doesn’t define him. “Society tells us that we have to always hustle and grind to be successful, but you don’t,” Smale insists. “I have been chasing what is next for so long that when I get to the ‘what’s next,’ I expect it and am over it. It’s tiring. What’s it going to take for us to realize that now is enough?” Smale took a minute to share his perspective on the St. Louis foodand-beverage scene and how his daily rituals have changed over the last few months — even if his love of pizza, brownies and Lion’s Choice remains steadfast.

[SIDE DISH]

Corey Smale Is Happy to Be the Hype Man Written by

CHERYL BAEHR

O

n the surface, Corey Smale seemed to have it all. Armed only with a marketing background and no restaurant experience, he helped to create a food phenomenon, propelling the business he founded, Strange Donuts, into one of the city’s most recognizable brands. The gig would thrust him into the ranks of the city’s entrepreneurial elite and give him a platform to go in whatever direction his heart desired. However, deep down, something was off. “The success of Strange Donuts early on was my anxiety going crazy,” Smale explains. “I was pushing it and directing it into cool marketing, but really, it was me going crazy running it. I think about that a lot.” That thought didn’t register with Smale, however, until last April, six days into the opening of his new concept, the “new American Chinese” eatery Good Fortune (1641 D Tower Grove Avenue, 314-726-4666). Thinking he was having a heart attack, he went to the hospital and was instead diagnosed with a panic attack. It wasn’t that the stress of the opening had gotten to him; anyone who has ever visited Strange Donuts when the doors open at 9 p.m. on a Friday night knows Smale has been in some high-pressure situations. Rather, it was the realization that he was out of his depth in the restaurant he’d just opened and that he could not get to where he needed to be without making some serious life changes — an existential crisis, smack-dab in the middle of a grand opening. “What I’m doing now is way more focused and refined and

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Corey Smale says giving up weed has made his hectic work life possible. | CORY MILLER

serious — fun, but I had to be in the right mental state to handle it,” Smale explains. “Six days in, I realized that I couldn’t keep doing what I was doing. It was either change the concept or change me, so I had to change me. I have too many people counting on me to mess this up.” Smale is open about what those changes entail, mainly that he gave up smoking marijuana. For the past ten years, he says, his habit was allconsuming; he would “get fucked up all day, every day.” Now that he has a clear head, he’s been able to be more focused, disciplined and reflective — and that has allowed

him to understand his motivation for getting into the business and what that means for his future. That motivation, first and foremost, is the marketing side of the industry. Smale does not beat around the bush; he admits that Strange Donuts was, first and foremost, about the hype, not doughnuts. But he’s come to terms with the fact that he likes being the hype man and sees a place for that role in the restaurant business. “I know I am in the restaurant business, but sometimes I feel like I don’t belong there,” Smale muses. “I have an obsession with culture and media that stems from

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What is one thing people don’t know about you that you wish they did? I stopped smoking weed for good. What daily ritual is non-negotiable for you? My days have become increasingly more regimented. I wake up, walk my dogs, make sure we have money, drink some OJ, sauna/swim/steam, then I take on the day at 11 a.m. I’ve stopped taking meetings after 6 p.m., too. If you could have any superpower, what would it be? Unlimited empathy. What is the most positive thing in food, wine or cocktails that you’ve noticed in St. Louis over the past year? Younger heads getting involved, earlier than ever. We just launched a dinner series called Young Blood where Ryan works with line cooks around the city to showcase the talent coming

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[FIRST LOOK]

The Comfort of the Middle East, in the West End Written by

LEXIE MILLER

W

hen Ahmed Hameed opened Levant (386 N. Euclid Avenue, 314-833-4400) June 1, he wanted to give St. Louis something he believed was lacking in the area — a Middle Eastern restaurant like the ones at home in Damascus, Syria. So, Levant now serves the Central West End what he describes as Middle Eastern comfort food. “We serve healthy comfort food,” Hameed says. Not only is the food at Levant authentic to the eastern Mediterranean region of the Middle East, it is also healthy and something you can eat every day, Hameed says. There are many vegetarian and some vegan options on the menu. Hameed, who co-owns the restaurant with his brother Aboud Alhamid, first gained a passion for food at fourteen when he began cooking school in Syria. He later went on to get his bachelor’s degree in business. He has not only lived in Syria, but moved to Thailand before coming to Missouri in early 2015. After working as a chef at Ranoush in the Delmar Loop with his brother, he decided to branch out and start something unlike the other Middle Eastern eateries in town. While Ranoush is similar to other places in the St. Louis area, he believes Levant is something for people to try and fall in love with. “It’s a new taste for people,” he says. Levant still serves staples like falafel and hummus, but Hameed puts his own twist on things, serving many dishes that cannot be found anywhere else. That includes Hameed’s personal favorite on the menu, the kibbeh labaneh, which is meatballs in a yogurt sour-cream sauce. Other popular dishes include the mixed grill, with several meats and veggies, and the dawood basha, or

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Levant’s vegetarian platter offers a bounty of classic Syrian menu items. | LEXIE MILLER Lebanese meatballs braised in tomato sauce. Levant is located in the Euclid Avenue storefront that previously held Kopperman’s. It has a large outdoor patio, and inside is a full bar, an area with couches for latenight lounging and a casual dining room, its walls hung with tapestries. It is a sit-down restaurant, but one where families with small

COREY SMALE Continued from pg 31

up in St. Louis. Social media has changed every game, and the next generation totally sees and feels that. There’s more room for everyone to shine. What is something missing in the local food, wine or cocktail scene that you’d like to see? More eaters! For its size, St. Louis has a ton of incredible cooks and concepts, but often we’re all competing for the same number of customers every night. I love seeing the number of diners, especially in St. Louis city, on the

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children would feel welcome. Along with dinner, Levant also offers a full bar menu and hookah on the patio at night. There is also a DJ on Friday and Saturday nights, and Sunday nights are dedicated to salsa dancing. “We have the best falafel,” Hameed says. “And hookah,” chimes in his girlfriend.

While some of the dishes are on the pricey side, between $15 to $20, they are large portions that generally include sides like rice and pita along with the main course. A few traditional Middle Eastern desserts are also on the menu. Levant is open Monday through Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. and Friday through Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. n

rise to catch up with all the good food that’s available. Who is your St. Louis food crush? Zoe Robinson. Who’s the one person to watch right now in the St. Louis food scene? Luke Cockson [general manager of Good Fortune] is the most gracious, down-to-earth dude I’ve met in this industry. And he’s totally ours so don’t even think about it. Which ingredient is most representative of your personality? Five-spice. If you weren’t working in the restaurant business, what would you be doing?

Starting a hospitality-consulting agency with a couple of my closest mentors and friends. Wait, I am. More on that soon … Name an ingredient never allowed in your restaurant. I don’t make that call; ask Ryan. What is your after-work hangout? My wife, my bathtub, WWE Network. What’s your food or beverage guilty pleasure? Frozen pizza, soda, brownies, cookies ... this is starting to sound like my grocery list. What would be your last meal on earth? Lion’s Choice. n


[MEDIA]

When Haute Cuisine Came to Small Town, Missouri Written by

CHERYL BAEHR

T

he trailer for Bret Hoy’s new short documentary film, “Lingua Francas,” opens with chef Daniel Ernce on the Copenhagen metro, headed to his job at the acclaimed restaurant 108. As the doors of the train open, scenes of the European capital come into view — a seaside metropolis that couldn’t be farther from Ernce’s pastoral hometown of Springfield, Missouri, and the pop-up series, Progress (www. progresspopups.com), he began just one year prior to leaving for the Danish city. Ernce, however, would contest the presumption that there is something inherently different between Springfield and Copenhagen, at least in terms of how people want to eat. The universality of the desire for thoughtful, quality food is not just the subject of Hoy’s documentary but also the spirit that animates Progress, which is catching serious buzz for its fearlessness in preparing haute cuisine for a middle-American audience. For Ernce, though, the key to his success is less fearlessness than it is offering Springfield a refined taste of food that is unique to that part of the world — something he has noticed an increasing demand for over the years. “There has been this big shift in the food scene here in the past five years,” Ernce explains. “Back then, I couldn’t tell you about what it would look like today, but here we are with people interested in delving deeper and realizing that food is so much more than something you put in your mouth. People are much more openminded and less averse to trying new things.” “Lingua Francas” follows Ernce and his Progress team — general manager Cassidy Rollins and

From left, Progress’ front-of-house manager Cassidy Rollins, beverage director Michael “Jersey” Schmitz and chef Daniel Ernce. | ANA ELLIOTT

beverage director Mike “Jersey” Schmitz — as they communicate their culinary vision to the diners of Springfield. However, Ernce’s journey began long before Hoy’s film crew came to town. Ernce grew up in the kitchen (his mother loved to cook) and gained an awareness of food at a young age. Then, at eighteen, he moved to Australia for ten months and lived in a home with ten other people, none of whom could cook. Ernce found himself making dinners for the group and realized that this was something he wanted to pursue. In college, he studied professional writing, with dreams of ghostwriting cookbooks. But between his junior and senior year, he realized that he did not want to be a ghostwriter; he wanted to write cookbooks of his own. He added a culinary minor to his coursework and began working for a Springfield innovation firm, Food IQ. After being pushed into attending culinary school, Ernce realized he wanted to do his own thing. One night he got to talking with a bartender who suggested they do a pop-up together. Unbeknownst to them, the bar’s owner had been having an almost identical conversation with the chef. At

that moment, Progress was born. One year into the pop-up, Ernce had the opportunity to pursue an internship at 108, the Michelinstarred restaurant that was the casual spinoff of chef Rene Redzepi’s temple to Nordic cuisine, Noma. The experience would shape Ernce and Progress, though ultimately his Springfield roots proved just as critical. They remain the soul of the concept, no matter how high end or innovative it may appear. “I think the reason we are who we are has a lot to do with figuring out our own identity and tapping into our time and place and who we are,” Ernce explains. “It’s filtering what is available locally through your own voice as a chef, whether that’s humble country food or exquisite plant-driven food or modern American.” As Ernce sees it, the interest in what he and his partners are doing is part of a larger cultural phenomenon. “I feel like the Midwest, particularly the Ozarks, is poised for an evolution in the dining world, because if you look at pop culture over the last few years, it is starting to focus on the region,” Ernce explains. “It started with Winter’s Bone, then Gillian Flynn’s books

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like Gone Girl and now even the series Ozark. It’s been interesting seeing pop culture narrow its view on this region while at the same time food culture is doing the same. We see it as a stage for us to step up to.” For now, that stage is Hoy’s documentary, which is part of this year’s St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. The annual Cinema St. Louis event runs July 13 through July 22 at Washington University; “Lingua Francas” is part of the “documentary shorts” program on July 21 at 2:30 p.m. Though Ernce didn’t seek out Hoy — or, for that matter, any of the recognition Progress has received — the chef sees “Lingua Francas” as capturing the story he and his team are trying to tell, even if he didn’t know what that was when filming began. Now, though, it’s quite clear. “We’re trying to contribute something meaningful to the dining scene. Not forcing high-end dining culture onto Springfield, but to show people there is more to eat besides meat and potatoes and steaks the size of your head,” Ernce says. “We’re an outlet that shows people that there is more. We want to see change, but that won’t happen on its own.” n

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CULTURE [PREVIEW]

Jay E Is Ready for His Closeup Written by

DANIEL HILL

F

rom the outside, Jason Epperson’s house in St. Peters is largely indistinguishable from those of his suburban neighbors. But covering the walls inside is something those neighbors almost certainly don’t have: dozens of platinum and gold plaques. “I think that there’s probably like 30, if you add ’em all up,” says Epperson of the decorations in his home recording studio. “There’s a lot of albums that aren’t here. I got a Kanye West plaque coming soon too. They had used some of ‘E.I.’ on the last one, the Pablo one. So that’s coming in. And then there was like some Funkmaster Flex and some other albums I don’t have hanging up, just ’cause of space and tracking them all down and whatnot.” Epperson, better known in the music world as Jay E, rose to prominence in the early 2000s as the producer for Nelly and the St. Lunatics, helping to create what is now known in hip-hop as the St. Louis sound. His work on Nelly’s breakout, Country Grammar, brought him his biggest accolade to date: a diamond certification denoting 10 million records sold. “It’s very rare, especially in hiphop,” Epperson, 39, says of the award statue, which sits to the left of the computer monitor in the basement studio. “And then,” he adds, pointing to the right of the screen, “Nellyville is right on its ass, so hopefully I get to put the other one here.” After nearly twenty years in the game and loads of industry recognition for his work, Epperson is doing something he’s never done before: releasing a solo record. The project, titled In the City, is an all-local affair featuring appearances by a slew of St. Louis artists

including Murphy Lee, Sag Live, J.R., the Writerz, Tef Poe, Bryce Green, Fresco Kane, Ebony Eyez, DJ Kut, Kyjuan, Davyne Truth, Keem, Gthesinger, Ali, Story of the Year, Chingy, Ricky Mane, Miistro Freeyo, the Knuckles, Nick Menn, Kaia and Koko. “The album is all St. Louis based, it’s all St. Louis artists and it’s all St. Louis musicians,” Epperson says. “It’s mixed here in St. Louis; all the songs were recorded here in St. Louis. So it’s pretty much all just the home base and all of these artists getting together.” Epperson got the idea to make the record after noticing that producers are increasingly releasing their own albums. Figuring he had enough pull to do the same, he reached out to a host of St. Louis acts, including all of the St. Lunatics and other well-established rappers such as Chingy and Tef Poe, as well as some up-and-comers, for a compilation album celebrating the city. “It’s a little bit of appreciation for where I’ve come from and where I’m still at, St. Louis,” Epperson says. “I think that we have a large enough amount of talent here to be the next Motown or Atlanta or whatever. I just think that we need more highlight of all of us getting together, maybe on this album or another album. It doesn’t matter how it happens. I think that we just all need to come together and just kind of work together on blowing this place up even more, musically.” Missing from the tracklist is Nelly himself. Though he was originally supposed to be involved, Epperson says that the rapper is getting ready to release a new album, and the tracks that they’ve worked on together might end up on that — in other words, scheduling conflicts proved prohibitive. One relative oddity in the mix is rock band Story of the Year, but while Epperson is best known for hip-hop, he’s worked with rock acts before. One of the gold records on his wall came from working with California-based metal band Avenged Sevenfold; he’s also done some production for Good Charlotte. “The album isn’t just one thing,” Epperson explains. “It’s hip-hop, it’s pop, it’s trap, it’s rock. I’m a music lover, so I’ve always wanted my albums to be bouncing

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Nelly’s former producer will celebrate his first solo record at the Pageant. | VIA THE ARTIST

around a lot. I grew up with rock, classic rock, and my mom listened to country and I listened to hiphop and obviously soul and R&B. So I just always wanted the album to be very versatile. Something for everybody.” Epperson also has a personal history with Story of the Year. “It’s crazy because before Country Grammar blew up they were the next street over in Overland right off of Page,” Epperson says of the band. “That’s where I met Nelly and all them. I pretty much musically was out in Overland the whole time. “There was a lot of musical talent in Overland at that time, because Country Grammar just popped, and then [Story of the Year’s] Page Avenue just blew up,” he continues. “Something was going on in Overland at that point in time. And we’ve always wanted to work together any which way, so the collaboration was long overdue.” The album saw its official release July 6. Coming in a couple

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weeks, on July 20, is a huge Red Bull-produced celebration at the Pageant dubbed “The Mind of Jay E.” Legendary California rapper E-40 will make an appearance, along with local up-and-comer Mvstermind. The idea is to include one artist who inspired Epperson — E-40 — and one who was inspired by him — Mvstermind. Other performances will be by artists on the album itself, including Chingy, Fresco Kane, Murphy Lee and the St. Lunatics. Between the show and the record, Epperson hopes he can help his favorite St. Louis artists get even a portion of the recognition he’s enjoyed over the years. “I wanna kind of give back,” he says. “Give back to the artists that I vibe out with and just try to do my best as far as giving them the spotlight, you know what I mean? I’ve had the spotlight for almost twenty years now, so it’s just like, I wanna give back. I want one of these guys to be the next big thing out of St. Louis. Or all of them to be the next big thing.” n

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[HOMESPUN]

Worth Waiting For Traveling Sound Machine releases its first new music in four years Written by

CHRISTIAN SCHAEFFER

W

hen Traveling Sound Machine released its first EP in late 2014, the band was riding high on that initial blush of intimacy and excitement that attends new relationships. Within a week of playing its first show, the many-member band was in the studio working on what would become its self-titled record. If the group couldn’t really figure out what it wanted to sound like — gypsy-pop? Indie-waltz? — that was part of the charm. “With the first EP that we released, it was one of those situations where we really wanted to get the project going right away,” lead singer and songwriter Steven Lickenbrock says. “With the first record, we definitely rushed into playing our first show and rushed into the recording. We didn’t give it enough time to sit back and think about the songs and optimize them in any way.” If the band’s first release was built on speed and assembled on the fly, its just-released follow-up The Time We Were Almost Swallowed by the Earth was borne of quite a bit more time and patience. It’s just that the nearly four-year gap between releases was more than the band intended. After accordion player Ena Selimovic left the band to focus on school, Traveling Sound Machine not only lost a key element of its klezmer- and Eastern Europeanstyled pop; the band seemed to sputter out and stopped booking gigs. Lickenbrock recalls that time as one of unrest and turmoil, both for his bandmates and for his own well-being. “We basically stopped playing for a little bit — a lot of my bandmates were going through problems at the same time,” he says. “I ended up getting diagnosed with a mental illness and I couldn’t write anymore. I was going through this process of testing out certain medications. I was just spiraling out.”

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Traveling Sound Machine drummer Steve Larson (center) and bandleader Steven Lickenbrock perform at the release party for The Time We Were Almost Swallowed by the Earth. | DESIREE TROY And while Lickenbrock makes no bones about the difficulty of righting his mental state, he found that the attendant insomnia was having a curious effect on his writing. “Over time, when I would go into this mode of no sleep, and when I would talk to my doctor or my friends or bandmates, and they would try to ask me to describe what I was feeling, I would go straight into metaphors to describe what I was feeling,” Lickenbrock says. Those metaphors, of fragile insects, trapped hummingbirds and busted elevators, found their way into a new batch of songs. Lickenbrock found his voice again, both as a singer and a songwriter, and the songs on Swallowed benefit from the focus on his journey through illness, confusion and doubt toward some hopeful resolution. “It was one of those situations where I’m gonna try my best to say everything I wanna say in less words,” says Lickenbrock. “We would go through and analyze everything and look for spots to trim it down.” If the goal was to pare back, the band didn’t quite succeed; Swallowed feels overstuffed in places, and for a seven-track album it hits the listener more like a full-length than an EP. It is to Lickenbrock’s credit that these thorny songs are performed in a captivating, unflinching fashion. His bandmates offer a lithe, atmospheric backbone for these songs much of the time, with loose

tendrils of Mellotron and open guitar chords providing a net. Elsewhere, Chris Kepley’s trumpet pierces the air and the rhythm section asserts itself. “I consider this more of a pop record,” Lickenbrock says. “I use more pop elements, and I have more room to make this really colorful arrangement. That’s something people don’t do anymore, especially with this kind of music.” Lickenbrock says that he leaned on Sparklehorse records quite a bit in making Swallowed. Mark Linkous’ project also trafficked in warbly, vintage tones and fever-dream lyrics; he likewise battled with mental illness and ultimately committed suicide in 2010. That connection isn’t lost on Lickenbrock, and his ultimate motive for this album is to provide a space for those similarly afflicted to connect with the music. In concert, Lickenbrock says, it has already started to build a network of support. “After shows and stuff, people are coming up to me and saying, ‘I suffer from severe depression and these songs help me,’” says Lickenbrock. “It was almost like I wrote and built this image where I was able to capture these feelings that people have and they can’t describe what it is.” For Lickenbrock, that kind of effect on listeners makes the gap between albums worth the wait. “If you want to make an album that really has an impact, you have to be patient,” he says. n


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38

OUT EVERY NIGHT

[CRITIC’S PICK]

Wednesday July 11 9:30PM Urban Chestnut Presents

The Voodoo Players Tribute To Van Morrison Friday July 13 9:30PM

The Mighty Pines plus Special Guests

Arkansauce

Wednesday July 18 9:30PM Urban Chestnut Presents

The Voodoo Players Tribute To The Allman Brothers Friday July 20 10PM

Matthew Sweet. | EVAN CARTER

Alligator Wine and Friends

MATTHEW SWEET

Tribute To The Music of Watkins Glen

8 p.m. Saturday, July 14. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard. $22 to $25. 314-726-6161.

Saturday July 21 10PM

Aquaducks

Horn Driven Funk from Nashville

Of all the sub-genres of rock & roll, power pop would seem the least likely to age nimbly. But here we have Matthew Sweet, one of its greatest progenitors, tunesmithing his way far past middle age, with all the gleaming harmonies and crackling guitars sounding alive and in love with the essence of power pop: melody. This year, Sweet released Tomorrow’s Daughter, his fourteenth al-

of the genre. Even the slow numbers demand humming, but mercifully there are few of those and all but one clocks in under four minutes. Though he’s hit a remarkably prolific streak (another album is rumored for fall release), he remains that rare craftsman who never overthinks the power of a pop hook. Quirky Connoisseur: Sweet’s eye for oddball art has turned into an expertise in the likes of Margaret Keane (of Tim Burton’s Big Eyes fame) and Jean Toti, aka MAIO, whose paintings adorn his latest releases.

bum and one of his purest explorations

THURSDAY 12

DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND: 8 p.m., $18-$20. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. IVAS JOHN & BRIAN CURRAN: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. MIDNIGHT RIVER CHOIR: 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. NATE LOWERY: 4 p.m., free. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. PONCÉ: w/ Morning Mtn., Orphan Welles 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. REMO DRIVE: 8 p.m., $13-$15. Blueberry Hill The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. RICH MCDONOUGH & THE RHYTHM RENEGADES: 8 p.m., free. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. ROXY ROCA BAND: 10 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. STATES & CAPITALS: w/ Forts Like Vana 6 p.m., $12-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314289-9050. THE K.G. ROBERTS BAND: w/ A Band Called Hemingway 6 p.m., $10-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

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FRIDAY 13

—Roy Kasten

THE BONBON PLOT: 7 p.m., free. Evangeline’s, 512 N Euclid Ave, St. Louis, 314-367-3644. BROTHER JEFFERSON BLUES BAND: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. CHRIS STAPLETON: w/ Marty Stuart, Brent Cobb 6 p.m., TBA. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944. CRAIG WEDREN: 8 p.m., $20-$25. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. DR. ZHIVEGAS PERFORMING THE MUSIC OF PURPLE RAIN: 9 p.m., $20-$60. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. LEROY JODIE PIERSON: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314436-5222. LUCKY OLD SONS: 8 p.m., $3. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. LUXORA: w/ Birds Of Squalor, Name It Now, Anaphora, Stefan Drinnon 7 p.m., $3-$5. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. MOUND CITY MUSIC FEST DAY 1: w/ Common Jones, Guerrilla Theory, DJ DCUPP, The Driftaways 6 p.m., $10-$15. Atomic Cowboy Pavilion, 4140 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis,


314-775-0775. NATIVE BLOOD: w/ Blastar, Van Buren 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. RON JEREMY: w/ Peter Daniels, Brandon Judd, Max Price 8 p.m., $18-$22. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. WATCH WHAT CRAPPENS: 8 p.m., $25-$75. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. WILLIAM CLARK GREEN: 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989.

SATURDAY 14

THE ALLEY TONES: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. AR’MON & TREY: 3 p.m., $18.50-$103.50. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. BIG MIKE AGUIRRE & BLUE CITY ALL STARS: 7 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BRIAN CURRAN: 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. CARA LOUISE BAND: 7 p.m., free. Das Bevo Biergarten, 4749 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314224-5521. CHIN UP, KID: w/ Rain In July, Treading Oceans, The Cinema Story, Eat. Sleep. Catapult., KerplunK 7 p.m., $8-$10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. DAVYNE TRUTH: w/ New Money, Bryce Green, Carleone Carle, Kevo, Shailynn, Cedes, Bud Locco, Lil Kev 9 p.m., $5-$10. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. EUGENE & COMPANY: 9 p.m., $3. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. GARY ROBERT AND COMMUNITY: w/ Tracing Wires, Guy Morgan and the FT Crew 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226. JC AND THE NUNS: w/ The Langaleers, Little Cowboy 9 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. JUSTICE DECAYS: w/ Life Sucks,Kill Their Past, Brute Force 8 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. KILBORN ALLEY BLUES BAND: 10 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. KUNG FU CAVEMAN: 9 p.m., free. Nightshift Bar & Grill, 3979 Mexico Road, St. Peters, 636-441-8300. MARISSA ANDERSON: 7 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. MATT “THE RATTLESNAKE” LESCH: 8 p.m., $5. Hwy 61 Roadhouse and Kitchen, 34 S Old Orchard Ave, Webster Groves, 314-968-0061. MATT MORGAN: 3 p.m., free. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. MATTHEW SWEET: 8 p.m., $22-$25. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. MOUND CITY MUSIC FEST DAY 2: w/ Monkh And The People, The Scandaleros, Brother Francis and the Soultones, DJ Trouble, Break Night 6 p.m., $10-$15. Atomic Cowboy Pavilion, 4140 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, 314-775-0775. R&B ONLY: 9 p.m., TBA. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. ROB ZOMBIE, MARILYN MANSON: 6 p.m., $29. 50-$125. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944. SCARFACE: w/ DJ Quik 8 p.m., $35-$45. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. SEAN CANAN’S VOODOO PLAYERS WHITE ALBUM 50TH ANNIVERSARY: 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. SEVEN BRIDGES ROAD: A TRIBUTE TO THE EAGLES: 7 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. SILENT PLANET: w/ My Epic, Comrades 6 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. STONE IN LOVE: A TRIBUTE TO JOURNEY: 9 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. TRAVIS TRITT: 8 p.m., $35-$55. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314-388-7777.

SUNDAY 15

ARCADIA DANCE ORCHESTRA: 8 p.m., $12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. BIG FELLA: w/ Marlin & Keylo 7 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. BOMBADIL: 8 p.m., $10. Foam Coffee & Beer,

3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. IRON MIKE NORTON: 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. LOVE JONES “THE BAND”: 8:30 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. MOE.: 8 p.m., $25-$30. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. ROCK FOR TERBROCK – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR JILL: w/ Impala Deluxe, SuperJam, Joe Dirt & the Dirty Boys, Danny Liston, Dave Glover Band 6 p.m., free. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. SIMO: 8 p.m., $12. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. THE SQUARSHERS: 11 p.m., free. Halo Bar, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-1414. TRIBUTE TO ELLA FITZGERALD & JOE PASS: 3 p.m., $8-$10. Ozark Theatre, 103 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, 314-962-7000.

It’s Always a Party!

MONDAY 16

BLIND WILLIE & BROADWAY COLLECTIVE: 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BONSAI TREES: w/ The Public, Big Tobacco 8 p.m., $8-$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. MICAWBER: 7 p.m., $8-$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. NEOROMANTICS: 7 p.m., $9-$12. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. OH WONDER: w/ Sasha Sloan 8 p.m., $25. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. TV GIRL: w/ Infinity Crush 8 p.m., $10-$12. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100.

TUESDAY 17

ATTILA: w/ Suicide Silence, Rings Of Saturn, Volumes, Spite 7 p.m., $25. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. COURTNEY BARNETT: w/ Vagabon 8 p.m., $27$30. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. HOWLIN RAIN: w/ The Mountain Movers 8 p.m., $15. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. JACKIE COHEN: 8 p.m., $10-$13. Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, 314-533-0367. PROUD PARENTS: w/ Xetas, Bucko Toby 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. S.L.I.P.: w/ Peace Talks, G.N.A.T., Newt Patrol 9 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. SORRY PLEASE CONTINUE: 8 p.m., $5. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226. ST. LOUIS SOCIAL CLUB: 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314436-5222. SWEET CRUDE: 8 p.m., $10-$13. The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-935-7003. UNSANE: w/ Dodecad, Dibiase 8 p.m., $15-$17. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

duke’s VOTED ST. LOUIS’ FAVORITE BAR & BEST SPORTS BAR AT THE CORNER OF MENARD & ALLEN IN THE HEART OF HISTORIC SOULARD

Duke’s Photos by Big Stu Media

Duke’s Sports Bar Where the Games Begin

WEDNESDAY 18

BIG RICH MCDONOUGH & RHYTHM RENEGADES: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. FOREIGNER: w/ Whitesnake, Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Evening 6 p.m., $20-$350. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944. MEPHISKAPHELES: 8 p.m., $12-$14. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. THE PRETENDERS: 7 p.m., $29.50-$129.50. Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-499-7600. ROYAL BRAT: w/ Shux, Kiki 9 p.m., $7. Blank Space, 2847 Cherokee St., St. Louis. SHORT LEASH: w/ Lucia, Morose, Brute Force 8 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. A STORY TOLD: w/ Southpaw 6 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. TORREY CASEY & SOUTHSIDE HUSTLE: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. WAYNE HANCOCK AND SCOTT H BIRAM: 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis,

Continued on pg 40

FIND OUT ALL THAT’S GOING ON @DUKESINSOULARD

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Continued from pg 39

BEST BETS

Five sure-fire shows to close out the week

FRIDAY, JULY 13 Dog Party w/ the Vigilettes, Brain Waves

9 p.m. Pizza Head, 3196 South Grand Boulevard. Free. 314-266-5400.

From its place on the hundredsdeep roster at Burger Records to its releases on the infamous Asian Man imprint, Dog Party has the full backing of the California garage rock Illuminati, and for good reason. If the fictional band in Scott Pilgrim (yes, Sex Bob-omb) has a real-life foil, it’s these two sisters, who throw down a blissed-out set of riffs and heavy backbeats. The last decade has done nothing to degrade the group’s sound, and time has only pushed the pair well beyond the worship of its forebears. The records bring a full-band approach, with Gwendolyn and Lucy Giles taking up multiple instruments while the live show fills in the gaps with fuzz and feedback.

Mound City Music Fest

6 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Atomic Cowboy Pavilion, 4140 Manchester Avenue. $10 to $15. 314-775-0775.

Few spots in St. Louis can evoke the kind of sensory overload triggered by Atomic Cowboy’s sprawling compound. The Mound City Music Fest makes full use of the space, with the finest in STL’s funk and fusion scene performing on the outdoor stage and an on-site after-party at the indoor stage. Projections stretch throughout the grounds and across the street, literally surrounding the concertgoer in audiovisual splendor under the moonlight. Hot off the release of a new record, Common Jones kicks off a Friday blowout that culminates with the electro-soul stylings of Break Night inside the Bootleg late Saturday night.

SATURDAY, JULY 14 Gaslight Studio Presents “Memory Sessions”

6 p.m. Gaslight Studio, 4916 Shaw Avenue. Free. 314-496-0628.

The event is fully streamable, so you won’t need to be physically at Gaslight’s bar/recording studio to “attend.” And either way the price of admission is the same — that is to say, it’s free — although donations are encouraged. With proceeds benefiting the Alzheimer’s Association, this unique show offers vignettes Continued on pg 41

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[CRITIC’S PICK]

LISTINGS

[WEEKEND]

314-498-6989. WESTERN MEDICATION: w/ display-only 8 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100.

THIS JUST IN ADDERALL: W/ Mom, Sat., July 21, 9 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. ANIMA/ANIMUS: W/ Unimagined, VLE, Fallen we Divide, Neither of Me, Sat., July 21, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. ASHES & IRON: W/ Not Waving But Drowning, Slow Damage, Rover, End World, Sat., Sept. 8, 7 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. BIG MIKE AGUIRRE & BLUE CITY ALL STARS: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BIG RICH MCDONOUGH & RHYTHM RENEGADES: Wed., July 18, 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-4365222. BLACK JOE LEWIS & THE HONEYBEARS: Sun., Aug. 19, 8 p.m., $22-$25. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. BLACK MOTH SUPER RAINBOW: Thu., Nov. 1, 8 p.m., $17-$20. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. BLIND WILLIE & BROADWAY COLLECTIVE: Mon., July 16, 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BOOGIE ON THE BOULEVARD: Thu., July 26, 5 p.m., free. Thu., Aug. 23, 5 p.m., free. The BoulevardSaint Louis, S. Brentwood Blvd. & Galleria Parkway, Richmond Heights, 314-558-4151. BOY HITS CAR: W/ Tone Wolf, Thu., Aug. 16, 7 p.m., $12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. BRIAN CURRAN: Sat., July 14, 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. CLOVEN HOOF: W/ Vanlade, Thu., Sept. 13, 8 p.m., $20. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. CLUSTERPLUCK: Sun., July 29, 4:30 p.m., free. Sun., Oct. 7, 4:30 p.m., free. Das Bevo Biergarten, 4749 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-224-5521. DAVID COOK: Thu., Oct. 25, 8 p.m., $18-$78. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. DIY HALLOWEEN 2018: Wed., Oct. 31, 9 p.m., TBA. RKDE, 2847 Cherokee Street, Saint Louis. ERIC HALL: W/ Primpce, Thee Oswalds, Sunwyrm, Mon., July 23, 9 p.m., $5. RKDE, 2847 Cherokee Street, Saint Louis. THE FLOOZIES: Thu., Nov. 8, 9 p.m., $22-$25. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. THE GLORIOUS SONS: Mon., Sept. 24, 8 p.m., $12$15. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. HENRY ROLLINS: Tue., Oct. 2, 8 p.m., $29.50. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. HISTORY SHMISTORY: Sun., July 22, 8 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. THE HOLLOW ENDS ALBUM RELEASE SHOW: Fri., July 27, 8 p.m., $8. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314727-4444. IMAGINE: A CITY SOIREE: Fri., Aug. 3, 7 p.m., $50. Moulin at Vin de Set, 2017 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, 314-241-4949. IRON CHIC: Tue., Sept. 18, 8 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. IRON MIKE NORTON: Sun., July 15, 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. J.I.M.M.Y.’S EXTENDED MIXTAPE LIVE: W/ Ackurate Tha Wise, RileyB, Nick Menn, Gritz Hoffa, DJ Stan Da Man, Fri., July 20, 8 p.m., $10. The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314935-7003. JARREN BENTON: W/ Kato On The Track, Fri., July 27, 8 p.m., $20-$75. Fubar, 3108 Locust St,

JULY 11 - 17, 2018

riverfronttimes.com

THE PRETENDERS

ted from the contributions of relatively

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 18. Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street. $29.50 to $129.50. 314-499-7600.

young guns like Dan Auerbach and

Forty years into her career as Pretend-

founding drummer Martin Chambers

ers’ frontwoman, Chrissie Hynde still

alongside ace guitarists James Wal-

gives off a vibe suggesting you wouldn’t

bourne (Pernice Brothers, the Pogues)

want to run into her in a dark alley.

and Eric Heywood (Tift Merritt), who

She’s never suffered fools, as more

have toured with it over the past

than a few interviewers can attest, and

decade.

that attitude lends credence to this

Off the Rails: Opening for the show

current Pretenders tour: She and the

will be the Rails, the duo of Pretenders

band have enough vitality and verve to

guitarist James Walbourne and singer

be seen as much more than a legacy

Kami Thompson.

the recently departed Richard Swift, but this iteration of the band features

act. The group’s 2016 Alone benefit-

—Christian Schaeffer

St. Louis, 314-289-9050. JASON GARMS: Thu., Aug. 2, 7 p.m., free. Thu., Aug. 30, 7 p.m., free. Element, 1419 Carroll St., St. Louis, 314-241-1674. JD MCPHERSON: Fri., Sept. 14, 8 p.m., $20. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. JOEY GRACEFFA: Sat., Oct. 20, 7 p.m., $43.50$138.50. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. KAMIKAZE KOLE: W/ Frost Money, Sat., July 21, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. KILBORN ALLEY BLUES BAND: Sat., July 14, 10 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. LE BUTCHERETTES: Wed., Aug. 15, 8 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. LOCAL H: Thu., Oct. 4, 8 p.m., $15-$18. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. LOS STRAITJACKETS: Thu., Oct. 25, 8 p.m., $20. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314498-6989. LOVE JONES “THE BAND”: Sun., July 15, 8:30 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. MAKE ME BREAK ME 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW: W/ Fly Method, Thieves to Kings, The Wild & Free., Fri., Sept. 14, 6 p.m., $7. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. MODERN GOLD RECORD RELEASE SHOW: W/ The Bad Haircuts, The Shuggah Pies, Sat., July 28, 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. OLD SALT UNION: Sat., Sept. 15, 9 p.m., $15-$18. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314588-0505. PIEBALD: Sun., Sept. 16, 8 p.m., $20-$24. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. PORCHES: W/ Girlpool, Thu., Nov. 1, 8 p.m., $18$20. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. RAMONES | CLASH | SPECIALS TRIBUTE: Fri., Aug. 31, 8 p.m., $10. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. RIVER CITY OPRY JULY EDITION: Sun., July 22, 1 p.m., $5. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. S.L.I.P.: W/ Peace Talks, G.N.A.T., Newt Patrol, Tue., July 17, 9 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. SEVEN BRIDGES ROAD: A TRIBUTE TO THE EAGLES: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. SHELBY LYNNE: Fri., Aug. 24, 8 p.m., $32-$35. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. SHORT LEASH: W/ Lucia, Morose, Brute Force, Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. SLOTHRUST: Fri., Oct. 19, 8 p.m., $16. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444.

SPACE DINGUS: W/ Dear Genre, Fri., July 20, 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. ST. LOUIS SOCIAL CLUB: Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. START MARKING SENSE: TALKING HEADS TRIBUTE: Fri., Sept. 28, 8 p.m., $10-$12. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. STONE IN LOVE: A TRIBUTE TO JOURNEY: Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. STRUNG OUT: W/ MakeWar, Thu., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $18-$20. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. SUBTRONICS: W/ Shlump, Fri., July 27, 8 p.m., $10-$20. 2720 Cherokee Performing Arts Center, 2720 Cherokee St, St. Louis, 314-276-2700. SUNFLOWER BEAN: Sun., Sept. 23, 8 p.m., $12$15. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. TALL HEIGHTS: W/ Old Sea Brigade, Frances Cone, Tue., Oct. 23, 8 p.m., $14-$16. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. THE SPILL CANVAS: Sat., Sept. 29, 8 p.m., $16$18. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. TORN AT THE SEAMS: W/ Silence the Witness, We Are Descendents, Summits, Unimagined, Sat., Aug. 18, 7 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. TORREY CASEY & SOUTHSIDE HUSTLE: Wed., July 18, 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. TRIBUTE TO ELLA FITZGERALD & JOE PASS: Sun., July 15, 3 p.m., $8-$10. Ozark Theatre, 103 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, 314-962-7000. VINCE GILL: Fri., Nov. 16, 7 p.m., $56.50-$72. Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-499-7600. WAR OF THE WINGS: Fri., July 27, 7 p.m., $10. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. WESTERN MEDICATION: W/ display-only, Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. WINO: W/ Xasthur, Sat., July 28, 8 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

THIS WEEK

THE ALLEY TONES: Sat., July 14, 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. AR’MON & TREY: Sat., July 14, 3 p.m., $18.50$103.50. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. ARCADIA DANCE ORCHESTRA: Sun., July 15, 8 p.m., $12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. ATTILA: W/ Suicide Silence, Rings Of Saturn, Volumes, Spite, Tue., July 17, 7 p.m., $25. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. BIG FELLA: W/ Marlin & Keylo, Sun., July 15,


7 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. BIG MIKE AGUIRRE & BLUE CITY ALL STARS: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BIG RICH MCDONOUGH & RHYTHM RENEGADES: Wed., July 18, 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BLIND WILLIE & BROADWAY COLLECTIVE: Mon., July 16, 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. BOMBADIL: Sun., July 15, 8 p.m., $10. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. BONSAI TREES: W/ The Public, Big Tobacco, Mon., July 16, 8 p.m., $8-$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. BRIAN CURRAN: Sat., July 14, 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. CARA LOUISE BAND: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., free. Das Bevo Biergarten, 4749 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-224-5521. CHIN UP, KID: W/ Rain In July, Treading Oceans, The Cinema Story, Eat. Sleep. Catapult., KerplunK, Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., $8-$10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. COURTNEY BARNETT: W/ Vagabon, Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $27-$30. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. DAVYNE TRUTH: W/ New Money, Bryce Green, Carleone Carle, Kevo, Shailynn, Cedes, Bud Locco, Lil Kev, Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., $5-$10. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. EUGENE & COMPANY: Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., $3. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314773-5565. FOREIGNER: W/ Whitesnake, Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Evening, Wed., July 18, 6 p.m., $20-$350. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944. GARY ROBERT AND COMMUNITY: W/ Tracing Wires, Guy Morgan and the FT Crew, Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., $7. W/ Tracing Wires, Guy Morgan And The FT Crew, Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226. HOWLIN RAIN: W/ The Mountain Movers, Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $15. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. IRON MIKE NORTON: Sun., July 15, 5 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. JACKIE COHEN: Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $10-$13. Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $10-$13. Kranzberg Arts Center,

WEEKEND Continued from pg 40 by individuals linked to the disease between performers whose music will focus on the cause. Songwriter Gavin M leads a lineup of local artists for this fundraiser, which runs in a tight twohour span from 6 to 8 p.m. More details can be found at act.alz.org/goto/ gaslightmemorysessions.

Ar’mon & Trey

3 p.m. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Avenue. $18.50 to $103.50. 314-833-3929.

Singing covers on Vine might not seem like the most obvious first stop on the road map to success, but it’s hard to argue with the kind of trajectory shown by, say, Justin Bieber. Sure, the details here are different, but Ar’mon & Trey are poised for the mainstream with the recent release of the Long Story Short EP. Some of the band’s younger viewers — the ones here for the pranks and personal sidebars — might not get the new, diamond-studded R&B songs, but the duo’s longtime subscribers

501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, 314-533-0367. JC AND THE NUNS: W/ The Langaleers, Little Cowboy, Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. JUSTICE DECAYS: W/ Life Sucks,Kill Their Past, Brute Force, Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314328-2309. KILBORN ALLEY BLUES BAND: Sat., July 14, 10 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. KUNG FU CAVEMAN: Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., free. Nightshift Bar & Grill, 3979 Mexico Road, St. Peters, 636-441-8300. LOVE JONES “THE BAND”: Sun., July 15, 8:30 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. MARISSA ANDERSON: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. MATT “THE RATTLESNAKE” LESCH: Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $5. Hwy 61 Roadhouse and Kitchen, 34 S Old Orchard Ave, Webster Groves, 314-968-0061. MATT MORGAN: Sat., July 14, 3 p.m., free. Hammerstone’s, 2028 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 314-773-5565. MATTHEW SWEET: Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $22-$25. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. MEPHISKAPHELES: Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $12$14. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. MICAWBER: Mon., July 16, 7 p.m., $8-$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. MOE.: Sun., July 15, 8 p.m., $25-$30. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. NATIVE BLOOD: W/ Blastar, Van Buren, Fri., July 13, 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. OH WONDER: W/ Sasha Sloan, Mon., July 16, 8 p.m., $25. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. THE PRETENDERS: Wed., July 18, 7 p.m., $29.50$129.50. Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-499-7600. PROUD PARENTS: W/ Xetas, Bucko Toby, Tue., July 17, 9 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. R&B ONLY: Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., TBA. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314833-3929. ROB ZOMBIE, MARILYN MANSON: Sat., July 14, 6 p.m., $29.50-$125. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944. ROCK FOR TERBROCK – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR JILL: W/ Impala Deluxe, SuperJam, Joe Dirt

Continued on pg 43

Always Fun and Games on the Patio

duke’s duke’s

have literally grown up alongside them.

Marisa Anderson w/ Zak Marmalefsky

Photos by Big Stu Media

7 p.m. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 South Jefferson Avenue. $7. 314-772-2100.

Marisa Anderson hammers new shapes out of traditional guitar music with an approach that seems familiar while still feeling wholly free of genre. That’s not to say there isn’t a distinct vibe here, but Anderson’s malleable style fits equally in the canon of both Americana and avant-garde. Floating between a keen sense of structure and a stream-of-consciousness approach, Anderson speaks through a six-string and, on occasion, keys. The Portland composer just released Cloud Corner through Thrill Jockey, committing her long, winding trail of experimental guitar to vinyl, CD and digital formats. —Joseph Hess Each week we bring you our picks for the best concerts of the weekend. To submit your show for consideration, visit riverfronttimes. com/stlouis/Events/AddEvent. All events subject to change; check with the venue for the most up-to-date information.

STL’s Hottest Dance Party! THURS - FRIDAY - SATURDAY FIND OUT ALL THAT’S GOING ON @DUKESINSOULARD

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$6 b

40+ restau m o r f s r e ra urg

nts

JULY 30-AUGUST 5 P RES E NTE D B Y Atomic Cowboy | Bar Louie | Big Daddy’s | Blueberry Hill | The Blue Duck | Bomber O’Brien’s Bootleggin’ BBQ | Brew Hub | Cafe Piazza | Capitalist Pig | Carnivore | Concord Grill Corner Street Food | The Dam | Duke’s | Dulaney’s | Evangeline’s | Frida’s | Good Times Grill Good Times Saloon | Growler USA | Hamburger Mary’s | Hi Pointe | Hot Shots Sports Bar & Grill Hwy 61 Roadhouse | J Smugs GastroPit | Layla | Maggie O’Brien’s | Maya Cafe | Milo’s | O’Connell’s Pub Peacock Loop Diner | River’s Edge Social | Sandrina’s | Saint Louis Science Center Seamus McDaniel’s | Stackhouse Pub | Stone Turtle | Trueman’s

. . . A N D M O R E TO B E A N N OU N C E D !

BURGERWEEKSTLOUIS.COM FOLLOW US • PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY • 42

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JULY 11 - 17, 2018

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[CRITIC’S PICK]

SCARFACE

and about being institutionalized and

8 p.m. Saturday, July 14. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard. $35 to $45. 314-726-6161.

depressed. He’s carried the nickname

Scarface has never really fully gotten his

brought a certain rapper named Ludac-

due, and that’s a damn shame. As one-

ris to the world (who then subsequently

third of the Texas trio the Geto Boys, his

eclipsed his mentor by leaps and bounds

“legendary rapper” status is a given, but

in terms of financial success). In short, if

somehow it has never translated into

this show doesn’t sell out, it will just be

the type of commercial success he de-

the latest in a series of injustices.

serves. Often described as “your favorite

Tonight’s the Night: Opening the show

rapper’s favorite rapper,” Scarface was

will be fellow underappreciated rapper

one of the earliest performers to rap in

DJ Quik, another from hip-hop’s golden

the first person about robbing and deal-

age. You’d be a fool to miss him.

ing drugs, about frightening his mother,

LISTINGS Continued from pg 41 & the Dirty Boys, Danny Liston, Dave Glover Band, Sun., July 15, 6 p.m., free. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. RON JEREMY: W/ Peter Daniels, Brandon Judd, Max Price, Fri., July 13, 8 p.m., $18-$22. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. ROYAL BRAT: W/ Shux, Kiki, Wed., July 18, 9 p.m., $7. Blank Space, 2847 Cherokee St., St. Louis. S.L.I.P.: W/ Peace Talks, G.N.A.T., Newt Patrol, Tue., July 17, 9 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. SCARFACE: W/ DJ Quik, Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $35$45. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. SEAN CANAN’S VOODOO PLAYERS WHITE ALBUM 50TH ANNIVERSARY: Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314498-6989. SEVEN BRIDGES ROAD: A TRIBUTE TO THE EAGLES: Sat., July 14, 7 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. SHORT LEASH: W/ Lucia, Morose, Brute Force, Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis, 314-328-2309. SILENT PLANET: W/ My Epic, Comrades, Sat., July 14, 6 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. SIMO: Sun., July 15, 8 p.m., $12. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. THE SQUARSHERS: Sun., July 15, 11 p.m., free. Halo Bar, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314726-1414.

WEEKENDS ARE FOR GOOD TIMES

“the King of the South” for years, and his work as an executive with Def Jam South

—Daniel Hill

ST. LOUIS SOCIAL CLUB: Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. STONE IN LOVE: A TRIBUTE TO JOURNEY: Sat., July 14, 9 p.m., free. Valley Park City Ball Park, 2nd St. and St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, 314-581-5720. A STORY TOLD: W/ Southpaw, Wed., July 18, 6 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. SWEET CRUDE: Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $10-$13. The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-935-7003. TORREY CASEY & SOUTHSIDE HUSTLE: Wed., July 18, 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222. TRAVIS TRITT: Sat., July 14, 8 p.m., $35-$55. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314-388-7777. TRIBUTE TO ELLA FITZGERALD & JOE PASS: Sun., July 15, 3 p.m., $8-$10. Ozark Theatre, 103 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, 314-962-7000. TV GIRL: W/ Infinity Crush, Mon., July 16, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. UNSANE: W/ Dodecad, Dibiase, Tue., July 17, 8 p.m., $15-$17. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. WATCH WHAT CRAPPENS: Fri., July 13, 8 p.m., $25-$75. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929. WAYNE HANCOCK AND SCOTT H BIRAM: Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989. WESTERN MEDICATION: W/ display-only, Wed., July 18, 8 p.m., $7. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100. WILLIAM CLARK GREEN: Fri., July 13, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-498-6989.

Voted St. Louis’ Favorite Wings & Favorite Appetizers

DJ DANCE PARTY FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE MUSIC SATURDAY AFTERNOON & NIGHT LIVE MUSIC SUNDAY-FUNDAY AFTERNOON

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SAVAGE LOVE LOPSIDERS BY DAN SAVAGE Hey, Dan: Longtime Savage Love fanboy with a bit of a conundrum — and it’s your fault! I’m a bi man in my 30s. To use Charles M. Blow’s word, my bisexuality is “lopsided.” This means that I fall in love with women exclusively, but I love to have sex with men occasionally. My current girlfriend not only approves, she likes to join in. We have a great kinky sex life, and at times we invite a hot bi dude to join us. You keep saying that to counter bisexual erasure, it is the duty of every bisexual to come out of the closet. If I were a “proper” bisexual, i.e., romantically interested in men also, that would be no problem — my family and work and social circles are extremely liberal. However, your advice to us kinksters and people in open relationships is that we probably shouldn’t come out to our parents or colleagues, since when it comes to sex, it’s advisable to operate on a need-to-know basis. While I agree with this completely — my mother doesn’t need to know my girlfriend pegs me — the rule keeps me in the closet as well. Since I’m only sexually interested in men, wouldn’t I be revealing facts about my sex life if I came out as bi? I also wouldn’t want to mislead gay men into thinking that I’m available for romantic relationships with them. So which rule is more important: the duty to come out as a bisexual or the advice to operate on a need-toknow basis when it comes to your sex life? Bisexual Leaning Out Warily There’s nothing improper about your bisexuality, BLOW — or Charles M. Blow’s bisexuality, or the bisexuality of other “lopsided” bisexuals. While the idea that bisexuals are equally attracted to men and women sexually and romantically used to be pushed by a lot of bi activists (“I fall in love with people, not genitals!”), it didn’t reflect the lived/fucked/ sucked experience of most bisexuals. Like you and Blow (heteroromantic bisexuals), many bisexuals have a strong preference for either women or men as romantic

partners. My recently “gay married” bisexual friend Eric, however, is one of those bi-romantic bisexuals. This popular misconception — that bisexuals are indifferent to gender (and more highly evolved than all those genital-obsessed monosexuals) — left many people who were having sex with men and women feeling as if they didn’t have an identity. Not straight, not gay and disqualified from bi. But thanks to bisexuals like Blow coming out and owning their bisexuality and their lopsidedness, a more nuanced and inclusive understanding of bisexuality has taken root. That nuance is reflected in bisexual activist Robyn Ochs’s definition of bisexuality: “I call myself bisexual,” Ochs says, “because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted — romantically and/or sexually — to people of more than one sex and/ or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way and not necessarily to the same degree.” Lopsided or not, BLOW, you’re a proper bisexual, and if you’re in a position to come out to your family and friends, you should. And rest assured, telling people you’re bi doesn’t mean you’re divulging details about your sex life. You’re disclosing your sexual orientation, not detailing your sexual practices. You can tell someone you’re attracted to men and women — at the same time, in your case, if not in the same way — without telling them about the hot bi dudes you and the girlfriend bed together. And if you and the girlfriend are perceived to be monogamous, and you want to keep it that way, you can allow people to continue to make that assumption. Finally, BLOW, most gay men are aware that bi guys usually aren’t romantically interested in other men. And that’s fine — so long as hetero-romantic bi guys don’t mislead us, most gay men are down to fuck. (And gay men who won’t date homo-romantic or bi-romantic men? You guys are missing out. My friend Eric was a hot, hung, adventurous catch. Congrats, Christian!) And since you’re partnered and presumed to be monogamous, you’re also presumed to be unavailable. But if you’re worried a gay friend

might hire a hit man to off the girlfriend so he can have a shot at your heart, come out to him as hetero-romantic at the same time you come out to him as bi. Hey, Dan: Bi married man here. I was always out to my wife, but two months ago, I came out to our tight circle of friends. Everyone has been supportive, and I’m glad I took this step. But on three different occasions, my wife’s best friend has loudly asked me whose cock I would most like to suck out of all the other guys at the party. My birthday is coming up, and I don’t want her there. My wife doesn’t want to offend her oldest friend, and she makes excuses like “She was drunk” or “She was only joking.” I told my wife that I wouldn’t be coming to my own birthday party if her friend was invited, but she invited her anyway “by accident.” (She sent the invite via group text.) She doesn’t want to confront or disinvite her friend because that would be awkward. What do we do? Her Unthinking Buddy Bad Yucks Here’s what you’re going to do, HUBBY: You’re going to ask your wife how she would feel if a friend of yours was sexually harassing her and you made excuses for that friend (“He was drunk!”) and then “accidentally” invited that asshole to her birthday party. Then if she won’t call her friend and retract the invitation, you do it. It will be awkward, that’s for sure, but your wife’s friend shouldn’t be spared that awkwardness. Lord knows she made things awkward for you — don’t hesitate to return the favor. Hey, Dan: I am a 23-year-old bisexual woman and I have two questions for you: (1) Is it possible to fall in love differently with women than with men? I think I am bisexual because I have been in love with some women, despite never getting past a kiss. What I find strange is that whereas with men I feel immediate attraction, with women the attraction rises after a deep friendship is formed. (2) Is it possible that I was in love with two different people at the same time? I always thought that I could be in love with only one

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person at a time, but during that short span, I was in love with both a guy who made me suffer and my best friend, a woman, who helped me with that guy. After I found a new boyfriend, I stopped thinking about anyone else because our relationship is closed. But I don’t know if that’s just because I avoid thinking about others or because I wasn’t really in love with the two people (despite my surprisingly real heartbreak). Bisexual In Need And Inquiring Finally 1. See my response to BLOW, above. 2. A person can love more than one parent, more than one child, more than one sibling, more than one set of tit clamps and more than one romantic partner. Telling people they can feel romantic love for only one person at a time isn’t just stupid, it’s harmful. Let’s say Bill is partnered with Ted, and Bill believes romantic attraction/love is a one-at-a-time phenomenon because that’s what he was told. Now let’s say Bill develops a crush on Sandra. If Bill doesn’t question the one-at-a-time bullshit he was taught to believe about romantic love, Bill is highly likely to think, “Well, I must not be in love with Ted anymore, otherwise I couldn’t feel this way about Sandra,” and then he may dump tried-and-true Ted for shiny-and-new Sandra. I’m not arguing that everyone should be poly — most people want only one partner at a time, and that’s fine. But telling people they can’t experience romantic attraction or romantic love for more than one person at a time sets long-term relationships up for failure. Because while stable, lasting love feels amazing, it’s less intoxicating than shiny, new, cumdrunk love. And while almost all stable, lasting loves were shiny, new, cum-drunk loves early on, very few new loves become lasting loves. If we don’t want people tossing lasting love overboard every time they develop feelings for someone new, people need to know that, yes, you can be in love with two different people at the same time. Listen to Dan’s podcast at savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

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