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NOVEMBER 30–DECEMBER 7, 2016 I VOLUME 40 I NUMBER 48

Fallout Shelter As tension between the homeless and housed rises downtown, all eyes are on Larry Rice Written by

DOYLE MURPHY Photography by

NICK SCHNELLE

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THE LEDE

“Dottie is the wife of Ted Drewes Jr. and my grandmother. Some of the trees we sell will have a tag that says ‘Dottie Tree’ on them, because she loves the type of trees that are the perfect shape and have a good top and everything. We denote that to our customers: ‘Oh, this is a Dottie Tree; this is one that Dottie would like.’ If it’s got even one bad side, we can’t put that tag on there. She’s picky with her tree! Every year, the first one that we pick out for her she rejects, the second one she rejects and it’s usually the third one that we get right. It has to be exactly right.”

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURE

12.

Fallout Shelter

As tension between the homeless and housed rises downtown, all eyes are on Larry Rice

Written by

DOYLE MURPHY Cover by

NICK SCHNELLE

NEWS

CULTURE

DINING

MUSIC

5

21

29

39

The Lede

Calendar

Your friend or neighbor, captured on camera

Seven days worth of great stuff to see and do

8

24

What Happened to Thomas Fleming?

Doyle Murphy checks in on a five-month-old missing person case only growing more mysterious

Setback for Anti-Pot Crusaders

When prosecutors tried to push a county group to condemn medical marijuana, common sense prevailed

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Film

Robert Hunt watches Rules Don’t Apply and Manchester by the Sea

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NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Tree of Life

Cheryl Baehr adores the way Twisted Tree Steakhouse has claimed the Pear Tree’s delicious legacy

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Side Dish

Nixta’s Tello Carreon talks about falling in love .... with Missouri

34

First Looks

Sarah Fenske gets a taste of St. Louis dining history at Circa STL, while Cheryl Baehr checks out the new Herbie’s in Clayton

Find Your Voice

Syrhea Conaway owes her new a cappella album to a technical malfunction

42

Homespun

The Domino Effect Satellites

44

Out Every Night

The best concerts in St. Louis every night of the week

47

This Just In

This week’s new concert announcements

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NEWS

What Happened to Thomas Fleming? Written by

DOYLE MURPHY

F

ive months ago this week, police in Sauget discovered Thomas Fleming’s abandoned car next to a coal plant near the eastern bank of the Mississippi River. There was no sign of Fleming. The 57-year-old accountant from Kirkwood had gone missing twelve days before, on June 16, and he’s still missing today. Police on both sides of the river say they don’t know what happened to him. Investigators stress they have found no suggestion of foul play. Still, there has always been something puzzling about the way he vanished. “It’s weird,” says the missing man’s neighbor, 88-year-old Norma Etheridge. “It bothers me.” Fleming and his wife lived above Etheridge in an apartment complex on Old Big Bend Road. A big man at six feet three inches tall and 270 pounds, he was a Notre Dame grad and liked to watch his alma mater play football on TV at Mike Duffy’s Pub & Grill in Kirkwood. Staff there remembered him as a friendly, talkative patron who guzzled water by the pitcher — apparently as a way of combating his diabetes. Etheridge considered him a good neighbor. She had a soft spot for him, because he was the same age as her son. On the morning he disappeared, she saw him sitting in his car, parked outside. Fleming’s wife was gone that day and didn’t come home until evening, Etheridge says. St. Louis was in the midst of a heat wave, and Etheridge was working in the garage on some items to sell at a flea market. She estimates Fleming sat outside in his car for 30-40 minutes. Etheridge remembers thinking it was too hot to sit in that car, but Continued on pg 9

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Thomas Fleming’s Nissan was found on the Sauget waterfront, twelve days after the Kirkwood accountant went missing. | CRAIG DIETRICH/FLICKR

Prosecutors Rebuffed in Anti-Pot Plan

L

et it be known: The Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys isn’t down with weed — and the group is ready to defend prohibition even if it means opposing medical marijuana for those battling serious illnesses. As detailed in last week’s cover story, which traces the failure of Missouri’s flagship medical marijuana ballot initiative, the state association is actively opposed to cannabis legalization — despite polling that shows that more than 60 percent of Missourians would support some form of medical cannabis. Back in August, a dozen prosecutors signed their names to an affidavit declaring that marijuana is a gateway drug that “destroys children’s lives and results in addiction and a lifetime of suffering.”

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Strong words indeed. And this week, during the annual conference of the Missouri Association of Counties, or MAC, government officials from across the state rejected the prosecutors’ hard-line positions on pot. MAC is a non-profit “lobbying alliance” that represents more than 1,400 elected officials, according to its website. On November 20, during a legislative committee hearing, the prosecutors’ association submitted a resolution that sought to place MAC firmly on the side of anti-pot crusaders. According to the resolution (included later in the post), marijuana is a “dangerous psychoactive drug” with no medical value and is linked to violence, crime and child abuse. The resolution called for MAC to oppose “any legislative efforts” that would legalize or decriminalize weed — recreational or medicinal — in Missouri. The resolution passed the legis-

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lative committee, and on Monday it was brought before MAC’s full membership for a vote. But the resolution’s vilification of medical cannabis didn’t go over well. “There was quite a debate,” says MAC president-elect Wendy Nordwald, who chaired the Monday meeting. “Most people that stood up were against the resolution.” According to Nordwald and several attendees, the resolution attracted broad criticism from MAC members. Some noted how ailing family members could be treated with medical cannabis, if only it were legal in Missouri. One county commissioner recounted how her own sister had to move to a different state to obtain relief using the so-called “dangerous psychoactive drug.” It’s likely that a significant portion of MAC’s members aren’t fans of recreational marijuana, but Nordwald says that the prosecutors’ opposition to medical marijuana was a Continued on pg 10


THOMAS FLEMMING Continued from pg 8 she left him alone. She eventually retreated to her apartment to catch the 11 a.m. showing of Judge Mathis on TV. She never saw Fleming again. “If I had known anything was wrong, I would have knocked on the window and talked to him,” she says. Kirkwood police say Fleming was last seen about 11 a.m. as he drove away from his mother’s house in Glendale. What happened next is still a mystery. The state Board of Accountancy had been trying to reach Fleming on the day he disappeared. The board had previously audited him and found he had fallen behind on the training hours that accountants must complete every three years to ee t eir erti ation t s not a major sin, but the board was calling him in front of the state’s Administrative Hearing Commission to clear it up. The state sent Fleming a notice that arrived on June 16. According to a delivery receipt, someone signed for it at 11:16 a.m. — shortly after Fleming reportedly drove away from his mother’s home. It’s only about a ten-minute drive between the Glendale home and Fleming’s apartment, so he could have had time to return and sign for the package. But an attorney handling the state’s case against leming o l later n t e signature questionable. “This morning it was brought to my attention that Mr. Fleming has been reported missing,” the board’s attorney, Samantha Anne Green, wrote in an August 23 letter to the hearing commission. “Upon review o m le it also a ears t at t e green ar erti e mail re ei t on le it t e ommission or ser i e has a signature that differs from the signature for Mr. Fleming.” Green did not respond to a message seeking comment. Fleming’s wife has declined comment. Green’s skepticism about the mailing’s signature was apparently news to Kirkwood police. When the Riverfront Times contacted the original detective on the case, more than ten weeks after Fleming had gone missing, the officer said it as t e rst e ear o it t promised to pass the information on to the detective now handling the case. We forwarded Green’s letter along with a copy of the postal receipt obtained by the RFT. A mark,

like a curvy X or possibly a strangely written T, is scrawled in the signature box. Kirkwood Detective Robert Bruhy, who took over Fleming’s case, followed up shortly after. Bruhy says the investigation had not turned up anything suspicious, and the packing slip and letter had not changed that. “There is no way to verify Mr. Fleming’s signature on the USPS receipt as a forgery without personally speaking to him,” Bruhy wrote in an email. “At this time the USPS delivery receipt only suggests Mr. Fleming was home at 11:16 a.m. on June 16.” Later, on the phone, Bruhy says the case is still open, but investigators seem to have hit a dead end. No one had been using Fleming’s credit cards, and they found nothing strange in his bank accounts. His abandoned car, a gray Nissan Versa with a Panda sticker in the back window, was maybe in a strange location, but it didn’t seem to have een rifle t ro g as o l e likely in a theft or attack. In the original missing person bulletin distributed to reporters, police noted that wherever Fleming had gone, he hadn’t taken his diabetes medication. He also had a history of depression. The place where Fleming’s car was found, the waterfront in Sauget, Illinois, features a string of shipping yards and treatment plants. Video footage from one of the industrial sites nearby captured something, maybe just a person’s shadow, walking past, but you couldn’t make out who it was, authorities say. According to Kirkwood police, someone at a nearby facility recalled seeing the Nissan come and go in the days prior to Fleming’s disappearance. On June 16, it arrived and never left. Investigators wondered if Fleming had walked or fallen into the Mississippi. They sent a teletype out to agencies all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. Nothing has turned up. “There’s nothing that substantiates foul play,” Bruhy says. “There’s nothing that substantiates suicide.” Sauget Police Chief James Jones says he hadn’t heard of any previous sightings, but at least one worker in the area had reported speaking with Fleming before the disappearance. It was blazing hot outside, and Fleming was wandering along the train tracks. The worker gave him a bottle of water and then headed back to his job. “When he turned around,” Jones says, “he was gone.” n

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deal-killer. After some debate, Karen Miller, the Boone County Commissioner, proposed a motion to reject. The resolution was defeated with a voice vote. “It was a substantial yea not to adopt,” says Nordwald. She believes the resolution was too sweeping, and its passage would have placed MAC in an awkward position as an active lobbying group. “We are advocates for the Missouri taxpayer, our citizens and constituents. We typically don’t get involved in something like this,” she says. “In my mind, this is a personal issue. I have a husband who has chronic pain and the doctor has told him a million times that medical cannabis could help. That’s a personal thing, and for MAC to get involved in a personal issue isn’t what we stand for.” But for Amy Fite, the issue of medical marijuana is anything but personal. The prosecutor for ChristianCounty, Fite became president of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys in October. Fite is convinced that opposing cannabis in all its forms is the right thing to do. She points to research in Colorado indicating that the state’s legalization measures led to a spike in childhood exposure to pot. She’s concerned that the same thing could happen here in Missouri. “Legalization of marijuana is a public safety issue,” Fite says.

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And although Missouri’s lawmakers have recognized the medical benefits of cannabis oil for children ith treatment-resistant epilepsy, Fite maintains that the legislature isn’t the place to approve new medicines for public use. “The appropriate channel for that is with the FDA,” she says. “I’m certainly empathetic if there is somebody who is suffering or in pain, but all we’re asking is that it go through the proper channels.” Of course, it is the FDA’s shameful history of pushing prescription painkillers that’s contributed to an addiction epidemic that’s ravaging the country. Unlike opioids, no one is fatally overdosing on pot. But for Fife, until the FDA and federal agencies say otherwise, marijuana remains a Schedule I drug with no medicinal value. And the prosecutors’ association is illing to fight to ensure that Missouri upholds that designation. For Fite and her allies, that means opposing any future legislation or ballot initiatives to legalize weed. Even limited measures, such as the failed New Approach Missouri ballot initiative, would open the door to broader legalization down the road, says Fite. “Legislating medicine is not the way,” she says. “That is really just a ruse with regards to the desire to have marijuana in any form.” — Danny Wicentowski


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Fal Sh

As tension between the homeless and housed rises downtown, all eyes are on Larry Rice Written by

DOYLE MURPHY Photography By

NICK SCHNELLE

P

eople started to drop during the first weekend in November. Staggering, nearly passed out on their feet, they crashed to the sidewalks in a drab stretch of St. Louis’ downtown. The stricken vomited, and some shook in the grip of seizures. Others slipped into zombie-like states of near catatonia. One man, unable to break his own fall, plunged facefirst into the concrete and bashed out his front teeth. A bad strain of synthetic marijuana, or K2, was just beginning to hit the city. Sold for $1 or $2 per joint, it swept through St. Louis’ homeless community, with the primary concentration of overdoses striking sidewalk encampments that bookend the towering shelter at New Life Evangelistic Center in the 1400 block of Locust Street. Nearly overnight, emergency calls began to flood city dispatch lines. “You would be at one call, and someone would walk up and tell you there’s another person down over there,” St. Louis Fire Department Captain Garon Mosby says. “We were getting multiple overdoses — five, seven at a time.” Police Chief Sam Dotson was driving past during one of the early days of the outbreak when he spotted a half-dozen people down “in convulsions and foaming at the mouth” and stopped to help. It wasn’t long before the police and fire departments decided to shorten response times by posting up on Locust and waiting for the next OD. They were soon joined by TV trucks and news reporters. By the middle of the week, the canyon-like strip of the old garment district was lit with the strobes of red and blue lights and camera flashes. And still people were going down. The fire department’s Bureau of Emergency Medical Services usually handles about 70 overdoses in a typical month. During the first

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Continued on pg 14

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

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llout Shelter Rev. Larry Rice looks out the front door of the New Life Evangelistic Center as homeless men wait in line for potential beds for the night on November 14. riverfronttimes.com

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Just as the K2 outbreak was beginning to hit, on November 9, the St. Louis building commissioner issued New Life a ceaseand-desist order that gives Rice 30 days to close the shelter.

NLEC Continued from pg 12 week of the bad synthetic marijuana epidemic, the bureau ran 158 calls for K2 alone. The surge o emergen s mmonses nall egan to rea a ter e or si a s t t e re e artment s still logged another 51 calls during the rst e a s o t e se on ee None was fatal, but the frightening s ate o o er oses le t a lasting impression. This brand of K2 — some were calling it Tunechi, a reference to the rapper Lil Wayne, who has a history of seizures — caused o ens o eo le to o er eat sei e and hallucinate. A majority became om ati e in t eir in o eren e restling it t e er eo le o ome to el t em a t orities say. no o e seen t e s o 14 RIVERFRONT TIMES NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

The Walking Dead os sa s ome o t em ere tr l li e t at The unsettling episode was set against the backdrop of a renewed ontro ers s rro n ing e ie e s elter s o n er t e e arr i e sa t e s en onsla g t o o er oses as ot a trage on t e man le el an in a roa er onte t a onse en e o at e s spects is a conspiracy to undercut his li e s or i e a tall man it a o is a e e en at age as een g ting a ears long attle against the city and his neighbors to keep the shelter open. Just as the K2 outbreak was beginning to it on o em er t e t o is il ing ommissioner issued New Life a cease-and-desist or er t at gi es i e a s to lose the shelter. Brad Waldrop, a longtime riti o i e le a n isan e lawsuit against New Life a week

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later, alleging the pastor intentionally attracts people who need serious help to his doorstep and then t rns is a as t e rea a o on the neighborhood. e s it ites t e o er oses as s ar ing an n re e ente le el of chaos and panic in the community,� and lays the blame on the lawless atmosphere surrounding New Life. n res onse i e oints o t the encampments are actually in ront o t e al ro s ar ing lots largely comprising people who eit er on t ome into e i e or a e een arre or rea ing t e rules. He claims as many as half of the people hanging out on the si e al aren t e en omeless they just come to kill time or smoke K2. Waldrop refuses to clear them a a e a se t e re oliti all useful, the pastor says. The greater


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Larry Rice is not delusional in elie ing t at is s elter is n er atta t is a ersaries sa t e truth is far simpler than any of the astor s ons ira t eories t e think he runs a dangerous operation that only hurts the homeless and his neighbors. i e ro i es e ser i es an or es most o is o ernig ters out of the building each morning, lea ing t em little to o t ang out along the edges of the property, critics say. “What I see are just large numbers of people that are congregating and Continued on pg 16

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NLEC Continued from pg 15 don’t have any place to go but on the sidewalk,” says Alderwoman Lyda Krewson, who wants New Life closed. “That’s not right.” Interim City Counselor Michael Garvin says New Life has operated without an occupancy permit since the shelter’s original 2-bed hotel license was revoked in May 201 in response to neighbors’ complaints. To keep from being shut down, ice would need to collect signatures from a majority of neighbors in support of a new permit, but Garvin says he’s seen no evidence New Life has even begun to do that. “They seem to be in a stall pattern,” he says. In recent months, the city has tried to redirect people away from New Life to a spectrum of services designed to get them back into permanent housing as uickly as possible. Eddie oth, the city’s director of human services, says the effort breaks the problem of homelessness into pieces. A little help with an electric bill or negotiating with a landlord will keep the majority of people from ever landing in a shelter or on the streets. Maybe 100 for groceries will entice a relative to let them stay at their place for a while. The approach is described as “housing first.” “The premise of diversion is any couch is better than any shelter bed,” oth says. That approach doesn’t work for everyone and not always right away, and so in August, the city opened the 2. million Biddle ouse. The shelter, located in a former public market building on North Tucker Boulevard, offers about 100 beds for single men at night, along with daytime services that include three meals and hot showers for anyone. Newly renovated with classroom space, an enclosed patio and paid staffers embedded onsite to help guests work through the issues that forced them out of their homes, Biddle ouse is the city’s modern alternative to the aging New Life shelter. Rice’s operation, Roth says, was noble in its original intent to help the homeless and raise awareness of the problem, but the model is outdated and undercuts the coordinated strategies of nearly three dozen agencies supported by the city.

ot claims New Life “swamps the system” by encouraging needy people from across the region to ome to t o is lea ing t e it to ten to t em en t e e it the shelter. ot sa s i e as re se to oo erate it an ot er ser i e ro i ers an emoni es an ili es an one o estions is methods. t s not rig t ot sa s ice sees ulterior motives behind the growing criticism. The city, he says, is embarrasse e a se e s oing a o it as aile to o ro i e a roo o er ea or eo le o a ea solutely nowhere else to go. While i le o se an ot er go ernment s orte s elters re ire a om re ensi e inta e ro ess an ten to ll e i e remains one of the last places where

16 RIVERFRONT TIMES NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

the desperate can show up on any gi en nig t an no t e ll n a bed and a sandwich. ort timers an sta or t o ee s or oin one o t e enter s programs, which can last up to t o ears an in l e ol nteer work around the shelter and daily ors i e i e s o eration also in l es an in o se tele ision station that broadcasts its message to a broader audience and helps with fundraising. e re st tr ing to o t e or o o i e sa s ta i ill as li e at e Life for more than a month with her year-old daughter and baby. Her husband stays on a separate floor or men e sa s relati es had kicked them out and they were o t o o tions en t e arri e t s ar or me to get in an where,” Gill says. “All of the other s elters o a e to all in an

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o all an t e re ll The city has said that if New Life loses it ill e an t e n m er of beds at other facilities to handle t e o erflo t ill is s e ti al e oesn t ant to sta at e i e ore er t s e sa s s e s made friends with other mothers o a e el e it a sitting while she goes to school and her husband looks for work. ott gan e i es ear ol s elter manager arri e a o t three years ago. After retiring from the military, he had worked it t e al ation rm an as helping with disaster relief after a tornado when a tree crushed the roo o is ome e sa s gan lanne to n a ne ome en is assignment as nis e t e sa s anot er ol nteer at one of the relief sites accidentally tipped a pot of boiling water onto his lower leg. The burns put him


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It’s hard for me to get in anywhere. All of the other shelters, you have to call in, and you call and they’re full.

in the hospital. He says he needed some ere to re o er en e as release an eterans airs suggested New Life. He says he decided to stay. “I really did want to stay here for a few years, because I did elie e t is as m alling gan says. He suspects the root of the contro ers s rro n ing e ie lies not in t e s elter s o erations but in the increased number of high-end lofts in the gentrifying neighborhood. A short walk from as ington en e s ars an restaurants, the district has seen an in l o ne more ealt residents in the past decade. ere s no lo e lost et een a lot o o r neig ors an s gan says, “but I think a lot of this is being unfairly laid at our doorstep.” Continued on pg 18

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17


Carley Ott, left, holds her oneyear-old daughter Tianna as she shares her story during a rally in support of New Life.

18

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e

NLEC Continued from pg 17 i e sa s e igotr is so lear ell o neig ors on t ant to see homeless people near their homes, he adds. “The new n-word in Ameri a is omeless He directs much of his anger at ra al ro t e e elo er o owns and manages properties surro n ing e ie elter or ers regularly call police about problems in the sidewalk encampments in ront o t e al ro amil s ar ing lots a or ing to i e t e laims o ers tell t em t ere is nothing they can do unless Waldrop complains. Instead, Waldrop lets them sit, knowing all the problems they create will be associated with

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

i e i e sa s i e also tell o t at m ealing K2?” Waldrop deadpans when as e a o t i e s a sations Waldrop has been battling New Life for nearly four years, leading a etition ri e an testi ing against i e ring a oar o li er i e earing t at ltimatel le to t e it s re o ation o e i es o an ermit e sa s i e s theory that he condones or has any ontrol o er t e en am ments is a lie. “This is just fucking insane to me al ro sa s is g on t know where he comes up with this stuff.” e sa s e s alle oli e re eate l o er t e ears or g ts r g se an li se a ts all tie

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to i e s o eration n it s ort noting that police say, regardless o o om lains t e an t st force people off a public sidewalk. at oint as rein or e in en t e it ai to settle a la s it le on e al o homeless people who claimed cops illegally cleared them out of o nto n ring t e re io s ear s air t o is Waldrop, who was a board member for a now-shuttered day shelter sa s e an ot ers a e trie o er an o er to get e i e to partner with the city on strategies to help the homeless or at least to ma e asi im ro ements s as hiring full-time, professional security or allowing residents to stay insi e ring t e a i e re ses to


Abdullah Brown, 58, sits inside the New Life Evangelistic Center. Brown has been to homeless shelters around the country and says St. Louis needs to do a better job of taking care of the homeless.

oo erate or e en ollo t e la he says. ant arr i es t o n e a se e s not el ing eo le Waldrop says. e la s it le in mi o emer alleges t at i e ses is in o se tele ision st io to attra t people from the region to his shelter and tries to amplify problems in the neighborhood “as a core business practice.” “This is an intentional attempt to e astate t e s rro n ing omm nity as well as bait the community into taking actions in response to t e ast n isan e reate i [New Life] can use to gain media attention in order to solicit donations in or er to ma imi e t e nan ial ro ts o e i e t e s it sa s

al ro no s e s in or a long legal attle n t is e an i e agree. On a morning just days after the s it as le i e s ea s o tsi e New Life to a group of demonstrators o e organi e a rall in support of the shelter. e e got to sta o en e s o ts e re tr ing to slas s it a t o san i erent ni es A crowd of about two dozen people has gathered in a semicircle around him. A half-dozen cops look on from down the block. A few people from the encampments an er o er is is it i e sa s is is t e line in the sand. This is the Alamo. is is ere e ll ma e o r last stand.” n

Rev. Larry Rice, left, speaks at the November 17 rally outside the shelter.

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CALENDAR

21

WEEK OF DECEMBER 1-7

Christine Dwyer as Sylvia Llewelyn Davies in Finding Neverland. | CAROL ROSEGG

BY PAUL FRISWOLD

THURSDAY 12/01 Driving Miss Daisy Daisy Werthan’s driving days are done. She’s wrecked another car, and her son Boolie orders her to use the chauffeur he’s hired. But that doesn’t mean she has to like it. She resents her driver, Hoke, and treats him poorly, and not just because he’s a black man. In the Georgia of 1948, however, it’s not like an older Jewish woman and her black driver are going to be friends. Still, despite their cultural differences, Daisy and Hoke have a lot in common, as they discover throughout the course of their long relationship. New Jewish Theatre presents Alfred Uhry’s Pulitzer

Prize winning drama Driving Miss Daisy. Performances take place at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (December 1 to 18) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Campus Drive, Creve Coeur; www. newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $39.50 to $43.50.

Buyer & Cellar The rich ain’t like you and me — their incredible resources allow them to make their dreams a reality, no matter how ludicrous they might be. Barbra Streisand, for example, has created a faux shopping mall in the basement of her mansion to house her collections of vintage

clothes, furniture, dolls and other indulgences. They’re arranged in shops designed to mimic a turn-ofthe-century Main Street shopping district. This is all true, by the way. Jonathan Tolins’ one-man comedy Buyer & Cellar gussies up the absurd real-life situation by imagining that Babs has hired someone to create displays and maintain the stores — that’s where Alex comes in. He’s an out-of-work actor who gets to be Streisand’s subterranean shop boy, an soon n imsel engaging in improv with her. It’s an odd show, but a funny one. Stray Dog Theatre presents Buyer & Cellar at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday (December 1 to 17) at the Tower Grove Abbey (2336 Tennessee Avenue; www. straydogtheatre.org). Tickets are $20 to $25.

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FRIDAY 12/02 American Buffalo When you’re desperate, you make desperate decisions. And so when Donny sells a customer a buffalo nickel and then starts thinking he got rooked on the deal, he decides to steal it back. And if he’s going to steal one coin, he might as well steal the guy’s whole collection. His plan is to pull off the heist with his employee, Bobby, but once Don’s poker buddy Teach hears about the scheme he wants in, too — and he’s far more violent than either of them. David Mamet’s American Buffalo is about small-time crooks whose dream of a big score is as two-bit

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Continued on pg 22

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CALENDAR Continued from pg 21 as they are. The American dream may be open to everyone, but some people’s dreams are too small and surly to thrive. St. Louis Actors’ Studio presents American Buffalo at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (December 2 to 18) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35.

The Making of the Star Wars Holiday Special Back in 1978 there was just one Star Wars movie and everybody had a theory about who the Jedis were, where Wookiees came from and when Luke and Leia were gonna get together and mash guts. So when a special Star Wars holiday special aired on broadcast TV, lots of people watched — and were horrified. The production was a jumbled amalgamation of a crappy variety show, a cool cartoon starring new mystery man Boba Fett and a bizarre live-action story about Chewbacca getting home to celebrate Life Day, a Wookiee holiday. And then at the end a visibly high Princess Leia sang a horrible song about love and feelings. Bea Arthur, Art Carney and Jefferson Starship also showed up, because the ‘70s were relentlessly horrifying. How did this show get on the air? Magic Smoking Monkey is here to explain things with its new production, The Making of the Star Wars Holiday Special. The audience is encouraged to come in costume — either as your favorite Star Wars character or your favorite B-list ‘70s celebrity — to enhance the insanity of it all. Show times are at 8 and 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday (December 20 to 10) at the Regional Arts Commission (6128 Delmar Boulevard; www. stlshakespeare.org). Tickets are $10 to $15.

SATURDAY 12/03 RFT Holiday Spirits If you’ve been banned from the company Christmas party this year, come to ours. RFT Holiday Spirits gives you hors d’oeuvres, unlimited craft cocktail tastings and a 22

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Run-D.M.C. star in Krush Groove. | COURTESY WEBSTER FILM SERIES commemorative tasting glass, and you won’t even have to see your boss dancing. Wood Hat Spirits, Saint Louis Distillery and Narwhal’s Crafted Urban Ice proffer specially concocted winter-theme cocktails, while local businesses Anthonino’s Taverna, Evangeline’s and Three Kings handle the food. DJ Alexis Tucci -- Nightchaser will create a lively atmosphere for the evening; you get all of this for just $30. RFT Holiday Spirits takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. tonight at Delmar Hall (6133 Delmar Boulevard; www.rftholidayspirits.com).

Print Bazaar on Cherokee This is a tough time of year for people who hate shopping for gifts. Maybe you loathe the task because you make terrible decisions, or maybe you’re just not cut out for the mall scene. Whatever the reason, you still have to find something heartfelt, personal and unique for the special people in your life. Guess what? Those adjectives pretty much describe the art of printmaking, and this Saturday is Print Bazaar on Cherokee. The annual sale of works by the it s nest rintma ers eat res dozens of artists selling handmade, idiosyncratic pieces for a fair price. From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. you can roam Cherokee Street looking for the art that speaks to your soul. Maybe it’s the “off-kilter view” of seasoned printmaker Arden Goewert. Perhaps you’ll find it at the inclusive, LGBT-friendly Westminster Press (3156 Cherokee Street). Printmaking is a democratic

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

art — it’s made by all kinds of people, for all kinds of people. Get out there and get you some. There will be artist demonstrations, on-site framing and food trucks. Visit www.cherokeeprintbazaar. com for the full list of artists and participating locations.

SUNDAY 12/04 A Christmas Carol An abrasive millionaire who disparages everyone around him is visited by quartet of ghosts on Christmas Eve who shock him to his core and force him to change his ways for the better. Is this merel is l llment rit large or another production of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? It could perhaps be both. The Repertory Theatre of Saint Louis brings back its most requested show (adapted by David H. Bell) for a timely holiday run. A Christmas Carol is performed Tuesday through Sunday (December 2 to 24) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18 to $88.50.

TUESDAY 12/06 Finding Neverland J.M. Barrie is a playwright who lacks inspiration and originality. When he encounters four young boys playing made-up games, he gets caught up in the fun and joins in. The fact that their recently widowed mother, Sylvia,

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is beautiful is another enticement to spend time with the family. Barrie soon realizes that his work needs more imagination and a child-like sense of wonder, and he embarks on a new play about a boy who stays a boy forever and has endless adventures in a land of make-believe. James Graham’s musical Finding Neverland is based on the 2004 Johnny Depp lm o t e same name t sto s at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox. com) for a pre-Christmas run. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (December 6 to 18). There’s a 1 p.m. matinee on Thursday, December 15. Tickets are $5.75 to $98.

WEDNESDAY 12/07 Krush Groove Go back in time to the heady days of rap’s infancy in 1980s New York with Krush Groove. The 1985 lm is a slig tl tionali e a count of Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin’s rise to fame via Def Jam Recordings. Blair Underwood plays Russell and Rick Rubin plays himself (and not too believably, either) — two street-wise college students who manage RunD.M.C., Kurtis Blow and the Fat Boys. While they’re trying to make it big and bring rap to the world outside the Big Apple, Russell is also competing with his brother, Run (of Run-D.M.C., naturally) for the affections of Sheila E. (played by herself). Keep your eyes open for LL Kool J and the incredibly young Beastie Boys. The Webster Film Series presents Krush Groove as part of its Strange Brew series at m tonig t at lafl ottleworks (7260 Southwest Avenue, Maplewood; www.webster.edu/ lm series mission is

Planning an event, exhibiting your art or putting on a play? Let us know and we’ll include it in the Night & Day section or publish a listing in the online calendar — for free! Send details via e-mail (calendar@ riverfronttimes.com), fax (314-754-6416) or mail (6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 200, St. Louis, MO 63130, attn: Calendar). Include the date, time, price, contact information and location (including ZIP code). Please submit information three weeks prior to the date of your event. No telephone submissions will be accepted. Find more events online at www.riverfronttimes.com.


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24

FILM

[REVIEW]

Journey to the Past The past is a playground in Rules Don’t Apply, but a nightmare in Manchester by the Sea Written by

ROBERT HUNT Manchester by the Sea

Directed and Written by Kenneth Lonergan. Starring Casey Affleck, Lucas Hedges and Michelle Williams. Opens Friday, December 2, at Landmark Plaza Frontenac Cinema.

Rules Don’t Apply

Directed by Warren Beatty. Written by Warren Beatty and Bo Goldman. Starring Lily Collins, Alden Ehrenreich and Warren Beatty. Now screening at multiple theaters.

L

ee Patrick, the closest thing to a hero in Manchester by the Sea, works as an all-around maintenance man/janitor for a few apartment buildings. Played ase e e s emotionall untouchable, passively killing time with plumbing and changing light bulbs and hauling trash. He wears a thin coat of anger, but even that, en it nall er ts in a ar g t seems distant and unmotivated. When his older brother dies Lee returns to his former hometown, where he learns that he has been named as guardian of his seventeen-year-old nephew Patrick (Lucas Hedges). As he gradually establishes common ground with the boy, fragments of his past emerge. o t e lm is an attem t to reveal how Lee got to where he is, t t at is o er itsel ltere t ro g flas a s isn t meant as a s r rise or a at arti nis it s st o e is t s o e er one is The most devastating thing about the men and women in Kenneth onergan s ne ilm isn t t at t e re all ro en in some a it s t at t e arel a no le ge it is is a lm in i im ortant things are usually left unspoken. Much of its substance rests on the spaces and silences between characters, on performances that

24

RIVERFRONT TIMES

Casey Affleck dominates Manchester by the Sea. | CLAIRE FOLGER/COURTESY OF AMAZON STUDIOS AND ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS seem so perfectly natural, it takes a little time to notice how exact they are. Affleck dominates the film without a single false moment or a tra e o arti e t es matched by a refreshingly unmannered Hedges. Michelle Williams is ain ll goo as ee s e ie t rst glan e s e s s ame ll ner se a earing in flas a s riefl eno g to e ismisse as a ameo t st en o e nearl forgotten about her, she reappears to deliver the most emotionally ra moment o t e entire lm onergan s irst ilm in more than a decade (his earlier film Margaret as lme in t held from release until 2011), Manchester by the Sea is tightly focused even when its structure seems almost arbitrary. Random details of everyday life are revealed with precision, and scenes that seem unimportant or even inom lete t rn o t to a e signi cant but almost subliminal payoffs. at ma rst a ear nne essary or redundant — the lengthy e i tion o ee s a to a a ti ities at the beginning, for example ro e to a to t e lm s slo

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

but steady rhythm of everyday life. As a writer, Lonergan has an ear for natural dialogue and ordinary details. As a director, he knows how to give meaning to those same etails to let is ast n manit in the mundane. In Manchester by the Sea, not much happens but ever t ing matters t s a o t eo le who seem barely able to react to the world around them because t e re still reeling rom a tions of the past. Matthew Broderick, who appears very briefly as the closest thing Manchester by the Sea has for a villain, plays an almost completely different character in Rules Don’t Apply e s one o man amiliar faces (Alec Baldwin, Martin Sheen, Steve Coogan, Candice Bergen, Ed Harris) who wander across t e s reen in arren eatt s strange fantasia about the Hollywood career of Howard Hughes. Beatty has long cited a Hughes biopic as a dream project, but like many dreams, this one got a little muddled in the retelling. Co-written by Beatty and Bo Goldman o rote a ar etter lm about Hughes 35 years ago, Jona-

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t an emme s Melvin and Howles ard t e lm eli eratel m chronology and bends historical detail to create a romantic comedy set in a fairy tale version of a 1950s film studio. In an even stranger decision, they push Hughes into t e a gro n eatt oesn t a ear on s reen or t e rst al hour), favoring instead a love story between a young starlet (Lily Collins) and a chauffeur (Alden Ehrenrei ot ne l ire at g es RKO in 1958. (In reality, Hughes sold his interest in the studio four years earlier.) Though it takes a considerable amount of time to get there, the last al o t e lm nall allo s eatt to have fun with some of the odder as e ts o g es ersonalit t it s too errati to regain t e lost alan e o t e rst al g es e entricities are just a game, a harmless kind of movie madness. Howard Hughes remains one of the strangest an most as inating g res in the history of the twentieth century, but Rules Don’t Apply reduces him to a supporting role, the wacky uncle running around the house in a screwball comedy. n


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Josh Tim

The Philharmonic’s long tradition of ringing in the holiday season with a festive evening of orchestral favorites continues with special guests, the Women’s Hope Chorale of St. Louis. InART theAPPROVED spirit of our musical celebration, AE APPROVED we ask you to again CLIENT APPROVED support the U.S. Marine Corps’ wonderful “Toys for Tots” campaign. As this concert sells out quickly, be sure to place your ticket order early.

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Clockwise from top: Twisted Tree Steakhouse’s tenderloin saltimbocca, turtle pie, filet mignon with batter-dipped lobster tail and cheeseburger. | MABEL SUEN

[REVIEW]

Tree of Life Twisted Tree Steakhouse is a new classic — and a worthy heir to the Pear Tree’s legacy Written by

CHERYL BAEHR Twisted Tree Steakhouse

10701 Watson Road, Sunset Hills; 314-3943366. Tues.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. (Closed Sunday and Monday).

T

he large gray plaster arch that welcomes diners to Twisted Tree Steakhouse looks like any old entryway, but I’m convinced it’s actually a wormhole. On the outside, the massive restaurant at the corner

of Watson and Lindbergh appears to be nothing more than the latest mediocre occupant in a line of mediocre occupants (the bikerthemed Mile 277, which closed in January, and a Viking conference center before that). The building is flan e a tea n a e an a Fuddrucker’s, and its placement in a Holiday Inn parking lot evokes the old Howard Johnson’s motor lodge and grill concept. Anything you think this scene reveals about Twisted Tree, however, gets checked at the door, as the fast food joints and chain stores of Sunset Hills give way to a sophisticated bar that could be a million light years away — or at least several miles to the northeast in Clayton. Dim lighting and sleek, backlit finishes illuminate the lounge, packed several people deep as would-be patrons wait upward of two hours for a table. Reclaimed wood, vintage signs and Restoration Hardware-style chandeliers carry

through to the comfortable dining room, where waiters and their assistants push around old-school gueridon serving carts, and general managers, dressed in suits, work the room. To say this was not what I had expected when I pulled into the parking lot is an understatement. Not knowing much about Twisted Tree’s legacy, I was prepared for roughly the equivalent of Applebee’s. After all, the fourmonth-old upscale steakhouse comes courtesy of the folks behind Syberg’s, whose claim to fame is shark chunks, and Helen Fitzgerald’s, which is known for, well, being Helen Fitzgerald’s. There’s nothing wrong with these places per se — they’re just not the places you think of as sister concepts to a top-notch steakhouse. That’s where Pear Tree comes in. Before burning to the ground in 2012, the restaurant was an unlikely institution in Bevier, Missouri,

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drawing visitors from around the region to its century-old building in the middle of farm country. Pear Tree was known for its aged steaks, batter-dipped lobster tails and impeccable service. It was a source of pride for locals and a must-visit stop for any “big city” businessmen who came to the area to hunt or simply get away from it all. That’s how Kirk Syberg found the place. Several years ago, the restaurateur had dinner at Pear Tree while en route to his family’s arm near a on e as floore by his experience and eventually got to know Mike Abbadessa, the son of Pear Tree’s patriarch. The friends chatted about opening a restaurant together, and when the re estro e ear ree t eir tal s became more serious. Four years later, Syberg and Abbadessa made good on their plans. Though not exactly Pear Tree part two, the restaurant exists as an homage to Continued on pg 30

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TWISTED TREE Continued from pg 29 the old Bevier place — and there is indeed much to celebrate. The Pear Tree’s signature onion rings alone might be worth that lengthy wait for a table at its successor. Tender sweet onions are dipped in light-as-air batter with just a whisper of peppery heat. These addictive beauties are offered in two sizes, but you’re a fool if you don’t get the large. Crab Rangoon are filled with hunks of succulent crabmeat and wrapped in paper-thin wontons — for once this ubiquitous takeout dish deserves its seafood name. “Twisted Shrimp” offers yet another tem tation or lling e ore t e main course. Similar to a jalapeno popper, the large shellfish are stuffed with jalapeno and cream cheese, then wrapped in bacon and grilled. The bitter char from the grill and spice of the pepper cut through the cheese and pork decadence. Every entrée at Twisted Tree is served with the restaurant’s signature all-you-can-eat salad — a challenge they would have lost had I even one morsel less dignity. A literal throwback to Pear Tree, the crisp salad is served family-style in a chilled metal bowl. Homemade French dressing, feta cheese and the restaurant’s signature onion vinaigrette, which tastes like a bloody Mary minus the tomato, arrive at the table in a 1970s-era lazy Susan. Both dressings deserve every bit of the hype they’ve received over the years, which include being bottled and sold at grocery stores. However, if you are a blue cheese fan like me, make sure to ask for the restaurant’s ethereal chunky blue cheese dressing. I didn’t think it could get much better than this, but the salad’s piece de resistance are the housemade garlic croutons, fried to order and served warm in

A smaller dining area at Twisted Tree provides a bit of privacy for a group. | MABEL SUEN a mammoth bowl that invites you to snack on them like a side dish in their own right. We devoured every last one. Like at the old place, Twisted Tree’s steaks are aged (dry, wet or a combination of both) for a shockingly long time — on average, 100-plus days. The result is a steak with a deeply concentrated beefy flavor, like beautifully seasoned prime rib. The juicy meat, cooked to a perfect medium rare, is encrusted with salt, pepper and herbs, and drizzled with au jus tableside. I opted for a simple baked potato dressed in butter and chive-sour cream, closed my eyes and relished every bite of this quintessential steakhouse masterpiece. The restaurant’s entrée specialty is its surf and turf: a batter-dipped lobster tail served with either the prime ri or a si o n e let o te or the latter and was impressed with how much the aging adds depth to what’s usually not my favorite cut. e ten er meat is oo e on a flat top, which gives a pleasant crispness

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to the exterior. The seafood component was equally excellent with its delicate, lightly seasoned breading and tender texture. I can see why people used to drive for hours to eat this dish. Non-steak items also impressed. Tender chicken breasts are dredged in flour and sautéed with lemon butter for a classic chicken picatta — a straightforward, yet wholly satisfying, dish. Salmon so rich it could be mistaken for a stick of butter is cooked medium rare and glazed with smoky bourbon sauce, and the “Hog Chop” presents as a mammoth piece of pork, glistening with sweet maple syrup reduction. The accompanying crisp apple and sauerkraut slaw is an ideal pairing. The only dish that didn’t thrill was a walleye special. Pairing such an oil s it reame r ssels sprouts proved to be too rich. There was an attempt to offset this with a balsamic drizzle, but it wasn’t enough to have the desired effect. Compared to the seemingly endless parade of successes, this

misstep was minor, if not completely erased by the dessert selection. A chocolate gooey butter cake gives the satisfaction of eating brownie batter, and pumpkin tiramisu is as delicate as eating a cloud. However, the real treat — at least for people like me, who have aged out of getting invited to weddings — is the wedding cake. The buttery cake, layered with fragrant almond butter cream, brought a tear of joy to my eye faster than even the most earnest exchange of vows. And here I was, eating it a million miles away from a boring banquet hall in a space that, frankly, I had assumed was going to be nothing more than a boring banquet hall. That’s the thing about expectations: They can lead us where we least expect them to — even all the way to Bevier, Missouri. n Twisted Tree

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SHORT ORDERS

[SIDE DISH]

From Mexico to Missouri, With Love Written by

CHERYL BAEHR

A

s a child, the executive chef at the newly opened Nixta (1621 Tower Grove Avenue, 314-899-9000), Tello Carreon, found that his love of cooking made him the object of his siblings’ ridicule. “At a very early age, I’d come home from school and hang out at my mom’s table to see what she was doing,” he recalls. “My brothers would come in from the el s ere t e ere el ing m dad and make fun of me because I was in the kitchen with my mom.” Despite the ribbing, Carreon could not shake a passion for cooking, and it turned into a calling when he found himself in the United States and in need of a job. “My brother told me I should come visit him the the U.S.,” the native of Guanajuato, Mexico, exlains t rst en e in stin, Texas, but it was quite similar to where I was from in Mexico. I wanted to see something different, so I came to Missouri. I got a job washing dishes for three months, but ended up staying for a year — they say that Missouri draws you in, and it did for me. I fell in love with it here.” t as at t is rst gig at a sim le Mexican restaurant where Carreon learned how to properly use a knife. The knowledge empowered him to begin experimenting with food, which led him to culinary school. However, Carreon credits the chefs around town for helping him build his knowledge and allowing him to work his way up in the industry. At every job — Pueblo Solis, Portabella and Terrene — he picked up new ideas that would prepare him for his work with chef and restaurateur Ben Poremba.

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Now the executive chef at Nixta, Tello Carreon could see himself geting into carpentry. But okra? Never. | CHERYL BAEHR “I started working for Ben at the bottom, doing prep work during the daytime,” says Carreon. “But he let me work my way up, and eventually, I became chef de cuisine at Elaia when [chef de cuisine] Josh Charles left.” He adds, “We always had this idea for Nixta — we just love cooking together and it eventually took shape.” Now in charge of Nixta’s kitchen, Carreon is having the last laugh at his brothers as he honors his family’s culinary legacy with reimagined versions of traditional dishes. It’s a labor of love, he admits, which how he thinks all cooking should be. “I always tell new culinary students that they have to feel this in them from the heart, from the chest,” Carreon says. “This is not a profession where you just take things lightly. Your’e either all in or you’re not in at all.” Carreon took a break from the brand-new Nixta to share his

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

thoughts on the St. Louis food and beverage scene, his love of frozen custard and why you’ll never see okra on his menu. What is one thing people don’t know about you that you wish they did? That I’ll share my knowledge with anyone who’s willing to learn. What daily ritual is non-negotiable for you? Morning coffee. If you could have any superpower, what would it be? The power to heal. What is the most positive thing in food, wine or cocktails that you’ve noticed in St. Louis over the past year? Colleagues who’ve been able to realize the dream of opening their own restaurants. What is something missing in the local food, wine or cocktail scene that you’d like to see? Nixta, of course. Who’s the one person to watch

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right now in the St. Louis dining scene? I admire the creativity and hard work of Bay Tran, the executive chef at Treehouse. Which ingredient is most representative of your personality? Ghost pepper. If you weren’t working in the restaurant business, what would you be doing? I would be a carpenter. Name an ingredient never allowed in your kitchen. Okra. It refuses to be made palatable. What is your after-work hangout? Home. What’s your food or beverage guilty pleasure? A custard concrete with banana, chocolate, pecans and peanut butter. What would be your last meal on earth? Lamb barbacoa, cooked in agave leaves. n


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[FIRST LOOK]

Circa STL Brings Alive St. Louis Culinary History Written by

SARAH FENSKE

I

f you did not go to high school in St. Louis, and you were to dine at Circa STL (1090 Des Peres Road, Des Peres; 314-394-1196), the new restaurant now open in west county, you might be wise to take a tour guide, or at least a friendly native. The menu turns out to be a crash course in the greatest hits of St. Louis restaurant history — and you can bet a lot of it will go right over your head if you’re ordering unassisted. For example: The French onion soup proves to be a riff on the soup made, yes, famous at Famous Barr, the late, lamented department store. The house salad comes with an anchovy-forward Mayfair dressing, invented in the 1930s at downtown’s Mayfair Hotel. The “Loaded Garlic Bread Sandwich” — toasted garlic bread with ham, provel and a sprinkling of paprika — is better known to St. Louisans as a “Gerber” sandwich, brought into being by a place called Ruma’s Deli. The “STL Prosperity” sandwich, invented at the Lemp Mansion, manages to incorporate alfredo sauce on top of ham, turkey and provel. Just what your cholesterol needed! As dining at Circa STL is akin to taking a deep dive into St. Louis history, you might assume that some of the city’s more depressing culinary habits will be on display. Surely the toasted ravioli will come from a freezer bag; surely the lettuce on your salad will be iceberg, topped with provel. But at many turns, the kitchen at Circa STL surprises. Instead of iceberg, the salad greens are instead a spring mix — and sure, they’re topped with provel, but that’s part of the fun. 34

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The decadent open-faced “STL Prosperity” sandwich (top) is joined by St. Louis-style pizza and, of course, t-ravs on Circa STL’s menu. | SARAH FENSKE

And as for the toasted ravioli, they’re actually wonderful — among the biggest we’ve ever seen, filled with cheese in addition to the usual mystery meat, and fried to crispy-skin perfection. We’d put these up against any in town. The items listed above are only a small sampling of the offerings here. In addition to a few other hearty classics, you can get a falloff-the-bone pork steak, St. Louis-style pizza or “Chicken Modiga” a is e o l n t easil n historical information about via Google, but which our St. Louis-born guide insists is indeed a local classic. And for dessert, what else but gooey butter cake? The one we had is more cake-like than the goo we’re used to, but since it comes topped with ice cream and

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

chocolate sauce, we couldn’t muster any complaints. And all this talk about the food neglects the real reason St. Louis history enthusiasts might want to stop by Circa STL — the memorabilia. There’s an amazing collection of beer signs and framed newspaper stories on display throughout the brightly lit dining room and the bar as well. The walls are positively laden with things to look at, and glass display cases are everywhere, including a large one stuffed with items that bisects the room. The memorabilia is said to come from co-owner Brian Walsh’s personal collection. It’s also said to be only part of the collection, which is fairly remarkable. If your tour guides know their Des Peres history in addition to

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their St. Louis one, they’ll tell you that this spot on the backside of an older strip mall has had a fair amount of turnover in recent years. You may be a stone’s throw from West County Center, but it feels a world away — older, less fancy, and a bit more interesting. After decades as Rick’s Cafe Americain, the space has recently held Rib City and Zydeco Blues, neither of which lasted more than a few years. Circa STL, then, poses an interesting question. Do west county residents want a walk down memory lane? Or are they more interested in the new and shiny? If they’re on the fence, and you want to persuade them of Circa STL’s merits, you might suggest they try n the toasted ravioli.


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[FIRST LOOK]

MEET THE NEW HERBIE’S … SAME (MOSTLY) AS THE OLD HERBIE’S Written by

CHERYL BAEHR

R

egulars at Herbie’s Vintage ‘72 in the Central West End were the saddest diners in town when news broke in May that the restaurant was moving — that is, until devotees of Cardwell’s in Clayton learned the very same day that their beloved watering hole would be closing. It turns out that neither party should have worried. On November 14, the CWE mainstay, rebranded simply as Herbie’s (8100 Maryland Avenue, Clayton; 314-7699595), settled into its new digs in the old Cardwell’s space at the corner of Brentwood Boulevard and Maryland Avenue. The move has proven to be more than simply a relocation; rather it represents a merger of sorts of two of St. Louis’ most iconic restaurant names. With his lease up for renewal this fall, Herbie’s chef-owner Aaron Teitelbaum was ready for a change. It just so happened that longtime Cardwell’s owners Rich and Debbie Gorczyca were also looking forward to their next chapter: retirement. The restaurateurs struck a deal that would move Herbie’s into the Cardwell’s space for what amounts to a Herbie’s-branded stewardship of the legendary Clayton eatery. Executive chef Chris Vormund insists that the space may be different, but the new restaurant really is Herbie’s. “We wanted to embody the old Herbie’s feel — the art, the fixtures, the seating — we wouldn’t dream of having our bar without our bar things,” he says. That said, Vormund notes that the

Keetons

Touches from Herbie’s, including vintage posters and chandeliers, now adorn the familiar Cardwell’s space. | KELLY GLUECK

move has been a blending of the two restaurants. “Our regulars have been very loyal and are making the trip west,” Vormund says. “But the Cardwell’s regulars and people in the neighborhood have also been very supportive.” Indeed, Herbie’s bar has been packed with a mix of old and new faces. Fixtures from the CWE space set its loyalists at ease, with vintage chandeliers and posh leather couches making the trip to the new space. The Cardwell’s bar has been revamped to a Parisian-style lounge, complete with vintage posters from Herbie’s. The French bistro aesthetic carries through to the polished dining room. The layout is similar to Cardwell’s — two large rooms, two small intimate rooms and a third, larger private dining space — though the restaurant received a facelift that softened its masculine feel. Twinkly wire chandeliers salvaged from the old Monarch (a nod to Teitelbaum’s tenure at the now-shuttered Maplewood restaurant) hang from the ceiling, and

pastel brocade wallpaper trims some walls. The hallway that leads to the restrooms is noteworthy, with LED lights installed underneath perforated ceiling tiles, creating what Vormund refers to as a “Starry Night” effect. Though the dining room has changed since the Cardwell’s days, there is one notable similarity: the Herbie’s management team insisted upon retaining as many of the Cardwell’s staff members who wanted to stay on. “We made a promise to everyone that if they stayed to help Rich and Debbie with the transition, there would be a place for them here,” says Vormund. It’s been no trouble incorporating them in with the Herbie’s staff who made the move west. “We now have lunch and weekend brunch service, so we’ve basically doubled our hours. There’s room for everyone,” he explains. According to Vormund, Herbie’s regulars should not notice a striking difference between the menus at the old place and the new one. “We al-

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ways changed our menu seasonally, so any changes people see are those that would have happened or what we would normally be doing,” he says. “Some of our familiar favorites, like the beef wellington, have had a facelift, but the staple items are still there.” The one place Vormund expects Herbie’s to evoke Cardwell’s the most is its lunch menu: “We’ll have the elements that people came to expect from Cardwell’s, but with a Herbie’s twist on them.” The large outdoor patio is also a big change for Herbie’s regulars — and a good one. Vormund has been thrilled by the response the place has received and looks forward to the start of lunch service, brunch and the eventual patio season. He admits that change can be difficult for people, but believes that it’s been necessary and welcome. “Everywhere runs its course — no matter how great or well-run it is,” he says. “We’re just excited with what we are don ing here.”

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Hours: SUN - THURS - 11am - sell out, or 9p FRI & SAT- 11am - sell out, or 10p riverfronttimes.com

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

37


®

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UPCOMING SHOWS 12.10 PAT LISTON BAND

1.27 DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS

12.11 STEEL PANTHER

2.1 DAWES

12.16, 17, 22, 23, 29, 30, 31 EL MONSTERO

2.7 TESLA

1.6 REEL BIG FISH & ANTI-FLAG

2.15 ADAM DEVINE

1.7 MEMORIES OF ELVIS

3.1 ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES

1.13 GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

3.5 CIRCA SURVIVE

1.16 LUKAS GRAHAM

3.15 EXCISION

1.19 BROTHERS OSBORNE

3.27 BRING ME THE HORIZON

1.20 YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND

4.23 FLAMING LIPS

visit us online for complete show information facebook.com/ThePageantSTL

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thepageant.com // 6161 delmar blvd. / St. Louis, MO 63112 // 314.726.6161

38

RIVERFRONT TIMES

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

riverfronttimes.com


MUSIC

39

Syrhea Conaway owes her new solo project to a technical malfunction that left a Chicago performance instrument-free. | PHOTO VIA FPE RECORDS [ALBUM]

Find Your Voice Syrhea Conaway goes full a cappella for her latest solo album, VOX Written by

HARRY HALL

S

t. Louis’ Syrhea Conaway didn’t start her solo project, Syna So Pro, with a cappella performance in mind. For years she has employed a multi-instrumentalist’s approach to her work, relying on a pair of pedalboards containing a multitude of effects an loo ing e als to fles o t er sound in a live setting. t te ni al i lties at a ate-

ful out-of-town show made instrument-free performance a necessity — and helped Conaway find her voice in a whole new way. Conaway was performing a solo gig in a Chicago bar when her gear malfunctioned, causing a brief moment of panic for the artist. But instead of stopping the show, she just started singing, her vocals alone lling t e s a e In the audience that night was Matt Pakulski of FPE (For Practically Everyone) Records, who was impressed by Conaway’s exploration. He bought her album and played it for his young daughter, whom he consults before signing any artists. When she liked what she heard, Pakulski approached Conaway, offering to put out her next record. VOX, to be released December 9, is the solo a cappella album born of this union. Conaway is already a ell no n g re in t o is music scene, performing for nine years as part of various groups including Whoa Thunder and Pat Sajak Assassins. VOX is the third of

her solo efforts, which generally serve as a departure from her work with other artists. “Syna So Pro started because I wrote these songs for bands, and they didn’t think they were actual songs,” Conaway says. “But I was trying to convince people that these were songs. So I started this recording project, never thinking it would be a live thing.” VOX begins with a brief opening that creates a circle with the last track (listen to the record on repeat to hear it) before launching into “Kickman.” The song starts out in t n r s terrain it fl t ating vocal melodies and harmonies, then turns to a more traditionally driving beat with inspirational lyri s en ing it a er e snarl n terms o infl en e ona a cites choral arrangements and any band with lots of vocal harmony, especially Queen. But she’s hesitant to allow her sound to be limited to any genre, wary of letting people judge her music before even listening to her.

riverfronttimes.com

“Once you say ‘choral,’ people get a certain idea about what they think the music will be, and it doesn’t have to be that way,” says Conaway. “I’m trying to break down these silly constructs that we’ve built and come to believe, by changing things slightly or making it yours. It doesn’t have to be onesized.” ne o t e greatest infl en es present in VOX is Conaway’s childhood, or at least her journey into adulthood. Halfway through the album, “On the Radio” takes a sharp turn to spoken-word territory. She revisits a pre-teen memory of performing a song for her father, a song that then materializes in the next track, “Petey the Turtle.” The song is a true story — Conaway explains that she wrote most of the songs on VOX in her teenage, amateur musician years. “Most of it was written [back then], and I revisited it,” she says. “I listened to it and thought, ‘Wow, the shit I wrote Continued on pg 40

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

39


SYRHEA CONWAY Continued from pg 39

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NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

ELK BURGER , MELTED BRIE , BRANDIED CRANBERRY COMPOTE , PORT WINE ONIONS AND SPRING MIX ON A BRIOCHE BUN

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back then is so much better than what I’m writing now.’ Sometimes playing in a band can make you kind of lazy.” The album includes both hymnal, almost carol-like vocals on “Make a Move” and a smooth rap in “Holiday.” “Genre really bothers me,” she says. “We as a society have been trained to put everything in a box, including people. I can never really truly articulate anything that I’ve created and put it in a box, because e al a s een infl en e e erything I’ve ever experienced.” That attitude carries over to Conaway’s life outside of music as well. Both before and after this year’s tumultuous presidential election, she observes, people have been quick to make judgments about others — some founded, some not. Through her album, she wants to resist this drive. “With the political climate, with Trump winning, it’s really sad to see so many people very sad, very angry and upset,” she says. “But at the same time, you’re still part of the problem of labeling a person or people who voted for a candidate as a certain thing.” Instead of judgment, Conaway’s songs refle t a ositi e message with lyrics that repeat inspirational sentiments like “you are down; you need to rise up” throughout. “I just want people to think for themselves, because there’s just so much non-objective thinking going on right now, a lot of repeating what we’ve heard, not really analyzing what’s really going on or asking, ‘Am I part of the problem, or do I really have a solution?’” VOX’s eclecticism, its inability to stay in one genre or conform to one set of expectations, resists easy e nition e same o l e sai about the more complex socio-political issues of our time. Through her work as Syna So Pro, Conaway hopes she is breaking down molds. “What I’m trying to do,” she says, “is plant a seed for people to see that what they think they know is kind of an illusion, that what they hold is not necessarily true, not really accurate.” Another refrain in the album, the lyrics that literally tie together it together, goes: “Everyone has a voice, you gotta learn how to use it.” Syrhea Conaway has found her voice in VOX — and she wants you to n o rs as ell n


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42

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RIVERFRONT TIMES

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

ST LOUIS RFT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 2.19x12

he Domino Effect, the hip-hop duo comprising rappers Steve N. Clair and Cue, like to boast that they are “the most known of the unknowns.” It’s a subtle subversion of hip-hop bragging, and the seemingly contradictory phrase underlines the group’s upward mobility as well as its n illingness to sa ri e its art or ommercial gain. The pair’s 2015 release Unknown made its status plain in the title, but for the just-released Satellites, the Domino Effect retains its underdog pose while delivering eight strong, varied tracks that rely on throwback soul samples and word-onthe-street rhymes in equal measure. “We’ve got two perspectives,” says Clair of the group’s known/unknown divide. “In the sense of underground hip-hop in St. Louis, we’re trying to start it off on the lowest of the low on the totem pole. The people that follow the underground scene know us, but people who follow Hot 104.1 FM have no idea who Domino Effect are.” Cue, who handled much of the production on the eight-song set, emphasizes his and Clair’s commitment to “always sticking true to ourselves, to that known Domino Effect DNA. It’s about always keeping our same style, that same element of hip-hop that we bring into our city.” That DNA stays largely true to Unknown, with tracks that can hit hard, including the assured “Reign Supreme,” but are more often content to use jazz and syrupy soul music to lay a funky foundation. For Cue, the band’s trademark is twofold: He describes the production as “kind of nostalgic and trippy.” That vibe shows itself on the jazzy syncopations of “Protocol” and the smoothed-out jam “+Frequencies.” As a producer, Cue most clearly tips his hand with a nearly unadulterated sample of the Stylistics’ quiet storm classic “Betcha By Golly Wow” for “314-Life.” Cue notes that the sample is a nod to the sounds of their youth. “That’s stuff we grew up on — putting on the Stylistics on and bumping that when you’re getting ready for a cookout or something,” says Cue. “With Satellites in general, it feels like every song is taking you on a ride through the galaxy. I’ve always been intrigued by that type of sound.” Clair says that the varied sounds speak to the duo’s i e infl en es an gi es re it to is rot er li la o o ers ro tion on a e tra s ere “All three of us are musically inclined — you’d be s r rise sa s lair e are e nitel infl en e by ’70s soul, progressive rock and psychedelic music. Hip-hop might be the third on the list that I listen to.” If the production leans toward silky retro jams, Domino Effect’s verses are rooted in the here and now. Some of the tracks on last year’s album were in direct response to Michael Brown’s killing and the subsequent unrest in Ferguson, and those issues and

LH

riverfronttimes.com

others are still present on Satellites. “We talk about real things,” says Cue. “We talk about things that are relatable; we always give you that subject matter.” The clearest message comes through the track “Chainge,” which uses a ballad tempo and uncluttered, piano-led production to make its bones. “From our perspective, there ain’t nothing new under the sun,” explains Clair of the song, which traces a line from slavery through the present day. “We spelled it like ‘chains’ for a reason. It’s kind of like a reaction toward all the police brutality and things like that.” Even the more upbeat “314-Life” doesn’t tiptoe around heavy subject matter. While the track is styled as a throwback jam and a celebration of city living, Cue, Clair and guest Indiana Rome mix childhood memories with harsh reality. “There’s been a lot of murders of people that we may not know, but are always one person away from someone we know,” says Cue. “We tried to make a feel-good record while keeping perspective of everything that’s been going on.” According to Cue, Rome’s verse came in at the eleventh hour but adds another layer to the song. “Everyone’s got their own perspective on what it’s like to grow up in STL,” says Cue. The recurring thread of real-talk is bracing in places on Satellites, but the album provides smart, humane commentary on St. Louis circa 2016 and shows Cue and Clair’s appreciable skills, rhymes and heart. A layer of positivity is never too far from these songs’ surface. “That’s one of the main reasons we’re doing music: to lift someone’s spirit and make them feel good,” says Cue. “We may talk about more negative situations, but we always try to bring a positive mode and higher learning as opposed to just rapping about whatever on any track. We put our emphasis on teaching you something.” – Christian Schaeffer


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RIVERFRONT TIMES

43


44

OUT EVERY NIGHT

THURSDAY 1

Haar, John Flack, Peter Merideth, Emily Peter-

282-2258.

City, 314-727-4444.

5TH ANNUAL SANTA JAM: w/ Josh Turner, Jana

son and Steve Neale 11 a.m., $12. The Sheldon,

GIN WIGMORE: 8 p.m., $18-$20. Off Broadway,

NITE OWL TRIBUTE TO HIP-HOP: 8 p.m., $10.

Kramer, William Michael Morgan 7 p.m.,

3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-533-9900.

3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

Cicero’s, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City,

$9.37-$19.37. Peabody Opera House, 1400

BOO BOO DAVIS & THE BUMBLE BEE TRIO: 10

THE GREEN MCDONOUGH BAND: 2 p.m., free.

314-862-0009.

Market St, St. Louis, 314-241-1888.

p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broad-

Howard’s in Soulard, 2732 S 13th St, St. Louis,

OH BROTHER: 9 p.m., $5. Hwy 61 Roadhouse

ALARM WILL SOUND: 8 p.m.; June 1, 8 p.m., $10-

way, St. Louis, 314-436-5222.

314-349-2850.

and Kitchen, 34 S Old Orchard Ave, Webster

$20. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St.

BRIAN CURRAN: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues &

HANDS LIKE HOUSES: w/ The Color Morale, Out

Groves, 314-968-0061.

Louis, 314-533-9900.

Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

Came The Wolves 6 p.m., $17-$20. Fubar, 3108

RFT HOLIDAY SPIRITS: 7 p.m., $30. Delmar Hall,

BILLY BARNETT BAND: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues

5222.

Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

& Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

DINOFIGHT! ALBUM RELEASE PARTY: w/

MARSHMELLO: w/ Ookay, Slushii, Speaker of

RITTZ: 8 p.m., $20-$65. Pop’s Nightclub, 401

5222.

Bagheera, The Vigilettes 7 p.m., $7. Utopia Stu-

the House 8 p.m., $25-$28. The Pageant, 6161

Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720.

BONES JUGS N HARMONY: w/ The Loot Rock

dios, 3957 Park Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3660.

Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

SANDY WELTMAN: w/ the Carolbeth True Trio 8

Gang 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp

EARTHLESS: w/ Ruby The Hatchet 9 p.m., $15-

MIKI HOWARD: w/ Lenny Williams, Surface 8

p.m., $15-$20. Ozark Theatre, 103 E. Lockwood

Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

$18. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis,

p.m., $30-$40. Ambassador, 9800 Halls Ferry

Ave., St. Louis, 314-962-7000.

CRYSTAL LADY: w/ Jennifer Hall, Circle The Wag-

314-535-0353.

Road, North St. Louis County, 314-869-9090.

ons 7 p.m., $10. Cicero’s, 6691 Delmar Blvd.,

THE FAT BABIES JAZZ BAND: 7:30 p.m., $15. Casa

NICK WATERHOUSE: 8 p.m., $15. Blueberry Hill -

SUNDAY 4

University City, 314-862-0009.

Loma Ballroom, 3354 Iowa Ave, St. Louis, 314-

The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University

CROWBAR: w/ Goatwhore, Lillake, Lyluth, Some

ILIZA SHLESINGER: 8 p.m., $29.50. The Pageant,

Kinda Khaos 7 p.m., $18-$20. Fubar, 3108

6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

JOE METZKA BAND: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues

JACKYL: 7 p.m., $15-$20. Pop’s Nightclub, 401

& Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720.

[CRITIC’S PICK]

5222.

JESKE PARK CD RELEASE: w/ The Public, Glasses,

SAM NAUMANN: 7:30 p.m., free. Webster Uni-

GypsyLion, Transition, Lia 6 p.m., $10. Blue-

versity Community Music School, 535 Garden

berry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd.,

Ave., Webster Groves, 314-968-5939.

University City, 314-727-4444.

THE KING KHAN & BBQ SHOW: w/ the Gartrells

LOVE JONES “THE BAND”: 8:30 p.m., $10. BB’s

8 p.m., $15. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room,

Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis,

6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-

314-436-5222.

4444.

THE MYSTERY LIGHTS: w/ Warbly Jets 7 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St.

FRIDAY 2

Louis, 314-773-3363.

ANNIKA CHAMBERS BLUES BAND: 10 p.m., $10.

NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS: 8

BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St.

p.m., $27.50-$32.50. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar

Louis, 314-436-5222.

Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

ASSUMING WE SURVIVE: w/ Avion Roe 6 p.m.,

SPACE SHIP JAZZ FUSION: 6 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz,

$10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-

Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-

289-9050.

436-5222.

CAVEOFSWORDS: w/ Kids and Chemicals, The

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: 3 & 7 p.m., $40-

Goes, Hylidae 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor,

$76. Scottrade Center, 1401 Clark Ave., St.

5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226.

Louis, 314-241-1888.

EXTINCTION A.D.: 7 p.m., $12. Fubar, 3108 Lo-

WASH U FLUTE CHOIR: 7:30 p.m., free. The 560

cust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

Music Center, 560 Trinity Ave., University City,

THE FAT BABIES JAZZ BAND: 8 p.m., $10-$12. Off

314-421-3600.

Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-

Nick Waterhouse. | PHOTO VIA GRANDSTAND MEDIA

3363. INDYGROUND 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY: w/ Steddy P, DJ Mahf, Farout 9 p.m., $8-$10. The Bootleg, 4140 Manchester Ave., St. Louis, 314-775-0775. JEFFREY LEWIS & LOS BOLTS: 7 p.m., $7. San Loo, 3211 Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314-696-2888. LEROY JODIE PIERSON: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314436-5222. PULSE: w/ D-Railed, Sail Through Storms 8 p.m., $10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. STIR: 8 p.m., $25-$40. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. WINTER LOUGRASS FEST: 7 p.m., $13. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314833-3929.

SATURDAY 3 “WINTER WONDERLAND”: featuring Zoe Vonder

44

RIVERFRONT TIMES

MONDAY 5 THE MARCUS KING BAND: 8 p.m., $12-$15. Blue-

Nick Waterhouse 8 p.m. Saturday, December 3. Blueberry Hill Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Boulevard, University City. $15. 314-727-2277.

After the sinewy sonic noir of 2014’s Holly, Nick Waterhouse once again revs up his R&B time machine for this year’s Never Twice, a suite of mod jazz, cool blues and organ-driven rock & roll. The album sounds like ? and the Mysterians playing be-bop Mose Allison, or maybe Mose Allison playing Latin jazz at a small combo after-hours jam session, with Leon Bridges sitting in on a

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

cut for good measure. “Just for once, I want to hear that something is mine,” Waterhouse declares on the smooth and shimmying opener “It’s Time.” All these vintage tones, melodies and rhythms really are his, and he shares them with extraordinary skill and spirit. Payback Time: Student loan debt is a strange topic for a breakup song, but Chicago-based soul singer Krystal Metcalfe (a St. Louis native) pulls it off on the withering single “Sallie” (as in Sallie Mae). Don’t miss her opening set.

riverfronttimes.com

– Roy Kasten

berry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. ROGER HODGSON: 8 p.m.; Dec. 6, 8 p.m., $45$65. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314-388-7777. SOULARD BLUES BAND: 9 p.m., $5. Broadway Oyster Bar, 736 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314621-8811. SPOKEN: w/ Dayshell, 3 Pill Morning, Union Grove 6 p.m., $12-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. THE WOODSHED: THE MIGHTY PINES VS OLD SALT UNION: 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. THIRD SIGHT BAND: 8 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-4365222.

Continued on pg 46


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STEVE BYRNE December 1-3 • Sullivan & Son • Chappelle’s Show

Free Haunt Glass for the 1st 10 Sagittarians

KEVIN BOZEMAN December 7-11 • Last Comic Standing • Comedy Central’s Premium Blend

Saturday Dec 11th Happy Hour 3-7 Every Day $2 domestic & Rails

JOHN MORGAN December 14-19 • Montreal Comedy Festival • Our most requested comic!

JR BROW New Years Eve 3 Shows! 5:00, 7:30, & 10:00 • Comedy Central’s Live at Gotham • Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson CALL NOW FOR CHRISTMAS PARTIES! 314-469-6692 purchase tickets online @ stlouisfunnybone.com riverfronttimes.com

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

45


OUT EVERY NIGHT Continued from pg 44 [CRITIC’S PICK]

“St. Louis pioneers of craft beer and live music” THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 ST Crystal Lady, Jennifer Hall, Circle the Wagons Rock Jazz Soul - 7pm - $10

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2 ND

Jake’s Leg- Grateful Dead Tribute Doors 8:30/Show 10pm - $7

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3RD IN THE BAR AREA Geeks Who Drink Pub Trivia - 8:30pm - FREE

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3RD

A Tribute to Hip Hop featuring Nite Owl and DJ Stan Da Man - Classic Hip Hop - 8pm - $10

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4TH IN THE BAR AREA Open Mic with Mark Z - 8:30pm - FREE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7THIN THE BAR AREA

King Khan & BBQ Show. | KELLY GLUECK

Geeks Who Drink Pub Trivia - Trivia - 8:30pm - FREE

UPCOMING SHOWS

12/8 Kid Quill & Call Me Karizma 12/16 HOTR, Lucas Jack, Integrow 12/17 311 & RHCP Tribute 1/7 Pepperland-Beatles Tribute

6691 Delmar

In the University City Loop

314.862.0009 • www.ciceros-stl.com

fri. dec. 2 10PM Marquise Knox

sat. dec. 3 10PM Old Shoe from Chicago

Wed. dec. 7 9:30PM Voodoo Players Tribute to Bob Dylan

thurs. dec. 8 10PM Aaron Kamm and the One Drops

King Khan & BBQ Show 8 p.m. Thursday, December 1.

Arish “King” Khan and Mark “BBQ” Sultan have been writing doo-wop-inspired garage-rock jams together for more than twenty years now, going all the way back to the mid-’90s, a time before either of them had chosen the cute nicknames by which they are now most commonly known. Considering the longevity of their working partnership, fans were surprised and dismayed when the duo split in 2010. It was not to last, though, and by 2012 the two were back on the road and working on the material that would become last year’s Bad News Boys LP. The band’s first full-length

since 2009’s Invisible Girl, Bad News Boys delivers songs about food, zombies and diarrhea with an ear-to-ear, mischievous grin, proving to fans and critics alike that the group’s best days are most certainly not behind it. Party Favors: It was around this time of the year in 2009 that King Khan and his crew were arrested in Kentucky for possession of psychedelic mushrooms, causing the group to miss its scheduled St. Louis show. Driving with illicit substances is a dangerously illegal activity, but consuming said substances before a performance usually makes for a fun time. In other words: Be a pal and bring drugs for the band. – Daniel Hill

VALE OF PNATH: w/ Aethere, Micawber 6 p.m.,

Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-

$10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-

436-5222.

289-9050.

THE MOTH & THE FLAME: 8 p.m., $12-$15. The

Blueberry Hill Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Boulevard, University City. $15. 314-727-2277.

TUESDAY 6 GROUPLOVE: 8 p.m., $30-$35. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

fri. dec. 9 10PM Tribute To The Meters

featuring Mike Murano, Big Mike Aguirre, Andy Coco, Nate Hershey and featuring Adam Hucke and Charlie Cerpa

sat. dec. 10 10PM Jake’s Leg Discounted Holiday Gift Certificates NOW AVAILABLE! 736 S Broadway St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 621-8811 46

RIVERFRONT TIMES

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. WONKY TONK: 8 p.m., free. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

JAMAICA LIVE TUESDAYS: w/ Ital K, Mr. Roots, DJ

WEDNESDAY 7

Witz, $5/$10. Elmo’s Love Lounge, 7828 Olive

BIG RICH MCDONOUGH & RHYTHM RENEGADES: 7

Blvd, University City, 314-282-5561.

p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broad-

JEREMY JOYCE: 6:30 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues

way, St. Louis, 314-436-5222.

& Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

THE BLUES CRUSHERS: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz,

5222.

Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-

MAYOR TAYLOR: 10 a.m.; Dec. 7, 10 a.m., $15-

436-5222.

$18. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St.

BOB “BUMBLE BEE” KAMOSKE: 8 p.m. Beale on

Louis, 314-533-9900.

Broadway, 701 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-

ROGER HODGSON: Dec. 5, 8 p.m.; 8 p.m., $45-

7880.

$65. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City

CAPSIZE: w/ Torn At The Seams, Mocklove,

Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314-388-7777.

LifeWithout 6 p.m., $12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St,

ST. LOUIS SOCIAL CLUB: 8:30 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz,

St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

riverfronttimes.com


BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St.

2016-17season

Louis, 314-436-5222, bbsjazzbluessoups.com. THE BLUES CRUSHERS: Wed., Dec. 7, 10 p.m., $5.

THIS WEEK

BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St.

DAMIEN ESCOBAR: 8 p.m., $40-$65. The Sheldon,

bodyoperahouse.com.

5TH ANNUAL SANTA JAM: W/ Josh Turner, Jana

Louis, 314-436-5222, bbsjazzbluessoups.com.

3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-533-9900.

JULY TALK: W/ Mona, Wed., Feb. 8, 8 p.m., $12-

Kramer, William Michael Morgan, Thu., Dec.

BOB “BUMBLE BEE” KAMOSKE: Wednesdays, 8

MAYOR TAYLOR: Dec. 6, 10 a.m.; 10 a.m., $15-

$14. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis,

1, 7 p.m., $9.37-$19.37. Peabody Opera House,

p.m. Beale on Broadway, 701 S. Broadway, St.

$18. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St.

314-588-0505, oldrockhouse.com.

1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-241-1888, pea-

Louis, 314-621-7880, bealeonbroadway.com.

Louis, 314-533-9900.

LAMBCHOP: Wed., March 22, 8 p.m., $16. Off

bodyoperahouse.com.

BONES JUGS N HARMONY: W/ The Loot Rock

SAM LEWIS: 8 p.m., $12-$15. Off Broadway,

Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-

ALARM WILL SOUND: Thu., Dec. 1, 8 p.m.; Thu.,

Gang, Thu., Dec. 1, 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway,

3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

June 1, 8 p.m., $10-$20. The Sheldon, 3648

3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, off-

STEVE VAI: 8 p.m., $28.50-$30. The Pageant,

MARTINA MCBRIDE: W/ Lauren Alaina, Thu.,

Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-533-9900,

broadwaystl.com.

6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161.

Feb. 2, 7 p.m., $26.75-$96.75. Peabody Opera

thesheldon.org.

BOO BOO DAVIS & THE BUMBLE BEE TRIO: Sat.,

TOMMY HALLORAN: 5 p.m., free. The Stage at

House, 1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-241-1888,

ANNIKA CHAMBERS BLUES BAND: Fri., Dec. 2,

Dec. 3, 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups,

KDHX, 3524 Washington Ave, St. Louis, 314-

peabodyoperahouse.com.

10 p.m., $10. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S.

700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222,

925-7543, ext. 815.

MUUY BIIEN: Sat., Dec. 17, 8 p.m., $10-$12. The

Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222, bbsjazz-

bbsjazzbluessoups.com.

WASH U JAZZ BAND: 8 p.m., free. The 560 Music

Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-

bluessoups.com.

BRIAN CURRAN: Sat., Dec. 3, 7 p.m., $5. BB’s

re ir stl om

coming soon to

jazz at the bistro

ASSUMING WE SURVIVE: W/ Avion Roe, Fri., Dec.

Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis,

NIKKI LANE: W/ Brent Cobb, Jonathan Tyler,

2, 6 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St.

314-436-5222, bbsjazzbluessoups.com.

Fri., March 10, 8 p.m., $15-$18. Off Broadway,

Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

CAPSIZE: W/ Torn At The Seams, Mocklove,

3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, off-

“WINTER WONDERLAND”: Featuring Zoe Vonder

LifeWithout, Wed., Dec. 7, 6 p.m., $12. Fubar,

THE 442S HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR: Tue., Dec. 20,

broadwaystl.com.

Haar, John Flack, Peter Merideth, Emily Peter-

3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fu-

7:30 p.m., $15-$25. The 560 Music Center, 560

PEPPERLAND: Sat., Jan. 7, 9 p.m., $10. Cicero’s,

son and Steve Neale, Sat., Dec. 3, 11 a.m., $12.

barstl.com.

Trinity Ave., University City, 314-421-3600.

6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-

The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis,

CAVEOFSWORDS: W/ Kids and Chemicals, The

BILLY JOE SHAVER: Thu., March 23, 8 p.m., $20-

0009, ciceros-stl.com.

314-533-9900, thesheldon.org.

Goes, Hylidae, Fri., Dec. 2, 9 p.m., $7. The

$30. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis,

PETE AYRES BAND: W/ Richie Kihlken, Paige

BIG RICH MCDONOUGH & RHYTHM RENEGADES:

Alyssa, The Belief Cycle, Thu., Dec. 22, 7 p.m.,

Wed., Dec. 7, 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues &

314-352-5226, theheavyanchor.com.

CHRIS SCOTT: W/ Matt Jordan, Joshua Stanley,

$10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis,

Nov 30 – Dec 3 Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis,

314-773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com. Fri., Jan. 20, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Cicero’s, 6691

314-773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

5222, bbsjazzbluessoups.com.

Some Kinda Khaos, Sun., Dec. 4, 7 p.m., $18-

Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009,

POLTERGUTS: W/ Arcane Haven, Cohen, Sat.,

BILLY BARNETT BAND: Thu., Dec. 1, 7 p.m., $5.

$20. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-

ciceros-stl.com.

Jan. 28, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St.

COLONY HOUSE: Wed., Feb. 15, 8 p.m., $14-$16.

Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar

RIFF RAFF: W/ Dolla Bill Gates, Owey, Peter

Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444, blueber-

Jackson, Chris Allen, Fri., Feb. 3, 8 p.m., $20-

ryhill.com.

$23. Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East

FAMOUS LOSERS: W/ Rescue the Mouse, Thu.,

St. Louis, 618-274-6720, popsrocks.com.

March 30, 7 p.m., $10-$12. Cicero’s, 6691

RIO STAR: Fri., Jan. 27, 8 p.m., free. Cicero’s,

Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009,

6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-

ciceros-stl.com.

0009, ciceros-stl.com.

FESTIVAL OF LAUGHS: W/ Mike Epps, Rickey

S.L.U.M. FEST AWARDS: Sat., Jan. 21, 8 p.m.,

Smiley, Bruce Bruce, Felipe Esparza, Fri., April

$10-$13. Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St.

21, 8 p.m., TBA. Chaifetz Arena, 1 S. Compton

Louis, 314-726-6161, delmarhall.com.

Ave., St. Louis, 314-977-5000, thechaifetzare-

SALISBURY: W/ Sleepy Rubies, Thu., Dec. 29, 8

na.com.

p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St.

THE FEW’S 5TH ANNUAL XMAS BASH: Sat., Dec.

Louis, 314-773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

17, 6 p.m., $7-$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St.

SIMS: Sat., Jan. 14, 8 p.m., $15. Blueberry Hill -

Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., Universi-

GORAN IVANOVIC TRIO: Fri., Dec. 16, 8 p.m., $10.

ty City, 314-727-4444, blueberryhill.com.

Pop’s Blue Moon, 5249 Pattison Ave., St. Louis,

SKALIDAYS: A BENEFIT FOR ST. VINCENT HOME

314-776-4200, popsbluemoon.com.

FOR TEENS: W/ Ska-Side Johnny and the

Center, 560 Trinity Ave., University City, 314421-3600.

THIS JUST IN

THE GROOVELINER: W/ Southern Exposure, Jackson Howard, Sat., Jan. 7, 9 p.m., $10. The

tones ni

a

e

oon an its

at

e

e

agni

ent

m

e

Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis,

Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis,

314-833-3929, thereadyroom.com.

314-833-3929, thereadyroom.com.

HAYES GRIER: Wed., March 8, 8 p.m., $35. The

SON VOLT: Sat., March 18, 8 p.m., $22-$25. The

Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-

Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-

6161, thepageant.com.

6161, thepageant.com.

HELL NIGHT ALBUM RELEASE: W/ Fister, Max-

TREADING OCEANS CD RELEASE SHOW: W/

imum Effort, Fri., Dec. 23, 8 p.m., $10. The

Strange Medicine, Wed., Jan. 18, 6 p.m., $10-

Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-

$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-

o

st t

t

ree o is

Dec 7-8

lafl

a

Sponsored by Edward Jones, Eric Cunningham, Financial Advisor

Tim Warfield’s All-Star Jazzy Christmas featuring Terell Stafford, Stefon Harris, Cyrus Chestnut, Eric Wheeler, Clarence Penn, & Joanna Pascale

Dec 14-17 Exclusively Sponsored by Garden View Care Center

CROWBAR: W/ Goatwhore, Lillake, Lyluth,

A Very Manley Christmas

with Jim Manley’s Mad Brass & Rhythm Dec 9-10 Jazz St. Louis Big Band plays Ellington’s Nutcracker Dec 19-21

Good 4 the Soul Dec 29-30

concerts | dinner | drinks

TREY ANASTASIO: Wed., May 3, 8 p.m., $42.50.

full concert listing and info:

oom

The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis,

jazzstl.org | 314.571.6000

s

314-726-6161, thepageant.com.

THE HILLSIDE BARONS: W/ Prairie Rehab, Fri., m

Matt Wilson’s Christmas Tree-O

9050, fubarstl.com.

re ir stl om e

Vijay Iyer Trio

lafl

com.

TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS: W/ Dalton Domino,

JAY & SILENT BOB GET OLD: Thu., April 20, 8

Sat., Jan. 28, 8 p.m., $22.50-$25. The Pageant,

p.m., $40-$50. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar

6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161,

Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161, thepageant.com.

thepageant.com.

JOHN PRINE: W/ Amanda Shires, Fri., March 10,

WHISKEY MYERS: Fri., Jan. 20, 8 p.m., $13-$16.

8 p.m., $59.50-$99.50. Peabody Opera House,

Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-

1400 Market St, St. Louis, 314-241-1888, pea-

726-6161, delmarhall.com.

riverfronttimes.com

the harold & dorothy steward center for jazz 3536 washington ave. | st. louis, mo 63103

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NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

47


48

RIVERFRONT TIMES

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

riverfronttimes.com


SAVAGE LOVE QUICKIES BY DAN SAVAGE Hey, Dan: My boyfriend of almost two years is wonderful, and we have had very few issues. But there is one thing that has almost been a deal breaker. He fiddles with his penis almost constantly — in front of me and in front of our roommates. I’ve confronted him about it a number of times. He said he should be able to fiddle with his dick in every room of the house if he wants to and he should feel comfortable doing so. I told him that he is being “comfortable” at the expense of the comfort of those around him. We’ve had a number of confrontations about this, and he does it a lot less, but he still does it. If he doesn’t stop when I tell him to, I just leave the room. My question to you: Is this behavior unacceptable or am I being unreasonable? Frustrated With The Fiddling Until a few weeks ago, I would have said that neo-Nazis sieg-heiling around Washington, DC, was unace ta le an an ele te o ial or pundit who didn’t immediately conemn neo a is o l e nis e politically and professionally. But it turns out that neo-Nazism is just another example of IOIYAR — “it’s OK if you’re a Republican” — and relativism reigns.

In other words: “Unacceptable” is a relative concept, FWTF, not an objective one. That said, FWTF, I don’t think you’re being unreasonable: Fiddling with your dick in every room of the house is inconsiderate and childish. It sounds like you’re doing a good job of socializing your boyfriend — better late than never — and I would encourage you to keep it up. Hey, Dan: I’m a straight man in a mostly healthy marriage. Our sex life is average, which I understand is better than some people can hope for, and we communicate well. For example, I felt comfortable admitting to my wife a few weeks ago that I would like more blowjobs. She in turn felt comfortable admitting to me that she would prefer if I showered more often. So we made a deal: I would shower every day and she would blow me twice a month. But the first month came and went with no blowjobs in sight. I’ve showered every single day. Should I bring this up to her? Bathe Longer Or Withhold Sex Your wife doesn’t wanna suck your cock, BLOWS, squeaky clean or stinky cheese. I would recommend outsourcing non-birthday blowjobs — if your wife is okay with that, BLOWS, which she won’t be. Hey, Dan: I’m a mid-30s bi woman in an incredible poly marriage with a bi

guy. A few months ago, I learned that one of my closest friends (also poly) has a crush on me. I also have always had a crush on him. My crush-friend needed to ask his other partners how they felt about him being involved with me. Three months have gone by, and he’s not yet told me how his other partners feel. One of those partners is under a lot of stress — not the best time to bring up potential new partners to her — but my friend has dated other people in the past three months. I think if he really wanted to do something with me, he would have asked by now. I know you can’t ask someone to give you closure. I’ve also got a shit-ton of pride that prevents me from asking him directly how he feels. Should I just move on? Confused And Pathetic Yup. Hey, Dan: I am a queer trans woman in my mid-twenties, and I am in a monogamous relationship with a queer cis woman. We have been dating for about three months now. We have had an absolutely amazing sex life since day one, except for one caveat: She has never in her life had an orgasm. For most of the time she has been sexually active, she has felt ambivalent about getting off. It has only been in the past month that she has started feeling a “sexual awakening,” as she calls it. We have been making progress, but she has been having

riverfronttimes.com

49

issues with getting caught up in her head when I am pleasuring her. This has been causing dysphoric feelings for her. We have had a few discussions about what we can do about the situation, but we are feeling lost. We know there isn’t going to be a quick fix, but what do we do about this? Confused And Nervous Truly Can’t Overcome Much Exasperation Pot. Hey, Dan: I’ve been in a long-term relationship with the girl I’m going to marry. While I’ve had a few relationships in the past, she has had only one other relationship before me, who also happened to be her only other sexual companion. My girlfriend is very vanilla in the bedroom, which is fine for me, but the issue is that currently the only way for her to have an orgasm is to grind (dry hump) on my boxer shorts until she climaxes. This obviously causes her a little bit of embarrassment, along with some heavy rug burn on both of our ends. My question for you: Is there any toy or something that may help with this? Girlfriend Dryly Humping Pot and sex toys — they might not help, but they couldn’t hurt. Listen to Dan’s podcast at savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

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File Bankruptcy Now! Call Angela Jansen 314-645-5900 Bankruptcyshopstl. com 4801 WELDON SPRING PKWY. ST. CHARLES, MO 63304

T-Mobile USA is proposing to install new wireless telecommunications antennas on an existing building located at 26 Maryland Plaza, St. Louis, MO, 63108. The new facility will consist of the collocation of 9 antennas at a top height of +/-50 feet above ground level on the roof of the building. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6116005054HRC c/o EBI Consulting, 6876 Susquehanna Trail South, York, PA 17403 or (225) 316-7900.

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertising.

SOUTH-CITY $525 314-223-8067 Spacious 1 BR, wood floor, thermal windows, stove, fridge. 2nd fl, fenced yard, by park, dining and shopping close by.

300 Rentals 317 Apartments for Rent BENTON-PARK $795 314-223-8067 Spacious 2 BR, wood fls, efficient electric, furnace/ac. Lots of closet space! 1st fl, porch, ceiling fan, w/d. Avail Dec 1st. CENTRAL-WEST-END

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5578 PERSHING 1100 sq ft; Perfect for WashU, Fontbonne OR SLU students. Nurse? Located near several major hospitals, Forest Park and Delmar Loop. Some utilities included; Off Street Parking. Optional 2 Gated Parking Spaces, $75 remote deposit. Application Fee: $50.00 (Lease Description: 18+, satisfactory credit, no prior evictions) Dog-Town $750 314-220-8921 One bedroom remodeled charmer. Fully equipped kitchen. Stunning hardwood floors. Central air/heat. Winter Special: Two Months Free Rent!! DOWNTOWN Cityside-Apts 314-231-6806 Bring in ad & application fee waived! Gated prkng, onsite laundry. Controlled access bldgs, pool, fitness, business ctr. Pets welcome

530 Misc. Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

LAFAYETTE-SQUARE $625 314-853-6618 Extra large 1 BR, new appliances, luxury vinyl flooring, W/D. NICE!

400 Buy-Sell-Trade

OVERLAND/ST-ANN $535-$575-SPECIAL 314-995-1912 1 MO FREE! 1BR & 2BR SPECIAL! Great location near Hwys 170, 64, 70 & 270. 6 minutes to Clayton. Garage, Clean, safe, quiet. RICHMOND-HEIGHTS $525-$575-SPECIAL 314-995-1912 1 MONTH FREE! 1BR, all elec off Big Bend. Near Metrolink, Hwys 40 & 44, Clayton.

475

Want/Trade Antiques Wanted

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527 Legal Notices

Historian will pay top $$$ for German/Japanese WWII military relics.

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600 Music

SOULARD $795 314-724-8842 Spacious 2nd flr 2BR, old world charm, hdwd flrs, yard, frplcs, off st prk, no C/A, nonsmoking bldg, storage.

nprent@aol.com SOUTH CITY $400-$850 314-771-4222 Many different units www.stlrr.com 1-3 BR, no credit no problem SOUTH ST. LOUIS CITY 314-579-1201 or 636-939-3808 1, 2 & 3 BR apts for rent. www.eatonproperties.com. Sec. 8 welcome

610 Musicians Services

MUSICIANS

SOUTH-CITY $450 314-277-0204 3841 Gustine-1st floor North-1BR, hardwood floors, blinds & appliances. Garage $20 extra. Available in Dec

SOUTH-CITY $625.05 314-277-0204 3400 South Spring-1st Floor North-2BR, eat in kitchen & dining room. Blinds, appliances, C/A, all electric. $40 app fee per adult, becomes key deposit. No rent deposit. Available Now! SOUTH CITY $400-$850 314-771-4222 Many different units www.stlrr.com 1-3 BR, no credit no problem SOUTH ST. LOUIS CITY 314-579-1201 or 636-939-3808 1, 2 & 3 BR apts for rent. www.eatonproperties.com. Sec. 8 welcome ST-JOHN

$495-$595 314-443-4478 8700 Crocus: Near 170 & St.Charles Rock Rd Special! 1BR.$495 & 2BR.$595.

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

314-579-1201 or 636-9393808 1 & 2 BR apts for rent. www.eatonproperties.com. Sec. 8 welcome

UNIVERSITY-CITY $795 314-727-1444 2BR, new kitch, bath & carpet, C/A & heat. No pets WESTPORT/LINDBERGH/PAGE $535-$585 314-995-1912 1 MO FREE!-1BR ($535) & 2BR ($585) SPECIALS! Clean, safe, quiet. Patio, laundry, great landlord! Nice Area near Hwys 64, 270, 170, 70 or Clayton.

www.LiveInTheGrove.com 320 Houses for Rent Dog-Town $925 314-220-8921 Carriage House, one bedroom. Hardwood floors, fully equipped eat-in kitchen. Ultra modern bathroom. Central air/heat. Outside space. Winter Special: Two Months Free Rent!! NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY 314-579-1201 or 636-939-3808 2, 3 & 4BR homes for rent. eatonproperties.com. Sec. 8 welcome Dog-Town $925 314-220-8921 Carriage House, one bedroom. Hardwood floors, fully equipped eat-in kitchen. Ultra modern bathroom. Central air/heat. Outside space. Winter Special: Two Months Free Rent!! NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY 314-579-1201 or 636-939-3808 2, 3 & 4BR homes for rent. eatonproperties.com. Sec. 8 welcome

Do you have a band? We have bookings. Call (314)781-6612 for information Mon-Fri, 10:00-4:30

MUSICIANS AVAILABLE

Do you need musician? A Band? A String Quartet? Call the Musicians Association of St. Louis

(314) 781-6612 M-F, 10:00-4:30

MUSICIANS Do you have a band? We have bookings. Call (314)781-6612 for information Mon-Fri, 10:00-4:30

MUSICIANS AVAILABLE

Do you need musician? A Band? A String Quartet? Call the Musicians Association of St. Louis

(314) 781-6612 M-F, 10:00-4:30

MUSIC RIVERFRONTTIMES.COM

riverfronttimes.com

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

RIVERFRONT TIMES

51


EVANGELINE’S

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File Bankruptcy Now! Call Angela Jansen ~314-645-5900~ Bankruptcyshopstl.com The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertising.

We Have The Gifts!

TIS’ THE SEASON TO BE CRAFTY!

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RIVERFRONT TIMES

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Installed price offers are for product purchased from Audio Express installed in factory-ready locations. Custom work at added cost. Kits, antennas and cables additional.

SOUTH 5616 S. Lindbergh • (314) 842-1242 WEST 14633 Manchester • (636) 527-26811

HAZELWOOD 233 Village Square Cntr • (314) 731-1212 FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS 10900 Lincoln Tr. • (618) 394-9479

Unless otherwise limited, prices are good through Tuesday following publication date. Installed price offers are for product purchased from Audio Express installed in factory-ready locations. Custom work at added cost. Kits, antennas and cables additional. Added charges for shop supplies and environmental disposal where mandated. Illustrations similar. Video pictures may be simulated. Not responsible for typographic errors. Savings off MSRP or our original sales price, may include install savings. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Details, conditions and restrictions of manufacturer promotional offers at respective websites. Price match applies to new, non-promotional items from authorized sellers; excludes “shopping cart” or other hidden specials. © 2016, Audio Express.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2016

riverfronttimes.com

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Riverfront Times - November 30, 2016  

Riverfront Times - November 30, 2016

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