Page 1


2012 Winner

BEST LAWYER 2012 Winner Best Lawyer

AGGRESSIVE CRIMINAL BEHALF AGGRESSIVE CriminalDEFENSE DefenseON onYOUR YOUR Behalf

HIRE AN EXPERIENCED DWI ATTORNEY HIRE AN EXPERIENCED DWI ATTORNEY Get the knowledge and experience YOU need.

GET THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE YOU NEED

HONORS & AWARDS

Honors and Awards: • Charles Shaw Trial Advocacy Award •Charles Shawand Trial Advocacy • Missouri Kansas SuperAward Lawyers •Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers St. Louis Magazine, •St.•Louis Magazine, Lawyers in St. Louis DWI BestBest Lawyers in St. Louis DWI • Riverfront Times Lawyer •Riverfront Times BestBest Lawyer •Best Lawyers in United States • Best Lawyers in United States •Best Lawyer to call from a DWI check• Best Lawyer to call from a DWI checkpoint, point, as voted by lawyers in Missouri as voted by lawyers in Missouri for for Missouri Lawyers Weekly Missouri Lawyers Weekly

Proven Defense by a Former Law Enforcement Officer Proven Defense by a Former Law Enforcement Officer EXPERIENCED & FOCUSED WINNING CASES Cases Experienced and Focused winning Missouri Driving Attorney Missouri Drunk Drunk Driving Attorney

They Say Can’t BeCan’t Won Be Won They Say

TRAVIS NOBLE, P.C.

Don’t trust just anyone with your DWI defense. Contact the law firm of Travis Noble, P.C., by e-mail or call us at 314-450-7849 or 866-794-0947 to schedule your free consultation with a St. Louis DWI lawyer to discover that you have more options than you imagined. We 8000 MARYLAND AVENUE, SUITE 350 accept all major credit cards, including Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express.

ST. LOUIS, MO 63105 PHONE: 314-721-6040 Travis Noble, P.C. TOLL FREE: 866-794-0947 8000 Maryland Avenue, Suite 350 | St. Louis MO 63105 Phone: 314-721-6040 | Toll Free: 866-794-0947 The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. This disclosure is required by rule of the Supreme Court of Missouri.

2

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. This disclosure is required by rule of the Supreme Court of Missoui.


riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

3


Bring In This Ad And Receive

$3 OFF MEDIUM BAG

$5 OFF LARGE BAG

of Nutro Pet Food Limited to 1 bag. Expires 9/1/17

PET CONNECTION 314-773-7387 2214 S. VANDEVENTER ST. LOUIS, MO 63110 MON-FRI 10AM-6PM SAT-SUN 10AM-4PM 4

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


5

THE LEDE

PHOTO BY THEO WELLING

“Whisk is my whole heart and soul. I have a lot of friends who work jobs that they don’t like or they’re not sure where they want to go with their life. I feel very confused in a lot of personal aspects of my life right now, but I love that this is my job, that this is what I get to do. I try to remind myself of how privileged I am that I can do that.” —KAYLEN WISSINGER, OWNER OF WHISK: A SUSTAINABLE BAKESHOP, PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE TOWER GROVE FARMERS MARKET ON JUNE 24

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

5


6

TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURE

13.

Remember the Race War

In East St. Louis 100 years ago, a white mob turned on black residents — with consequences that echo today Written by

DANNY WICENTOWSKI At first, soldiers did virtually nothing to stop the violence committed against blacks in East St. Louis. This photo s original caption reads, Colored man in front of car, being mobbed. Militia looking on. | PHOTO VIA THE CRISIS

THE CRISIS

NEWS

CULTURE

DINING

MUSIC

5

21

29

35

The Lede

Calendar

Your friend or neighbor, captured on camera

Seven days worth of great stuff to see and do

9

24

Goodbye to All That

Film

Meet Me in St. Louis

Circa STL gives diners a crash course in the city’s culinary history

37

Side Dish

The Missouri Civil War Museum earns the right to take the Confederate monument off the city’s hands

Robert Hunt finds the eponymous Okja charming — her namesake movie, not so much

Senada Grbic is carrying on her family’s legacy at Lemmons

9

26

Galleries

39

Police Broadcast SSNs Springfield police are putting citizens’ info on blast

Sara Bannoura captures all the excitement at Pridefest 2017

First Look

Sara Graham checks out the Juice, now open on Cherokee Street, while Sarah Fenske enjoys Bissinger’s revamp

41

Food News

Scott Davis will head up the kitchen at Cafe Osage

6

Cover image provided by

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

When One Door Closes

Cicero’s long-time doorman deals with a death in the family, even as the landmark restaurant closes its doors

25

Homespun

Illphonics Purple Piano Society

50

Out Every Night

The best concerts in St. Louis every night of the week

52

This Just In

This week’s new concert announcements


Publisher Chris Keating Editor in Chief Sarah Fenske E D I T O R I A L Arts & Culture Editor Paul Friswold Music Editor Daniel Hill Digital Editor Elizabeth Semko Staff Writers Doyle Murphy, Danny Wicentowski Restaurant Critic Cheryl Baehr Film Critic Robert Hunt Contributing Writers Mike Appelstein, Allison Babka, Sara Graham, Roy Kasten, Jaime Lees, Joseph Hess, Kevin Korinek, Bob McMahon, Nicholas Phillips, Tef Poe, Christian Schaeffer, Mabel Suen, Lauren Milford, Thomas Crone, MaryAnn Johanson, Jenn DeRose Editorial Interns Quinn Wilson, Sara Bannoura

A R T Art Director Kelly Glueck Contributing Photographers Holly Ravazzolo, Mabel Suen, Steve Truesdell, Eric Frazier, Micah Usher, Theo Welling, Corey Woodruff, Tim Lane, Nick Schnelle

music OUR CENTRAL WEST END LOCATION IS

read more at

P R O D U C T I O N Production Manager Brittani Schlager

M U LT I M E D I A A D V E R T I S I N G Sales Director Colin Bell Senior VP Sales & Marketing Mike Lipel Senior Account Executive Cathleen Criswell, Erica Kenney, Nicole Starzyk Multimedia Account Executive Jill George Account Managers Emily Fear, Jennifer Samuel

RIVERFRONTTIMES.COM

C I R C U L A T I O N Circulation Manager Kevin G. Powers

S U B S C R I P T I O N S Send address changes to Riverfront Times, 6358 Delmar Blvd., Suite 300, St. Louis, MO 63130. Domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $78/6 months (Missouri residents add $4.74 sales tax) and $156/year (Missouri residents add $9.48 sales tax) for first class. Allow 6-10 days for standard delivery. www.riverfronttimes.com The Riverfront Times is published weekly by Euclid Media Group Verified Audit Member

Taste our Northern Hemisphere Gold and Silver medal winning Oils from the NY International Olive Oil Competition.

3 dozen Balsamic Vinegars 100% EVOO from 7 Different Countries Salts, Seasonings and Sauces Gift Baskets & Cooking Classes Central West End 115 N Euclid West County 118 West County Center

E U C L I D M E D I A G RO U P Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner Human Resources Director Lisa Beilstein Senior Marketing & Events Director Cassandra Yardeni www.euclidmediagroup.com N A T I O N A L A D V E R T I S I N G VMG Advertising 1-888-278-9866, www.voicemediagroup.com

OPEN!

St. Charles 617 S Main St. Shop online with us at www.diolvias.com

NULL & CROSSBONES DREADFUL COLLECTABLES

Riverfront Times 6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 300, St. Louis, MO 63130-4719 www.riverfronttimes.com General information: 314-754-5966 Fax administrative: 314-754-5955 Fax editorial: 314-754-6416 Founded by Ray Hartmann in 1977

Riverfront Times is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1.00 plus postage, payable in advance at the Riverfront Times office. Riverfront Times may be distributed only by Riverfront Times authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of Riverfront Times, take more than one copy of each Riverfront Times weekly issue. The entire contents of Riverfront Times are copyright 2015 by Riverfront Times, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the expressed written permission of the Publisher, Riverfront Times, 6358 Delmar Blvd., Ste. 300, St. Louis, MO 63130. Please call the Riverfront Times office for back-issue information, 314-754-5966.

COME IN FOR 20% OFF! 9319 B MIDLAND • OVERLAND, MO 63114 314-731-NULL riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

7


Celebrate Dad

With 15% off all in-stock Benchmade, HK, and Victorinox (Swiss Army) Knives! es! Now through June 30

New 2017 Tacoma SR5 Double Cab 4x4 V6

New 2017 4 Runner SR5 Premium 4x4 V6

MSRP $35,142 • STOCK #30419

MSRP $40,068 • STOCK #30500

$33,404

$37,891

T-Th 10-7 F 10-8 Sa 9-4 www.midamericaarms.com 8205 Gravois Rd. St. Louis MO 63123 314-631-3130

LEVIN’S

New 2017 Highlander XLE V6 AWD 7 Passenger

$38,674

CLOTHING FROM NEW BORN TO 86" IN PANTS

Men’s Cargo Shorts to size 68 Dickies Shorts to size 60 Dickies Pants to Size 72 Men’s Polo Style Shirts to 8X Men’s Dress Slack Sets up to 8X Men’s Dress Shirts up to 8X Men’s Suits to Size 72 Long Sleeve Shirts to 8X Dickies Boots to Size 14 Sweat Pants to size 8X T-Shirts up to 10X

ALTERATIONS AVAILABLE

8

RIVERFRONT TIMES

MSRP $41,328 • STOCK #30461

EXP. 7/5/17 Saturday Alternate Jersey

SUMMER IS HERE!

MAJESTIC REPLICA JERSEYS AND T-SHIRTS SIZE 3X-6X

NEW Merchandise Arriving Daily! HOURS: MON-FRI 9-5

SAT 9:30-3 SUN 11-3

1401 WASHINGTON • 314-436-0999

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

*WITH APPROVED CREDIT. EXCLUDES TAX, TITLE LICENSE + 199 ADMIN FEE.


NEWS

9

Police Radio Chatter Reveals SSNs Written by

DANNY WICENTOWSKI

A

s a private investigator based in pringfield, Missouri, errick Marshall spends a lot of time listening to the police scanner app on his phone. n ebruary, while working an unrelated case, Marshall listened as a pringfield police o cer called into dispatch to report a suspect who lacked o cial . ver the police scanner, Marshall heard the officer rattle off a string of nine digits. t was the suspect’s social security number. hat breach wasn’t the only time police have broadcast such personal information for all to hear. ver the next few months, Marshall’s research found at least ten instances where social security numbers were broadcast, along with other critical personal information. hey’re giving their name, their date of birth, their address, everything. And ’m like, his is cra y,’ says Marshall, who shared several recent police scanner recordings with Riverfront Times that feature pringfield o cers reporting social security numbers and other identifying information. Although the private investigator has listened to uncountable hours of police radio dispatches, it wasn’t until the ebruary incident that he reali ed police were playing a dangerous game with people’s personal information. An identity thief, Marshall suggests, could easily skim the numbers while listening to the police scanner or even access recordings of previous dispatches stored in online databases. Now, Marshall is putting three different agencies on blast for the problematic practice the reene ounty heriff ’s ffice, the pringfield Police epartment and the pringfield- reene ounty mergency ommunications Continued on pg 10

Before a lawsuit halted the city’s efforts, crews removed the top of the Confederate monument in Forest Park. | LIA GLYNIAS

City Gives Up Fight for Confederate Monument

T

he Confederate Monument that has sat in Forest Park for more than a century has new owners — and they’re going to be permitted not only to take it, but to pay for the privilege. Under a legal settlement announced Monday, the monument will go to the Missouri Civil War Museum, which filed a lawsuit earlier this month attempting to exert ownership. The museum won a key battle last week when a judge agreed to block the city from removing the monument until its legal argument could be heard. A trial had been set for next month. In a press release Monday, Mayor Lyda Krewson said she’d agreed to hand over the monument to avoid costly litigation. “This issue has

played out for far too long,” Krewson said. “This settlement agreement is the best way to move forward and put this issue behind us.” After years of dormancy, the 102-year-old statue became a big public issue again this year, following movements in New Orleans and other Southern cities to remove such monuments. Krewson had vowed to remove the 32-foot shaft using a combination of public and private and funds — and city crews even began the work of taking off its top. But those plans got more complicated three weeks ago, when the Missouri Civil War Museum announced that it had been gifted the statue by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. That group indisputably paid for the memorial and its installation in Forest Park more than a century ago, but the museum pointed to something previously unnoticed: a 1912 city ordinance that assigned maintenance for the riverfronttimes.com

memorial to the Daughters of the Confederacy. The museum argued that meant the Daughters had every right to transfer it — and that the city did not have the right to destroy it. Said Krewson, “Although it is our position that the City controls the monument and would have prevailed in court, the City has entered into this agreement to avoid protracted legal proceedings and move forward immediately with the monument’s removal. This is an outcome both parties wanted. “As part of the settlement, the Civil War Museum has agreed that the monument will be stored at their expense until a permanent location is found. That permanent location must be at a Civil War museum, battlefield or cemetery. Further, the Civil War Museum has agreed that the monument will not be displayed or located in the City of St. Louis or in St. Louis County.” No word yet on where that new location will be. —Sarah Fenske

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

9


SCANNERS Continued from pg 9 center. n a complaint dated June , Marshall and civil rights attorney tephen yse accused the three law enforcement agencies of violating state and federal laws. he complaint demands that the agencies halt the practice of transmitting personal information over unsecured fre uencies and issue a public reprimand for senior personnel in each of the above agencies for failing to train and or supervise their subordinate personnel in complying with their legal duty to protect individual private information from wrongful disclosure. pringfield officials, however, defend the practice. n an email, pringfield spokeswoman ora cott says that the city’s legal department is currently working on a thorough legal review of the matter, but upon an initial review, we have no indication that we are operating outside of the law. cott adds, pringfield Police officers, in the course of their daily interactions, do not use social security numbers unless there’s no other identifier available. t’s important they have the capability to confirm the person’s identity through emergency dispatch via their radios for safety reasons. he safety of the public is our top priority. mergency ommunications and pringfield Police work together to ensure that public safety. Police departments around the county, however, are acting to encrypt their dispatches not only to ensure citi ens’ privacy, but also to protect o cers from possible ambush or attack. hat tactic, however, has ramifications of its own ncryption conceals the chatter on police scanners from public scrutiny, removing a longstanding tool used by the public and media to keep police departments accountable. n response to uestions from RFT, a spokeswoman for the t. ouis Metropolitan Police epartment says that its o cers’ radios are encrypted. imilarly, a spokesman for the t. ouis ounty Police epartment says that its police radios have been encrypted since ctober . Marshall’s complaint suggests pringfield could face big ramifications for its broadcasts. he fact that potentially mil10

RIVERFRONT TIMES

lions of people could be listening to these communications at any given time, means every time a social security number and or other information is leaked, each party who overhears the transmission would constitute a violation of the river’s Privacy Protection Act, and the related state statutes, his letter of complaint argues. Although this complaint contains ten recorded violations of the PPA, the number of times the law was violated would depend on how many people were listening at the time of the transn mission.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

Encryption shields St. Louis County police radio chatter from the public. | DANNY WICENTOWSKI


INCLUDES BUD FAMILY PINTS, WELL DRINKS, & HOUSE WINE FROM 4PM - 10PM

PLUS DJ JOE WITH TRIVIA & GIVEAWAYS 601 CLARK STREET • 314-345-9880 *ONLY ON NON-GAME DAYS* riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

11


Remember the Race War

In East St. Louis 100 years ago, a white mob turned on black residents — with deadly consequences that still echo today by Danny Wicentowski

I

t was the summer of 1917, a Monday in July, and smoke billowed thick and charcoal dark above East St. Louis. The city was burning. Across the Mississippi River, refugees who’d fled to St. Louis watched the flames overtake the horizon. The distant crackle of gunfire carried through the night. What would enter the historical canon as the “East St. Louis race riot” amounted to a two-day nightmare for the city’s black residents. Primed by months of racist fear-mongering from union leaders and newspapers, roving mobs of armed whites — men and women, young and old — took to the streets on the evening of July 2, 1917. They tore through the Illinois city, wrenching black men and women from streetcars and setting fire to black-owned homes.

12

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


Carnage wracked the city. Blacks were indiscriminately shot and beaten with paving stones; others were lynched from telephone poles or left to bleed out in the street. The butchery did not cease until a show of force by Illinois National Guardsmen on July 3. Even then, sporadic arsons and beatings continued into the coming weeks. The attacks began with a case of mistaken identity — and a thirst for revenge. Interviews conducted by the St. Louis Argus (and echoed in a later congressional inquiry) spoke of a weeks-long wave of terror leading up to the deadly evening where mass violence ignited: “Negroes…waylaid and beaten by white thugs, with-

out provocation, daily.” The match was struck the night of July 1. It was a day featuring multiple reports of beatings — one black man was said to have shot his attackers and escaped, but the evening would bring a drive-by shooting targeting black residents. The Argus reported: “An automobile traversed a portion of the Colored district, speeding at a rapid rate and its occupants shooting into the homes of the residents.” In response, armed blacks mobilized themselves into a defense force. But when they fired back, they struck the wrong target.

Very few photos exist showing the widespread destruction in East St. Louis in July 1917. In less than 48 hours, mobs of white residents burned more than 300 homes and factories. | PHOTO Continued on pg 14 VIA THE CRISIS

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

13


Race War Continued from pg 13 Around midnight, two plainclothed detectives driving into a black neighborhood were mistaken for the shooters. In a moment of confusion, a crowd of armed black men, roused by the ringing of a church bell calling residents to defend their neighborhood, fired on the officers, killing both. Less than 24 hours later, the East St. Louis police department turned a blind eye as white rioters called for a bloody solution to what one union leader had previously called “the influx of undesirable negroes.”

Hometown Team. Hometown Beer.

Locally Brewed, Canned & Bottled. 14

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

Samuel Kennedy was barely seven years old when the mob came to his family’s home on Piggot Avenue, near the south end of town. Night had already fallen on July 2. The Kennedy home was little more than a shack, and as the rioters blasted bullets through the windows and set fire to the walls, little Samuel followed his mother and a handful of siblings out a side door. The rioters had blocked a nearby bridge. (According to one witness, members of the mob had decapitated a woman and left her body and head lying on opposite sides of the bridge’s entrance ramp — a warning to blacks seeking escape.) So Samuel Kennedy followed his mother across the railroad tracks. On the way, the remaining family members gathered driftwood and salvaged bits of the burned houses, anything wooden and somewhat stable. They carried the items to the river’s edge. The raft, when it was ready, was a shoddy but seaworthy vessel. It took them hours of paddling to finally wobble the improvised lifeboat across the Mississippi. Safe on the Missouri side, Samuel looked back at the glowing city. The screams of its residents drifted over the water. It was a sound he’d never forget. Even in wartime (the U.S. had entered World War I in April), news of the massacre dominated every local paper, and what reporters described was nothing less than mass murder. The massacre’s victims, wrote St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter Carlos Hurd in one of the first published eyewitness accounts, had been issued a “death warrant” based only on the color of their skin. “I saw man after man,” Hurd recounted, “with hands raised, pleading for his life, surrounded by groups of men — men who had never seen him before and knew nothing about him except that he was black and saw them administer the historic sentence of intolerance, death by stoning.”

The mob-driven chaos raged until the afternoon of July 3. Later attempts to calculate the death toll were complicated by widespread dumping and burning of bodies, but most historians estimate that between 40 and 200 people perished and hundreds more were injured. The white mobs further destroyed hundreds of black homes, as well as businesses and industries perceived to have employed the “undesirable negroes.” round 7,000 black residents fled to St. ouis. Many stayed there permanently, choosing to forsake the city which had so viciously cast them out. There were no terms for this sort of catastrophe. What does it mean when a mother and child are shot, one after the other, and then thrown into a burning house to die, owing only to the color of their skin? The words for “genocide” and “ethnic cleansing” were decades from invention. Some historians would eventually borrow the word “pogrom,” used for the wave of ethnic killings that targeted Jews in Russia in the 1880s. There is another word to describe what happened in East St. Louis in 1917, and it is the term Samuel


During the violence of July 2, o cers used billy clubs to break photographers cameras. Photos of the aftermath, including the one at left, were published by the NAACP magazine The Crisis in September 1917. Above, white rioters burned hundreds of black-owned homes, in many cases shooting residents who ed the ames. | PHOTO VIA THE CRISIS

Kennedy used when he finally told his own sons what he had witnessed that terrible summer. “The story that was passed to us by our father, by our uncle, by our aunts and cousins who were all survivors — they called it ‘the race war,’” recalls Terry Kennedy, a St. Louis city alderman like his father. Samuel Kennedy represented the city’s 18th ward from 1967 until his death in 1988. Terry Kennedy pointedly avoids referring to a “race riot.” “It wasn’t a riot for them,” he says of survivors like his father. “It was a fight for their very life and existence.” There are streets in East St. Louis that lead nowhere but the past. Next to a college campus parking lot, a curb seems to open into a thoroughfare. The pavement runs about a foot and abruptly ends, as if swallowed into an otherwise well maintained field of grass. There are other ghost roads like this one, some still showing century-old red brick poking through the ground. When those bricks were first laid, the land where Southern Illinois University’s East St. Louis Center

currently sits held a neighborhood of black and white families, segregated by mere blocks and crammed up against a railway line. There are no known living survivors of the East St. Louis race war, but many people still want to mark its 100th anniversary. Six weeks before the actual date, on the last Friday in May, the East St. Louis 1917 Centennial Commission kicks off a two-day conference in one of the college’s multipurpose rooms, aiming to commemorate the deadly events and to remember those who were lost. The keynote speaker is historian r. Charles umpkins. Through first hand survivor interviews and years of research, Lumpkins came to the conclusion that there was more to the destruction than just some random or inevitable explosion of racial hatred. The violence, he argued in his 2008 book American Pogrom: The East St. Louis Race Riot and Black Politics, had been fomented not only by union leaders wishing to rid the city of strikebreakers, but also corrupt white businessmen who sought to end black political influence. “It’s been painted as a race riot,

white against black, black against white, white folks shooting at black folks and black folks shooting at white folks,” umpkins says, addressing a crowd of about 60. But that wasn’t the case, he says. Urging them to preserve and study East St. Louis’ bloody past, Lumpkins notes the horrific events of uly and played a significant role in the country’s broader history of anti-black atrocities. In the race war’s shadow, early civil rights icons like NAACP co-founder W.E.B. DuBois and anti-lynching journalist Ida B. Wells rose to even greater influence, as their work documented the atrocities and shamed complicit East St. Louis city officials. The attention on East St. ouis inspired the “Silent arade” on July 28, 1917, that drew 10,000 blacks in New York City to protest lynchings and call for a federal investigation into the “race riot.” It is considered among the first examples of public protest for black civil rights. For Lumpkins, though, the broader historical importance cannot eclipse the incomprehensible human suffering. “As a historian, I try to choke back the tears,” he continues. “These are human beings, and that’s what we have to remember. Some of you have roots in this city, and that hurt, that trauma, might be passed on down from one generation to the next.” For many years, the appalling stories were passed generation to generation, and the official records were largely forgotten. The transcripts of survivor interviews, which were conducted in the following year by congressional investigators, spent nearly 50 years collecting dust before SIU-Carbondale sociology professor Elliott Rudwick stumbled upon them while researching his groundbreaking riverfronttimes.com

1964 book Race Riot at East St. Louis, July 2, 1917. Still, it took 80 years to have a major commemoration acknowledging what East St. Louis’ black community lived through in 1917. It was Samuel Kennedy’s twin sons who organized the 1997 event, nine years after their father’s death. Two decades later, on the second day of the 2017 centennial conference, Terry and Dhati Kennedy enter the SIUE auditorium dressed in white dashikis and accompanied by a line of drummers. For the Kennedy brothers, the events of 1917 are not subjects of academic curiosity. The stories are an essential piece of their family bloodline, passed father to son. Today those stories are preserved by a dwindling number of storytellers. “ y father told me,” says hati, taking the microphone from his brother, “he saw people burned to death. How they’d run out of their houses like human torches, and white people just shooting them down. How people were dragged off the street car and beat and hanged.” Samuel Kennedy had tried to suppress the horrific memories of his youth. But his sons were perceptive. They heard snippets from their uncles and cousins. When Dhati was fourteen, he found himself alone with his father on a drive. Dhati worked up the courage and asked him the question that dogged his childhood: “What happened to our family in East St. ouis?” The elder Kennedy pulled the car over, and the story spilled out. He told Dhati about the beatings, the fires, and, in methodical detail, the raft and the nighttime journey over the Mississippi.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Continued on pg 16

RIVERFRONT TIMES

15


the Bintelli beast

HAS ARRIVED! 49 CC SCOOTERS STARTING AT $995* * NOT

SHOWN

FINANCING AVAIL ABLE 49 CC

9804 ST. CHARLES ROCK ROAD • ST. LOUIS MO 63074 (314) 942-3200 • ROCKROADSCOOTERS.COM

Candy • Salt Water Taffy • Gifts • Posters Tin Signs • Over 400 + Sodas • Gags & More!

Race War Continued from pg 15 During an interview at St. Louis City Hall one week after the centennial conference, Terry breaks in at this part of his brother’s story. “When we learned the raft as children, it of course seemed kind of loony,” he says. But he notes with relish that when he contacted his grandmother’s side of the family, which had moved years ago to Washington, D.C., he was surprised to hear that they too had grown up hearing about the makeshift raft and daring river journey. “There had to be some validity to it,” concludes Terry. “They had the exact same story.” The Kennedy brothers’ desire to honor the sacrifices of their father and other survivors spurred them to action in 1997. At the 80th anniversary commemoration, hundreds marched through downtown East St. Louis as a memorial to those who died on its streets. By 1997, the survivors who were able to attend were already into their 70s and 80s. One woman, Scotia Calhoun, was 100 years old. She had lived on Piggot Avenue in the south part of town, and she herself had watched the Kennedy house collapse in flames. Dhati remembers the moment he told her his name. She said, “Baby, your people all died.” Dhati smiles at the memory. “But they didn’t,” he told her. “They didn’t all die.” To anyone paying attention, the weeks and months preceding July 2, 1917, contained plenty of evidence that a disaster was on the horizon for East St. Louis. In the 20th century’s first two decades, waves of Southern blacks followed reports of jobs in Northern industrial towns. The positions, they were told, were high paying, affording the prospect for families to escape the lynchings and servitude that remained in place in the South. Thousands arrived in East St. Louis, but the hopeful working men found themselves pitted as strikebreakers against the unions, whose lengthy battles with the area’s smelting plants and stockyards had resulted in hundreds of white workers walking off the ob in protest. The bitterness of these white workers was further abetted by a city notorious for crime and almost completely given to vice and corruption. Then a community of about 60,000, East St. Louis sat just over the river from its bigger, boomtown cousin. St. Louis boasted a population

16

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

As far as I know, an East St. Louis attorney told angry white residents, “there is no law against mob violence. of 600,000 and growing. Just 5 percent of its residents were black. East St. Louis’ black occupancy, meanwhile, would roughly double in the seven years leading up to 1917 — swelling to about one sixth of the Illinois city’s total residents. One year prior, the residents of St. Louis passed a ballot measure putting segregation laws on the books. While Illinois had outlawed such formal discrimination, racism and separatism persisted in East St. Louis all the same. And while factories, smelting plants and railway lines provided employment, East St. Louis was less


Left, this photo shows the remains of buildings at 4th Street and Division Avenue. Property damage was estimated in the millions of dollars. | VIA SANDRA PFEIFER At right, Mineola Mc ee, 2 , was leaving an outhouse when police o cers and soldiers opened fire. Her story later horrified a congressional in uiry. | PHOTO VIA THE CRISIS

a city than a collection of lawless fiefdoms stitched together into a bad caricature of a civil government and law enforcement. Factories were intentionally built outside city limits to stiff the city on tax revenue. The mayor was barely a figurehead; the actual power brokers were businessmen and industrialists whose bribes animated their pick of corrupt politicians. Into this environment entered thousands of black workers; they made their homes just blocks from whites, shopped in the same downtown stores and, crucially, were seen as competition for the same jobs. The tension of this relatively sudden integration was later described in a congressional investigation, whose final report was delivered one year after the riots. “White women were afraid to walk the streets at night,” the report claimed, characterizing the concerns of East St. Louis’ white residents and business leaders. “Negros sat in their laps on street cars; black women crowded them from their seats; they were openly insulted by drunken Negroes. The low saloons and gambling houses were crowded with idle vaga-

bonds; the dance halls in the Negro sections were filled with prostitutes, half clad, in some instances naked, performing lewd dances.” By 1917, tensions between white workers and black strikebreakers intensified. rominent members of the black community began to see the coming storm all too clearly. That summer, blacks began drilling in secret, gathering arms and preparing for the worst. On May 28, 1917, a local man named lexander lannigan took control of a city council meeting. Flannigan, described in the congressional report as “an attorney of some ability and no character,” advised the crowd that blacks couldn’t move into the neighborhood if they never reached the front door. “ s far as I know,” he told the people assembled, “there is no law against mob violence.” Numbering over 1,000, the white mob fanned into the streets, beating several black bystanders and burning a handful of homes and business. On this occasion, however, soldiers from Illinois National Guard were able to halt the violent tide before people started dying.

ressure built over the next month. As the Argus indicated, unprovoked beatings happened daily, and the violent attacks increased in frequency and severity. At this point, it would only take a spark to set the whole town ablaze. One hundred years later, on a recent afternoon, SIUE professor and East St. Louis historian Andrew Theising angles his red Nissan SUV out of the college parking lot and hangs a right onto 8th Street. There are no street signs, however, so Theising counts the blocks until he gets to Bond Avenue. In 1917, “all this used to be houses,” he says, gesturing as he drives to barren stretches of gravel crowded by vegetation and overhanging trees. He pulls up to 10th Street and Bond. It was here, on the evening of July 1, that two plainclothes police officers drove through the intersection in a black Model T Ford. “There had been some shooting in the neighborhood, over at 17th and arket,” Theising recounts. crowd of several hundred armed blacks, drawn by the ringing of the church bell, arrived to defend the neighborhood from additional drive-by attacks. riverfronttimes.com

“So this unmarked police car came,” says Theising, “and it would have been totally dark, no street lights down this way. Right about here is where the officers were shot.” The next day, the blood spattered and bullet-riddled vehicle sat parked across the street from the police station, and the grim sight attracted a hostile crowd of white men. In his 2008 book Never Been a Time, St. Louis journalist Harper Barnes cites the accounts of newspapermen on the scene who witnessed a sharply dressed lawyer named John Seymour approach the mob. “[Seymour] said he would be happy to defend anyone who could ‘avenge the murders of the two policemen,’” Barnes writes. “The crowd cheered. Policemen standing nearby bantered with the angry white men, and it became apparent to bystanders that they were making it clear, intentionally or not, that they would do nothing that day to stop white men from killing blacks.” olice officers and soldiers would later be implicated for much worse than offering tacit approval to the violence. Continued on pg 18

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

17


Race War Continued from pg 17

BRING IN YOUR METAL

WEIGH YOUR METAL

GET PAID FOR THE METAL

“broadway LOCATION”

3144 N BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS MO 63147 314-231-1938

“RIVER LOCATION”

www.chauvincoffee.com

300 E. NAGEL, ST. LOUIS, MO 63111 314-638-1122

PSCMETALS.COM

HURT & NOT SURE WHERE TO TURN?

ALEXANDER A. WOLFF ATTORNEY AT LAW • 314-584-4105

I handle auto, truck, motorcycle, and bicycle crashes, slip & falls and product liability cases. Free consultation, no obligation.

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. This disclosure is required by rule of the Supreme Court of Missoui.

18

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

Two policemen and three soldiers were accused of shooting the arm off a twenty-year-old woman. “Instead of being guardians of the peace,” the congressional report noted, “they became part of the mob.” Additional reinforcements from the Illinois National Guard marched into town in the early hours of July 3. The divisions deployed immediately, quelling the most intense violence by placing hundreds of white rioters under arrest. By then, thousands had fled across bridges to Missouri. Some 1,500 blacks sheltered in East St. Louis municipal buildings; when they finally emerged, the city that greeted them must have looked like a hellscape. More than 300 buildings had been burned, leaving entire neighborhoods decimated. The official death total came to nine white men and 39 black men, women and children. It was an absurdly low estimation. Other accounts placed the black death toll as high as 500. Contemporary historians like Theising believe the number is closer to 100. “Illinois had a reparation law, and here’s where the inability to count bodies really hurt people financially,” he notes. “We’ve tried to find coroner records, and so much of them have been destroyed, if they were even accurate to begin with.” An unknown number of victims were burned inside houses, though it’s debatable whether the flames could have completely obliterated the bodies. It’s more likely that Cahokia Creek hid many atrocities. In 1917, the waterway ran through the sunken city, coursing under bridges and streets before washing out into the Mississippi. Theising stops the car at an unassuming intersection that faces an old railway bridge. Piles of grain dropped by passing semis swirl on the pavement. Theising consults a printed map, a list of “sacred sites” he’s compiled to help visitors taking self-guided tours. “I think it was in this very spot,” he says, tracing dotted red lines on the paper, which show where the creek once ran. “Either the bodies would have floated underneath us right now, if they were dumped at Broadway, or they were just dumped here. I think they were just dumped from here. This was closer to where people died.” In the fall of 1917, more than 100 people, white and black, were indicted on crimes including murder, rioting and arson. Thirteen people, all black, stood trial for the murder of the two

plain-clothed detectives on July 1. Ten were ultimately jailed with fourteen-year sentences. The Illinois Supreme Court upheld the convictions. But in the end, only a handful of the white mob’s ringleaders faced jail time, and police officers and soldiers who were found to have participated in the massacre largely escaped punishment. That was not true of one black resident who tried to defend his community from the attackers. A black dentist named Leroy Bundy had organized the self-defense forces that repulsed the white mob from attacking deeper into black neighborhoods. He was accused of causing the riots, and after a sham trial he was found guilty and sentenced to life in prison. Bundy’s conviction was overturned in 1920 by the Illinois Supreme Court. In the end, despite a congressional investigation and widespread outrage at inhumane crimes committed against innocent blacks, there was little justice for the victims. The colonel behind the bungled first response of the Illinois National Guard avoided a court martial and was allowed to resign, an offer similarly extended to city’s police chief. East St. Louis mayor Fred Mollman was indicted for “malfeasance in office,” but the charge was later dropped. Mollman


The remains of a century-old brick road, left, runs partway through a grass field in East St. Louis. Top right, in 1917, hundreds of black families escaped to St. Louis via the Municipal Bridge. At True Light Baptist Church, bottom right, a ringing bell mustered black defenders on July 2, 1917. | PHOTOS VIA DANNY WICENTOWSKI

served out the rest of his two-year term and then retired from politics. Although a grand jury indicted seven police officers for murder, rioting and conspiracy, state prosecutors ultimately dropped the charges, and instead allowed three officers to plead guilty to rioting and pay a $150 fine. No city or police official faced further punishment for their inaction on July 2 and 3. The mob spirit seemed to melt back into the fabric of East St. Louis. The city moved on. There are still those who remember the race war. At first, the task of keeping the stories of East St. Louis’ bloodiest summer alive fell to journalists and historians. Although the last decade saw a spike in scholarship on the subject, the strongest contemporary push for preserving the race war’s legacy has come from descendants like Ann Walker, whose family arrived in East St. Louis in 1910. In the early 2000s, Walker won a grant to develop programming that would highlight the African American experience in Illinois. That experience, naturally, included the state’s three major race riots of the twentieth century. Crisscrossing the state, Walker had

found groups of interested community members and amateur historians — at least that was the case in Springfield, where in 1908 a white mob murdered a half-dozen blacks and burned businesses and homes. It was also the case in Chicago, where a massive 1919 race riot was sparked when a white beachgoer struck a swimming black youth in the head with a rock, causing him to drown. But in East St. Louis, there were blank stares. The city’s residents did not know the stories behind the intersections they passed each day, the blood that had been spilled there. “East St. Louis was a weakest link on the chain, in terms of cultural memory,” says Walker. “I’d get these kind of responses: ‘I’ve never heard of that,’ or ‘Can you tell me more?’” Walker organized commemorations in East St. Louis, events that ran from 2004 to 2006. But even with her efforts, the Kennedys’ work in 1997 and this year’s conference, the atrocities remain under the radar for many locals. Even today, East St. Louis still lacks a permanent monument to the events of 1917. Aside from history books, museums and courses in African American studies, few learn of its horrors.

The passage of time has taken much from East St. Louis. Its population dwindled from a peak of more than 80,000 in the 1950s to less than 30,000 today. The city, suggests Walker, is an example of how the horrors of trauma can suppress its transmission. “My people don’t want to talk about it,” she says. “They don’t want to talk about the race riots, and a lot of that is because the history has been whitewashed. It casts us in a weak light, instead of understanding that having survived all of that is a demonstration of strength, not weakness.” Marvin Teer grew up knowing the difference. His father had been a toddler when his family fled East St. Louis in 1917, but he made sure to pass the stories of resistance and bravery to his own children. It wasn’t just men and women butchered like sheep. There were heroes, like the mortician who delivered refugees to safety in St. Louis — and then returned to Illinois with a hearse full of guns to arm the black defenders. “Whites came into the black neighborhood after a church was set afire, and they were met with sincere resistance, unexpected resistance,” Teer riverfronttimes.com

says, recalling one of his father’s stories. “It was empowerment. It was saying, ‘You will not kill us indiscriminately.’’’ Teer doesn’t maintain rosy illusions about the events of 1917. The horror that shocked a nation faded quickly, and the succeeding decades brought with them segregation and Jim Crow. Teer’s father, Marvin Sr., spent years working in white country clubs that would not accept him or his children. Still, Teer’s father would later become a schoolteacher at Vashon High School and go on to found a transportation company serving seniors. His son is now a state judge who presides over workers’ compensation cases. Marvin O. Teer Sr. died in 2010, at age 97. He may have been the last living survivor of the race war. “I don’t think of it as something epic,” explains Teer. The stories of destruction and survival are part of a path, one traced from slavery to the present day. He mentions Santayana’s oft-cited quotation — that “those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” “It’s one thing to remember something,” he points out. “It’s another to talk about it.” 

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

19


Eclipse Viewing Party

ucks, science Reserve your viewing space online! Food trucks, science ages. activities, art displays, and fun for al ages. Monday, August 21, 10AM-3PM THE BOOM BOOM BOMBSHELLS BURLESQUE SHOWS EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7 PM: DINNER SHOW 10 PM: LATE NIGHT SHOW 500 N. 14TH STREET

Tickets and Reservations: 314-436-7000 or theboomboomroomstl.com

Ride the 'Solar Expres ' parking shuttle

le

WHERE THERE’S CHOICE,

THERE’S HOPE.

ing online. limited.

Reserve yourCare premiere vieUp wing spactoe and24parkiWeeks ng online. Abortion

FIVE STAR FUN!

Visit fb.com/GatewayEscapeRooms to see our reviews.

Use coupon code RFT10 and save $10 on an escape room. Save even more when you have dinner, drinks or appetizers at Joey B’s here in Concord Plaza. What a fantastic night out for couples and groups.

Book Now - GatewayEscapeRooms.com

Advanced registration required, spaces are limited.

Appointments are available this week. Most women need only one visit. Ask for student discount.

618-451-5722 | HOPECLINIC.COM

Late Nights &Live Music FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND:

SATURDAY, JULY 1

m

www.VisitSteGen.com

Celebrate on the Center Line

Ste. Genevieve is on the line of maximum totality!

Two-day Eclipse Festival

COMING UP IN JULY:

Music Festival and Beer Garden

Facebook.com/stegen2017eclipse | 800.373.7007 Eclipse Viewing Party

Reserve your viewing space online! Food trucks, science activities, art displays, and fun for all ages. Monday, August 21, 10AM-3PM Ride the 'Solar Express' parking shuttle Reserve your premiere viewing space and parking online. Advanced registration required, spaces are limited.

20

SUNDAY, JULY 2

1-5pm • Scott & Karl

in the heart of historic downtown Ste. Genevieve. Sunday, August 20, noon-9PM

373.7007

12-4pm • Arvell and Company Duo 5-9pm • The Great Escape Acoustic

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

www.VisitSteGen.com

Facebook.com/stegen2017eclipse | 800.373.7007

SATURDAY, JULY 8

1-5pm • Sean Holland Band 6-9pm • Dave Bennett

SUNDAY, JULY 9

1-5pm • Encore Trio SUNSET DINNERS FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS AT 7PM BY RESERVATION ONLY

201 Montelle Drive | Augusta, MO 63332 | 888.595.WINE | www.Montelle.com


CALENDAR

21

W E E K O F J U N E 2 9 - J U LY 5

THURSDAY 06/29 Vagical Mystery Tour It’s no secret that Missouri’s legislators enjoy rescinding the rights of women, minorities and the poor. That’s why the Lady Parts Justice League has leaped into action. The collective gathers comics and writers and sends them out on the road to help raise awareness of attacks on reproductive rights and other social injustices in cities hard-hit by repressive laws, through stand-up comedy and improv. The group then goes one step beyond by inviting health clinic workers and community activists to the show, giving them the opportunity to speak directly with a crowd of people who want to help but may not know how best to do so. The Lady Parts Justice League brings its Vagical History Tour to Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room (6504 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.blueberryhill.com) for a 7:30 p.m. show. Performers include Lizz Winstead (co-founder of the LPJL and co-creator of The Daily Show), Joyelle Johnson, Leah Bonnema and the Upright Citizens Brigade company Buzz Off, Lucille. Tickets are $15 to $20.

FRIDAY 06/30 Grand Center Theatre Crawl St. Louis’ theater scene is strong enough that you can see thought-provoking and entertaining work almost every weekend of the year. But only one weekend offers three months’ worth of shows in a single shot. The Grand Center Theatre Crawl gathers 24 companies and then lets you loose on them. Each company will perform a short work from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday (June 30 to July 1) at various venues in Grand Center. To

Lizz Winstead leads the Vagical History Tour to St. Louis to fight for women’s rights. | MINDY TUCKER

BY PAUL FRISWOLD ensure everybody doesn’t lump up at the same show, you need to register through www.stlpublicradio.org. You’ll then be emailed a starting venue once the first show ends, you’re free to ramble through Grand Center, catching plays as you can. Admission is free; participating companies include Upstream Theater, That Uppity Theatre Company and Theatre Nuevo, which will be performing “The History of Mexicans in 10 Minutes.”

Office Space Mike Judge struck a nerve with his second film, e Spa e. The film captures the mind-numbing insanity of the middle management chain of command, the button-down thinking of corporate

problem solvers and the annoying habits of testy o ce e uipment. Peter ibbons is an o ce drone who’s being killed by his job. He goes to a hypnotherapist to assuage some of his stress, but the doctor dies halfway through the session, leaving him in a state of permanent relaxation. His new casual attitude allows him to blow off work so well that he’s bumped up to management. When he learns his friends are marked for downsizing, he hatches a scheme to get rich before cashing out. Who weeps for the o ce drones e pa e weeps for thee. The cult classic screens at 11:55 p.m. Friday and Saturday (June 30 and July 1) at the Landmark Tivoli Theatre (6350 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www. landmarktheatres.com) as part of the Reel Late movie series. Tickets are $8. riverfronttimes.com

SATURDAY 07/01 Show Me Kicks Expo Sneakerheads and the shoe-curious will descend on the Old Post ce ( live treet) today from noon to 5 p.m. for the third installment of the Show Me Kicks Expo. This sneaker conference brings together dealers and collectors to buy, sell and trade high performance and higher style athletic shoes. If there’s a pair of vintage Jordans that you outgrew and wish you could get back, this might be your best chance to find them. Tickets for the Shoe Me Kicks Expo are $12 to $20; visit www.showmekicks.com for advance tickets and more information.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Continued on pg 22

RIVERFRONT TIMES

21


CALENDAR Continued from pg 21 Baseball Weekend Have you ever wanted to undertake a baseball road trip, traveling from stadium to stadium and making summer memories he only thing holding you back is the expense and your own lack of time. Well, in St. Louis you can live out your dream of fields without breaking the bank or bankrupting your vacation days. Every summer the River City Rascals and the Gateway Grizzlies play a home-and-home series, and since they’re minor league teams, tickets are affordable enough that you can bring the husband and the kids. The Rascals host the Grizzlies at 6:35 p.m. Friday and Saturday (June 30 and July 1) at CarShield Field (TR Hughes Boulevard and Tom Ginnever Avenue, O’Fallon; www.rivercityrascals.com), and Friday just so happens to be Rick Ankiel bobblehead night. The two teams face off again at 6:35 p.m. Sunday, July 2, at the Grizzlies’ GCS Ballpark (2301 Grizzlie Bear Boulevard, Sauget, Illinois; www. gatewaygrizzlies.com). That Sunday night in Sauget is All-American Weekend, so the kids get to run the bases after the game and there will be fireworks. ickets for Rascals’ home games are $5 to $25; Grizzlies’ tickets are $6 to $45. Those higher-end prices are for multiple people to attend, by the way. If you want to go for the trifecta, you could hit Busch Stadium on Monday and Tuesday (July 3 and 4), and see the St. Louis Cardinals take on the Florida Marlins; tickets start at $10.90. Do you have it in you to visit three ballparks in four days ou’re a t. Louisan; you probably do.

Topdog/Underdog Brothers Lincoln and Booth have fallen on hard times. Their parents abandoned them while the boys were teenagers, and as adults they’re now forced to share a small apartment. Lincoln used to be one of New York’s best three-card monte hustlers, but he gave it up after a member of his crew was killed; now he works as an Abraham Lincoln impersonator in an arcade. Booth wants his older brother to teach him to work the cards so Booth can be the new king of the hustle, but Lincoln refuses. As black men in America, their options are limited, 22

RIVERFRONT TIMES

The Show Me Kicks Expo celebrates sneakerhead culture. | SHOTBYCT.COM and Booth’s mounting frustration with his brother and Lincoln’s regrets about how his life is going will limit them even more. Suzan-Lori Parks won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play Topdog/Underdog, which casts the current state of black America as a case of sibling rivalry writ large. JPEK CreativeWorks Theatre presents Topdog/ Underdog at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday (June 29 to July 1) at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.kranzbergartscenter. org). Tickets are $25.

SUNDAY 07/02 Fair St. Louis Like a mighty red, white and blue phoenix, Fair St. Louis rises once again from the heart of Forest Park (www.fairsaintlouis.org) to thrill the city and celebrate Independence Day. This year’s Fair St. Louis takes advantage of the holiday weekend to spread over four days. The 135th VP Parade starts at 9:30 a.m. at the intersection of Broadway and Market streets in downtown St. Louis. The Fair proper starts at 1 p.m. Sunday, 4 p.m. Monday and 1 p.m. Tuesday (July 2 to 4), with family-friendly entertainment in the Purina/Ameren Festival Zone, zip lines and human slingshot rides, a fairway and an interactive zone. Music headliners are Akon (Sunday), 3 Doors Down (Monday) and Jake Owen (Tuesday), with fireworks starting at p.m. Sunday and Tuesday and at 10 p.m. sharp Monday. As always, admission to Fair St. Louis is free.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

TUESDAY 07/04 Heritage & Freedom Fest Are you ourth-of-July’d out yet You’d better not be, because O’Fallon’s Heritage & Freedom Fest is going strong. The annual celebration of America’s birthday, rock & roll and fireworks takes place from 2 to 10 p.m. Sunday, 2 to 11 p.m. Monday and noon to 10 p.m. Tuesday (July 2 to 4) at the Ozzie Smith Sports Complex (900 T.R. Hughes Boulevard, O’Fallon; www.heritageandfreedomfest.com), and it is jampacked with patriotic fun. Sunday is family night, with no concerts or fireworks but plenty of entertainment in the form of carnival rides, a Midway full of games, a bungee trampoline and the Bubble Bus. Monday and Tuesday bring everything unday had plus fireworks (at 10:15 and 9:30 p.m., respectively) and concerts by Creedence Clearwater Revisited and World Classic Rockers, which features former members of Steppenwolf, Santana and Journey. Admission is free, although there is a nominal fee for the carnival ride tickets.

WEDNESDAY 07/05 Super Mario Bros. The 1993 film Super Mario Bros. is reviled by its stars and critics. And yet because of the profound love people have for the video game that inspired it, the live-action film still main-

tains a devoted following. Bob Hoskins and John Leguizamo star as brothers Mario and Luigi, who are New York-based plumbers. When they uncover a parallel world populated by highly-evolved dinosaurs, they get sucked into a fight to defend their world from a saurian incursion masterminded by the evil King Koopa (Dennis Hopper). It’s kind of a mess, but a lovable mess. Keep your eyes open for psychobilly rocker Mojo Nixon as Toad, a protest singer, and Sonic Youth’s original drummer Richard Edson as one of King Koopa’s henchmen, Spike. The Webster Film Series presents Super Mario Bros. as this month’s Strange Brew offering. You can catch it at p.m. at chlafly ottleworks (7260 Southwest Boulevard, Maplewood; www.webster. edu film-series). ickets are .

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum The Muny has been a tradition for 99 years, outlasting such previous St. Louis favorites as the jitterbug, the horse-drawn carriage and American League baseball (sorry, Brownies fans). The last of its double-digit seasons features seven musicals, and the cream of the crop just might be A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. This modern take on ancient Roman farces has music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim (he’s pretty good) and a book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart (both uite talented themselves). t’s a fast-paced and uick-witted show about Pseudolus, a slave who wishes to buy his freedom, and his young master Hero, a love-struck youth. he pair set off on a uest to fulfill each other’s dreams, only to get entangled in a never-ending series of mistaken identities and bungled schemes. It’s the perfect entertainment for a night under the stars, in the much-cooler-thanyou-think Muny (those newish fans make a huge difference). A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum takes place at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday through Tuesday (July 5 to 11) at the Muny in Forest Park (1 Theatre Drive, www.muny.org). Tickets are $15 to $95, but you can also watch the show for free from select seats. n


4TH OF JULY SALES EVENT MONDAY JULY 3RD & TUESDAY JULY 4TH NATURAL BRIDGE LOCATION

BRIDGETON LOCATION ONLY

1/2 OFF SALE!

BY THE POUND SALE!

EVERYTHING IN STORE 50% OFF

$1.99 PER POUND CLOTHING

(EXCLUDING BRAND NEW TOWELS AND SHOES)

(CLOTHING ONLY, SOLD AT $1.99 PER LB.)

2 DAY HALF OFF SALE ONLY AT:

2 DAY HALF OFF SALE ONLY AT:

7400 NATURAL BRIDGE NORMANDY, MO 63121 JULY 3 - 8AM-9PM JULY 4 - 8AM-8PM

3417 N. LINDBERGH BLVD. BRIDGETON, MO 63074 JULY 3 - 8AM-9PM JULY 4 - 8AM-8PM

PLAN YOUR 4TH OF JULY AT

STEELVILLE’S FAMILY RIVER RESORT! CAMPING LODGING RVING RAFTS CANOES K AYA K S

WINERY & EVENT VENUE

TUBES HIKING POOL BEACHES

Your Summer Patio Seating Destination! LUNCH • DINNER • WEDDINGS • EVENTS

Call 1-800-426-7238 or email rafting@theraftingco.com to make your reservation!

open wednesday-sunday 1 7 8 0 E A S T S TAT E R T 1 5 B E L L E V I L L E , I L 6 2 2 2 1 WWW.THEWEINGARTEN.COM • 618-257-WINE

FOLLOW US ON

SOCIAL MEDIA

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

23


24

FILM

Mija (Ahn Seo-hyun) and Okja enjoy a pastoral existence in the mountains of Korea. | © Netflix [REVIEW]

That’ll Do, Superpig Bong Joon-ho’s film about a labgrown pig is charming, but fails in its ambition to be more than that Written by

ROBERT HUNT Okja

Directed by Bong Joon-ho. Written by Bong Joon Ho and Jon Ronson. Starring Tilda Swinton, Jake Gyllenhaal, Paul Dano and Ahn Seo-hyun. Begins streaming on Wednesday, June 28, on Netflix.

B

ong Joon-ho’s Okja can be called a lot of things, but dull isn’t one of them. It moves like a theme-park ride, and while there may be fleeting glimpses of interesting things going by, it’s the movement that matters. Though it brushes past a few serious subjects — commercial meat production, for one — the decision not to rest on any of them for very long appears to be deliberate. It’s a fantasy/action

24

RIVERFRONT TIMES

film that raises heavy issues but refuses to take them too seriously. The hero and title character of Okja is a gigantic pig, roughly the size of a bus. She’s been developed through genetic engineering and left in the care of Mija (Ahn Seohyun), a young girl living in the mountains of Korea. Created as part of a campaign by the ubiquitous Mirando Corporation to burnish its eco-friendly image, Okja’s decade of free-range living comes to an end when she is whisked off to New York to compete against other animals for the title of World’s Greatest Superpig — and, eventually, to be repackaged as food in the Mirando slaughterhouse. Trying to hold on to her gargantuan friend, Mija is challenged by a stream of eccentric characters who want to exploit, rescue or cook the pig, including the dogmatic Animal Liberation Front headed by Paul Dano; Dr. Johnny (Jake Gyllenhaal), a washed-up television star/zoologist; and the rival Mirando siblings (both played by Tilda Swinton), the good cop/bad cop duo of the genetic engineering world. On the surface, Okja is a post-E.T. story of a child and her non-human friend, with many playful scenes of Mija frolicking in nature with her giant companion. The CGI animal

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

doesn’t have much of a personality, but Bong compensates by filling the screen with animated acrobatics inspired by the films of Japan’s Studio Ghibli. In these scenes and for much of its 118 minutes, Okja appears to be little more than a well-made family film, albeit one with language that used to earn an automatic R rating. (Netflix has opted for a self-imposed TV-MA rating rather than submitting the film to the MPAA.) Young viewers are likely to love Mija and her pig, but what will they make off the rest of the film, which lurches back and forth from broad comedy to grim ethical arguments? Bong’s last creation, Snowpiercer, was an erratic, race-against-theclock action film that occasionally came to a halt to introduce leaden, cartoonish villains. Okja goes in so many directions that it makes Snowpiercer seem almost relaxingly monotonous. When they’re not safely reworking the Spielbergian fantasy model, Bong and co-writer Jon Ronson fire satirical pellets in every direction, although it’s sometimes hard to tell what — if anything — their target is. GMOs? Corporate image-building? Steve Irwin imitators? Additionally, this is the second film released this year to use John Denver’s “An-

Okja goes in so many directions that it makes Snowpiercer seem almost relaxingly monotonous. nie’s Song” in what I’m assuming is intended as irony. Even if I understood exactly what was ironic about it, that’s still two times too many. The makers of Okja may have wanted to use their fantastic animated creature to sugarcoat a serious attack on bio-engineering or global capitalism, but somehow things got out of balance, and the already fuzzy message got lost in the child-friendly packaging. But though their serious intentions were simplified into weak caricatures, the central element — a girl and her pig — retains its innocent charm. Okja is a frequently charming fantasy film that distractingly keeps trying to be something bigger. n


riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

25


50

PRIDEFEST 2017 St. Louis Celebrates Pridefest

D

owntown St. Louis was showered with rainbows t h i s we e ke n d a t t h e city’s annual Pridefest. Thousands gathered at Soldiers Memorial Friday, Saturday and Sunday to celebrate the LGBTQIA+ community with live music, food, vendors and the second largest yearly parade in the Gateway City. Sara Bannoura was there to capture the festivities on Sunday. Take a look at all the fun, and start counting down the days until next year’s party. —Photos by Sara Bannoura

26

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

27


New happy hour Monday-Friday 4-7 All day Saturday $4 all drafts wells FOOD AUTHENTIC $4 MEXICAN $13 ON CHEROKEEdomestic STREET!buckets $17 micro buckets $2 sliders and more

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

NEW DRINK MENU • NEW HAPPY HOUR • MONDAY-FRIDAY 4-7 • ALL DAY SATURDAY $4 ALL DRAFTS • $4 WELLS • $13 DOMESTIC BUCKETS • $17 MICRO BUCKETS • $2 SLIDERS AND MORE

50% OFF

MARGARITAS 4-7PM DAILY 2812 CHEROKEE STREET | (314) 240-5990

CHAPARRITOSSTL.COM

GREAT CANS AND SMALL BUNS GOURMET SLIDERS, SALADS & SIDES

All You Can Eat Sushi! High Quality, Fresh Ingredients.

LUNCH $12.99 DINNER $19.99 9528 MANCHESTER ROAD, ROCK HILL; 314-942-6445

@SLIDERHOUSE

SLIDERHOUSESTL

@THESLIDERHOUSE

Authentic MexicAn Food, Beer, And MArgAritAs!

SUNDAYS BUY ONE, GET ONE 50% OFF 910 OL I V E ST R EET • D OW N TOW N • (31 4) 588-7888 • SUSHIAISTL.COM

FAMOU

S FRIED CHICKEN

4TH OF JULY AT PAT’S! EACH NIGHT JULY 2, 3 AND 4 GREAT VIEWS OF FIREWORKS AT 9:30PM FREE LIVE MUSIC BEFORE & AFTER FIREWORKS

2817 cherokee st. st. Louis, Mo 63118 314.762.0691 onco.coM www.tAqueriAeLBr 28

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

POP-UP PATIO FEATURING THE WANDERING SIDECAR BAR QUICK WALK TO FAIR ST. LOUIS

6400 oakland ave, st. louis, mo 63139 | (314) 647-7287

www.patconnollytavern.com


CAFE

29

Circa STL’s menu is a “greatest hits” collection of local foodstuffs, with St. Louis-style pizza, Gerber sandwiches, t-ravs and pork steak all on offer. | MABEL SUEN [REVIEW]

Meet Me in St. Louis Circa STL winningly gives diners a crash course in the city’s culinary history Written by

CHERYL BAEHR Circa STL

1090 Old Des Peres Road, Des Peres; 314394-1196. Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

B

rian Walsh stands in the middle of Circa STL’s dining room like a curator surveying his prized acquisitions. “I’m a preservationist, not a

hoarder,” he insists as his gaze lands upon a reclaimed bar that’s been turned into a display case. Inside are several hundred beer glasses that blend together to the untrained eye. To Walsh, however, each piece of barware represents a unique window into St. Louis — a Falstaff mug here, a Lemp pint glass there — that, given the chance, is waiting to tell the city’s history. Walsh’s interest in collecting began when he was a kid, bumming around with his mother in antique shops. The antithesis of famed de-clutterer Marie Kondo, the St. Ann native was always one to hang on to things. From his First Communion program to his second-grade report card, his interest in retaining his personal effects morphed into an obsession with all things St. Louis when he acquired an old Cardinals “angry bird” scorecard from the year of his birth. From there, he began adding a little bit here and there

to his stockpile until one day he looked at his loot and realized he was onto something. A pipe coverer and insulator by trade, Walsh dabbled in the antique business with a storefront in Florissant, but his real dream has always been to open a small, St. Louis-themed bar and grill. Originally, he envisioned the concept as the centerpiece of an antique mall, but later abandoned that in favor of a standalone restaurant. He searched all over town for the right place before settling on Circa STL’s location in Des Peres, a space that was formerly Rib City, Rick’s Café American and Zydeco Blues. Walsh had wanted a historic spot with exposed brick and tin ceilings, but when he laid his eyes upon the former tenant’s handsome mahogany bar, which used to belong to the Lemp Brewing Company and dated back to the 1880s, he knew he’d found Circa STL’s home. With that component as his anchor, he got to work turning the riverfronttimes.com

large strip mall space into a virtual museum of St. Louis culture. If his is not the largest collection of STL-centric memorabilia in town, it’s certainly a contender. Every inch of the restaurant drips with St. Louis history, from Walsh’s unparalleled vintage beer glass collection to posters to St. Louis-made Koken barber chairs to seats from sports stadiums past. Though structurally the room looks like any other basic bar and grill in town, his artifacts give an otherwise generic room in a west county strip mall the air of one of the city’s classic old-fashioned dive bars. Wa l s h a d m i t s h e i s a n inexperienced restaurateur, but he was able to draw upon his knowledge of local history to come up with the outline of a menu and tasked executive chef Melissa Molden with filling in the details. The result is an at times shockingly affordable

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Continued on pg 30

RIVERFRONT TIMES

29


CIRCA STL Continued from pg 29 (we’re talking $13 steaks) menu that reads like a “greatest hits” roundup of St. Louis cuisine. Not every piece of the city’s culinary history deserves resuscitation, of course. (I’d argue we’re in our golden age right now — and that much of what we ate decades ago was in desperate need of fresh ingredients.) But some of the offerings here provide the sort of approachable comfort that has the power to charm. The nostalgic, straightforward fare is most successful as appetizers. Large, hollowed-out mushrooms caps are stuffed with house-ground sausage, jalapeños, spinach and cheese reminiscent of the sort of starter you’d find at a family Italian restaurant on the Hill. It’s not revolutionary, but the mushroom was well-cooked and the filling appropriately oo y. Spinach-artichoke dip is another solid starter. Akin to creamed spinach, the delicate concoction has a lighter consistency than other examples of the form, allowing the vegetables to take center stage. It’s presented inside two towers of onion rings, which seems odd at first but turns out to be a pleasant pairing for this bar staple. You’d think the dip would seep between the layers of rings, yet it doesn’t, and when you’ve had enough of accompanying tri-colored tortilla chips, the rings provide a nice alternative. Toasted ravioli is Circa STL’s culinary claim to fame. If there’s a larger version in town, I haven’t seen it, with mammoth squares that measure roughly four inches across. But size is not all that matters. Made from wonton skins instead of the classic dough, the raviolis crisp up like a thin potato

at e r G

The dining room features a remarkable collection of St. Louis memorabilia, with many beer-related tchotchkes on display. | MABEL SUEN chip. Unlike the pasty meat goo that is passed off in most versions, Circa STL’s raviolis are stuffed with a blend of house-ground sausage and beef that (gasp) retains a juicy, crumbly texture. Rustic spiced marinara is more tapenade than dipping sauce, making it so each bite contains a generous hunk of tomato. Forget the décor; these alone are worth a visit. There are other successes as well. For anyone who has not experienced the glory of a Gerber sandwich, Circa’s “Loaded Garlic Bread” is a must-try. Garlic butter-

s! e c i Pr

soaked French bread blanketed in shaved ham and molten Provel is open-faced perfection. The salty jus from the ham mingles with the butter and cheese to form a layer that makes it hard to tell where the bread ends and the goo begins. The burger, a no-frills yet solid pub offering, shows that the kitchen can hit a temperature, while St. Louis-style pizza, inspired by the old Luigi’s restaurants, ticks the right boxes — cheese that sticks to the roof of the mouth, sweet sauce, cracker crust. If you’re a native St. Lou-

isan whose experience with the city’s contribution to the national pizza conversation comes from the rectangular pans served in north county, you’ll be satisfied. Circa STL misses on several occasions, however. The “Famous Barr French onion soup” is thin and lacks flavor. alsh admits he and his team have tweaked the recipe in response to customer feedback, but it’s still not there. Meanwhile, the pan-seared cod is tasteless and overcooked to the point of shredding apart. Lemon-

Fresh fish flown in every Friday & Saturday

“The Most Interesting Cheese Selection in St. Louis” Wine • Beer • Spirits • House • Roasted Coffee Fresh Bread • Gourmet Foods • Smoked Meats

314.781.2345 | Big Bend and 40 in Richmond Heights 30

RIVERFRONT TIMES

Continued on pg 33

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

Locally Owned Since 1979


SUNDAY BRUNCH CRUISE JULY 16

SKYLINE

Mi Lindo Michoacan

DINNER CRUISE

ENJOY A DELICIOUS BUFFET, LIVE MUSIC AND THE BEST VIEW OF ST. LOUIS

M E X I C A N R E S TA U R A N T & F U L L B A R

“As Authentic as it Gets!” 1 6 O Z . M A R G A R I TA S $ 3 . 9 9 DURING HAPPY HOUR M O N D AY - F R I D AY 2 - 7 P M 4 5 3 4 GRAVO IS AVENUE - 3 14.2 24.5 495

OYSTERS ON THE HALF-SHELL

AD D IT IO N A L PA R K I N G LOT E AS T O F R E S TAU R A N T

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY!

GATEWAYARCH.COM 877.982.1410 CRUISES RUN APRIL THROUGH OCTOBER. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.

MADE FROM SCRATCH FOOD • FAMILY-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT • 58 BEERS ON TAP • HUGE GLASSED-IN PATIO #ROCKANDBREWSSTL

17258 CHESTERFIELD AIRPORT RD. • CHESTERFIELD, MO 63005 • (636) 536-2739 • ROCKANDBREWS.COM riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

31


F n Fu Drinks t a rG eeople, ,HappyPeop yP ood

ple, o e P y p p a H , d Fun Foo Drinks! Great yPeople,

PenopFoleod, , Happ Fu Fo,od, HayppPeyop Fuopnle ,Gryea le Pe Petop y in,ks! pp pp Drle , Ha , Ha ! pp Food inks Fun Food, Ha Fun FoodGr FutnDr ea ! ! ! kseat Drinks Great Drinks Great DrinGr ople,

PeOP yPE pp , Ha • GR od leT, DRIN Le opEA Pe Fun FoFu y Y, Ha pp PP HA •n od Fo FUN FOOD eat Drinks!

KS!

FUN FOOD inks! Great Dr HAPPY PEOPLE GREAT DRINKS 106 main st. • edwardsville, il

F p p n u a F H , d o o F n u F , , , e e e l l l p p p ! o o o s e e e k P P P n y y y i p p p r p p p D a a a t a H H H , , , e ! d d d r s uF nFoo FunFooGreFautnDFrooink G ! ! ! s s s k k k n n n i i i rG eatDr GreatDr GreatDr

Gr

, yP FunFood,HappyFPuenopFoloed,Happ

le, il Indian Cuisine 106 main st. • edwardsville, edwardsvilAuthentic st. il• 618.307.4830 6 mainwww.clevelandheath.com 10 Spicing St. Louisan’s Taste Buds 618.307.4830 106 main st. • edwardsville, 106 main st. il • edwardsville, 106 main st. • edwardsville, il il 618.307.4830 618.307.4830 www.clevelandheath.com 618.307.4830 618.307.4830 m eath.co for 20 Years! www.clevelandheath.com www.clevelandheath.com www.clevelandheath.com www.clevelandhAuthentic Indian Cuisine 106 main st. • edwardsville, il 618.307.4830 106 main st. • edwardsville, il www.clevelandheath.com 618.307.4830

Happy 4th of Buds July!for 20 Years! Spicing St. Louisan’s Taste

www.clevelandheath.com

Open All Day!

pyPeople, FunFood,Hap ! s GreatDrink

Happy 4th of July! Open All Day! Lunch Buffet Mon-Sun 11:30am-2:30pm Fine Dining: Mon-Thurs 5-9:45pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm, Sun 5-9pm

618-307-4830 WWW.CLEVELANDHEALTH.COM 106 N. MAIN | EDWARDSVILLE, IL

Lunch Buffet Mon-Sun 11:30am-2:30pm Fine Dining: Mon-Thurs 5-9:45pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm, Sun 5-9pm 8501 Delmar @ I-70 • 314-567-6850 www.hoistl.com

, e l p K o N I e R P D y p T p A a E H R , , G d e • o l o e p F L o P n e O u P E F y P p Y p P a P H A , H d • o o D F O n O u F F N U F ! s k n i rG eatDr Drinks! 8501 Delmar @ I-70 • 314-567-6850 www.hoistl.com

eople,

FRESH & AUTHENTIC BRAZILIAN CUISINE BRAZILIAN CHURRASCO

Great

WWW.BRASILIASTL.COM • 314-932-1034 3212 SOUTH GRAND BLVD 32

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


CIRCA STL Continued from pg 30

Circa STL’s toasted ravioli are alone woth a trip to Des Peres. | MABEL SUEN spiked aioli, though enjoyable, wasn’t enough to enhance the lackluster fish. “Chicken Modiga” features a breadcrumb-dusted plum chicken breast that would have been a decent enough dish, were it not covered in a sticky and bland mushroom cream sauce. The “St. Louis Pork Steak Dinner” might evoke thoughts of a backyard barbecue, but instead of a tender, Maull’s-covered hunk of meat, it’s shredded and sparsely drizzled with generic barbecue sauce. As a pulled pork sandwich, it would be fine, but it is a far cry from the staple of St. Louis grilling culture. A St. Louis-themed meal cannot be complete without a slice of gooey butter cake, and Circa STL’s does not disappoint. The inchthick square slice is equal parts buttery yellow cake and gooey topping. I ordered mine to go and was happy that they did not include the vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce that were supposed to garnish it. The cake was good enough to stand on its own. Likewise, Walsh’s collection of artifacts is good enough to stand as a small museum, independent of any food concept. However, talking to him, his earnest passion for every aspect of St. Louis,

A St. Louis-themed meal cannot be complete without a slice of gooey butter cake, and Circa STL’s does not disappoint. including its food, is infectious. And judging from the many diners I witnessed giddily reveling in the chance to be a tourist in their own town, well, they seemed more than happy to nosh on gooey butter cake after taking pictures with a life-sized Tommy Herr cutout. We’re a proud group, we St. Louisans, and Brian Walsh has given us a place to celebrate our shared culinary history — good, bad, deep-fried or toasted. n Circa STL

Toasted raviolis ............................. $9.95 Loaded garlic bread sandwich ..... $8.95 ”St. Louis BBQ Pork Steak Dinner”................... $10.95

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

33


Authentic Hong Kong Style Cuisine

OPEN DAILY 11AM-10PM

DIM SUM 11AM-3PM

FRESH, MADE FROM SCRATCH

GENERAL TSO CHICK EN

8116 OLIVE BLVD. • (314) 567-9997 • WONTONKINGSTL.COM • WIFI AVAILABLE

Greek Restaurant

Great Food, Great Price, Everything Handmade!

Special Lunch Menu Every Day 11am-4pm featuring: Unlimited Soup/Salad - $6.95 Gyro Sandwich or Chicken Gyro Sandwich - $6.95 Steak ($6.30) or Mediterranean Style Burger ($6.95) Lamb ($8.95), Chicken or Pork ($7) Souvlaki Grilled Chicken Sandwich - $6.25 Beer Battered Tilapia - $7 Cod Sandwich - $7

**all sandwiches served with choice of soup, small Greek salad, or fries

Gryo Salad or Grilled Chicken Salad - $6.95 Apollonia Omlette - $6.95 Apollonia Pizza - $6.95 Shish-Kabob Plate $10-11

(314) 353-1488 • 6836 Gravois Ave. | St. Louis, MO 63116

A P O L L O N I A R E S TA U R A N T. C O M

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 2-6PM

BUY ONE, GET ONE

PIZZAS OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE & WELL DRINKS

$2

DOMESTIC BOTTLES

$1

OFF

3153 MORGANFORD RD, ST. LOUIS, MO 63116 34

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

DRAFT BEER

|

(314) 772-9800


T RY O U R CR A Z Y SHAK ES !

CAN’ T D E CI D E BE T WE E N C UPCAKE S O R IC E CR E AM ? PI C K YO U R FAVORITE IC E CR EA M AND PAIR IT WITH ON E OF T HES E C U PCAKES : R ED VELVET G OO EY BUTTER C H O CO L ATE THUN DER M IS SY LICIO US

CRAZY SHAKES

C O M IN G S OON EDWA RDS VIL L E , I L LO CAT I O N ! Jilly’s Cupcake Bar & Café

Jilly’s Ice Cream Bar

8509 DELMAR BLVD. 314-993-5455

20 STEPS TO THE LEFT OF CUPCAKE BAR (JUST AROUND THE CORNER)

JILLYS C UPCAKEBA R. C O M

EVENT S PAC E AVAIL ABL E

Our music rocks & so do our chefs! Open Daily Lunch to Late Night · TinRoofStLouis.com · Downtown 1000 Clark Ave

JULY 2ND

Michael & Mimosas | 10 AM - 2 PM Enjoy brunch to the music of Michael Jackson from a live band & DJ

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

35


TAI KE

lunch dinner brunch cocktails craft beer

St. Louis’ ONLY Taiwanese Restaurant! LUNCH & DINNER TUES-SUN

RFTRFT reader’s choice 2016WINNER winner: READER’S CHOICE

lunch din er brunch co ktails craftber FAVORITE NEW RESTAURANTNEW (2016), BEST APPETIZER SELECTION (2017) FAVORITE RESTAURANT

PINEAPPLE FRIED SHRIMP

GIVE FROZEN

“Arguably the City’s best Cevapi.” (SEASONED GROUND BEEF KEBOB)

RFT &reader’s 2016 winner: SPECIAL CEVAPI GYRO PL ATTER choice $9.99 -CHERYL BAEHR, RFT 5/10/17 FAVORITE NEW RESTAURANT

ANOTHER BAKE

lunch dinner brunch cocktails craft beer

5005 SOUTH KINGSHIGHWAY • 314-354-8333 • YAPISUBS.COM • TUES-SUN 11-8

“It is insanely, marvelously delicious.” -SARAH FENSKE, RFT EDITOR

8604 Olive Blvd - University City - (314) 801-8894

GIVE FROZEN FROZEN GIVE

ANOTHER BAKE ANOTHER BAKE

36

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


SHORT ORDERS

37

[SIDE DISH]

‘This Is the Food I Like Eating’ Written by

CHERYL BAEHR

S

enada Grbic laughs when she tells the story about how her love of cooking got her into trouble at school. At the time, she was in second grade. “We had to do a book report, and our teacher said we could pick out any book we wanted,” the executive chef at Lemmons (5800 Gravois Avenue, 314-899-9898) recalls. “I chose a cookbook, but my teacher said it wasn’t a real book. They had to call my mom because I got into an argument with the teacher about it.” Grbic attributes her passion for food at such a young age to her family’s deep culinary history. Her grandmother was a chef and owned her own restaurant in Bosnia, and her aunt is a chef. Her mother was also a chef and made a name for herself cooking for fellow refugees in St. Louis. When Grbic wanted to spend time with her, it was usually in the kitchen. “If I wanted to hang out with her, she’d just plop me on the counter,” Grbic recalls. “Sometimes she’d let me wash dishes so I could get extra cake for dinner.” Grbic got an early taste of the restaurant business — when she was eight years old, her father bought the restaurant in the city’s Bevo Mill neighborhood that they would turn into Grbic. As a family, they toiled for four years to get the place open for business. Grbic was by her mother’s side in the kitchen, trying out recipes and helping her develop a menu. It was natural that she would gravitate to a career in the culinary arts. After graduating from high school, Grbic attended Le Cordon Bleu in Chicago, then returned to

Senada Grbic inherited her cooking passion from her grandmother and mother, both chefs. | SARA BANNOURA St. Louis to become her mom’s official sous chef. However, Grbic has been branching out beyond her family’s namesake restaurant. This spring, the family opened a reimagined Lemmons in south city, where she serves as executive chef. Though she considers herself very traditional when it comes to her cooking, her approach at Lemmons is to blend her Bosnian roots with American fare. “I grew up eating Bosnian food, but I also grew up eating American food,” Grbic explains. “This is the food I like eating.” Now that she has come into her own with her cooking, Grbic is keeping an eye on a special little helper who seems more than willing to carry on the tradition of women chefs in the family. “I can’t keep my eleven-month-old daughter out of the kitchen,” Grbic sighs. “I’m secretly hoping that she will choose something else, because this is a hard life, but it doesn’t look

like that’s going to happen.” Grbic took a break from Lemmons and Grbic to share her thoughts on the St. Louis food and beverage scene, why she never skips her morning coffee, and why there’s no shame in the square beyond compare. What is one thing people don’t know about you that you wish they did? Everyone thinks that I’m a very serious person, but I think I am way more goofy than serious. What daily ritual is non-negotiable for you? Coffee every morning with my husband. No matter what is going on I will always have a cup of coffee with him. (Bosnian coffee, of course!) If you could have any superpower, what would it be? Super strength. Out of every superpower out there, super strength appeals to me most because my job would be a lot easier if I could riverfronttimes.com

just pick up everything and move it around without a problem. What is the most positive thing in food, wine or cocktails that you’ve noticed in St. Louis over the past year? The coolest thing I have seen happen lately is that people are becoming more open about themselves, and they are showing it through the food they cook and the cocktails they mix. When someone puts their heart and soul into something, you can really tell. What is something missing in the local food, wine or cocktail scene that you’d like to see? Late-night dining! Have you ever gotten off a twelve- to fourteen-hour shift, forgotten to eat all day and come home to find that everything is closed? You just don’t feel like doing any more cooking. Who is your St. Louis food crush? Loryn Feliciano Nalic [of Balkan Treat Box]! This woman is my idol. There isn’t a question out there

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Continued on pg 39

RIVERFRONT TIMES

37


Named Best Pulled Pork in St. Louis by George Mahe!

HOW TO DO SUMMER IN ST. LOUIS: x COURTYARD PATIO x HANDCRAFTED BBQ

x BREWS & BOOZE x FAMILY & FRIENDS

La Vallesana ENJOY A COLD BEER OR MARGARITA ON OUR LARGE OUTDOOR PATIOS!

2727 S. 12TH STREET • ST. LOUIS, MO 63118 • (314) 772-1180

LUNCH • CATERING & TAKEOUT • WED-SUN 11AM-3PM

PATIO BACK BAR NOW OPEN

O P EN 7 DAYS A W E E K 10 A M -10 P M 2801 C H E R OKE E ST R E E T 314 - 7 76 - 4 2 2 3 38

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


SENADA GRBIC Continued from pg 37

A rainbow of fresh-pressed juices are on offer, with a variety of pressed fruits available solo or in combination. | SARA GRAHAM [FIRST LOOK]

THE JUICE OPENS ON CHEROKEE

T

he Juice (2640 Cherokee Street) is bringing fresh-pressed vegetable and fruit juices to the Cherokee district. Co-owned by longtime friends John Randall, Carter McKee and Steve Miles, the bar also offers frescas, a small food menu and late-night hours. The concept was inspired by the plethora of juice bars and juice trucks in Los Angeles. And after a friend introduced him to the unique culture of the Cherokee Street neighborhood, Randall knew it was the ideal location. “It’s a beautiful place,” he says. “It’s an incubator for new ideas. The supportive community is also very conducive to do-it-yourself projects. People really help each other out here. It’s also so much more colorful than other parts of St. Louis with the Latino culture and food.” The juice menu features carrot, beet, cucumber, celery, orange, apple, grapefruit, pineapple, lemon and lime juices — available individually, in combination and with the addition of ginger, wheatgrass, pressed turmeric, fresh greens, guarana, spirulina, chia seeds, hibiscus, matcha or pea or whey protein. Twelveor sixteen-ounce options are available. Described by Randall as a lighter alternative to the heartier juice menu, aqua frescas — which combine fruit, sugar and water — are available in raspberry and cantaloupe.

The halal gyro crepe is topped with tomato, tzatziki and feta. | SARA GRAHAM A short food menu includes the bar’s signature item — a unique spin on the traditional gyro, only made with a sweet crepe. Other options include hearty bagel sandwiches (try a caprese, a salami melt or an egg and cheese with sausage, bacon or ham) and dessert crepes with whipped cream and almonds (strawberry and raspberry jam, banana and Nutella and strawberry banana split). “The breakfast-all-day offerings fill the need for a neighborhood diner,” explains Randall. Not only will you deliver a shot of nutrients to your system, you can also feel good about cocktail hour. Randall’s vision was to offer something different than traditional juice bars. The addition of alcohol allows the space to transform

into a bar scene atmosphere in the evenings. The menu includes a dozen cocktails that help you navigate a likely unfamiliar world of juice and spirits combinations, as well as a build-your-own option for the more adventurous. The concept has been open since May 1, and Randall says business has been good, especially on the weekends: “It’s better than we anticipated.” The juice bar already has a loyal following of regulars that come in several times a week to grab fresh juices to go. The Juice is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to midnight. — Sara Graham

riverfronttimes.com

that I have asked her that she hasn’t known the answer. She is extremely talented in every aspect of the kitchen, and she is one of the most helpful people I have ever met. Watching her cook Balkan food just like my mom and my grandma do is amazing. Who’s the one person to watch right now in the St. Louis dining scene? Alex Cupp, owner of the Stellar Hog. He is extremely skilled and has so much passion for what he is doing. Which ingredient is most representative of your personality? Ha! My “Moonshine Fire Glaze” that I’m using on my wings at Lemmons is totally me — sweet in the beginning and a huge kick of spice at the end. If you weren’t working in the restaurant business, what would you be doing? I would totally be a stay-athome mom. There is something about being a “Suzy Homemaker” that has appealed to me my entire life. I love the idea of being home with my daughter all day and cooking for my husband every day and greeting him when he comes home from work in a bright sundress and a vintage apron. Name an ingredient never allowed in your kitchen. Celery. My dad is allergic to it so I would never risk having it around. And since I haven’t had it around I’m not used to cooking with it. What is your after-work hangout? Work! Even after I get off work, I love to hang out there and just talk to my family and friends who work there. That’s the best part about owning a family restaurant; we get to see each other all the time and talk, eat, laugh and just hang out. What’s your food or beverage guilty pleasure? Imo’s. Every Sunday my husband and I have a “date night” where we order an Imo’s pizza with hamburger and onions and watch a movie. What would be your last meal on earth? That’s a tough one. Anything my mom cooks is good enough for me. Mom can basically create miracles in the kitchen. If I have to be specific, it would be her burek pita. n

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

39


   

  

Scott Davis, who has a new gig at Cafe Osage, will continue to consult at Rise. | MABEL SUEN [FOOD NEWS]

Cafe Osage Lands a Chef Written by

SARAH FENSKE

  C



 900 SPRUCE ST. ST. LOUIS, MO 63102 314-932-1456 40

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

hef Scott Davis, who’s earned acclaim for his work at Three Flags Tavern and Rise Coffee House, is heading to a new kitchen. Cafe Osage (4605 Olive Street, 314-454-6868) announced that Davis had been hired on as its new head chef. The cafe, which is located at Bowood Farms on the edge of the Central West End, serves breakfast and lunch — which makes it a perfect fit for avis. hen RFT critic Cheryl Baehr recently raved about Davis’ cooking at Rise Coffee House, he mentioned that its daytime hours were important to him, as he and his wife have a young son. A native of Vancouver, Davis moved to St. Louis in 2012. He’d previously studied at the Natural Gourmet Institute in New York. In St. Louis, he worked at Brasserie and Elaia before serving as the opening chef de cuisine at Three Flags Tavern. That restaurant earned acclaim before seeing its business suffer (and ultimately

close) thanks to the Kingshighway Bridge project; Davis departed in February 2016. The chef then landed at Rise, earning raves for expanding its menu to include breakfast and lunch offerings, not just pastries. “Scott’s desire to engage in and help further develop our garden to table concept excites us,” the owners of Cafe Osage, the McPheeters family, said in a press release. “With his attention to detail and penchant for fresh, locally sourced ingredients, we are sure that he will be the right fit culturally for Cafe Osage and the right person to lead our kitchen.” “I’m just looking forward to working with the growers at Bowood and showing off what we can grow in the city,” says Davis, who adds that his goal is to align the beauty of the space and the produce grown on site with a thoughtful, elevated menu. He plans to roll out a menu of his own creation sometime in mid-July. “Right now, I’m here watching how everything works,” he explains. “I want everyone to feel comfortable with what we are doing and not change things too quickly. So far, everyone seems receptive and really excited.” Cafe Osage had gone through a period without a chef after David Kirkland, who had been with Cafe Osage since its opening, left to open a restaurant of his own, Turn, in Grand Center. n


WINNER RFT FAVORITE IRISH/ENGLISH/SCOTTISH 2006-2016 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK LUNCH & DINNER FULL MENU AVAILABLE UNTIL MIDNIGHT FRI & SAT

SAT & SUN BRUNCH 10-3PM ENDLESS MIMOSAS BLOODY MARY BAR

CRISPY BERKSHIRE PORK BELLY

MAGNERS CIDER REDUCTION, APPLE FENNEL SLAW

Handcrafted by Bissinger’s quinoa wrap comes with a side of chips or fruit. | SARA BANNOURA

[FIRST LOOK]

PHOTO BY ED ALLER

Bissinger’s Gets Savory

8 S. SARAH STRE E T, ST. LO UIS 3 14-535-0551 WWW.THE SCOTTISHARM S.CO M

GRAND OPENING!

Written by

SARAH FENSKE

F

or ten years, Bissinger’s storefront on Maryland Plaza has been the city’s go-to spot for dessert and a drink. You could mosey on in after dinner and have a chocolate martini or a slice of torte, a glass of wine or a trio of truffles. Everything centered around the St. Louis-based chocolatier’s signature product. On June 14, Bissinger’s reopened as a more flexible dining spot: Handcrafted by Bissinger’s (32 Maryland Avenue, 314-367-7750). You can continue to get the chocolate fondue or the double-chocolate bread pudding. The difference is that now you can have a sandwich — and still eat your cake, too. The cafe is just the latest addition to Bissinger’s growing empire. In 2014, the chocolatier opened one special event space (the Caramel Room) and acquired another (Lumen). It formed a new company, 23 Blocks City Catering, to handle the food for both spaces, and hired acclaimed chef Nick Miller, formerly of Harvest, to run it. Now 23 Blocks is providing food at Handcrafted as well.

Twenty-four bottles are connected to a self-pour system. | SARA BANNOURA Amanda Bradham-Little, the vice president of marketing and events for 23 Blocks, says customers have been enjoying the cafe’s newfound versatility. “They’re loving the food, loving the atmosphere and loving that breakfast is back in the Central West End,” she says. “With other restaurants shuttered that filled that need, it’s now a great place to swing by and grab coffee, and something to eat too.” Options include nitrogen-infused cold brew coffee, quiche by the slice or, yes, a Bissinger’s chocolate croissant. At lunch, a host of coffee drinks are joined by sandwiches, salads and soups. A half-sandwich and half-salad lets you pick your combination for $12. The menu is tightly curated. The croque monsieur and brisket sandwich are both options for meat lovers, while vegetarians will opt

for the uinoa wrap, which is filled with arugula, black beans, micro cilantro and sweet potato in addition to the newly stylish grain. Quinoa reappears in the quinoa kale salad, which also stars roasted peppers, cucumbers, pickled shallots and feta. A Cobb and garden vegetable salad serve as options for the less adventurous. After 4 p.m., you can order from a menu of shareables, including flatbreads. But the biggest innovation at Handcrafted may well be the wine wall. A selection of 24 bottles are connected with self-service taps, allowing visitors to try two, four or six-ounce pours without needing to involve a server. Bradham-Little marvels at the wide variety of options, laughing, “We built a wall!” She adds, “I love putting the guest in control of their own wine destiny.” n riverfronttimes.com

dine in • take out • catering

EVERYTHING’S ONLY ONE DOLLAR! GENERAL TSO CHICKEN K U N G PA O C H I C K E N BLACK PEPPER CHICKEN SICHUAN BEEF GARLIC STRING BEAN DOUBLE COOKED PORK CRAB RAGOON EGG ROLL DOLL AR FRIED RICE AND MORE!

W E U P D AT E O U R M E N U EVERY OTHER WEEK! 10041 PAGE AVE • (314) 731-6898

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

41


®

SAT. 8/12

ON SALE FRI. AT 10AM

MON. 11/20 ON SALE FRI. AT 10AM

SAT. 10/7

ON SALE THU. AT 10AM

THU. 11/30

ON SALE FRI. AT 10AM

SAT. 10/14

ON SALE THU. AT 10AM

THU. 1/15/18 ON SALE THU. AT 10AM

WEDNESDAY 6/28

SUNDAY 7/9

TUESDAY 7/18

THURSDAY 7/20

FRIDAY 7/21

SUNDAY 7/23

UPCOMING SHOWS 7/25 CHEVELLE

9/12 SEU JORGE

7/28 LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND AT PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

9/16 MIKE BIRBIGLIA 9/18 APOCALYPTICA

7/31 LAMB OF GOD

9/19 JONNY LANG

8/1 STL FOODBANK BENEFIT W/ MARIA BAMFORD

9/24 BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE

8/8 A DAY TO REMEMBER

9/25 RHIANNON GIDDENS

8/15 CITY AND COLOUR

9/26 TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB

8/17 DIE ANTWOORD

10/4 ANGEL OLSEN

8/19 RAILROAD EARTH & MOE.

10/7 THE AVETT BROTHERS AT CHAIFETZ ARENA

8/26 ARC ANGELS BENEFIT WITH MEMBERS OF LITTLE FEAT 8/29 2 CHAINZ 9/1 & 9/2 UMPHREY’S MCGEE

10/10 MILKY CHANCE 10/12 THE HEAD AND THE HEART 10/12 QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE AT PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

visit us online for complete show information facebook.com/ThePageantSTL

@ThePageantSTL

thepageantstl.tumblr.com

thepageant.com // 6161 delmar blvd. / St. Louis, MO 63112 // 314.726.6161

42

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


MUSIC

43

Darryl Brown says he believes his now-former employers did everything they could to keep Cicero’s afloat. | THOMAS CRONE [INDUSTRY]

When One Door Closes Facing the sudden loss of his wife and job, longtime Cicero’s doorman Darryl Brown remains resilient Written by

THOMAS CRONE

W

alking out of Cicero’s air-conditioned music venue on the evening of Wednesday, June 21, Darryl Brown enters the adjacent restaurant, which is sweltering. As can happen at venues scheduled to close, business is booming at Cicero’s, and the heat in the room is palpable. Brown removes his jacket and sits

down, just a few feet from the door he’s worked for more than two decades, to talk about a dramatic pair of changes in his life of late. As he does so well-wishers stop by, one after another. They often get a word or two of comfort from a man they were intending to console. “You know I’m quiet,” he says to one, a Cicero’s regular. “You know I don’t put all my personal stuff out there.” On this night, though, Brown’s personal life is why people are drawn to talk to him. A crowd of friends and family fills Cicero’s venue, which is decorated with balloons, steam tables of food and other party favors. The gathering is a spirited celebration of the life of Donna Brown, Darryl’s wife, who passed away June 13 after complications from surgery. She was 58, and died following a brief coma attributed to the effects of anesthesia used in the surgery. That deep tragedy was shortly followed by more bad news, as Brown’s longtime employer, Cicero’s, announced its imminent clo-

sure. Final call would be Sunday, June 25. Within the span of a week, Brown’s spouse and job had both departed, quickly and unexpectedly. On the loss of Cicero’s, Brown admits to having heard “some people saying things,” but says he assumed it was the type of chatter that can run through any business, especially a busy restaurant and bar. It wasn’t. One year after the death of founder Shawn Jacobs, his heirs announced that they were closing the longtime music hub and restaurant, putting the 40-year-old Loop landmark up for sale. As someone who worked for Cicero’s owners for more than 20 years and knew them for another decade on top of that, Brown is satisfied that the Jacobs did what they could to keep the business afloat, to find a partnership or other solutions entirely. Though he mostly speaks of the place in the past tense, he also references “no longer working at this version of Cicero’s.” He expresses hope that if the name and concept are ever revisited, he would “be the riverfronttimes.com

first person contacted to help with any new iteration. After all, it wouldn’t be the first big change he’s seen in his tenure. In 1996 Brown followed Shawn and Alice Jacobs when they moved the venue across Delmar from its original location, which was situated atop and in what is now Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room. And when Shawn Jacobs took on a venue in the Landing for a time — a rowdier live music club called Furst Rock — Brown decamped from Cicero’s and ran security there before moving on to work at a few other places, including his own family’s real estate/housing development business. But eventually he gravitated back to his role at Cicero’s, where his quiet, watchful presence was as much a part of the experience as anything else at the space. If you went there for a show, you almost certainly had him check your ID, take your cash or wave you through (if you really were on the guest list, of course).

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Continued on pg 47

RIVERFRONT TIMES

43


c o n c e r t c a l e n d a r

THU JUN 29 WHITEY

MORGAN

THEGROVE

and the 78’s

JUL 7 & 8 Big Wu in The Lou

CLASSES. SHOWS. FOOD. BAR.

2 Nights under the stars

ALL ROADS LEAD TO SIAM

FRI JUL 14 THE SCHWAG

3960 CHOUTEAU | THEIMPROVSHOP.COM

DIVORCEE WEDNESDAY’S SEE BARTENDER FOR SCANDALOUS DRINK SPECIALS

GRATEFUL DEAD EXPERIENCE

FRI JUL 21

SIAMSTL

SIAM_STL

SIAMSTL

4121 MANCHESTER AVE. | WED-SUNDAY 9PM TO 3AM

game discount $1 off all appetizers

SAT JUL 22

and

The Urban Underdog Series proudly presents...

20 % off craft beer during games!

Ben Miller Band with

Oak, Steel & Lightning

SAT AUG 12

314-932-5232 4353 MANCHESTER “IN THE GROVE” WWW.OSHAYSPUB.COM

TAB BENOIT SAT AUG 26 The Werks + Aaron Kamm

SANDWICHKINGZ

& The One Drops for more information and to purchase tickets:

bootlegstl.com FULL SANDWICH AND SOUP MENU UNTIL 2:30 AM 2 0 B E E R S O N TA P, R O TAT I N G S E L E C T I O N O F B O T T L E S A N D C A N S POOL, DARTS, PINBALL, VIDEO GAMES D J S T H U R S D AY- S U N D AY • L I V E M U S I C 1 P M F R I D AY, S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY

4140 manchester AVe. stl, mo 63110

314.775.0775 44

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

4243 MANCHESTER AVE. | 314-531-5700 | GRAMOPHONESTL.COM riverfronttimes.com


VESTL.COM

W E A R E M O R E T H A N A L I Q U O R S TO R E ,

WE ARE A STORE ABOUT LIQUOR

A R T I S A N S P I R I T S • B A R WA R E • V I N TA G E G L A S S WA R E BITTERS • SHRUBS • BOOKS • CLASSES 4321 M A N C H E S T E R AV E . | 314 - 833 - 3088

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS:

Half price appetizer with purchase of 2 entrees $3 Civil Life Drafts Monday-Friday 11 am - 2 pm

HAPPY HOUR:

$3 wells, $3 select drafts, $3-5 appetizers Monday-Friday 4 pm - 7 pm

4317 Manchester Rd in the Grove 314 .553.9252 | laylastl.com riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

45


GREEN DINER While you recharge yourself, recharge your devices. Outlets in booths and all u-shaped counters! LEED Platinum certified!

Bowl with friends drinks, pizza, pop-tarts

It's social!

OPEN 24 HOURS PeacockLoopDiner.com

6191 Delmar · 314-727-5555 PinUpBowl.com

6261 Delmar in The Loop

music

thur. june 29 9PM Ben Franklin Effect

fri. june 30 10PM Funky Butt Brass Band - $8

sun. july 2 Johnny Fox 12PM FREE SHOW! Josh Gilton 4PM FREE SHOW!

read more at

mon. july 4 9PM Soulard Blues Band

wed. july 5 9:30PM

RIVERFRONTTIMES.COM

Voodoo players Tribute to Van Morrison

fri. july 7 10PM The Aquaducks Funk from Nashville

736 S Broadway St. Louis, MO 63102 (314) 621-8811 46

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com


DARRYL BROWN Continued from pg 43 From Brown’s perch at the door he saw the second version of Cicero’s go through a variety of musical emphases over its two decades on the western edge of the Loop. The room booked jam bands, hiphop acts, indie rockers and even rock-school-style kid matinees. He recalls talking to everyone from Darius Rucker to Nelly to countless unsigned bands. Through it all, bands came to know him. Some touring acts even told him, he recalls, that “they came here to see me. But I think it was the pizza they really missed.” His wife, Donna, also came to see him frequently at the bar. “She really enjoyed the place, too,” he says. Even with the space going through challenging last days, Brown says the Jacobs family was gracious after Donna’s death, offering up the room, helping with catering and generally allowing the place to be one of celebration, which he insists his wife would have wanted. Still, things become serious in the memorial service, as Donna Brown’s urn sits atop the same stage that hosted so many concerts over the years and Pastor Mandela Welch of north county’s 1 Love Relationship Christian Center gives a spirited homily. Yet even if some family members shed a tear or two, or lean into one another for hugs, the mood feels positive. It spills into the parking lot behind the building and the packed restaurant. As folks continue to find their way to him, Brown conducts himself with composure; his presence is remarkably steady and philosophical, thoughtful and kind. He says that he’s been leaning heavily on family in recent weeks. His wife had suffered a host of physical ailments including fibromyalgia, diabetes and the effects of five heart attacks. Now, he says, “She can finally rest. Not Brown. On Wednesday night, with Cicero’s facing just three more evenings of service, he says he will keep going. He will be at the bar through its last show on Saturday, June 24. For a man whose life has taken some harsh twists and turns of late, his goal is to stress out his family as little as possible, while maintaining routine as much as possible. “I want to keep things as normal as can, he says. ’ll definitely be here on Saturday.” n

DID YOU KNOW:

1.3 MILLION PEOPLE READ

EACH MONTH

sports bar patio bar balcony bar

2001 Menard (corner of Menard & Allen) 314-833-6686 Facebook: dukesinsoulard riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

47


48

HOMESPUN

ILLPHONICS Purple Piano Society illphonics.bandcamp.com

B

ecause Illphonics is a St. Louis band and its is a St. Louis story, the genesis of its new album starts where every St. Louis story eventually winds up: high school. hen four-fifths of the band were students at University City High School, the institution’s musical legacy (which has fostered the talents of everyone from Nelly to Jeremy Davenport) seeped into members’ everyday experiences. While a few of them played in the school’s jazz combos, a less formal setting brought emcee Larry “Fallout” Morris and pianist Keith Moore to recognition. Morris and Moore would set up shop at cafeteria tables — Morris with his verses and Moore with his portable 61-note piano keyboard — and entertain their classmates during lunch. “We would have these elaborate rap sessions every day — it was amazing,” says Morris. “So many emcees came from U. City. Nato Caliph, Thelonious Kryptonite, Nelly and them. Everybody wanted to be that guy. When you walked into the cafeteria, you didn’t know whether you was gonna flow or battle. Fast-forward to 2017; Illphonics is one of this city’s foremost live hip-hop acts, releasing albums every few years and playing increasingly high-profile gigs at home and abroad, including a slot at last year’s LouFest. But when it came time to name its newest LP, Morris reached back to high school for the inspiration for what would become Purple Piano Society. “Going to U. City High School, there was the Purple Piano Club, and I always had this fascination with it,” says Morris. “It was a basic music club — we had an actual purple upright piano at U. City High School. Keith would go play it, and I always thought that a purple piano was the dopest thing in the world. So with my imagination I just took it to extremes.” In conversation with Morris, guitarist Kevin Koehler and drummer Chaz Brew, it becomes clear that Purple Piano Society represents more than just a new set of songs for llphonics. t marks the first time that the group has self-recorded its material, with Koehler taking the lead as engineer. In addition, the album allowed band members (which include Simon “Spanky” Chervitz on bass) to stretch out and step away from their usual instruments. “For me, I feel like Purple Piano Society kind of represents where we’re going as a group,” says Morris. “I think people have seen us as a live band for years — they’ve seen Kevin only as a guitarist and me as an emcee, Keith only as a keyboardist, Chaz only as a drummer and Spank only as a bassist. What makes this album so special is that we all sat in a room together and switched — everybody did something a little different.” Koehler, who recorded the bulk of the album in his south city home studio, relished the chance to help shape the songs from behind the mixing console. “It

48

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

was cool for me to jump out more as an engineer, but thinking about it from a production standpoint — what could I add to this song? It doesn’t have to be guitar,” says Koehler. “I’m proud to have this be an opportunity for people to see me as not just a guitar player. Like Larry said, it is all of us branching out and assuming a role that we never have assumed before. Ultimately it makes us stronger as a band for it.” While much of the material on the new album stays true to Illphonics’ established style of live-band hiphop, many of the tracks put a focus on pairing Morris’ verses with more melodic hooks and choruses; to help with that sweetening, the band has partnered with a number of guest vocalists. Lena Charlie aids the snappy, syncopated sound of “Heights” while Joaquin Musick guests on a few songs here, including the subtle triumphs of opening track “We Are (Majestic).” Taken as a whole Purple Piano Society serves as a continued evolution for a band that has never worried too much about staying in one lane. e wouldn’t fit with ust the typical hip-hop acts, with the emcees and the DJs,” says Brew of Illphonics’ early days. “We just have so much more music to offer. Just a hip-hop head wouldn’t necessarily know what to think at first, ’cause the instrumentation would throw them off before the emcee verses.” While the band has built much of its reputation as a live act, Illphonics has taken a brief respite from the stage, both to work on new material and to avoid over-saturating the market. The band’s booking agent recommended that Illphonics not play a hometown gig until after its upcoming tour, so while Purple Piano Society gets released this week, the band won’t show off its new material to St. Louis audiences until its August 26 gig at the Old Rock House. “We’re still paying dues,” Morris says of the upcoming tour, which will find the group opening for local acts across the Midwest and East Coast. “People think, ‘Yeah, you guys have made it!’ No we haven’t!” –Christian Schaeffer


DANCE PARTY EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY

WHATEVER MAKES YOU FEEL SEXY Waxing & Vajazzling Services • Lingerie • Panties Sleepwear & Loungewear for Women Sizes X-Small - 3X • Girls Night Out Wedding Showers • Bachelorette Parties • Non-Profit Events • Private Parties

DJ DAN C WHERE IT’S ALWAYS A PARTY!

* * * * * * * * *COME * * *IN* FOR * * *A* * * * * * * * * $25 GIFT CARD!

Toward Your Wax Visit or Purchase Over $75

************************* 6635 DELMAR IN THE LOOP • ST. LOUIS, MO 63130

314.833.3598 • PRETTIKATBOUTIQUE.COM • TUESDAY-SATURDAY 12-8PM

2001 Menard (corner of Menard & Allen) 314-833-6686 Facebook: dukesinsoulard riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

49


50

OUT EVERY NIGHT

THURSDAY 29

free. Bevo Mill, 4749 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-

YOUTH IN REVOLT: w/ Light Up The Sky, Vesta

WALTER TROUT: w/ Anthony Gomes 8 p.m., $20-

311: w/ New Politics, The Skints 7 p.m., $49.50-

832-6776.

Collide, Thousand Below 6 p.m., $12-$15. Fubar,

$25. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis,

$55. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis,

DAVID ARCHULETA: 8 p.m., $30-$155. Old Rock

3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

314-588-0505.

314-726-6161.

House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505.

A - GAME: w/ Lydia Caesar 8 p.m., $5. The Fire-

LIBERTY FEST: w/ Matt Kennon, Josh Pruno,

SUNDAY 2

MONDAY 3

bird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353.

Dustin James Clark 4 p.m., $10-$20. Brookdale

DROIDS ATTACK: w/ Sumokem, Path of Might,

FAIR ST. LOUIS 2017: w/ Akon, 3 Doors Down,

THE ALLEY TONES: 10 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues &

Farms Corn Maze, 8004 Twin Rivers Road, Eure-

Venomous Maxomum, Spacetrucker 7 p.m., $12.

Jake Owen, Dirty Muggs, SuperDuperKyle, Eve

Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222.

ka, 636-938-1005.

Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

6, Sister Hazel, Ben Morgan, Matt Stillwell, Dan

BORN OF OSIRIS: w/ Volumes, Betraying The

THE MIGHTY PINES: w/ Clusterpluck 8 p.m., $15.

FAIR ST. LOUIS 2017: w/ Akon, 3 Doors Down,

+ Shay July 2, 1 p.m.; 4 p.m.; July 4, 1 p.m., free.

Martyrs, Widowmaker 7 p.m., $20-$23. The

Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-

Jake Owen, Dirty Muggs, SuperDuperKyle, Eve

Forest Park, Highway 40 (I-64) & Hampton Ave.,

Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis,

726-6161.

6, Sister Hazel, Ben Morgan, Matt Stillwell, Dan

St. Louis.

314-833-3929.

MONTANA OF 300: 8 p.m., $20-$80. Fubar, 3108

+ Shay 1 p.m.; July 3, 4 p.m.; July 4, 1 p.m., free.

RIVAL CHOIR: 6 p.m., $10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive

BROTHER JEFFERSON DUO: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz,

Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

Forest Park, Highway 40 (I-64) & Hampton Ave.,

St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353.

Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-

ROUGH SHOP: w/ the Red Headed Strangers, Sadie

St. Louis.

SOULARD BLUES BAND: 9 p.m., $5. Broadway Oys-

436-5222.

Hawkins Day 8 p.m., free. Off Broadway, 3509

KSHE 95 50TH ANNIVERSARY PIG ROAST: w/ REO

ter Bar, 736 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-8811.

CHASTITY BELT: 8 p.m., $12. Off Broadway, 3509

Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

Speedwagon, Styx, Don Felder, Michael Stanley

Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.

3RD ANNUAL ROCK PAPER PODCAST BIRTHDAY

and the Resonators, Joe Dirt and the Dirty Boy All

TUESDAY 4

JOE PASTOR TRIO: 9:30 p.m., free. The Dark Room,

SHOW: w/ Bald Eagle Mountain, The Royal Furs,

Stars 5 p.m., $27.50-$149. Hollywood Casino Am-

4TH OF JULY PARTY WITH MISS JUBILEE: 8 p.m.,

3610 Grandel Square inside Grandel Theatre, St.

Forgetting January, Hounds 7 p.m., $8-$10. The

phitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland

free. HandleBar, 4127 Manchester Ave., St. Louis,

Louis, 314-531-3416.

Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353.

Heights, 314-298-9944.

314-652-2212.

KIM MASSIE: 10:30 p.m., $10. Beale on Broadway,

TRAIN: w

THE OSCEOLA BROTHERS: 4 p.m., $10. National

FAIR ST. LOUIS 2017: w/ Akon, 3 Doors Down,

701 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-7880.

$25-$79.50. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre,

Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave., St. Louis.

Jake Owen, Dirty Muggs, SuperDuperKyle, Eve

KNIFE IN THE WATER: 8 p.m., $5. San Loo, 3211

I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights,

SOUL REUNION: 10:30 p.m., $7. Beale on Broad-

6, Sister Hazel, Ben Morgan, Matt Stillwell, Dan

Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314-696-2888.

314-298-9944.

way, 701 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-7880.

+ Shay July 2, 1 p.m.; July 3, 4 p.m.; 1 p.m., free.

.A.R., Natasha edingfield p.m.,

PLANES MISTAKEN FOR STARS: w/ Daybringer,

Forest Park, Highway 40 (I-64) & Hampton Ave.,

Sep Arer, Kilverez 8 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108

St. Louis.

Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

JAMAICA LIVE TUESDAYS: w/ Ital K, Mr. Roots, DJ

VALLEYS: w/ Magmadiver, Kill Their Past 8 p.m.,

Witz, $5/$10. Elmo’s Love Lounge, 7828 Olive

$5. The Sinkhole, 7423 South Broadway, St. Louis,

Blvd, University City, 314-282-5561.

314-328-2309.

KIM MASSIE: 10:30 p.m., $10. Beale on Broadway, 701 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-7880.

FRIDAY 30

MANIAC: w/ These Streets, Life Sucks 6 p.m., $7. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

DEATH TO THE BALL: A TRIBUTE TO HEADBANGERS BALL: 9 p.m., $10-$15. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929.

WEDNESDAY 5

FREE THROW: w/ Homesafe, Heart Attack Man

ALL ANGLES ORCHESTRA: 7 p.m., free. Grandel

7 p.m., $13-$15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St.

Theatre, 3610 Grandel Square, St. Louis, 314-534-

Louis, 314-535-0353.

1834.

KILBORN ALLEY BLUES BAND: 10 p.m., $10. BB’s

BABY BIRDS DON’T DRINK MILK: w/ Isabel Rex,

Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis,

Warren 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor, 5226

314-436-5222.

Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226.

LEROY JODIE PIERSON: 7 p.m., $5. BB’s Jazz, Blues

BOB “BUMBLE BEE” KAMOSKE: 8 p.m. Beale on

& Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-

Broadway, 701 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-621-

Shinyribs. | PHOTO VIA ARTIST WEBSITE

5222. MARQUISE KNOX: 5 p.m., $10. National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave., St. Louis. PALISADES: 8 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. SHINYRIBS: 8 p.m., $13-$15. Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444. TENGGER CAVALRY: w/ Felix Martin, Helsott 7 p.m., $12-$14. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. TOK: w/ Molly Simms 9 p.m., $8. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. VITAMEN A: 6 p.m., free. Howard’s in Soulard, 2732 S 13th St, St. Louis, 314-349-2850.

SATURDAY 1 AFTER MIDNIGHT: 9 p.m., free. Nightshift Bar & Grill, 3979 Mexico Road, St. Peters, 636-441-8300. DAS BEVO BIERGARTEN GRAND OPENING: w/ the

BOSTON: w/ Joan Jett & the Blackhearts 6 p.m.,

Shinyribs 8 p.m. Friday, June 30. Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Boulevard. $13 to $15. 314-727-2277.

King Khan and the Shrines may be lord and savior of wack-a-doowopdom, but Shinyribs, fronted by Kevin Russell (former leader of the Gourds, Austin, Texas’ answer to the Band), has mounted a supremely swampy challenge to the garage-funk throne. The band’s aesthetic could be summed up by a song title like “I Don’t Give a Shit,” or it could be

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

staged as a tent revival of country blues and blasphemous gospel glory. Russell’s band cooks with thick grease, but there’s an undeniable love for the deepest of Southern soul music in every medicine show stomp, wail, hip-shake and moan. Shiny Soul Sisters. One of the keys to Shinyribs’ sound is backup singers Sally Allen and Alice Spencer. The latter was one of the beloved voices of the Geyer Street Sheiks. Welcome Alice and her new band back to town. —Roy Kasten

TBA. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-2989944. THE COLOR MORALE: w/ The Plot In You, Dayseeker, Picturesque, Inner Outlines, Marked by Honor 6 p.m., $15-$17. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAZZ CRAWL: 5 p.m. continues through Dec. 27, free. The Stage at KDHX, 3524 Washington Ave, St. Louis, 314-925-7543, ext. 815.

THIS JUST IN AJJ: Sat., Nov. 18, 8 p.m., $15-$17. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com. ARSONISTS GET ALL THE GIRLS: W/ Circuit Of Suns, West Cliffs, Ascension of Akari, Summits, Portals, Thu., Aug. 17, 6 p.m., $13-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

Dust Covers, Beth Bombara, Old Capital 11 a.m.,

50

7880.

riverfronttimes.com


[CRITIC’S PICK] Droids Attack. | PHOTO BY DAVID REILING

Droids Attack Its logo looks kinda like the font on the cover of Master of Reality. Its motto is “death to false stoner thrash.” Its riffs are fucking humongous. In short, Droids Attack is the real deal. The Madison, Wisconsin-based metal act delivers Black Sabbath-style riffs with a punk rock edge to them, resulting in a ferocious sound that is sure to please fans of both. Its science fiction slant is plainly genuine too — the cover of the band’s latest, Sci-Fi Or Die, features an ancient Sumerian temple ripping out of the ground and heading skyward, two shafts of light shooting out its underside. The

band’s members look like nerds, too. We mean that in the best possible way: You don’t get this good at this style of music by focusing on your image; you get there by smoking pot, reading H.P. Lovecraft and riffing on the edge of your bed for hours at a time. Obviously Droids Attack’s members understand that — and fans everywhere rejoice. Don’t Wait Outside: The temptation to get ridiculously high in the parking lot before Droids Attack goes on will be very strong, and that’s understandable, but miss the comparably heavy openers Sumokem, Path of Might, Venomous Maxomum and Spacetrucker at your own peril. You’ve been warned! —Daniel Hill

BISKIT & STOGIE LA RUSSA: Sun., July 23, 6 p.m.,

St. Louis, 314-832-6776, thebevomill.com.

$10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-

DAVID RYAN HARRIS: Wed., Sept. 27, 8 p.m.,

9050, fubarstl.com.

$15-$65. The Monocle, 4510 Manchester Ave, St.

BIT BRIGADE: W/ Thor Axe, Fri., Oct. 13, 8 p.m.,

Louis, 314-935-7003, themonoclestl.com.

$10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis,

DOWNTOWN BOYS: Tue., Aug. 22, 8 p.m., $10. Off

314-773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-

CAROLYN MASON: Sun., July 23, 4 p.m., $10.

3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave.,

EMBRACER: W/ Chapters, Marriott, Biff K’narly

St. Louis.

and The Reptilians, Sat., July 15, 7 p.m., $12-$15.

CHASE RICE: Thu., Jan. 25, 8 p.m., $20-$30. The

Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050,

Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-

fubarstl.com.

6161, thepageant.com.

EMPIRE: A TRIBUTE TO RAGE AGAINST THE

THE COLEMAN HUGHES PROJECT: Sun., July 9, 4

MACHINE: W/ The Jalepeno Poppers – Tribute

p.m., $10. National Blues Museum, 615 Washing-

to RHCP, Stepped in Foo – Tribute to the Foo

ton Ave., St. Louis.

Fighters, Sat., July 15, 8 p.m., $10. Delmar Hall,

DAS BEVO BIERGARTEN GRAND OPENING: W/ the

6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161,

Dust Covers, Beth Bombara, Old Capital, Sat.,

delmarhall.com.

July 1, 11 a.m., free. Bevo Mill, 4749 Gravois Ave.,

AN EVENING WITH CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER AND

7 p.m. Sunday, July 2. Fubar, 3108 Locust Street. $12. 314-289-9050.

BIKES WELCOME

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: GOODTIMES.PATIO.BAR

200 N. MAIN, DUPO, ILLINOIS

Continued on pg 52

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

51


THIS JUST IN Continued from pg 51 [CRITIC’S PICK]

BEST HAPPY HOUR IN ST. LOUIS!

monday - friday 3-6pm

The Mighty Pines 8 p.m. Saturday, July 1.

12314 NATURAL BRIDGE RD. BRIDGETON, MO 63044

$2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES

Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard. $15. 314726-6161.

$5 TOPGREAT SHELF FOOD &MARGARITA DRINKS,

PLENTY OF PARKING, CARPOOL TO CONCERTS

1/2 OFF KETEL, JACK & CAPTAIN $3 CRAFT BOTTLE BEER OF DAY (HOUSE PICK)

SHOW$3 YOUR TICKET FOR ONE CRAFT DRAFTS

FREE BEER

HALF OFF 14 SELECT APPETIZERS

BEFORE ANY CONCERT

7 minutes from

HOLLYWOOD CASINO AMPHITHEATER

EPT EXC BACK KEL

NIC

JULY 1 - TRAIN JULY 2 - REO SPEEDWAGON & STYX JULY 5 - BOSTON WITH JOAN JETT JULY 6 - JIMMY BUFFET JULY 7 - SAM HUNT JULY 8 - ONE REPUBLIC JULY 9 - AGAINST ALL ODDS TOUR JULY 11 - THIRD EYE BLIND JULY 12 - IRON MAIDEN JULY 21 - JASON ALDEAN JULY 22 - ECHO & THE BUNNYMAN JULY 26 - VANS WARPED TOUR

MUST BE 21 OR OLDER. ONLY VALID DAY OF CONCERT.

12314 Natural Bridge Rd. • Bridgeton, MO 63044 • 314-739-2344

Ciggfreeds

liquid & lace

ST. LOUIS’ NEWEST ADULT BOUTIQUE VA P E S U P P L I E S

LINGERIE

A D U LT N O V E LT I E S

PLUS SIZES

20% OFF

TOO H OT F O R O U T S I D E F U N , W E H AV E S O M E I D E A S F O R I N S I D E F U N A S W E L L !

6 8 3 9 G R A V O I S • S T. L O U I S , M O 6 3 1 1 6 M O N D A Y - S AT U R D A Y 1 1 A M - 1 0 P M 314-300-8750 • CIGGFREEDS@GMAIL.COM G E T I N TO U C H W I T H U S O N FAC E B OO K ‘ C I G G F R E E D S S T L ’ O R V I E W O U R G A L L E R Y AT W W W . C I G G F R E E D S . C O M

52

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

riverfronttimes.com

The roots-based Americana quartet the Mighty Pines has come a long way since it came on the scene under the aegis of Acoustics Anonymous. A few years of steady local gigging, regional touring and, for a few members, tutelage alongside Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players has broadened the band’s approach to many stripes

of American music. And with Mike Murano now installed as a full-time member on drums, the band can move and groove a bit more fluidly. This weekend’s Delmar Hall show finds the band on its biggest local stage to date and will be in honor of the brand new LP Lonesome Blues. All Plucked Up: Fellow local stringbased quartet Clusterpluck will warm the stage with a heady mix of bluegrass and jam-band vibes. —Christian Schaeffer

FRIENDS: W/ Sheila E., Sat., Oct. 21, 8 p.m., $35-

IndyGround, Sat., Sept. 23, 9 p.m., $15-$18. Blue-

$55. Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market St, St.

berry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd.,

Louis, 314-241-1888, peabodyoperahouse.com.

University City, 314-727-4444, blueberryhill.com.

THE FUNS: Sun., Aug. 20, 8 p.m., $8. Off Broad-

ROBBING JON: W/ The Kaiju Killers, Name It Now,

way, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363,

Sat., July 15, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St,

offbroadwaystl.com.

St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

HAIR JORDAN: W/ Sheevaa, Icaria, Tue., July 18,

SAHBABII: Fri., Aug. 11, 8 p.m., $20-$60. Fubar,

6 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis,

3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.

314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

com.

HARDCORE SEX: Mon., Aug. 21, 7 p.m., $8-$10.

SCREAMING FEMALES: Tue., Oct. 3, 8 p.m., $12.

Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050,

Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-

fubarstl.com.

773-3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

THE HOTELIER: W/ Oso Oso, Alex Napping, Mon.,

SKEET RODGERS: Fri., July 21, 5 p.m., $10.

Nov. 13, 8 p.m., $13-$16. The Firebird, 2706 Olive

National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave.,

t., t. ouis,

-

-

, firebirdstl.com.

St. Louis.

JOHN D HALE BAND: Sat., July 8, 8 p.m., $10. Off

SOUL REUNION: Sun., Aug. 13, 4 p.m., $10.

Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-

National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave.,

3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

St. Louis.

THE KINGDOM BROTHERS: Sun., July 30, 4 p.m.,

SQUIRTGUN: W/ The Radio Buzzkills, Fri., Sept. 22,

$10. National Blues Museum, 615 Washington

8 p.m., $12-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis,

Ave., St. Louis.

314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

KREWELLA: Sat., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $25-$30. The Pag-

ST. VINCENT: Mon., Nov. 20, 8 p.m., $36.50-$54.

eant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161,

The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-

thepageant.com.

726-6161, thepageant.com.

LAVELL CRAWFORD: Sat., Aug. 12, 7 & 10 p.m.,

STEVIE NICKS: W/ Vanessa Carlton, Wed., Sept.

$35. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis,

13, 7 p.m., $53-$153. Family Arena, 2002 Arena

314-726-6161, thepageant.com.

Parkway, St Charles, 636-896-4200, familyarena.

LEIGH SPANOS: Fri., Aug. 11, 5 p.m., $10. National

com.

Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave., St. Louis.

THE STOLEN: Mon., Aug. 14, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar,

LIL PANTZ: Fri., July 28, 8 p.m., $10-$15. Fubar,

3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.

3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.

com.

com.

THE EDUCATED GUESS 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY +

LILLY HIATT: Sun., Oct. 1, 8 p.m., $12. Blueberry

RECORD RELEASE: Fri., Aug. 11, 9 p.m., $10. Off

Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd., Uni-

Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-

versity City, 314-727-4444, blueberryhill.com.

3363, offbroadwaystl.com.

LUKE PELL: Thu., Aug. 17, 8 p.m., $20-$25. Blue-

THIEVERY CORPORATION: Sat., Oct. 7, 8 p.m., $35-

berry Hill - The Duck Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd.,

$45. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis,

University City, 314-727-4444, blueberryhill.com.

314-726-6161, thepageant.com.

LUNA: Sat., Nov. 4, 8 p.m., $20. Off Broadway,

TOKIMONSTA: Wed., Oct. 4, 8 p.m., $15-$18. Old

3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, off-

Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-

broadwaystl.com.

0505, oldrockhouse.com.

MATTHEW LESCH: Fri., Aug. 18, 5 p.m., $10.

WOLF ALICE: Sat., July 15, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broad-

National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Ave.,

way, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363,

St. Louis.

offbroadwaystl.com.

NIKEE TURBO: Fri., July 7, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108

YELAWOLF: Tue., Oct. 3, 8 p.m., $25. Pop’s Night-

Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, fubarstl.com.

club, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-

P.O.S.: W/ B L A C K I E, Steddy P & DJ Mahf,

6720, popsrocks.com.


SAVAGE LOVE THE MUSIC BOX

special guest star here—it’s their job to seduce you, not the other way around.

miserable by searching for and landing mates they never wanted.

BY DAN SAVAGE

Incest porn—what is the reason behind why it’s so hot? I reject the premise of your question. There’s nothing hot about incest porn.

My boyfriend keeps talking about how much he would like for me to peg him. (I’m female.) Should I wait for him to buy a contraption or surprise him myself? We’ve been dating only three months. Traditionally, straight couples exchange strap-on dildos to mark their six-month anniversary.

I had a great time at the live taping of the Savage Lovecast at Chicago’s Music Box Theatre. Audience members submitted questions on cards, and I tackled as many questions as I could over two hours—with the welcome and hilarious assistance of comedian Kristen Toomey. Here are some of the questions we didn’t get to before they gave us the hook… If your partner’s social media makes you uncomfortable—whether it’s the overly friendly comments they get on their photos or vice versa (their overly friendly comments on other people’s photos)—do you have the right to say something? You have the right to say something— the First Amendment applies to relationships, too—but you have two additional rights and one responsibility: the right to refrain from reading the comments, the right to unfollow your partner’s social-media accounts, and the responsibility to get over your jealousy. A couple invited me to go on a trip as their third and to have threesomes. I am friends with the guy, and there is chemistry. But I have not met the girl. I’m worried that there may not be chemistry with her. Is there anything I can do to build chemistry or at least get us all comfortable enough to jump into it? Get this woman’s phone number, exchange a few photos and flirty texts, and relax. Remember: You’re the very

My partner really wants an open relationship; I really don’t. He isn’t the jealous type; I am. We compromised, and I agreed to a threesome. I want to meet him in the middle, but I really hate the idea of even a threesome and can’t stop stressing about it. What should I do? You should end this relationship yourself or you can let an ill-advised, sureto-be-disastrous threesome end it for you. Any dating advice for people who are gay and disabled? Move on all fronts: Go places and do things—as much as your disability and budget allow—join gay dating sites, be open about your disability, be open to dating other disabled people. And take the advice of an amputee I interviewed for a column a long, long time ago: “So long as they don’t see me as a fetish object, I’m willing to date people who may be attracted to me initially because of my disability, not despite it.” Why do I say yes to dates if I love being alone? Because we’re constantly told—by our families, our entertainments, our faith traditions—that there’s something wrong with being alone. The healthiest loners shrug it off and don’t search for mates, the complicit loners play along and go through the motions of searching for mates, and the oblivious loners make themselves and others

Gay guy, late 20s. What’s the best timing—relative to meals and bowel movements—to have anal sex? Butts shouldn’t be fucked too soon after a meal or too soon before a bowel movement. For more info, read the late, great Dr. Jack Morin’s Anal Pleasure and Health: A Guide for Men, Women, and Couples—which can be read before, during, and after meals and/or bowel movements. My sister’s husband describes himself as sexually “vanilla.” She says she hasn’t had an orgasm without a vibrator in seven years. They are currently separated, and he wants her back. If he makes some lifestyle changes (stops smoking so much weed, goes to the gym), is there hope for her sex life? Does your sister want him back? If so, taking him back is the only way to find out if he’s willing to make these lifestyle changes and make them permanently. I went to a big kink event. Why are the people so fucking creepy? How can you nd in y o s ho aren t super per y They’re hanging out with the kinky folks who aren’t super judgy.

53

Why do all of my gay friends make passes at my boyfriends at some point? t s not ust harm ess irtation either. Your boyfriends are irresistible, and your gay friends are irredeemable. My girlfriend and I are having a debate. Which is more intimate: vanilla sex or sharing a whirlpool bath with someone? Can you settle this? No. Three great dates followed by a micropenis. What do I do? Him: six-foot-four, giant e y. Me e oot e norma proportions. Great guy, but the sex sucked. If you require an average-to-large penis to enjoy sex, don’t keep seeing this guy. e needs to find someone who thinks—or someone who knows— tongues, fingers, brains, kinks, etc., can add up to great sex. As a trauma/rape survivor, I found myself attracted to girls afterward. Is this because I’m scared of men or am I genuinely attracted to girls? Is this a thing that happens after trauma? People react to trauma in all sorts of ways—some of them unpredictable. And trauma has the power to unlock truths or obscure them. I’m sorry you were raped, and I would encourage you to explore these issues with a counselor. Rape Victim Advocates (rapevictimadvocates.org) can help you find a ualified counselor. On the Lovecast, Dan chats with the author of Everybody Lies: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

STREAK’S CORNER • by Bob Stretch

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

53


Adult Entertainment 960 Phone Entertainment

$ 10 BE ST PH O N E SE X CHOOSE FROM: Busty Blondes, Ebony Hotties, Hot Coeds or Older Ladies

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN.

866-5 15 -F O XY ( 3 69 9 )

Only $10 per Call

CALLING HOT HORNY ST. LOUISANS!

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL WOMEN Call FREE! 314-932-2564 or 800-210-1010 18+ livelinks.com

NASTY TALK is waiting for YOU. Join the conversation! Connect live with sexy local ladies! Try it FREE! 18+ 314-480-5505

CALL GORGEOUS SINGLES ON THE NIGHT EXCHANGE!

www.nightexchange.com

Feel The Vibe! Hot Black Chat Call FREE! 314-932-2568 or 800-811-1633 18+ vibeline.com

Live Local Chat. Try us FREE! 18+ 314-480-5505

FREE SEX SLGBT

www.nightexchange.com

LAV ALI F E V O I CE

Talk to 1000s of EXCITING SINGLES in St. Louis! 1st Time Buyers Special Only $20 for 80 min! CALL TODAY! 314.450.7920 Must be 18+

1-800-LET-CHAT (538-2428)

Check it out BROWSE FREE!

More Local Numbers: 1-800-926-6000

Then just 20 cents p/m

So are the sexy singles waiting for you on the line!! It doesn’t get HOTTER than this!!! Try it FREE!! 18+ 314-480-5505 www.nightexchange.com

MEET HOT LOCAL SINGLES! Browse & Reply

FREE!!

Straight 314-739-7777 Gay & Bi 314-209-0300 Use FREE Code 3275, 18+

HOT LOCAL SINGLES

Try FREE: 314-932-2564

LOOKING TO MEET TONIGHT?

18+

ST.LOUIS ADULTS ARE CALLING Now For That

HOT & EROTIC ENCOUNTER!

Try us FREE!! 18+ 314-480-5505

Ahora español Livelinks.com 18+

www.nightexchange.com

$ 10 BE ST PH O N E SE X CHOOSE FROM: Busty Blondes, Ebony Hotties, Hot Coeds or Older Ladies

866-5 15 -F O XY ( 3 69 9 )

Thinking of Independence this 4th of July?

FREE TO LISTEN AND REPLY TO ADS Free Code: Riverfront Times

TH E 69TH AM EN DM EN T

TH E RI GH T TO BE SE XY ! FIND REAL GAY MEN NEAR YOU

Mid County

St. Louis:

South City

10210 Page Ave.

(314) 209-0300

3552 Gravois

(3 miles East ofWestport Plaza)

314-423-8422

Open until Midnight Fri & Sat

St. Peters

1034 Venture Dr.

(at Grand)

(70 & Cave Springs,S. Outer Rd.)

Open until Midnight Fri & Sat

Open until Midnight Thurs-Sat

314-664-4040

636-928-2144

www.megamates.com 18+

Dating made Easy

Meet sexy friends who really get your vibe...

Try FREE: 314-932-2568

FREE

More Local Numbers: 1-800-811-1633

to Listen & Reply to ads.

FREE CODE: Riverfront Times

CALLING HOT HORNY ST. LOUISANS! NASTY TALK is waiting for YOU. Join the conversation! Connect live with sexy local ladies! Try it FREE! 18+ 314-480-5505

vibeline.com 18+

For other local numbers: 18+ www.MegaMates.com

54

RIVERFRONT TIMES

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

www.nightexchange.com

LAV ALI F E V O I CE

Talk to 1000s of EXCITING SINGLES in St. Louis! 1st Time Buyers Special Only $20 for 80 min! CALL TODAY! 314.450.7920 Must be 18+

www.nightexchange.com

Feel The Vibe! Hot Black Chat Call FREE! 314-932-2568 or 800-811-1633 18+ vibeline.com

HOT LOCAL SINGLES

So are the sexy singles waiting for you on the line!! It doesn’t get HOTTER than this!!! Try it FREE!! 18+ 314-480-5505 www.nightexchange.com

1-800-LET-CHAT (538-2428)

Check it out BROWSE FREE!

Then just 20 cents p/m

LOOKING TO MEET TONIGHT?

18+

MEET HOT LOCAL SINGLES! Browse & Reply

FREE!!

Straight 314-739-7777 Gay & Bi 314-209-0300 Use FREE Code 3275, 18+

SEXY LOCAL SINGLES 800-538-CHAT (2428)

FREE 24/7 SEX HOT, BEEFY BI STUDS 800-GAY-MEET (429-6338)

MEN 4 MEN PERSONALIZE YOUR MASSAGE

Time for Summer Body Grooming! • FULL BODY MASSAGE • SOFT SENSUAL TOUCH • TANTRIC • INCALLS

St. Louis

(314) 739.7777

CALL GORGEOUS SINGLES ON THE NIGHT EXCHANGE! Live Local Chat. Try us FREE! 18+ 314-480-5505

Only $10 per Call

FREE SEX SLGBT

Empowering Your Sexual Wellness 7 Days A Week

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL WOMEN Call FREE! 314-932-2564 or 800-210-1010 18+ livelinks.com

WHO ARE YOU TRY FOR AFTER DARK? FREE riverfronttimes.com

314-932-2561

• OUTCALLS TO YOUR HOTEL/MOTEL, HOME & OFFICE

314-236-7060 LIKEITXXXHOTT@AOL.COM


100 Employment 110 Computer/Technical

Specialist Customer Care

(Nestlé Regional Globe Office North America, Inc. – St. Louis, MO)

Srv as Customer Care pt of cntct to address user’s needs & particpt in cont imprvmnt effrts. Coordnte Incidnt, Request, Prob & Knwldg Mgmt in AMS Assgnmnt Groups. F/T. Mail resumes: J. Buenrostro, Nestlé USA, Inc., 800 N Brand Blvd, Glendale, CA 91203. JobID: SCC-NSO.

120 Drivers/Delivery/Courier

DR I V E R S N E E DE D ASAP

Requires Class E, B or A License. S Endorsement Helpful. Must be 25 yrs or older. Will Train.

ABC/ Checker Cab Co CALL N O W 3 14-725 -9 5 5 0

190 Business Opportunities

FIT3 IS HERE! Are you ready to get fit financially & physically? Openings for serious, motivated individuals. Independent Reliv Distributor

Call (314) 223-8067 now for appointment

800 Health & Wellness 805 Registered Massage

A Wonderfully ~ Relaxing ~ Intuitive massage by licensed practitioner.

314-706-4076 2002030286

167 Restaurants/Hotels/Clubs

NOW HIRING:

FULL TIME COOKS

Experience Required Apply in person Apollonia Restaurant 6836 Gravois 314-353-1488 or 314-553-9830 SUMMER JOBS FLEX SCHED. Hiring Servers, Bartenders, & Cooks. 314-863-7400

A New Intuitive Massage Call Natalie 314.799.2314

Health Therapy Massage Relax, Rejuvenate & Refresh!

F lex ib le Appointm ents Monday Thru Sunday (Walk-ins welcome) 320 Brooke’s Drive, 63042 Call Cheryl. 314-895-1616 or 314-258-2860 LET#200101083 Now Hiring...Therapists

Simply Marvelous

Call Cynthia today for your massage. M-F 7-5, Sat. 9-1. 314-265-9625 - Eureka Area #2001007078

ULTIMATE MASSAGE BY SUMMER!!!!

Relaxing 1 Hour Full Body Massage. Light Touch, Swedish, Deep Tissue. Daily 10am-5pm South County.

314-620-6386 Ls # 2006003746

www.artformassage.info CMT/LMT 2003026388 Escape the Stresses of Life with a relaxing

O R I E N TAL MASSAG E & R E F LE XO LO G Y

You’ll Come Away Feeling Refreshed & Rejuvenated.

Call 314-972-9998

FIRST MONTH FREE! AFFORDABLE SENIOR LIVING

Newly Renovated 1 Bedroom Apartments $510 Appliances • Energy Efficient Laundry On-Site

HERITAGE SENIOR APARTMENTS NORTH COUNTY AREA 314-521-0388

FILE BANKRUPTCY NOW! CALL ANGELA JANSEN 314-645-5900 BANKRUPTCYSHOPSTL.COM THE CHOICE OF A L AWYER IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION AND SHOULD NOT BE BASED SOLELY ON ADVERTISING.

815 Mind/Body/Spirit

BE WELL, STAY WELL. Help others be well and stay well. Build a business helping others get what they need and you WILL get what you need. Call (314) 223-8067 now for appointment

500 Services 527 Legal Notices Mr. VIKAS ARORA holder of INDIA Passport No. J2361633 and Miss NISHA VERMA holder of India Passport No. J9393740 intend getting married at the Consulate General of India, Chicago, 455 N City Front Plaza Drive, NBC towers, Suite 850, Chicago IL 60611. under the Foreign Marriage Act, 1969 of India. Objections, if any, may be conveyed to the Consulate General of India, Chicago within 30 days. All the particulars must be filled in as per the passports. To Whom It May Concern: Notice is hereby given that on June 9th, 2017, the Circuit Court of St. Charles County, Missouri, entered judgment in Cause Number117-FC00743, changing the name of Marvella Sosa Dominguez to José Sosa Dominguez.

Mr. VIKAS ARORA holder of INDIA Passport No. J2361633 and Miss NISHA VERMA holder of India Passport No. J9393740 intend getting married at the Consulate General of India, Chicago, 455 N City Front Plaza Drive, NBC towers, Suite 850, Chicago IL 60611. under the Foreign Marriage Act, 1969 of India. Objections, if any, may be conveyed to the Consulate General of India, Chicago within 30 days. All the particulars must be filled in as per the passports. To Whom It May Concern: Notice is hereby given that on June 9th, 2017, the Circuit Court of St. Charles County, Missouri, entered judgment in Cause Number117-FC00743, changing the name of Marvella Sosa Dominguez to José Sosa Dominguez.

530 Misc. Services

NEW OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET

in Okawville, Ill, need vendors, $35/10x15, free camping for vendors, 314-503-4980 4 None 140.0 140.0 Travis Thornburgh 3537 Yellow Jasmine Bridgeton MO 63044 314-503-4890 lakeokydoke@ gmail.com

WANTS TO PURCHASE MINERALS and other oil & gas interests.

Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201 NEW OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET

in Okawville, Ill, need vendors, $35/10x15, free camping for vendors, 314-503-4980 4 None 140.0 140.0 Travis Thornburgh 3537 Yellow Jasmine Bridgeton MO 63044 314-503-4890 lakeokydoke@ gmail.com

WANTS TO PURCHASE MINERALS and other oil & gas interests.

Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

600 Music 610 Musicians Services

MUSICIANS Do you have a band? We have bookings. Call for information (314)781-6612 Mon-Fri, 10:00-4:30

MUSICIANS AVAILABLE Do You Need... A Musician? A Band? String Quartet? Call the Musicians Association of St. Louis

300 Rentals 317 Apartments for Rent

NORTH-COUNTY $510 314-521-0388 Newly renovated 1BR apts for SENIOR LIVING. Safe and affordable. FIRST MONTH FREE! OVERLAND/ST. ANN $535-$575 314-995-1912 SPECIAL-1 MONTH FREE! Great location near Hwys 170, 64, 70 & 270. 6 minutes to Clayton. Garage, Clean, safe, quiet. RICHMOND-HEIGHTS $525-$575 314-995-1912 SPECIAL-1 MONTH FREE! Near Metrolink, Hwys 40 & 44 & Clayton. 1BR, all electric off Big Bend.

RIVERBEND APARTMENTS

NORTH-COUNTY $510 314-521-0388 Newly renovated 1BR apts for SENIOR LIVING. Safe and affordable. FIRST MONTH FREE! OVERLAND/ST. ANN $535-$575 314-995-1912 SPECIAL-1 MONTH FREE! Great location near Hwys 170, 64, 70 & 270. 6 minutes to Clayton. Garage, Clean, safe, quiet. RICHMOND-HEIGHTS $525-$575 314-995-1912 SPECIAL-1 MONTH FREE! Near Metrolink, Hwys 40 & 44 & Clayton. 1BR, all electric off Big Bend.

RIVERBEND APARTMENTS 4720 S. Broadway St. Louis MO 63111 314-481-4250

Low Income/Section 8

1 & 2 BEDROOM WAITING LIST IS OPEN

4720 S. Broadway St. Louis MO 63111 314-481-4250

Low Income/Section 8

1 & 2 BEDROOM WAITING LIST IS OPEN

APPLY IN PERSON DAILY 9am-12pm. Must Bring Photo Identification & Proof of Income. Vouchers Welcome! NEW OWNERSHIP SOUTH CITY $400-$850 314-771-4222 1-3 BR Apts. Many different units. NO CREDIT, NO PROBLEM! www.stlrr.com SOUTH-CITY $495 314-443-4478 7327 Michigan Ave (near Loughborough & Hwy 55). 1 BR with large living room and bedroom. Basement storage, W/D hookup. SOUTH-CITY $515 314-707-9975 Jamieson & Nottingham: 1 BR, All Electric, Hardwood Floors, Central Air, W/D Hook-up. SOUTH-CITY $600 314-707-9975 Gravois & Pennsylvania: 2 BR, All Electric, Hardwood Floors, Central Air, W/D Hook-up. SOUTH-CITY 314-504-6797 5052 Miami (West of Kingshighway) Renovated 1 BD with Enclosed Sun Porch, Updated Bathroom, New Cabinets, New Windows, Dishwasher, C/A, Refinished Hardwood Floors, Appliances. Near Shopping and Bus Line. UNIVERSITY CITY $795 314-727-1444

APPLY IN PERSON DAILY 9am-12pm. Must Bring Photo Identification & Proof of Income. Vouchers Welcome! NEW OWNERSHIP SOUTH CITY $400-$850 314-771-4222 1-3 BR Apts. Many different units. NO CREDIT, NO PROBLEM! www.stlrr.com SOUTH-CITY $495 314-443-4478 7327 Michigan Ave (near Loughborough & Hwy 55). 1 BR with large living room and bedroom. Basement storage, W/D hookup. SOUTH-CITY $515 314-707-9975 Jamieson & Nottingham: 1 BR, All Electric, Hardwood Floors, Central Air, W/D Hook-up. SOUTH-CITY $600 314-707-9975 Gravois & Pennsylvania: 2 BR, All Electric, Hardwood Floors, Central Air, W/D Hook-up. SOUTH-CITY 314-504-6797 5052 Miami (West of Kingshighway) Renovated 1 BD with Enclosed Sun Porch, Updated Bathroom, New Cabinets, New Windows, Dishwasher, C/A, Refinished Hardwood Floors, Appliances. Near Shopping and Bus Line. NORTH-COUNTY $510 314-521-0388 Newly renovated 1BR apts for SENIOR LIVING. Safe and affordable. FIRST MONTH FREE!

www. LiveI nTheG rove. com

2BR, new kitch, bath & carpet, C/A & heat. No pets. WESTPORT/LINDBERGH/PAGE $535-$585 314-995-1912

320 Houses for Rent DUTCHTOWN $980 314-223-8067 3 BR spacious home for rent. Natural wood floor (1st flr), carpet (2nd flr). Lrg updated kitchen w/double oven gas stove, 2 bath, dining rm, bsmnt, w/d hookup, fenced yard, a/c. Lots of Closets!

SPECIAL-1 MONTH FREE! Nice Area near Hwys 64, 270, 170, 70 & Clayton. Patio, laundry, great landlord! Clean, safe, quiet.

(314) 781-6612 M-F, 10:00-4:30

riverfronttimes.com

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

RIVERFRONT TIMES

55


FIRST MONTH

FREE!

AFFORDABLE SENIOR LIVING Newly renovated 1 bedroom apartments in North County.

Heritage Senior Apartments 314-521-0388

Beautiful Gallery & Outdoor Courtyard RESERVE YOUR DATE! Weddings Meetings Cocktail Party Holiday Events

at CenterPointe Hospital

LET US HELP YOU PUSH THE RIGHT BUTTONS!

ALCOHOL & SUBSTANCE USE TREATMENT FOR ADULTS

Patricia’s

DETOXIFICATION 4-WEEK RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT OUTPATIENT PROGRAMS MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT AFTERCARE • FAMILY SUPPORT

31 4 -7 7 1 -82 30 m a d a r t.c o m

patriciasgiftshop.com

CALL 1-800-345-5407

DATING MADE EASY... LOCAL SINGLES! Listen & Reply FREE! 314-739-7777 FREE PROMO CODE: 9512 Telemates

24-hour Confidential Assessment with Caring and Compassionate Counselors. No Cost for the Initial Assessment. Most Major Insurances Accepted.

EarthCircleRecycling.com

Hope for a bright future

Earth Circle’s mission is to creatively assist businesses and residents with their recycling efforts while providing the friendliest and most reliable service in the area.

PRESENTS...

Murder in the Man Cave! -----------------------------

Bring 5 friends & your ticket is

Call Today! 314-664-1450

FREE!

EVANGELINE’S

-----------------------------

NOW SERVING BRUNCH ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY!

w w w. C e n t e r Po i n t e H o s p i t a l . c o m

evangelinesstl.com

AUDIO EXPRESS! Receive a complete bikini wax for $50 and bring a friend for free! 6635 Delmar Blvd (in the Loop) 314-833-3598

File Bankruptcy Now! Call Angela Jansen ~314-645-5900~ Bankruptcyshopstl.com

Lowest Installed Price In Town — Every Time!

$

200-watt AM/FM/CD deck. DriveEQ defeatsroad noise.

Two-Year Warranty

$

19990

Save To

00*

1- or 2-DIN deck to fit your dash! Loaded with features.

SOUTH: 5616 S. Lindbergh • (314) 842-1242 WEST: 14633 Manchester • (636) 527-26811 HAZELWOOD: 233 Village Square Center • (314) 731-1212 Mon. - Sat. 9 AM - 7 PM; Sunday Noon - 5 PM Unless otherwise limited, prices are good through Tuesday following publication date. Installed price offers are for product purchased from Audio Express installed in factory-ready locations. Custom work at added cost. Kits, antennas and cables additional. Added charges for shop supplies and environmental disposal where mandated. Illustrations similar. Video pictures may be simulated. Not responsible for typographic errors. Savings off MSRP or our original sales price, may include install savings. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Details, conditions and restrictions of manufacturer promotional offers at respective websites. Price match applies to new, non-promotional items from authorized sellers; excludes “shopping cart” or other hidden specials. © 2017, Audio Express.

riverfronttimes.com

AUDIO EXPRESS!

Get the Attention of our Readers

www.LiveInTheGrove.com

Installed price covers labor for installation in factory-ready locations. Custom work, kits, plugs and supplies additional. Complete details at store.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2017

Made You Look! Call 314-754-5966 for More Info

99

$

2837 Cherokee Street (314) 226-9243 thepalmtreestl.com

00*

Two-Year Warranty

INSTALL ! D INCLUDE

Dinner only during Ramadan

9930

Take Your Choice Of CD Receivers!

$

RIVERFRONT TIMES

May 27-June 25 7-10pm All Inclusive Appetizer Entree Dessert Beverage

99

Save

SL Riverfront Times —

DINNER BUFFET

INSTALL ! D INCLUDE

Firecracker Bargain!

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertising.

56

RAMADAN KAREEM

Big Savings With Installed Price!

Every Wednesday

Always receive a pair of cute panties with any bikini wax.

Visit gatewayescaperooms.com or call 314-270-9884

The Changing Pointe at CenterPointe Hospital 4801 Weldon Spring Parkway St. Charles, MO 63304

Lowest Installed Price In Town — Every Time!

Ultimate Massage by

Summer!

SWEDISH & DEEP TISSUE FULL BODY MASSAGE MON - FRI 10 AM - 5 PM

SOME WEEKENDS

South County/Lemay Area

314-620-6386 # 2006003746

Profile for Riverfront Times

Riverfront Times - June 28, 2017  

Riverfront Times - June 28, 2017

Riverfront Times - June 28, 2017  

Riverfront Times - June 28, 2017

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded