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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

. . . featuring music and lifestyle in Adelaide

Issue 18 2019

Children Of The Damned MEGAtravel: The Music in Mongolia Khristian Mizzi Baby Animals live gig photos Mental As Anything live gig photos Bendigo Writers Festival: Stuart Coupe talks about his book “Roadies” 1

Orianthi review & live gig photos In Conversation With The Sopranos Music In Exile Graham Bonnet live gig photos HotFest 2 gig photos Dragon live gig photos


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

IN THIS ISSUE Photos & Reviews

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Regular Columns MEGAlocal Sound Advice MEGAlocal SA Paranormal MEGAlocal

Kevin Borich Photo: Sue Hedley

6 Orianthi Review 11 Streaker 12 In Conversation With The Sopranos Review 14 Graham Bonnet & Alcatrazz 18 Gordon Koang review 24 Baby Animals 28 Bendigo Writers Festival 30 Kevin Borich @ HotFest 2 31 Taste @ Hotfest 2 32 Swannee @ HotFest 2 33 Cassidy Paris/ Tyler James Band/ Marie Wilson @ HotFest 2 34 The Babes/The Menace @ HotFest 2 36 The Hindley Street Country Club 39 Mental As Anything 44 Stars 46 Dave Graney & The Mistly 56 Girlschool 59 Dragon

Features

16 Music In Exile 18 Let’s Dance Carinda 20 Khristian Mizzi 40 MEGAtravel: Music of Mongolia 52 Children Of The Damned 54 Ron Tremaine’s Musical Odyssey 3


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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAscene Editor: Sue Hedley Deputy Editor: Michelle McGoldrick Contributors this issue: Allen Tiller Frank Lang Jo Newman Writer On The Road: Michelle McGoldrick Photographer: Sue Hedley Additional Photography: Lisa Vincent Michelle McGoldrick Jenny Warren

EDITOR’S NOTE Hi MEGAscene readers, This issue is big! We have a review and photos of Adelaide’s own Orianthi, and a review of In Conversation With The Sopranos from the cult TV series. Writer on the Road was at Bendigo Writers Festival and met up with Stuart Coupe who talked about his current book “Roadies”. A gig review and photos of Girlschool live, plus photos of Dave Graney Graham Bonnet , Baby Animals, and Hindley Street Country Club live. Read about a record label with a difference in “Music in Exile” story, and this issue also features a story on Mongolian music and a story on Children Of The Damned. Ciao for now,

Sue

Editor, MEGAscene

Layout: Sue Hedley Michelle McGoldrick Published by: Rising Star Media www.risingstar.com.au

Front Cover Photo: Orianthi Back Cover Photo: Swanee Front & Back Photos: Sue Hedley

MEGAscene web address: www.facebook.com/megasceneoz Editorial and Advertising enquiries: rsm@risingstar.com.au Telephone: Sue - 0414 984 739 Postal address: PO Box 333 Greenacres SA 5086 © Rising Star Media 2019 All rights reserved

All materials published in MEGAscene are subject to copyright. No part may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. The opinions expressed in MEGAscene are not necesarily those of the editors or publisher. No responsibility is taken for the contents or illustrations of advertisements. This linking to other sites within MEGAscene is provided strictly as a courtesy by Rising Star Media for the convenience of its’ users and Rising Star Media is not responsible for the content of any site linked, or linked within a site, nor does it constitute the endorsement of the web sites or of their policies, products, services or delivery of goods. Rising Star Media will not be held accountable for the content of any postings contained in any site linked or linked within a site, nor does it deem reliable any offers, expert advice, financial opportunities or otherwise that any such postings should imply.

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAreviews live Orianthi @ The Gov 28/07/2019 by Jo Newman Adelaide’s own ‘Guitar Queen’, singer/ songwriter Orianthi Panagaris, was recently in Adelaide performing at The Gov. It was her only Australian show. Ori, as she is affectionately known, was in her teens when she got to play with Carlos Santana on stage at his Adelaide concert in 2008. Since then there she has had amazing success and opportunities to play with some of the worlds best, including Steve Vai, Alice Cooper, ZZ Top, Michael Jackson and Richie Sambora. During the show Ori reminisced about a time that she got a call from Prince asking her to jam with him. What a treat it was when Ori played us a special song she wrote with him called “Knocking Down The Door”. Amongst Ori’s great set of hits - “According To You”, “Heaven In This Hell”, “Frozen”, “Bad News”, “Better With You”, “Suffocated” - we got a sneak peek of hearing a great new track called “How It Is”, a song she co-wrote with another Aussie rock chick, Vanessa Amorosi.

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To the surprise and delight of the audience young guest Taj Tennant showed off his guitar skills as he jammed with Ori, playing the song “Dirty Blues”. A couple of covers, “Are You Going My Way” and Hendrix song “Voodoo Child”, were also played with Ori’s cousin Theo Panagaris onstage to jam with her. Theo’s three piece band Streaker opened the show, warming up the eager crowd with a riveting set of originals and covers including a fabulous medley of songs - “Whole Lotta Love”, “War Pigs”, “Good Times Bad Times”, “Paranoid”, and “Communication Breakdown”. It was my first time seeing Ori perform live and it won’t be my last. I think I can say Adelaide’s ‘Daughter of Rock’ left a lasting impression on everyone who was there. Look out for her new album called O, which should be released in November this year. Orianthi will be back here in Adelaide to promote the album. Don’t miss out.


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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Orianthi @ The Gov Photos by Sue Hedley 28/07/2019

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Orianthi @ The Gov Photos by Lisa Vincent 28/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Streaker @ The Gov Photos by Lisa Vincent 28/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAreviews live

In Conversation with The Sopranos by Michelle McGoldrick Photos by Sue Hedley In Conversation with The Sopranos Q&A toured major Australian cities in June this year promoted by Abstract Entertainment. MEGAscene was at the Melbourne and Adelaide shows for a review by Michelle McGoldrick in Melbourne, and photos by Sue Hedley in Adelaide. The event featured three main characters from the show: Steven Schirripa (Bobby ‘Bacala’), Michael Imperioli (Christopher Moltisanti), and Vincent Pastore (’Big Pussy’). The show at the Palais Theatre commenced with an announcement directed at the audience seated at The Palais, ”No photos can be taken, anyone caught taking photos will get wacked.” The audience roared with appreciative laughter. The three actors appearing in the Q&A then strolled onto the stage and the audience immediately

noted the actors were not, thankfully, in character. Instead, the audience witnessed three jovial, relaxed and communicative actors who happily chatted about their auditions for the show and on set antics whilst giving up close and personal accounts of their experiences in the cult series. A story was relayed about a time when an extended delay on set saw the actors in their mobile dressing room drinking Wild Turkey for five hours. The actors were totally inebriated, and this made their upcoming scene of throwing a decapitated head over a steep cliff very dangerous. The production team came up with an ingenious idea to put a rope around the actor’s ankles and bury the rope under leaves and debris for the filming of the scene. The scene went ahead without hitch and only the torso-less head went over the cliff.

Bruno Lucia opened the show for The Sopranos

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Steven Schirripa (Bobby ‘Bacala’)

Another story described scenes where characters were laughing uncontrollably, not because of the script but because the production crew were playing crude pranks on the actors with the cameras rolling. Hard to explain; but one joke included a strap on dildo and a costume but, you know, you probably had to be there to get the full impact of the ridiculous.

Michael Imperioli (Christopher Moltisanti)

Overwhelmingly, what stood out over the evening was the humour the audience saw in the narrative of The Sopranos and the actor’s recounts. Rather than wallow in the violence that polarised audiences, the actors emphasised the key concept that drove the success of the show: the humanity in the monster. What was obvious throughout the audience at The Palais was their choice to overlook Soprano’s character’s flaws and their grim penchant for violence. Self-reflection, redemption and morality were always options for the mob but in the end it was understood - blood is always thicker than water. Sadly, the main anti-hero from the series passed away in 2014 but his impact on the series has never been forgotten. Prior to his death James Gandolfini told Rolling Stone magazine, “I heard David Chase [The Sopranos producer] say one time the show is about people who lie to themselves, as we all do. Lying to ourselves on a daily basis and the mess it creates.” Over eight years The Sopranos explored enough lies and mess to fill eight series, eighty six episodes and over 100 major awards before the show was finally whacked in 2007.

Vincent Pastore (’Big Pussy’)

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Graham Bonnet @ Enigma Bar Photos by Sue Hedley 06/06/2019

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Music In Exile by Michelle McGoldrick Music in Exile is a project of Joe Alexander from Melbourne record label, Bedroom Suck Records. The label gives a voice to CALD artists in Australia by supporting artists to tell their stories of survival through music. Joe Alexander spoke with MEGAscene about his important initiative. How do people connect with Bedroom Suck Records when they arrive in Australia? Many incredible artists [who come to the record label] have already arrived in Australia and they have rich musical diversity to share. I would encourage everyone to keep their eyes open to support these communities of music. We often find artists who are already in contact with other support organisations like Multicultural Arts Victoria or the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre. It is these organisations who have already supported the artists, but we look for those who wish to further their careers in music. I encourage people to look into these organisations and maybe volunteer some time! This project has received limited funding from State and local governments, as well as APRA, the Australian Performing Rights Association, who are interested in supporting songwriters new to Australian life. This funding is only really a small percentage of our entire activity though - everything really happens through volunteer hours, particularly our studio engineers Stefan Blair and James Mannix, who devote so much time to recording these artists. What platforms are available for artists to share their music - aside from recording - i.e. festivals, radio programs, touring opportunities, workshops? There are platforms out there for artists to share their music, but it’s really a question of accessibility. It can be hard enough for Australian-born English speakers to get their band a gig, network with promoters, book upcoming tours or organise recording time, let alone for someone who is new to the country and is struggling with so many

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other settlement issues. The unfortunate reality is the music industry works on networks and building support systems for artists - our idea is to devote time to help build these networks for asylum seeker and refugee artists. We hope to get the artists to a level where they have these support systems, mostly from booking agents, managers and local radio and press contacts. What has been your personal journey with Music in Exile? My independent label, Bedroom Suck Records, was originally based in Brisbane but now I am based in Melbourne. It’s been nearly ten years since I started the label as a DIY initiative to release my own music. I’ve always been interested in the idea of using music for social change, and it felt like the right time to turn my attention to something like this. The idea was that networks and experience gained through the Bedroom Suck label could be used to assist others. There are lots of others who make the project possible Stefan Blair is our chief recording engineer and is also a musician and self-released artist. Stefan’s strength is in DIY recording and home studios. The man is a whiz, creating beautiful records with a few simple microphones. Liam Parsons and James Mannix also lend their industry experience, and there is a revolving cast of others who help with publicity and logistics. We are looking for a great Publicist & Social Media Manager at the moment - if there is anybody out there, drop me a line!


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Are there any particular artists you are working with you’d like to mention? We’ve been particularly busy with Gordon Koang lately, a South Sudanese artists who is living in Melbourne and is very prolific - at any one time he might have ten different ideas for albums in his head, including all the musicians’ parts ready to go. He is amazing. We’ve just finished recording Gordon’s first full-length album since his arrival in Australia, which listeners should keep an ear out for toward the end of the year! We hope to build support for Gordon in the festival circuit and ultimately create pathways for him to tour overseas and back home in Sudan.  Any new projects on the horizon, what might the future hold for Bedroom Suck Records? Our aim is to keep our doors open to anyone looking for support. If there are any artists out there, or someone who knows an artist in their community, or even industry professionals that think they have something to offer let’s get together and show our support for asylum seekers! A lot of us here in Australia are in such a position of privilege - I hope we can find a way to share that with others.  Gordon Koang Photo: Luke Byrne

At this stage we are recording out of a piano shop in Reservoir, Melbourne. It may not look like much but the knowledge and equipment our engineers share builds great recordings. If the artists need support in terms of sessions musicians, we draw on our network of friends and musicians. It’s all volunteer. Again, if there are established musicians out there who want to collaborate with Music in Exile artists or feel they have something to offer, drop us a line! It’s always good to have a database of performers we can share with Music in Exile artists. What do you wish to give back to music culture here and around the world? Ultimately, the goal is to assist these artists in establishing networks that allow them a viable career in the Australian music industry. This can be tough as any kind of career in music is near impossible to find! But I believe the quality of the music and the incredible stories behind it will be enough to make this happen.

During June and July Gordon Koang headlined shows around the country, including performances at CHANGES in Melbourne. Gordon’s latest single “Asylum Seeker” is out now and on this track he sings of asylum seekers and refugees who have settled here in Australia.The song is described as a love song for his community and a message of hope and support, praising the courage of asylum seekers and asking them to have patience in the long wait for residency status in Australia. Go to SoundCloud to stream the new single. Gordon will be on tour this September including shows in Melbourne, Adelaide, and BIGSOUND Festival in Brisbane. Dates: 03/09 - 05/09 - BIGSOUND, Brisbane Friday, 14/09 - The Tote, Melbourne Friday, 20/09 - Chateau Apollo, Adelaide website: https://musicinexile.com.au/ Email: hi@musicexile.com.au

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MEGAreviews live Gordon Koang @ Theatre Royal, Castlemaine - April 2019 by Michelle McGoldrick

Let’s Dance Carinda 2019 Let’s Dance Carinda is an annual music festival held in Carinda, NSW. The festival celebrates Bowie’s ‘Let’s Dance’ video that was filmed in the Carinda Hotel. Let’s Dance Carinda 2019 will take place from October 5th - 6th at the Carinda Hotel and oval. Bowie Unzipped starring Jeff Duff, the Thin White Ukes and Phill Schooner Band will lead the entertainment along with local bands over the three days.

The photo on the Promo Poster

South Sudanese performer Gordon Koang communicates sincerity and groove referenced by God and Halleluah in Neur, Arabic and English dialect. Coming to Australia four years ago after escaping civil war in his homeland, Koang’s music belts out the joy of determination, survival and hope. Koang’s music demands movement, it is not music for the voyeur. It is rigorous and happy North African beats that prescribes movement for full impact. “Dance, stand up and clap your hands”: Koang decreed with a wisdom that defied the visual by relying on the spiritual with shakers, Arabic drum and traditional instruments.

A street parade, ukulele workshops, Bowie dog trials and re-enactment of the ‘Let’s Dance’ song will be back this year for the ultimate big Bowie blast. Don’t miss it! Tickets available at www.trybooking.com/ BDLPX. For more information see their website https://letsdance-carinda.com/. Anyone needing encouragement to attend, see the story on Let’s Dance Carinda 2018 in Issue 14 of MEGAscene.

Imagine for a moment being blind from birth; how would you respond if you were asked, “what do you see when you hear the sound?” Koang answered his own question with a straightforward reply, “I play music because I love it – and I love you.” Complete with belly laugh and blowing kisses. There you have it: music is love. You feel it. Sure, love is an exhausted theme in music except that Koang’s love in music is a survival medium – music is fundamental in keeping Koang’s people’s spirits alive amidst the horrific violence of the ongoing South Sudanese Civil War. Love, music, survival, joy, peace. Now that’s worth celebrating.

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Jeff Duff at Let’s Dance Carinda 2018


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Khristian Mizzi by Michelle McGoldrick “A once in a generation performer. A voice that moves people like his does, is a precious thing indeed.” - Greg Champion The Australian and Canadian folk festival circuit is blessed with established performers like Khristian Mizzi who has impressed audiences at Port Fairy Folk Festival (2006), Korumburra Buskers Festival (2006), Boolarra Folk Festival (2007, 2009, 2011, 2016, 2019), The Basin Music Festival (2010 - 2017), Robson Valley Music Festival - Canada (2010), Salmon Arm Blues and Roots Festival - Canada (2010), Maldon Folk Festival (2017), Maroondah Festival (2017, 2018), Newstead Live! (2017, 2018), Burke & Wills Music Festival (2018, 2019), Riverfolk Festival - Warburton (2018, 2019), Fleurieu Folk Festival (2018), Healesville Music Festival (2017, 2018), Illawarra Folk Festival (2019), and Maleny Folk Festival (2019). It’s been a long and winding road for the Gippsland musician. Born in Moe, Victoria, Mizzi’s early musical exposure was limited but nonetheless influential.

“My family were not musical at all. We had only a small stack of records which we played in the evenings. Some of my most vivid, happy childhood memories are of my Mum and Dad dancing in the lounge room to old rock n’ roll songs as my brother and I hovered around their feet. Later, when I was in my teens, my mum sat my friends and I down and she played us Bob Dylan songs. My mum explained the meanings behind the lyrics and the importance of music for social change. My mother taught me about history through the tunes. I knew then that writing songs had an impact on the way people felt about things. I learnt that a soundtrack for daily living was potentially just as important as living itself.” Mizzi’s touring life began when he was in his

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early twenties. He drew inspiration from his travels along Victorian highways between gigs in Gippsland and Melbourne. His experiences influenced his taste for fine musical pedigree: Leonard Cohen, James Taylor, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens and John Martyn. Mizzi joked, “I often say my ‘top 10 songs of all time list’ has about 100 songs in it and they change all the time. But, for sentimental reasons, some songs stay with me more than others. Leonard Cohen’s “Suzanne”, “Famous Blue Raincoat” and “Bird On A Wire”, Neil Young’s “Thrasher”, “On The Beach”, “After The Goldrush” and pretty much the whole of Joni Mitchell’s ‘Blue’ album. Cat Stevens’ “The Wind”, “Miles From Nowhere” and “Sad Lisa”, and John Marten’s “Go Easy”, “Don’t Wanna Know About Evil”, and “Man at the Station”: these songs are hard wired in my brain and have become my trusty travel companions. I couldn’t say what it is in these songs that makes them stand out from the others, sometimes the melody pulls at the heart, the lyrics ring truth into my mind, sometimes a pretty line brings tears to my eyes … sometimes it’s just the time I heard it that becomes significant too.” Mizzi’s reputation’s on the live folk scene solidified when in 2017 he was awarded the ‘Troubadour Artist Of The Year’ award at the Newstead Live Folk Festival. He explained, “I had never heard of the Troubadour Award or The Troubadour Foundation until Andrew Pattison (the Troubadour Foundation founder) saw me perform at Newstead Live 2017. I was driving home from the festival and I received a phone call from Folk Artist Mandy Connell telling me I had been awarded the Troubadour Foundation Artist of the Year award. As I was already in Melbourne I didn’t get a


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chance to receive the award on stage, but I wrote to Andrew to thank him and the Foundation for their generous and supportive award. The foundation’s gift of a cash donation assisted me to record my new EP.” Mizzi’s appreciation of the positive networking in the music was not lost on the experience either. “Winning the Troubadour Award was the beginning of a wonderful friendship which grew out of a mutual respect and love of music for both Andrew Pattison and I. It is hard to measure the significance of the support and encouragement of a community like the Troubadour Foundation for a musician starting out. I will always be grateful for the support and kindness of these folks.” Mizzi’s has completed his first solo full length album. “The songwriting process is, more often than not, a long and boring one. Sometimes it consists of me just staring at the page or out the window for a couple of hours until something locks in. When I sit down to work on something, I need to be able to see the scene in my mind. What does it look, smell and sound like, who is telling the story and who are they telling it to. Usually a melody will form first; I feel it in my chest. I sometimes throw oohs and aahs out into the room so I can get the melody to sit right. The chords will lock in afterwards to hold the melody together and guide it along. And while this process of building something that resembles a song is playing out, the sounds I’m making will create a feeling. Some melodies sound like rain or some sound like a bustling cityscape. Or a bird flying or a machine turning. Some have the feeling of vastness while others have a motion feeling about them like a rolling train.” “Rarely do I set out to plot out a story. Most of the time the story unfolds as I’m writing and it is as much a surprise to me (while writing) as it is for a listener who hears it for the first time. This is where the reward is for me - the discoveries, the truths that surface, the sweet surprises!” Web: https://khristianmizzi.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=EOA9IQM_E3w I: https://instagram.com/khristian_mizzi For more info contact Ronnie Taheny at Arty Records: ronnie@ronnietaheny.com

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Catalogue

‘The Road Between’ EP (2009) Self Titled EP (2017) ‘Some Other Morning’ LP (Sept 2019)

Upcoming Shows

Saturday August 24 - Storytellers - with Linda Mizzi, Casey Radio (LIVE) Sunday August 25 - House Concert, Ballarat (VIC) Friday August 30 - Maleny Folk Festival, Maleny Showgrounds, Maleny (QLD) Sunday September 8 - Saint Charlie Bar, Fitzroy (VIC) Friday September 13 - HATS (Heritage Arts Tradition), Auburn Courthouse, Auburn (SA) Saturday September 14 - Wheatsheaf Hotel, Thebarton, Adelaide (SA) Sunday September 15 - The Trinity Sessions, The Trinity Sessions Church, Clarence Park, Adelaide (SA) Wednesday September 18 - Lomond Acoustica, The Lomond Hotel, Brunswick (VIC) Saturday October 5 - House Concert, Hobart Hobart (TAS) Sunday October 6 - Marakoopa Cafe, Mayberry (TAS) Sunday October 13 - The Drunken Poet, West Melbourne (VIC) Friday October 25 - Palomino Nights The Pantry, Mt. Gambier (SA) Saturday October 26 - Monday, October 28 The Fluerieu Folk Festival, Fleurieu Showgrounds, Willunga (SA) Friday November 15 - CD Launch, The Caravan Music Club, East Bentleigh (VIC) Saturday November 16 - Live at Bundy Hall (VIC) Bundy Hall, Bundalaguah (VIC)


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MEGAlocal Send your local music news to: rsm@risingstar.com.au THE SCREAMING JETS AND ROSE TATTOO Two of Australia’s most revered rock n roll bands have decided to join up in a national tour de force in August/September 2019 in a run of shows aptly titled “Off The Chain”. In a once only collaboration, The Screaming Jets and Rose Tattoo will bring their unique firebrand of hard rock together for 8 shows only…. Continuing the celebration of their ‘Dirty Thirty’ 30th Anniversary in 2019, this run with Rose Tattoo will be the last big tour for the Jets for 2019 before work starts on the next originals album, due for release in 2020. Catch them at The Gov on Friday 20th and Saturday 21st September. Tickets $48.50 + Booking Fee.

MI-SEX AT THE GOV Party like it’s 1979 when Mi-Sex bring their mammoth live show and unique blend of rock meets new wave, meets punk meets disco, to The Gov on 23rd November. Playing their debut LP, Graffiti Crimes, from start to finish, prepare yourself for a show that revives the soundtrack of our generation; featuring the hit singles “But You Don’t Care”, “People”, “Blue Day“ and “Castaway”, alongside a cacophony of timeless classics and a few newbies, just for fun. Featuring founding members Murray Burns on keys and Don Martin on bass, with Steve Balbi (Electric Hippies, Noiseworks) out front, James Van Cooper on guitar and Jordan McDonald on drums, join us in celebrating the legacy of New Zealand’s favourite sons and 1980s icons, Mi-Sex.

The Screaming Jets have long been known as the “Last Great Aussie Rock Band”, whilst The Tatts have held the ‘Rock n Roll Outlaw’ moniker since their inception in 1976. Both bands are known for their explosive and sometimes controversial live shows, and this tour will be no exception. Never ones for hold back these two heavy-weight Oz music legends will vie each night for the closing spot and no doubt will attempt to out rock each other with their extensive catalogue of Aussie music gems… including Jets ‘Better’, ‘Helping Hand’, ‘C’Mon’ & Tatts ‘Rock N Roll Outlaw’, ‘Bad Boy For Love’ & ‘We Can’t Be Beaten’. This night will be a show not to be missed and definitely legendary! Opening on all dates will be hard rock, blues, soul band CHILD.

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Baby Animals @ The Gov Photos by Sue Hedley/05/2019

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Baby Animals @ The Gov Photos by Sue Hedley 17/05/2019

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MEGAreviews live Bendigo Writers Festival by Michelle McGoldrick

Stuart Coupe and Don Walker reveal a hidden problem in the Australian music scene At this year’s Bendigo Writer’s Festival an unlikely but legendary duo discussed an important topic in Australian music: the unacknowledged value of roadies. Cold Chisel principal song writer, Don Walker, and prolific music writer, Stuart Coupe, appeared in the Engine Room in Bendigo’s Arts Precinct and told the audience of their concerns for roadie’s mental and physical health. Walker, who joined Adelaide-originated band Cold Chisel in 1983, wrote songs that defined the Australian psyche in the 1980s: “Flame Trees,” “Saturday Night,” “Choirgirl,” “Goodbye (Astrid Goodbye)”, “Cheap Wine,” and the Australian Vietnam war song “Khe Sanh” (voted the 8th greatest Australian song of all time by the Australian Performing Rights Association in 2001). As well as once managing major Australian acts like Paul Kelly and the Hoodoo Gurus, Coupe’s literary achievements include The New Music (1980), The New Rock ‘n’ Roll (1983), The Promoters (2003), Gudinski (2015) and Tex (2017). Coupe’s latest book, Roadies, was the main focus of his appearance at the Bendigo Writer’s Festival and it is a book that has generated discussion and debate on the undervalue of roadies in the Australian music scene. Coupe commenced by describing the conditions roadies once worked under and the impact of the work. The stories were confronting. Back in the 70’s one roadie may have been responsible for a rig that today would demand at least two men to move it. It is as Jimmy Barnes said, “the show has to happen and they’ll [roadies] do whatever it takes for that to happen.”

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Roadies

(Roadies, Hachett Australia. 2018) Coupe further described the mental health and poor physical health experienced by many roadies for whom Occupational Health and Safety, workplace training and support, wage accord and superannuation were once unheard of. Coupe described the toll a roadie’s life took on personal and family relationships and that many [mostly] men eventually fell into a hole of isolation and loneliness that continued to the end of their life. Years of hard work carrying heavy rigs, lights and gear ruined many roadie’s backs and if that weren’t enough the combined impact of mental health and unemployment beyond the music industry bought a heavy toll. The suicide rate for roadies is much higher than the national average and it is a problem that has resulted in the creation of support networks but there is no easy fix: Walker acknowledged ex-pat Australian sound engineer, Gerry Georgettis, who went onto success in America until he killed himself in act of self destruction that sent chills through


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the music industry here and overseas. One the saddest accounts of all mentioned by Walker and Coupe was the deaths of two roadies in 1980. After a tyre blew on the truck they were driving between gigs, Alan Dallow and Billy Rowe perished in a fiery crash. The men were honoured on Jimmy Barnes’ debut album Bodyswerve in the song “No Second Prize”. Both men had worked for Cold Chisel previously.

Walker concluded by saying Cold Chisel is currently in the studio recording a new album which is excellent news for Chisel fans. Coupe’s current literary project is a book about Paul Kelly and, true to form, he remains absorbed in his love of music, “ [I recently] saw Nick Cave and Warren Ellis play … it was exemplary. And if I wouldn’t mind at all if I had to spend the rest of my days listening to The Dirty Three,” he said.

But there was no denying the funny side of the music industry either, particularly when it came to Australia’s answer to San Quentin. Walker described how playing to a prison audience after his band’s extended hiatus was a great way to test new songs and crowd reactions: nothing like a captive audience he deducted. Coupe told of a gig in Long Bay prison which turned disastrous because the inmates were expecting Paul Kelly and the ‘coloured girls’. It seems the inmates were very disappointed when the coloured girls turned out to be a white all-male backing band. Coupe and Walker also laughed about other gigs that did not go as planned. They recalled their respective bands playing in venues like waterfront pubs, empty hotel bars and country pubs that erupted into violence once the band’s set was finished. It seemed young men’s jealousy of local girl’s attentions towards a band and their crew was a regular catalyst. But Coupe was clear in his final assumption of the now recognised value of road crew: despite technological advances there will always be a need for roadies ‘as long as there is a guitar that needs plugging in’.

Don Walker and Stuart Coupe being interviewed by Em Burgess-Gilchrist Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Stuart Coupe’s website is: https://www.laughingoutlaw.com.au/ https://www.facebook.com/stuart. coupe Don Walker’s website is: http://www.donwalker.com.au/ https://www.facebook.com/don. walker.315865 Bendigo Writers Festival website is: https://www.bendigowritersfestival. com.au/

Don Walker and Stuart Coupe Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

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Kevin Borich @ HotFest 2 Photos by Sue Hedley 02/06/2019

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Taste @ HotFest 2 Photos by Sue Hedley 02/06/2019

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Swanee @ HotFest 2 Photos by Sue Hedley 02/06/2019

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Cassidy Paris/Tyler James Band/Marie Wilson @ HotFest 2 Photos by Lisa Vincent 02/06/2019 Cassidy Paris

Tyler James Band

Marie Wilson

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The Babes & The Menace @ HotFest 2 Photos by Lisa Vincent /05/2019 The Babes

The Menace

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The Babes 35


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Hindley Street Country Club @ Thebarton Theatre Photos by Sue Hedley 20/07/2019

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Hindley Street Country Club @ Thebarton Theatre Photos by Sue Hedley 20/07/2019

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Mental As Anything @ Adelaide Casino Oasis Bar Photos by Lisa Vincent 11/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAtravel

The Music In Mongolia by Michelle McGoldrick MEGAscene’s Writer on the Road toured Mongolia this year and discovered not only is the country filled with horses – it’s filled with magnificent music too. The music of Mongolia is expansive, like the steppes that define and sustain the country’s nomadic culture and peoples. Traditional horse-head fiddles, throat singing, Buddhist monks chanting and modern pop music Mongolians believes music makes people human. In early Mongolian history people who refused to sing or play instruments were punished by torture or death: Mongolians have a longstanding reputation as people of music and poetry. Overwhelmingly, Mongolians love to sing. Across nomadic ger camps a strong sense of contentment is attributed not only to the lush diet of populations on the steppe; inner Mongolia’s peacefulness comes from the impact of folk music on both the people and their animals who are inseparable beings in Mongolia nomadic life. Mongolian folk songs are sang for many reasons such as to soothe unsettled animals, to provide a good milk yield, encourage yaks to pull heavy loads or attract wild animals like wolves towards hunters. Many songs are about the tenacity of Mongolian horses and riding a horse across Mongolia’s steppe is a truly inspiring experience for those who like vast scenery and cultural traditions. Mongolia has the highest equine to human population in the world and it is not surprising there are love songs directed towards horses e.g. “Horse of the Narrow Gobi” and “Small Light Bay”. Mongolia’s gentle horses guide the rider across beautiful landscapes, but it is the soft folk sang by a nomadic rider that adds a dreamlike atmosphere never to be forgotten. The Urtiin duu or “long song” is one of the two major forms of Mongolian songs, the other being the “short song” (Bogino duu).

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Writer on the Road channelling her inner horsewoman Photo: Jenny Warren

Mongolian horsewoman on the steppe Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

In the long song, the singers barely move their mouth as they sing draw out notes. According to some Mongolians, the songs sound best when riding a horse at full gallop! The long song plays an important role in Mongolian society and is performed at weddings, the birth of a child, the branding of foals, weddings and other social events celebrated by Mongolia’s nomadic communities. Performances and compositions of Urtiin Duu are closely connected to the pastoral way of life of the Mongolian nomads on their ancestral grasslands.


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Buddhist monk preparing for meditation at Monastery Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Mongolian horseman

Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Buddhist chanting cannot be discounted as a highly effecting form of singing across Mongolia. Chanting is heard at temples and monasteries and the impact can be almost paralysing in its’ intensity. A form of musical verse, chanting is a mantra for preparation for meditation. The chanting has roots in Tibetan culture, shamanism and a firm belief that sound has a power that is uniquely spiritual and mystical.

Mongolia has its’ own sense of orchestral music and at the 2019 Nadaam Festival the Morin Khuur Ensemble of Mongolia performed at the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet in Ulaambaatar. Mongols have created an astonishing four hundred different kinds of musical instruments, but it is the Morin Khur, or horse-head fiddle, which is the most identifiable instrument of the country. The instrument reflects Mongolia as the country sees itself: an ancient, horseworshipping, independent country unlike any other, a powerful force. Dating back 800 years to the era of Genghis Khan, the Morin Khour has traditionally been made from tortoiseshell, wood and metal and decorated with green horse heads. Today, the Morin Khour is made of hand-carved wood but still uses traditional horse hair strings. Other Mongolian musical instruments include Khuunchir (two string fiddle), khuunchir (two string fiddle similar to a Chinese ehru) and tovshuur (lute), yatga, zo and damar drums and the incredible Limbe (Circular Breathing) Flute. In 2011, the folk long song performance technique of Limbe performances — circular breathing — was placed on the UNESCO Intangible Heritage list. In circular breathing,

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

players breathe in through the nose while simultaneously blowing out through the mouth, using air stored in their cheeks to play the flute without interruption. Single stanzas of folk long song last approximately four to five minutes. A single song consists of three to five or more stanzas, which requires performance of the flute to continue uninterrupted for twelve to twenty-five minutes. [Source: UNESCO]. Currrently there only fourteen Limbe practitioners remaining in the world, so hearing the instrument is a rare treat. Tsuur music is a combination of instrumental and vocal performance with a blending of sounds created simultaneously by both the musical instrument and the human throat. Tsuur music has an inseparable connection to the Uriankhai Mongolians of the mountains Altai Region, and music remains an integral part of their daily life. The Tsuur is a vertical pipe-shaped wooden wind instrument with three fingerholes played with the musician’s front teeth whilst the throat produces a sound unique in tone and texture. Unfortunately Tsuur performers have dwindled across Mongolia and there may be only forty known instruments preserved in the Altai region. In 2010, traditional music of the Tsuur was placed on the UNESCO Intangible Heritage list because of its’ roots in nomadic groups in northwesten Mongolia where it has been a crucial element in assuring the group’s survival by supporting daily activities and animal herding as well as religious ceremonies and rituals.

Morin Knurr Ensemble of Mongolia Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

“In describing the beauty of the grassland, a melody performed by Morin Khour is much more vivid than the color of the painters or the language of the poets”. (Unknown). The fiddle’s significance extends beyond its function as a musical instrument, for it was traditionally an integral part of rituals and everyday activities of the Mongolian nomads. [Source: UNESCO]

Jazz bars are found in Ulaambaatar, the capitol of Mongolia. A night out at the Fat Cat Jazz Club or UB Jazz Club in downtown Ulaambaatar proves that the language of jazz is universal. At the Fat Cat, stairs lead to a basement club with posters and photos on the walls and a truly impressive cocktail bar dominating visual space. The atmosphere is intimate, the lighting low, the alcohol menu extensive and cosmopolitan. The music menu is very impressive also with jam sessions, funk nights, Jazz on Vinyl, Billie Holiday tributes, South African music nights and ongoing jazz ensembles including the Martin Zenker Quartet. The music of Mongolia deserves more attention than space permits for this story and there are many different styles of music thriving in Mongolia. Across the world stage

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Horse Head Fiddle Photo by Mongolian Morin Huur Used with permission


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Mongolian music is making an impact on a global scale with The Hu headlining heavy metal festivals across Europe and the USA. Chirgilchin, or ‘Master Throat Singers from Tuva, are based in USA. Chirgilchin features traditional Mongolian singing and instruments, the likes of which are rare outside the country. A favourite of Laurie Anderson and of multi Grammy award winning producer Tony Visconti who pioneered the glam rock sound in the 70s’s; Chirgilchin frequently post live feeds of their concerts on social media. Likewise, touring Mongolia in person is the the best way to experience the country’s music and culture. Perhaps best seen and explained via a local, Writer on the Road recommends Nogoolin Tours for a close up and personal tour of Mongolia www.nogoolintours.com

Ulaambaatar Mongolia

Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Fat Cat Jazz Club

Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Mongolian steppe

Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

One Cool drummer at Fat Cat Jazz Club Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

Horses rule in Mongolia

Photo: Michelle McGoldrick

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Stars @ The Gov Photos by Sue Hedley 05/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Dave Graney & The Mistly @ The Gov Photos by Sue Hedley 12/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Live Sound Advice by Frank Lang

Too Much Foldback? It’s a fact that with 500 watt powered fold back speakers even four wedges can add up to more sound bouncing around a small stage than most pub PA’s have for front-of -house.

harmonies in one or two songs why not wander over to the main vocal mic and share it; it’s a great look, looks like people on stage are comfortable.

And if you have four separate sends and if every Muso is chasing more foldback for themselves then the acoustic environment can very soon mess right up.

I work for a band and the drummer insists on two 1000 watt subs and two 1000 watt wedges, for that BIG sound. For a while there he was moving them outwards a tad when space allowed and I was noticing that in smaller to middle size rooms the drum fill was larger than FOH. Moving them back inwards solved this issue and with a lot of discussion between drummer and me we have a usable drum stage sound now.

For some groups of musos it seems the solution to all their “I can’t hear myself, the guitar is too loud,” issues seem to be to ask for more noise (insert foldback here) on stage. Now how is that going to work! After many years as a sound guy and a musician I find that if you are louder than the drums played without drum fill that is, and you simply calm down your own volume, blending it in, things can’t get out of hand. Some stage environments are rotten at best, and if everyone insists on playing loud the sound can jumble. Some pros I know play their parts and play by memory, but I know of only a handful of people with this ability. This in turn gives the sound person half a chance to at least mix the front-of-house half decent.

Today’s hint, to save channels, is the splitter lead. Make a couple up, simply put two mics into one channel, they can come in handy when used on guitar if the guitarist uses two amps, or rack and floor into one channel. It saves channels and with a little care with moving the mics in or out and you can have a very balanced toms sound. Sounding Good? Signing off for now, Frank Lang

Too much for a small stage? Well most of the time it is. How much fold back? How many wedges? Well its up to you really but experiment with less wedges, you might be pleasantly surprised. Are you playing Wembley Stadium or some small room in an Adelaide pub? If the latter is the case, perhaps one wedge for the singer? And if the wedge has been tuned nicely and the lows put in perspective, perhaps rolled off at 150k (the benefit of digital mixing comes into focus here when you can tune up the foldback standing right at the microphone) Maybe even consider this approach: if you sing

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Adelaide is a

MEGAscene


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAlocal RICHIE RAMONE TO TOUR OZ HARDLINE MEDIA are pleased to announce the return of RICHIE RAMONE to Australia, just in time for the countdown to Christmas, in DECEMBER 2019. The famed punk drummer is set for a killer run of shows in HOBART, SYDNEY, BRISBANE, MELBOURNE, CANBERRA and ADELAIDE.

“Australia is a long way from where I live in LA so it’s kinda hard to get there very often. But I love Australia, I love the fans there, and I look forward to setting these clubs on fire. Aussie’s love to rock, and we’re bringing it!” - RICHIE RAMONE Aussie punks and rockers get ready for a full throttle set with Richie singing lead AND drumming, or mic in hand, front and centre … in the crowd, sharing the mic around to fans - an in your face, high octane show with all the intensity of a classic RAMONES performance, with that extra Richie rockin’ kick. The famed punk drummer is best known for his time on the stool as the drummer for the RAMONES and is the only RAMONES drummer credited as the sole writer and composer of six RAMONES songs. He is also acknowledged as being the only RAMONES drummer who ever sang lead vocals in some tracks. Richie joined the band before the release of “Subterranean Jungle” in 1983. He went on to perform on RAMONES albums such as “Too Tough to Die”, “Animal Boy” and “Halfway to Sanity”. Most notably, he wrote the hit RAMONES’ song “Someone Put Something in My Drink”, which is featured on the album “Ramones Mania” - the first RAMONES album to go platinum. He also penned songs “Smash You”, “I’m Not Better Now”, “Humankind”, “You Can’t Say Anything Nice” and “I’m Not Jesus”. Richie’s songs “Someone Put Something In My Drink” and “I’m Not Jesus” have been covered by many bands, including CHILDREN OF BODOM and BEHEMOTH. “Richie’s very talented and he’s very diverse . . . He really strengthened the band a hundred percent because he sings backing tracks, he sings lead, and he sings with Dee Dee’s stuff. In the past, it was always just me singing for the most part.” - JOEY RAMONE He has also worked on some of DEE DEE RAMONES’ solo recordings, and in bands the ROCK N ROLL RATS and the GOBSHITES. This December, Richie arrives in Australia fresh off the back of a packed run of shows in the US and South America. And after the release of his highly commended book “I Know Better Now”. He is also set to appear in a horror/comedy flick ‘“Headcheese” later this year. From behind the kit, to amongst the pit - you will not want to miss RICHIE RAMONE live in action! TOUR DATES: SAT 7 DEC - HOBART - ALTAR SUN 8 DEC - SYDNEY - FRANKIE’S WED 11 DEC - BRISBANE - CROWBAR THUR 12 DEC - MELBOURNE - MAX WATTS FRI 13 DEC - CANBERRA - BASEMENT SAT 14 DEC - ADELAIDE - ENIGMA TICKETS & INFO: www.hardlinemedia.net

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

SA Paranormal By Allen Tiller Barossa Junction Motel In 2014, my paranormal investigation team ‘Eidolon Paranormal’ were invited to conduct a paranormal investigation at a remarkable location, The Barossa Junction Motel. The motel was somewhat of an icon on the road between Nuriootpa and Tanunda, with its train carriage hotel rooms, and train-themed restaurant. It also contained a large motor vehicle-related museum. The hotel was the idea of John Gordon, who was also behind the Buffalo Family Restaurant in Glenelg. Gordon set up the location in conjunction with his good friend Bruce Hoffman, after their winery, Hoffman’s Wines, was purchased by Peter Lehmann. The site of the motel was originally the Barossa Drive-in Theatre. The screen from which was incorporated into one of the large halls inside the museum. Gordon and Hoffman sold the location to Eric Parker in 2003, but due to ongoing overheads and lack of interest, the site was sold in 2014. Woolworths purchased the property to extend their Dorrien Estate Winery which sat alongside the property. This led to most of the contents, old trains, cars and other memorabilia being auctioned off and removed. The Barossa Junction Hotel had long been rumoured to be haunted. Legend had it that in the train carriages the spirit of a girl had been seen. She was said to be a young teen who could be seen inside the carriages, or sometimes walking between them in the yard. No-one could identify whom she might be, but there was speculation she either died by falling off a carriage or drowning in the onsite swimming pool. Another train of thought (pun intended) was that she may have died on one of the train carriages before they were converted into hotel rooms at the Junction. Either way, there is no proof of her history or her ghostly presence.

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Barossa Junction Motel Photo: Allen Tiller

We investigated the site the night before the auction. We were granted access to every location inside the property and made the most of it by investigating every train, room and vehicle we came across. The swimming pool which was located inside a building was also rumoured to be haunted. We entered late in the night to find the pool virtually empty. The room looked as though it had not been used in some time as cracks were starting to appear with plants in them. Dust and cobwebs were everywhere, and with our night vision lights reflecting off the remaining water, it created a spooky and creepy effect. Even though we had heard this area might also be haunted, on this night, no one came forward.

The swimming pool at the Barossa Junction Motel Photo: Allen Tiller


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

We came up with absolutely nothing. Not a thing from a train carriage, the pool area, or the car museum! This isn’t entirely unusual in investigating the paranormal, but we were granted the privilege of investigating a truly iconic location in the Barossa Valley! After the auction, Mr Parker moved what was left of the collection to his museum in Greenock, located in the old Perry’s Electrical site. It is not known if the alleged ghosts moved with him.

Barossa Junction Motel Photo: Allen Tiller

Allen Tiller (ALIAtech, DipFamHist) is Australia’s most recognised paranormal investigator, eminent paranormal historian, and star of the international smash hit television show “Haunting: Australia”. Allen is also the founder of Eidolon Paranormal, South Australian Paranormal, and the author of book and blog, “The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal”. He is winner of the 2017 “Emerging South Australian Historian of The Year Award” as presented by The History Council of South Australia. Employed as “Historian in Residence” in 2016/2017 with the Adelaide City Council Libraries and employed by the City of Port Adelaide Enfield Council to write the popular, “Ghosts of the Port Self-Guided Walking Tour”.

Barossa Junction Motel Photo: Allen Tiller

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

Issue 9 2017

Issue 10 2017

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Gig photos of Painters and Dockers

Dusty Lee

Gig photos of Electric Mary

Gig photos of Deep Throat

Gig photos of Dino Jag

Gig photos of Phil Emannuel

Gig photos of Full Tilt Janis

You can find Allen online at: www.AllenTiller.com.au www.EidolonParanormal.com.au www.twitter.com/Allen_Tiller www.facebook.com/ AllenHauntingAustralia https://www.facebook.com/ TheHauntsOfAdelaide

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Children Of The Damned Story and photos by Sue Hedley MEGAscene caught up with drummer Joseph Marafioti to talk about his tribute band Children Of The Damned. Children of the Damned were formed in Adelaide and play homage to the new wave of British heavy metal masters Iron Maiden. Like minded musicians deliver a show from a select catalogue of early Di’Anno & Dickinson 80’s era tracks, fronted by the raw air raid siren vocals of veteran rocker Jim Petkoff. The band members are: Jimmy Petkoff - Vocals Ian Poole - Guitar David Marafioti - Guitar Luciano Tropeano - Bass Joseph Marafioti - Drums The members all knew each other from living around the same area and playing together over the years in various bands Van Halen, Rush, Hendrix, and many more. “Like many bands we idolised as young musicians in the 80s when metal was in its prime, Iron Maiden was right up there as being the band that stood the test of time,” says Joseph Marafioti. “Fast forward to now, The Children Of The Damned tribute act was something we just had to do, paying homage to what has shaped us as the musicians we are today. We all have to admit, every time we play Iron Maiden, we are buzzing just like we are teenagers again.” “We all have to give credit to David Marafioti (guitar) for kickstarting the band to where it is now. As particular as he is when it comes to hitting that Iron Maiden sound, with many hours of practice we had to prove ourselves to ensure we all delivered the power and technique musically.” The vocalist, Jim Petkoff, is in multiple bands and guitarist Ian Poole plays in Agent 99. “For the rest of us this is the only band we’re in. We like it that way as it allows us to dedicate all our energy and

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Children Of The Damned

commitment to learning and playing the Iron Maiden as authentically as it deserves!” “To be honest, before joining this band it was Niko that stood out when it came to Iron Maiden,” says Joseph. “But after learning many of the classic early songs on drums from Clive Burr to the detail he delivered, it brought on a whole new appreciation of the driving force he played, making these songs sound to have so much power and precision!” “Besides the obvious, Iron Maiden, all of us have a wide range of influences such as Frank Zappa, Steve Vai, Scatterbrain, Faith No More, Mr Bungle, Van Halen, Dream Theatre, Led Zeppelin, Rush and Yes.” Children of The Damned will be performing again on Friday October 25th at the Findon Hotel (Rat & Parrot Bar). For more info: www.facebook.com/ childrenofthedamnedadelaide


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Joseph Marafioti

Jimmy Petkoff

Luciano Tropeano

David Marafioti

Ian Poole

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

RON TREMAINE’S MUSICAL ODYSSEY RON TREMAINE’S MUSICAL ODYSSEY Ron Tremaine’s Royal Roasting will be at The Gov on Saturday 26th October, 11.00am till 3.30pm. It will be hosted by Peter Goers. The musicians and entertainers booked are Levi Smith’s Clefs, Sandi McMenamin, Peter Goers, Ron Tremaine, The McAskills, Danny Kaye, Gary Burrows, and Topsy and the Bear. All of Ron’s friends please come along and help roast Ron. The Roasters are: Anne Wills OAM, Roger Moore, John Wynne, and Melody Earl (Ron’s youngest daughter). The general audience will be invited to roast Ron as well via radio microphones. Ron Tremaine’s musical career started when he was 14 years old as a pianist playing at the Duke of Wellington Hotel in Payneham. Ron’s working life started as a copy boy at the Adelaide News Ltd with luminaries such as Rex Jory and Mark Day. Ron’s first job every morning was to buy a packet of Senior Service cigarettes for Rupert Murdoch. He then joined John Carroll Publishing where he created South Australia’s first pop magazine, Young Modern. A brief sojourn with the Stock & Station Journal saw Ron develop a strong affinity with Rural South Australia. Ron was playing with the Delaires when he and the group were invited to play at the Largs Bay Sailing Club for organisers, Tony Bowden, John Ferrier and Eric Taylor. The guys invited Ron to join their team and established the famous Princeton Club. Australia’s first rock & roll band was Brian Penglase and The Penny Rockets with vocal group The Four Tones. They joined the Princeton Club and an eight year season started with Princeton presenting major Australian guest artists every week. The Princeton organisation acquired the Boomerang Club at Brighton Town Hall which became The Miami Club with Ken Messenger managing. The Miami became a major rock and top 40 venue with Tweed Harris’ Clefs and vocal group The Viscounts with Glenise Shearman and Trevor Pridam. The outstanding Pat Aulton began his career with The Clefs. Next group that featured at the Miami was Barrie McAskill and The Drifters with Glenise Shearman and Hayden Burford and compered by 5KA’s Stuart Jay. The Miami also presented major Australian guest artists weekly. The Princeton then ventured into the Cloudland Ballroom at Hackney and opened a new dance called Rockville with Adelaide’s King of Rock & Roll, Barrie McAskill and The Fabulous Drifters, with Jill Freeman, Daryl Morton and a new vocal group The Twilights, being Glenn, Paddy and Mike. Barrie then moved to the KT Club in the Kings Ballroom where Graham Bartlett and The Key Tones were the hosting group. Ron and Bob Lott with Jerry Wesley-Smith formed the Central Booking Agency and recruited Joyce Washington as a booking manager. CBA became the top booking agents in South Australia. Daryl Sambel, Bev Harrell’s manager, roadied Bev to a gig at Cohuna, Victoria. Here Daryl and Bev heard a singer called John Farhnam singing with a band called Strings Unlimited. Daryl told Ron about John, his parents were approached and the rest is history. Daryl managed John and took over managing Bev Harrell and guided her to Australian stardom. Ron directed the first two Adelaide Festival of Arts as the Light Entertainment Manager. He was instrumental in securing Marlene Dietrich, Jaques Loussier’s Modern Jazz Quartet, The Royal Thai Ballet and Acker Bilk. Ron also booked Brian Henderson’s Bandstand and his entire cast to play a live Royal Command Performance at Elder Park for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The Beatles were next on Ron’s agenda, he teamed with Bob Francis and John Martins Ltd and presented the Fab Four. The Beatles played four record breaking concerts in the Centennial Hall at Goodwood. The Beatles attracted a crowd of 300,000 fans who greeted them on their arrival at the Adelaide Airport and all the way up the Anzac Highway to the city. THE PUBS: The Redlegs Club with partner Brian Braidwood. The Kent Town Hotel that Ron and a

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

partner bought from Bazz & Pilko. The Old Lion Hotel where Peter Allen gave a world preview of his first major hit “I Go To Rio”. Robert Stigwood was also there that evening. Ayers House Restaurant is where Ron formed a lifelong alliance with singer/songwriter/ pianist, Sandi McMenamin. Sandi couldn’t keep Bob Francis and Ron from joining in her show. So was born “Mister Blue Eyes and Mister Big Brown Eyes”, the great song she wrote for them. Sandi became an international piano bar entertainer overseas, and a cabaret artist in Australia. She teaches many piano students (including several grandchildren) and school choirs, and does lots of shows around South Australia. Her many videos can be seen on YouTube, including her most well-known song “Adelaide You’re A Lady”. For more info on Sandi McMenamin B Mus, see http://www.sandimcmenamin.com. Ron was recruited to manage Jo Jo’s in Queensland by Stefan, a world famous hairdresser. Stefan, Steve Ackerie, who worked with Ron in the early days of the Princeton. He had his barbers chair set up in the foyer of the Burnside Ballroom to trim the locks of aspiring patrons who lacked the Surfie or College Boy look to be allowed to purchase a ticket. Steve also cut hair at the Thursday nights Princeton Club held in The Greek Hall in Adelaide. Next Ron went to Alice Springs to work with Leon Samsonenko to design and build the Four Seasons Hotel. In Alice Ron met a Swiss pastry chef, Katherina Henggeler, who he formed a partnership with and started a small catering business. They bought a small bistro Bojangles and with Katherina, (Ina), in the kitchen things started happening. Within two years Bojangles was a major player in the catering and entertainment world. They won catering awards and brought to the Alice many top groups such as The James Brothers, Clearway and Topsy & the Bear. Ron and Ina then focused on The Alice Springs Bush Restaurant, 40 kilometres out of town on Undoolya Station. They specialised in Eco Tourism and within their first 12 months participated in a number of national Australian television shows and finally an international tourism show was filmed on Undoolya that was screened to 8 million European viewers. Ron and Ina retired back to South Australia, however, Ina bought the Rapid Bay Campground and Lilla’s Café in Yankalilla. Ina and Ron made this humble café into an award winning one before retiring again several years later. Ron has semi-retired to music, his first great love but still promotes the occasional show, particularly Sandi McMenamin, Peter Goers, Jan and Barrie McAskill, Irene Petrie and The Boiler Sisters, Sandi, and Jan and Irene. From Ron and Pat’s union four children were born, Margot, Jodie, Ron Junior and Melody. All of them have been very successful in life. Ron has been inducted into The South Australian Music Hall of Fame. A book written by Tonika Xenides, “SA Showbiz Memories” and C.D.’s by Levi Smith’s Clefs ”Empty Monkey”, The Drifters “The Palais Performance”, “The Best of Barrie and Jan McAskill”, and Jan McAskill’s “On Track” will be on sale. Proceeds will support Support Act Ltd SA. Limited seating will be available for people wanting to dine. A menu is available on the Gov’s website. http://www.thegov.com.au Please ring the Gov 8340 0744 to book for your meals and tables. Tickets online through https://www.trybooking.com/BDWIH Admission: $ 27.00

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

Issue 9 2017

Issue 10 2017

Kevin Borich

Interview with Louise Pearson Dino Jag

Gig photos of Painters and Dockers

Dusty Lee

Gig photos of Electric Mary

Gig photos of Deep Throat

Gig photos of Dino Jag

Gig photos of Phil Emannuel

Gig photos of Full Tilt Janis

MEGAscene

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

Beeb Birtles gets inducted into the AMC SA Music Hall of Fame

2018

Gig photos of The New Dead Metalfest VIII

. . . featuring music, lifestyle and fashion in Adelaide

Issue 12

Issue 11

Gwyn Ashton

Davinyls

Gig photos of Painters And Dockers

Sophie Downey, the Saxoffender, talks about art, sax, and rock ‘n roll

2018

Gig photos ofBurn

Interview with Phil Lanzon

Hindley Street Country Club

Gig photos of Andrew Strong

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAreviews live Girlschool @ Enigma Bar 05/07/2019 by Jo Newman “Hi Ya! Loved the gig at the Enigma - felt like it was a party to celebrate our short but sweet OZ tour!” Kim McAuliffe (Vocalist & Guitarist Girlschool)

“I agree with Kim, loved the Enigma gig ... Brilliant crowd and loved Oz. Hope we come back next year.” Denise Dufort (Drummer Girlschool)

It was 1978, I was 14 yrs old when I first heard about this all girl band called GIRLSCHOOL. Along with iconic female rock bands The Runaways, Fanny, and Vixen, Girlschool left their mark on my rock ’n’ roll heart. The British rock movement, known as the NEW WAVE OF BRITISH HEAVY METAL, was on the rise. I was on a visit to my cousin’s house, he had a vast collection of music from all over the world including various UK bands such as SEX PISTOLS, DEAD KENNEDYS, UK SUBS, THE CLASH, BEATLES and many more artists. He also dad copies of these artists in foreign languages. I was impressed by his collection of singles and albums and whenever i visited him he would keep me up to date with all the new bands he had come to know. It was on one of these visits I heard GIRLSCHOOL for the very first time; I was hooked. Girlschool started out in the late 70’s and rose to fame quickly and had commercial success in the 80’s with hits like “C’Mon Let’s Go”, “Race With The Devil”, and “Demolition Boys”. They travelled the world, touring and sharing the worlds’ stages with many famous bands, including Motorhead, Rainbow, Nazareth, Ramones, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Quiet Riot, Blue Oyster Cult, Scorpions, Iron Maiden, Budgie, and Aussie legends Rose Tattoo.

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Jo Newman and friends with Girlschool Photo: Lisa Vincent


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

From 1978 to present there have been several line up changes, with current line up now being: Kim McAuliffe on Rythym Guitar and Vocals (original member) Denise Dufort on Drums (also original member) Jackie Chambers on Lead Guitar Tracy Lamb on Bass Guitar Sadly, original member Kelly Johnson, vocalist and lead guitarist, passed away from cancer in 2007.

with their song “Take It Like A Band”. They ended their set with their ever popular tune “Emergency“ before rock’n out with their encore, a cover of ZZ Top’s “Tush” ... which Nicki Gartlan was asked up on stage to join in on the jam. For me the night ended with a cherry on top - meeting the band backstage. The girls were very down to earth, and were only too happy to meet us and others who were there.

Recently I was ecstatic when news broke out that after 40 years, Girlschool were finally touring Australia for the first time and better yet, they were performing in Adelaide. We arrived at the Enigma Bar, excited and pumped to be seeing Girlschool playing live at last. Support band Electric Sex Pants were onstage halfway through their set. Belting out the lyrics to their original song “Nice Guys Can’t F###” was Electric’s powerhouse front woman Nicki Gartlan, whose performance lived up to the band’s namesake - Electric!!! The eager crowd gathered around the stage as the familiar air raid siren wailed through the speakers; as they knew that any minute now Girlschool would be coming out of their dressing room and onto the stage. Girlschool kicked the night off with their hard rock’n hit “C’Mon Let’s Go”. Though there seemed to be some sound issues in the beginning of their set, the girls handled it like the professionals they are and didn’t let it interfere with their performance. Being a vocalist of a hard rock band myself i could definitely relate to being in that situation. The set was 18 songs, including my personal favourites, “Race With The Devil”, “Nothing To Lose”, “Hit And Run”, and “Kick It Down”. “Take It All Away” was Girlschool’s first single in the 70’s and for this song the lead guitarist, Jackie Chambers, held the microphone out to some of the audience to sing the chorus. I gladly sang along. They played more of my favourites too; “Kick It Down”, “Future Flash”, “Bomber”, and a heartfelt tribute to legendary Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead

Girlschool with Nicki & Duane from Electric Sex Pants Photo: Lisa Vincent

I left the venue feeling overwhelmed yet satisfied that we got this amazing opportunity to see a live performance and meet one of our favourite women of rock bands.

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Girlschool @ Enigma Bar Photos by Lisa Vincent 05/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

Dragon @ The Adelaide Casino Oasis Bar Photos by Lisa Vincent 18/07/2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

MEGAlocal Send your local music news to: rsm@risingstar.com.au THE DARKNESS ANNOUNCE ‘EASTER IS CANCELLED’ AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND TOUR 2020 The Darkness will be spreading their “Easter Is Cancelled “message across the land with an Australian and New Zealand headline tour in March 2020. On a mission to lead us to the sunlit uplands of inclusivity, togetherness and rock ‘n’ roll fellowship, The Darkness will play shows in Perth, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane and Auckland. These performances promise to be incredibly special, reflecting the grand scope and vision from the band’s new album Easter Is Cancelled, alongside epic live favourites such as “I Believe In A Thing Called Love” and “Love Is Only A Feeling” from their spectacular canon of hits. The Darkness have also just released a new single “Heart Explodes”, taken from their jaw-droppingly ambitious quasisci-fi concept album. Heart Explodes is an almighty mini-rock opera, which finds The Darkness baring all in a multitude of heartfelt emotions reflecting the hardships, struggles and changing relationships of life. TOUR DATES:

WED 11 MARCH – METROPOLIS, FREMANTLE FRI 13 MARCH – ENMORE THEATRE, SYDNEY SAT 14 MARCH – FORUM, MELBOURNE SUN 15 MARCH – THE GOV, ADELAIDE WED 18 MARCH – THE TIVOLI, BRISBANE FRI 20 MARCH – POWERSTATION, AUCKLAND 60

JENN BARRETT & THE NIGHTSHIFT Over the footy hype? Then give the AFL a miss and join Jenn Barrett and The Night Shift at the Wheatsheaf Hotel, Thebarton on Saturday September 28th from 2-5pm where they give a display of stage skill, talent and performance that definitely needs no guernsey. Tix: $15 presale + bf / $20 on the day: https://www.oztix.com.au/ “And The Big Girls Fly” also features Meena de Silva and Courtney Robb. The best alternative to the AFL grand final you’ll get this year. Original SA artists: kicking goals! https://www.jennbarrett.com/ https://www.courtneyrobbmusic.com/ https://meenadesilvamusic.wordpress. com/about/ Proudly presented by Arty Records Germany Ireland Australia.

KHRISTIAN MIZZI Khristian Mizzi’s latest and longanticipated full length album “Some Other Morning” will be released on Arty Records for his Sept 13th - 15th SA tour. Fri Sept 13th - “Courthouse” in Auburn Sat Sept 14th - “The Wheatsheaf” Sun Sept 15th - “Trinity Sessions” https://www.trybooking.com/481909 Fri - Sun Oct 25-27th “Fleurieu Folk Festival” in Willunga


MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

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MEGAscene • Issue 18 - 2019

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MEGAscene Issue 18  

MEGAscene Issue 18 features reviews and photos of Adelaide’s own Orianthi and Girlschool live, and a review of "In Conversation With The Sop...

MEGAscene Issue 18  

MEGAscene Issue 18 features reviews and photos of Adelaide’s own Orianthi and Girlschool live, and a review of "In Conversation With The Sop...