Page 1

rgb 13


Contents 1

2

3

4

5

6

1

Editors’ Letter

2

People

3

Reading List V

4

Projects

5

Process

6

Etc.


Editors’ Letter

the risd graduate book is a record of the achievements, pursuits and growth of each year’s graduating class. Through the platform of rgb students have the opportunity to make a statement about themselves and their work as they close this chapter in their artistic or design pursuits. rgb then becomes a vessel through which the work of each individual can be seen in the context of its relationships with that of other risd students, with graduate education and with the world of art and design at large.

VII


It is in that spirit of fostering relationships across disciplines, scales and institutions that the editorial team envisioned this year’s rgb. First and foremost, we felt that the book must be a forum within which each graduate’s work could stand in the context of her peers’ work. We quickly realized, however, that putting works in proximity to one another would not ignite discourse by itself, nor would it speak to the depth of the students’ work and experiences. To achieve that, rgb needed to be more than a record of each individual’s work. Our solution was to use rgb13 to highlight the connections between students’ work and lives that often go unseen as they invest in their individual pursuits. Furthermore, building on risd’s nature as a place to interact with a diverse creative community, we hope that exposing these connective threads will create new relationships and future collaborations that will move art and design forward. While these are ambitious goals, we hope rgb13 will prove a valuable tool that supports their realization. VIII


The first step in developing

But dividing the content in

this book was to ask the

two was not enough to fulfill

graduating class for more

the larger goal of uncovering

information than ever before.

connections and fostering new

Along with the required image,

discourses. Again we turned

statement and project details,

to our survey to develop a

the editorial team asked the

series of categories through

graduating class to fill out

which connections might

an optional survey to share

emerge. These categories

some of the more personal

were used to create what we

and informal aspects of their

call the See Also supplement.

time at risd. Rather than a

Throughout both sections,

single statement, we asked

each entry culminates in a See

for two—the first describing

Also footnote that references

themselves as artists, the

a series of other students.

second captioning the details

This feature utilizes the

of a specific project. This

survey submissions to draw

allowed us to break rgb13

initial connections, linking

in two sections, creating a

people who may never have

book of people and a book

met, but who are exploring

of work. The people section

similar ideas, experimenting

of the book focuses on the

at similar scales, working with

artists’ and designers’ personal

similar materials or asking

statements. The work section

similar questions. The See

showcases the graduating

Also supplement is intended to

class’s collective output, with

provide a roadmap for non-

vibrant self-captioned images.

linear exploration of the book.

The unique nature of each

It asks readers to actively read

section encourages readers to

about their fellow students, to

think about the ways in which

discover why the connections

we represent our work and

were made and what they say

ourselves.

about the risd community.

IX


Lastly, interspersed throughout

Writing Center; Bethany Johns,

each section are a number of

Graduate Program Director

pages containing process and

of Graphic Design; and Don

community content submitted

Morton, Director of the Center

through the survey. These

for Student Involvement,

moments provide an intimate

offered support, critique

window into the everyday life

and advice as we challenged

of a risd graduate student

the framework of this book

and the context within which

and explored its potential.

they create their work. This

Writing Center tutors Lauren

additional material ranges

Allegrezza bfa paint ’14,

from things people are reading,

Katherine Du bfa il ’15,

writing and saying, to visuals

Acacia Johnson bfa photo

of experiments, events,

’14, Courtney Lam bfa text

workspaces and experiences.

’13 and Lily Rothman bfa

While the work of the

paint ’15 helped establish a

graduating class is important,

unified voice for the text. rgb

the real heart of risd is this

editorial and design alumnus

experience—the community

Catherine Cieslewicz GD

and the dialogue that evolves

’13 offered advice, support

within it. rgb is about

and encouragement, and Ji

foregrounding that dialogue and

Yeo photo ’13 photographed

exploring what emerges from

students’ work. Our special

its continued evolution.

thanks go to Andy Jansons and

The editorial team would like

his entire team at Universal

to thank the many people

Wilde for their tireless

who contributed to this

involvement and eternal

book’s creation. Our Faculty

responsiveness to our strange,

Advisory Board, comprised of

contradictory and inconsistent

Brian Goldberg, the interim

production requests. And

Dean of Graduate Studies;

lastly, we wish to thank all the

Jennifer Liese, Director of the

graduating students for their

X


contributions. Without your dedication and willingness to participate, this book never would have been possible. We hope it provides you with everything we set out to offer, and that it may offer inspiration as you continue your creative endeavors.

The 2013 rgb editorial and design team is: Zachary Futterer  arch ’14, Jonathan Hanahan gd ’14, Brian James gd ’14, Brienne Jones gd ’14, Chloe Scheffe bfa gd ’15, and Aaron Tobey arch ’14

XI


ARCH Architecture CER Ceramics

DM FURN GLASS GRAPH HAVC ID INTAR JM LDAR PAINT PHOTO PRINT SCULP TLAD TEXT

Digital+Media Furniture Design Glass Graphic Design History of Art+Visual Cultures Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry+Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching+Learning in Art+Design Textiles


People DEPT-01

Student Artist Statement See Also DEPT-03

DEPT-02

Student Artist Statement See Also DEPT-20

DEPT-03

Student Artist Statement See Also DEPT-11

DEPT


ARCH-01

Jeana Antle

ARCH-05

1. Fill a sketchbook with spaces in the city. 2. Make a work of architecture.

Embedded in physical truth, within the site of exchange, there is a gap that allows the possibility of a relational exposition of new realities. By manipulating time, distance, material and composition, I attempt to illuminate the magnificence of the mundane as an agent of tacit opposition. Through the act of finding, manipulating and extracting oppositional tension, I attempt to enliven otherwise trivial or banal objects. By enlivening the mundane, I hope to discover new truths within the composition of objects, their containers and the sequence that unfolds when they reach critical mass.

See Also TLAD-02

ARCH-02

Royce Bixby My work aims to design cities that support strong communities and reinforce human connections to native ecological systems. See Also INTAR-04, DM-04, FURN-05, LDAR-11, INTAR-14,PRINT-02, LDAR-13, INTAR-27, INTAR-04, FURN-01

ARCH-03

Maxwell Dehne

See Also PRINT-02, DM-06, GRAPH-05, ID-02, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

Jim Bogle

Contemporary Architecture: A Critique It has evolved past the need for gravity; earth puts it at a disadvantage. This alien ARCH-06 Alexander Diaz architecture has failed to evoke a sense “The architect is a man of quality; he must of place. Its tectonics are completely know how to establish buildings and must ambiguous: there is no floor, wall, ceiling be well versed in all the sciences; he must nor roof. There is just the continuous not have any missing or supplementary surface and its scaffold. Its section is limb. He must be just, compassionate, unoccupiable. For this reason we must float disinterested, free from envy, without it into space (but let’s tie it down just in weakness, handsome, and learned in case we want it back). It has no context, so mathematics. He must know the ancient who really cares if it ends up on the moon? authors and must be straightforward and At least there it can be appreciated for what master of his senses. He must know the it really is. It is an architecture of spectacle whole country and be able to draw. He that is in need of a contextual counterpart. must be generous and not turn greedy. It has failed to find it here on earth, but an His health must be good. He must have event like this will surely suffice. no distortion in his thought and action and Can the iconic be contextual? What be free from vices. The possessor of a well does it mean to be contextual within the chosen name. He must have crossed the new global culture? It will take spectacular ocean of the science of architecture.” events to contextualize the inherently —Mayamatam 5.15-18a iconic forms emerging globally at an ever increasing rate. See Also DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, SCULPT-05, INTAR-28, CER-05, GLASS-03 LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03, LDAR-03

ARCH-04

Ben Crocker See Also GRAPH-02, GRAPH-14, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, PHOTO-01

ARCH-07

Brett Dunnam As a designer and a maker, I create objects and architecture which reflect an emphasis on the exposure of materials

ARCH


and methods of construction. From small details to the scale of a building, my work strives to achieve simplicity, subtlety, and practicality. See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, INTAR-14

ARCH-08

meandering across a bridge, forming a perpetual cross-current against it. See Also TEXT-06

ARCH-10

My work explores the saturation of cities, and the manipulation of spatial and social organization within. I seek to locate my designs in close conversation—or confrontation—with urban narratives, in an effort to recognize that my intent may be hijacked, reconfigured and given an unexpected life.

Margaux Fischer “I believed in the infinite seriality of time, in a growing and reeling net of divergent, convergent and parallel times. That entanglement of times growing near, growing out, intersecting or secularly ignoring themselves, embraces all possibilities.” —Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths, 1941 See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-06, INTAR-08, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

ARCH-09

Carlos Gamez

Elias Gardner

See Also INTAR-17, GLASS-01, ID-04, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-03, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

ARCH-11

Melissa Hauser The city is a dynamic environment to which we become desensitized over time. In our daily experience, what was once strange becomes usual, disconnecting us from our environment. Can architectural intervention defamiliarize a place to make us aware of our surroundings in the midst of our daily routines? Through such an intervention, we could reconnect to the built environment and ourselves.

Boundaries divide and separate. They ignite activity between two forces without directly being affected. They are seen as the extent or termination of one plane and the beginning of another. A boundary is a demarcation in space that acts as a physical or mental limit. In addition to See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, being a limit, they also have the capability LDAR-03, PRINT-09, SCULP-03 of transcending and becoming a threshold for new beginnings and progress. ARCH-12 Loren Howard Boundaries have many guises and many ways of being represented, but their Finding meaning in actions made by the essential characteristics are applicable body can be difficult. Decisions are often at countless scales. Rivers, for example, made because the hand, arm, eye, ear or can be physical demarcations as well as tongue senses congruence between present limits. They can ignite activity on either action and past embodied knowledge. side of them, or completely restrain For meaningful reflection, one must it. They are life sources that continue construct a distance from their body. to provide modern cities with stable This is accomplished by projecting the economies, growth and connectivity self onto [an]other. Through this reflected with the world. But in the case of the USperspective, the self can be viewed as a Mexico border, the river serves in part as whole, without blind spots. a method of fortifying the city, separating and suffocating it from its surroundings. See Also TLAD-01 This existence is contrasted with the reality above it—a trickling flow of people

ARCH


ARCH-13

Xinying Huang

culture. With this power comes certain convictions about how to exercise it. A thesis in architecture must contend with those convictions, and it should focus on one’s future aspirations for their practice. This proposition is burdensome, however. How can one hope to create a project that encapsulates how to design the parameters by which life, in all its complexity, can be facilitated for the rest of one’s career? This should not be the aim of the thesis, for it is impossible. Thomas Gardner noted in a thesis seminar: “Thesis begins with a question that is not too easy to answer, and the author of a thesis must have a stake in the question.” By seeking to answer a question that stems from our convictions, the thesis can investigate the consequences of their application to life.

See Also SCULP-04

ARCH-14

Beau Johnson Somewhere in the streets of Rome, I lost track of the distinction between Landscape and Architecture. I became interested in space and the ways we experience its tactile beauty. This pursuit took me through several offices around the United States and Europe, and now to the Rhode Island School of Design. My continual focus remains an interdisciplinary approach to architecture, as I attempt to refine and locate my everchanging role within an ever-changing society. I have a passion for design, teaching, drawing and making. I am persistently interested in blurring the boundaries between... everything. See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, TEXT-05, TLAD-03, DM-06

ARCH-15

Lissy King

See Also ID-04, INTAR-18, INTAR-32, LDAR-04, LDAR-11

ARCH-17

Daniel Laster See Also ARCH-25, DM-09, INTAR-29, LDAR-12, GRAPH-04, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, JM-04, FURN-05

“I remember the sound of the gravel under ARCH-18 Dongseop Lee my feet, and the soft gleam of the waxed My work involves authority, boundary and oak staircase. I can hear the heavy front surveillance. door closing behind me as I walk along the dark corridor and enter the kitchen, the See Also TEXT-01 only really brightly lit room in the house. When I design a building, I frequently find myself sinking into old, half-forgotten memories. Then I try to recollect what the ARCH-19 John McCampbell remembered architectural situation was Without the modern city there would really like, what it had meant to me at the never have been Jazz. It was born of a time, and I try to think how it could help million co-existing dialogs between me now to revive that vibrant atmosphere urban conditions and institutions. Jazz pervaded by the simple presence of things...” was an expression of the speed of life —Peter Zumthor, Thinking Architecture within a static world. That was then. Now, architects can catch up to the modern pace See Also PRINT-08 of life, facilitating new dialogs between people and the spaces they inhabit. We have the technology to make architecture ARCH-16 Kyle Kiser performative! As architects, we design spaces that Architectural Improvisation aims to facilitate life. Therefore we believe we address the staticity of building through possess the power to help shape life and rhythmic design and user-building

ARCH


integration. Many progressions occur through responsive space, pulling and pushing the inhabitant. While structure may lead, the space will allow users many opportunities to push back, to control an outcome. Spaces are composed, speaking a new visual language: the aural lessons of a powerful music translated to the visible spectrum and haptically perceived.

If architecture can form knowledge, what else can it do? Architecture is for exploring. See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, GLASS-01, INTAR-07, SCULP-05

ARCH-22 See Also TEXT-05

ARCH-20

Jacob Miller Architecture creates relationships between people and their environments. A shelter protects from the environment, but it also creates knowledge of things outside, or frames them in a particular way. A window may be thought of in this way, but the idea applies to history and culture as well as physical surroundings. Each of my designs applies an order that is uniquely mine on the world. My objective is to create something that is appropriate, humanistic and enlivening. See Also PRINT-01, GRAPH-18, GRAPH-07, GRAPH-08, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

ARCH-21

Nicholas Walker Moore “Architecture is a form of knowledge.” —Bernard Tschumi

Camila A. Morales I am an interdisciplinary architect, artist and designer. My work focuses on the relationship between the built environment, new media technologies and human sensory stimuli. Within the framework of interactive design, I have focused my studies on new methodologies of architectural design that integrate electronics and architecture to create responsive structures. My objective is to create a digital-physical continuum by acknowledging that mediated technologies are a ubiquitous element in our daily lives, then utilizing these embedded technologies to destabilize the presence of architecture. By understanding architecture as a dynamic component in the built environment, I aim to create innovative methods of connectivity, network communication and information tactics to engage the public with architecture and technology. See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, TLAD-04, FURN-01

If architecture is a form of knowledge, what knowledge does it form? How is that ARCH-23 J. Harley Nalley knowledge transmitted? See Also DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, From, by and to whom is it transmitted? ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, Is architecture the ambient medium SCULPT-05 between architect-didact and audience? Or does it form knowledge independent and beyond its human authors? Are then architects—replete with flaws, ARCH-24 Marisa Paz fancies, practices and (mis)perceptions— I like to keep a balance between life and the mediums by which architecture’s imagination, reality and contradiction, knowledge is communicated? in order step outside new boundaries. Or the priests by which the knowledge My Latin American roots have allowed is obfuscated, smuggled into the world via me to see the environment I inhabit with a construction document? different focal lens and a fast shutter speed.

ARCH


My work is focused around the notion of the void, the absence, or the creation of absence in architecture. Currently testing these ideas in my home town, Quito, I strive to find a shared ground between the public and the private realm. While at risd I have invested time in teaching, jewelry design and photography in order to introduce a new and more personal scale to my architecture. I enjoy people and sharing.

Once a structure is weathered and neglected and the materials have begun to decay, it is given over to a different logic that is fused by the passage of time and the historic framework of the complete structure. Tracing these two systems of a building’s fundamental elements and its material degeneration can create a timeline of decay. A pattern of degeneration can emerge as a tool for understanding the weathering of buildings and also for creating a new language for describing ruins. The decay of a building is therefore not a force to be feared. It can be embraced as a co-merging of a natural order with a system which humans have created to fend off the perceived chaos of nature. The degeneration of materials in buildings presents opportunities in architecture with generative potential.

See Also FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, INTAR-28, ID-05, JM-06, PAINT-07

ARCH-25

Christopher Ross

My thesis has been a journey deep into my own wonder about New Hampshire and New England’s constructed landscape. See Also TEXT-03, PRINT-02, GRAPH-11, I have hiked long-abandoned roads through FURN-05, LDAR-11, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, the woods, traced the lines of stone walls, JM-04, GRAPH-12, INTAR-01 discovered old foundations, explored former mill sites and dived deeply into Shaker architecture. I am now literally ARCH-27 Karl Sippel drawing into select Shaker buildings in My work is aimed at exploring architecture hopes of constructing back outward. that is developed through making. As It is my contention that their architecture architects, we are required to work within embodies the deepest and most profound a certain level of abstraction as what we statements about the New England make is not what we make. The challenge landscape. Through material, light and for me, as someone who thinks best scale they capture the divine (humanity) in through making, is how to engage in the the local landscape. One can sense in their act of physical creation in order to design presence an “other,” an intangible quality something without actually making the that can transform how we build today. finished product, due to the cost, time Yet it has become clear to me that this and scale of a full building. “other” is, in fact, us. The craftsmen have drawn themselves into their work, first See Also DM-07 through listening-in to everything, and then constructing-out for everyone. See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, TLAD-04

ARCH-26

Andrew Salter Is order simply completeness? What if a set of systems could be used to describe not only an original structure, but a decayed structure as well? There is a tangible hierarchy in any structure.

ARCH-28

Julie Sylvester I propose to orchestrate a sequence of movements in public spaces that mitigates anxiety and disorientation. Through the sculpting of architectural forms we can design a spatial experience that provides an eddy for momentary rest and regrouping. See Also GRAPH-02, GRAPH-14, INTAR-01, ID-05, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03

ARCH


ARCH-29

Burgess Voshell

CER-03

Hosseinali Saheb Ekhtiari

Making is everything. “Then said another—‘Surely not in vain My substance from the common Earth was ta’en, That he who subtly wrought me into Shape, Should stamp me back to common Earth again.’” —Khayam Neishabouri

See Also PRINT-09

ARCH-30

Eugenia Yu The making of space exists in language, drawing, woodcut, film, modern dance, calligraphy, miming, reading, walking, gathering, and Architecture, among other things.

CER-01

See Also DM-01, GRAPH-10, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, ARCH-25, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05, SCULP-01

See Also FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, GRAPH-16, ID-02, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, PAINT-01

Bjorg Hardardottir

CER-04

See Also LDAR-16

CER-05

See Also TEXT-04

CER-02

Humans are emotional creatures. Individuals feel a diverse range of emotions, even during a short time or on a small occasion. Emotions arise naturally through many experiences, and there are innumerable ways to express them. The artist's task is to analyze these emotional experiences, and to sensitively materialize them. I aim to express emotions outwardly by describing a range of psychological states through color and figurative form. My work is based on psychological observations, and represents the voices we all hear inside. I make ceramic figurative sculptures that describe emotions from my life, like a diary. By exploring the expressive potential of my visual language, the figurative form and its multi-colored surfaces reveal my abstract interiority.

Kim Wimprine See Also ARCH-06, ARCH-07, DM-04, DM-02, FURN-05, FURN-01, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13

Ahrong Kim

See Also PHOTO-03

Hye Weon Shim

DM-01

Namwoo Bae “I’m interested in things I don’t understand. It’s like that with every picture: I don’t like the ones I understand.” —Gerhard Richter See Also CER-03, GRAPH-05, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, ARCH-22, ID-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

DM-02

Liat Berdugo I don’t make art. I just do things that I think my friend Claire will like. And then I post these things on Vimeo. I have completely eliminated art making. The good thing about this system is that my friend Claire likes a lot of things. She likes strange fried foods. She likes refrigerator magnets. She likes it when I call her Clarence Thomas, which is what I call her. This is amusing to us because Claire is a white liberal dyke and Clarence is a black conservative straight man. Clarence Thomas likes her dog, Blue. Clarence Thomas likes writing novels.

CER, DM


Clarence Thomas likes incongruities, and so do I. I like the space between the digital and the analog, the virtual and the physical, the technically precise and the messily imprecise. I make videos that show electrical devices like vacuums being controlled by tangible and sloppy interfaces, like a woman dunking her head into a bowl of potato chips. I make videos where I cast devices as things they could never be: I scrape a block of cheddar cheese across the screen of my iPad, which has a picture of a cheese grater on it. I like to throw unexpected things together and let art be the spark across poles of apparent contradiction—a spark that unhinges, recontextualizes, provokes and delights. Clarence Thomas is a famous judge, but “he” is also the “she” who I am picking up at the airport.

through the medium I find most pertinent for my intent: wood, video, painting, steel— History doesn’t have a medium of choice, and neither do I. I am a hopeless enthusiast, an unspecialized amateur who choses not to specialize. Therefore, without the technical prowess of baroque sculptors or the resources of big IT corporations, I enthusiastically look for a middle ground through aspirational sculptures, drawings, programs and inventions that rest between my own deeply cherished traditions and my thirst for the new. See Also ARCH-06, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05

DM-05

I just want to be better than before.

See Also GLASS-03, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, ARCH-06, CER-05, FURN-05, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, PRINT-03, PAINT-05

DM-03

Ed Brown

See Also PHOTO-04

DM-06

See Also PRINT-04

DM-04

Sang Un Jeon Writing an artist statement was one of the hardest things I ever tried to do at risd. I do not have a well-developed written statement, even now.

Cristobal Cea Being an artist is one of the last refuges of the amateur. And I think of myself as a very serious amateur. I am an enthusiastic (although somewhat melancholic) researcher of my surroundings with an emphasis on Technology and Tradition. One permanently moves forward, while the other is stuck stubbornly in the past. I try to reconcile these affections of mine by, say, looking for epiphanies in the muted obsolescence of an ibm server, by asking computers to pray for me or by building my own wooden cell tower in order to be left alone. I don’t believe that everything was better in the past, nor that all problems will be solved in the future. I don’t believe in final solutions or utopias of any kind, but I do believe in the evocative power of objects and their implicit history. I summon these tokens of material culture not through a specific medium, but

Lisa Iaboni

See Also INTAR-26, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-02, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

DM-07

Moke Li I consider myself part of the new generation of Chinese artists who work in a wide range of media, including digital media, painting, sculpture and installation. I received a ba from China Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2011 before coming to risd. I am currently interested in multi-directional power relations as forms of control, in surveillance, and in discipline between states, corporations and citizens. See Also LDAR-08

DM


DM-08

Sophia Sobers

you down and devour you whole, or an industry that prides itself on the exploitation of women. Once you have been touched by the wolf, you are never the same. My work evokes that experience through interaction. I allow the user not only to read or hear the tale of the fallen woman, but also to experience the struggle, seduction, hesitation and disquiet of the characters in the story as well. I let the user enter the story and become the characters. Most people grew up being told the sweet fairytale of Little Red Riding Hood, and how she and her grandmother escaped from the big bad wolf. But this story is a far leap from the original tale told in the 17th century. Fables of Red focuses on the birth and growth of this bedtime story, from its first documentation as Le Petit Chaperon Rouge in 1697 by Charles Perrault, up to Rotkäppchen in 1812, the first adaption of many by the Brothers Grimm.

I investigate the future relationship between nature and technology, creating work based on interrelated systems. My work takes on a hypnagogic, meditative ambiance. Investigation of light and organic architecture becomes key to allowing viewers to get lost in their surroundings. I use recurring imagery, often laden with mystery, to suggest parallels between natural and synthetic forms, blurring the lines between the two. This creates a dialog of symbiosis between human structures and nature’s own steady, but unpredictable, patterns. The question arises: In an era where the human footprint is quickly overwhelming the precarious equilibria of nature, how might we find a balance between the two—or is it even possible? These questions find their way into the narrative, implying human presence among quasi-natural mutations. My work suggests that we have given birth to a new system, one truly destructive to ourselves, wherein nature continues to prevail. This is the universe my work inhabits. See Also CER-05, GRAPH-10, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04 ARCH-05, ID-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

DM-09

FURN-02

See Also ID-04, ARCH-05, GRAPH-16, ID-03, INTAR-32, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

Carley Eisenberg There are wolves lurking everywhere, whether it be men who draw you in and then, when you are fully trusting, tear

Marco Gallegos “Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.” —Leonardo da Vinci

Di Tang My hybrid works—including video, installation, kinetic sculpture and performance—explore different aspects and scales of human nature. They range from fundamental personal experiences such as memory, migration and time, to broad sociohistorical issues, such as alienation and identity in mass media.

FURN-01

See Also ARCH-30, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-04, DM-02, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05

See Also PHOTO-01

FURN-03

Adrianne Hee It doesn’t matter if you understand, just that you smile. See Also PAINT-04

FURN-04

Chen Liu I am developing my own creative method as a personal design tool: a brainstorm card system. Within the system I have a collections of nouns, verbs and adjectives on some cards. Noun cards are materials and objects, while verb cards are the process of “how,” and adjective cards are

FURN


the “mode.” For example, I may draw a FURN-06 Elish Warlop noun card that reads “paper,” a verb card My work is about the hidden and the that reads “folding” and an adjective card revealed. It illuminates a system that reading “angry.” I then brainstorm using reverberates through an object to create these three words: folding the paper angrily. its form. The system of mechanics that I am inspired by everyday moments holds the form together also registers of wonder and possibility, and I believe our impressions of the object: forces of that the best innovation comes from the compression, tension, momentum and intersections of different disciplines. How movement are all revealed when we engage. do I make the transition from ordinary to The final object is a record of our presence. extraordinary? Sometimes we need a little Our actions are cataloged, for a moment, creative randomness and some beautiful upon the object and within a context, accidents that we never thought about meant to be read and rearranged with time. before. —the power of random See Also ARCH-07, ARCH-24, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, See Also LDAR-11, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TLAD-04, LDAR-05 ARCH-02, JM-04, GRAPH-12, INTAR-29, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-17, JM-02

FURN-05

Simon Lowe

GLASS-01

My creative inquires are based upon the space/place dialectic. Employing situation-based practice, I respond to the architectural and cultural cues given by the locations through which I traverse, and from my flâneur I comment upon their particularities.

Breathe out, breathe in, breathe out. D’you hear the first Whisper, shiver of breath on vocal chord? Gusts pulsed before a tempest ever roared. Breeze aroused thrills more than string coerced.

See Also FURN-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, PRINT-10, ARCH-21, ID-04, INTAR-20, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

Our zephyr surges. Now our song can burst. Each beat of the air marks a pace toward A trip... a shuffle... side step. Dancing poured GLASS-02 And spilled in joy like blood, from veins which coursed.

Jean Prominski Glass glows. It has the ability to capture and reflect light to emanate an energetic beauty. I use the radiant qualities of glass to investigate the secular sublime. Drawing inspiration from environmental phenomena such as the weather, my work becomes an Atmospheric Wunderkammer.

One glance, you’ll see—though now I’m still, head hung— My finger’s waver tells a whirling stride; Each breath betrays a boundless rhythm sung.

See Also DM-02, INTAR-02, INTAR-08, INTAR-10, INTAR-14, INTAR-19, INTAR-23, INTAR-29, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, CER-03

One thing from you can I still hide: Behind my lips, where teeth meet tip of tongue, The droplet-taste of driving rain outside. GLASS-03 See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, CER-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14

Josefina Muñoz T.

Emma Stein My work is connected to the emulation of natural systems. It ebbs and flows,

FURN, GLASS


embracing themes of repetition, circling, growth, decay, deviations, relationships to the body and membranes that separate one thing from another. I mimic these phenomena and the interactions that occur within them using glass, cloth, video, insects, human-made materials and natural material. My work captures wholeness and multiples, cycles, expansion, contraction, interruptions and how they are all held together.

around it before reading inside it, is a part of the pleasure.” —Italo Calvino, If on a winter’s night a traveler I consider the experience of “reading around” a book to be just as valuable as its content. Once a book is purchased and read, it becomes an extension of ourselves: its form molds into our gestures; it absorbs the scents of the places it resides; its pages stain with the residue of food and drink. People identify different stages in life by the things they’ve accumulated; my autobiography is a shelf of such worn books.

See Also DM-02, INTAR-29, PHOTO-01, GRAPH-12, ARCH-07, CER-05, FURN-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, HAVC-01, PAINT-05, SCULP-01

GRAPH-01

Andy Chen I am examining the behavior of people who are systematically excluded on account of their race, class, sexuality, and social position and how they can escape the cyclical trauma imposed by forces beyond their control. I propose that we talk about social vulnerability productively rather than reproducing reductive narratives of pity or surfacelevel empowerment. My work focuses on dignity as a central construct. I define dignity as people’s ability to make unforced choices about their own bodies, lives, and aspirations—the capacity to self-determine as it is recognized by mainstream audiences. The dignity construct, therefore, depends directly on a command of mainstream seduction in ways that destablize stereotypes. In other words, I create narrative vehicles that intimately examine the lived experiences of marginalized people to forge a proxy understanding for the complex realities they contend with. See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-06, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-05, FURN-01, GLASS-03

GRAPH-02

See Also ARCH-26, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, DM-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

Justin Chen “You turn the book over in your hands... the circling of the book, this reading

GRAPH-03

Yejin Cho Our day-to-day experiences are often supported and directed by the instructional language of guides, such as street maps, guide books, recipes and user manuals. From verbal communication to printed materials, we accumulate diverse forms of instructions and process them as knowledge. That knowledge is then translated into behavior. The prescriptive nature of assignments like a recipe or meditation practice are intended to guide people to a space where they are comfortable interpreting and adjusting the process to suit their own personal desires. Guides should be more like a musical score which can be interpreted and performed with countless realizations. By incorporating a do-it-yourself ethos, guides can be experienced by every user differently, allowing us to converge distinct experiences within a single framework, namely the guide and the place/space it refers to. In my thesis, I use instruction to reveal process, to see the unseen, to stimulate human interaction and to manage its unpredictability. Various media, including postcards, manuals, posters, magazines and a website, are used to embody synthesized experience which delivers emotional response, evocative life stories and profound aesthetic pleasures. By

GRAPH


G RAPH-04

creating an open-ended platform that invites participation and shared authorship, my thesis attempts to collectively discuss issues, propose ideas and share our voices with others.

practical, impractical, experimental and metaphoric graphic design methodologies. My studies have been the journey of a designer, an artist and a quasi-anthropologist.

See Also PAINT-05, ARCH-05, DM-01, ID-06, INTAR-01, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

See Also ARCH-08, DM-09, ID-01, INTAR-26, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

Catherine Cieslewicz

GRAPH-06

Pattern and wallpaper are familiar and inherently passive elements in our visualspatial experience. We are neurologically equipped to recognize pattern and effectively ignore redundant information. But what goes unnoticed is still acting upon us. There is a parallel between the visual material we are meant to ignore (as pattern) and the variety of subjects we are willfully ignorant about. Employing GRAPH-07 pattern for communication elucidates the effective power of an immersive experience over a rhetorical argument. See Also ARCH-24, FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-04, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

GRAPH-05

Minsun Eo My life is inundated with different types of things, from small artifacts such as water bottles, books, ink cartridges, cookies and art work, to huge things such as automobiles and shopping malls. Each of them has a different kind of value: functional, aesthetic, symbolic or mythical. Focusing on the notion of mythic value, GRAPH-08 the objects mentioned above enable me to investigate the values embedded in things and phenomena, and then to create my own mythical value for those things. In my work, I create a typology of mythic values using a conceptual/visual methodology, thus illuminating the mythic aspect of my own life. I hope to encourage viewers of my work to experience a new way of perceiving implied mythic values in the ordinary world. My investigation has also enabled me to create my own mythology by generating

Colin Frazer “Words and rocks contain a language that follows a syntax of splits and ruptures. Look at any word long enough and you will see it open up into a series of faults, into a terrain of particles each containing its own void.” —Robert Smithson See Also DM-06, INTAR-26, LDAR-12

Christopher Hamamoto “This or any other procedure is merely a dam against the spring tide of memories which surges toward any collector as he contemplates his possessions. Every passion borders on the chaotic, but the collector’s passion borders on the chaos of memories... For what else is this collection but a disorder to which habit has accommodated itself to such an extent that it can appear as order?” —Walter Benjamin See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

Anther Kiley A formalist in a functionalist field, I am interested in the function of form— of crafted appearance—in graphic design. Through my projects and writing, I try to make sense of the changing ways designers have thought about their role as form-givers, and of the complicated attitude we have to this part of our work today. I raise questions about the view, more or less orthodox in graphic design, of form as purely a tool of communication. I try to re-approach form through the

GRAPH


lens of play and of craft. In doing this, I address the aesthetecizing—as opposed to the communicating—function of form in design, suggesting that, even in graphic design, form-making is often as much an act of aestheticization, decoration and personal expression as it is of controlled communication.

GRAPH-09

nature of interpretation and become part of the text itself. These visual metaphors set up the conditions for an experience rather than providing conclusions, leaving the viewer to form personal readings. See Also CER-03, DM-01, DM-08, INTAR-15, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, PRINT-09, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06

See Also DM-06, INTAR-26, ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, GRAPH-11 LDAR-02, PAINT-07

Wael Morcos

Min Ji Lee

Creativity is the practice of juggling expansive referential fields.

Graphic design makes things tangible in See Also ARCH-02, ARCH-16, ARCH-04, a practical way. To do this, it directs an ARCH-08, TEXT-03, PRINT-02, LDAR-03 audience’s attention toward what to see and how to see it in an accessible way. In that sense, graphic designers produce and GRAPH-12 Eugene Park disseminate a frame through which to see As a former physicist, my perspective on and experience the world. I believe the science moves beyond that of an academic role of graphic design is to provide various or professional discipline to become an readings to the audience rather than merely exploration of our environment. Similarly, conveying the default perspective. I am my role as a graphic designer is defined not interested in the relationship between a as a lecturer but rather as an interpreter lived-in place and its representation, and of this field. My work demonstrates that as a graphic designer I aim to provide science, compounded with graphic design, a new frame instead of a well-known can serve as a lens through which we can vision to see and experience the place see our world anew, and not remain as a where we live. In order to assign different practice that is confined to the laboratory perspectives to a given place I once lived, or to the classroom. In addition to I critically read a prescribed representation educating, my intention is to also help of the place, then utilize my personal people to fully realize and appreciate experiences as a quasi-citizen to introduce the intricacy, the magnitude and the an alternative narrative. complexities that surround us. See Also TEXT-02 See Also ARCH-08, FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-06, ID-02, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PAINT-02, GRAPH-10 Elisa Maezono TEXT-02 The traces of history—through images, artifacts and recordings—reveal the softness of time. They are the sites where GRAPH-13 Jiwon Park past bleeds into present and present sinks Cross-pollination is a reciprocal act of into readings of the past. My work looks influencing and inspiring one another. at the impulse to contain the ephemeral Literally, it refers to the process by which within the fixed and tangible, documents plant pollen is transferred from one that show evidence of a process, and flower to another to form seeds. This stories that are built out of these archives. action is often done by bees. I see graphic As opposed to a distanced, objective stance, designers as bees for society, facilitating I consider how graphic design can create cross-pollination, fostering mutual narrative structures that mimic the open

GRAPH


understanding, and empowering each GRAPH-16 Franziska Stetter other by sharing thoughts and experiences I am investigating the concept of Heimat to bring about positive change—the seeds. (German for “home”) by creating design See Also LDAR-15 projects around subjects such as migration, identity, and displacement. I use graphic design to open conver GRAPH-14 Federico Pérez Villoro sations, close the gaps between cultural divides and to explore a renewed enthuMy work examines mundane happenings to siasm for cultural exchange. investigate human behavior and interaction. In my thesis, I implement methods of See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, dialog and analysis to illuminate moments LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, of unconscious convergence and disparity INTAR-28, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07 during creative interactions. See Also ARCH-04, ID-05, INTAR-01, GRAPH-17 Jonathan Yamakami PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, DM-09, JM-01, “Everything has to do with my experience, LDAR-11, PRINT-01, TLAD-03, SCULP-02 because we only talk about ourselves. Imagination is nothing else than arranging the materials of our memory. There is no GRAPH-15 Amanda Sim imagination. There is only memory.” Can wonder, amazement, and curiosity be —António Lobo Antunes encapsulated? What would that look like? How do we communicate these qualities? See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, Where does one begin? Where does one ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07 end up? “My stories begin with some kernel HAVC-01 Raine Vasquez of interest—a phrase, an idea, a bit of Heliopolis, Egypt; 1450 BCE dialogue, a purposely limiting conceptual Alexandria, Egypt; 18 CE framework. From there I try to have as Victoria Embankment, London; September little idea as possible of the shape or 12, 1878 meaning of the story. I just try, intuitively, Heliopolis, Egypt; 1450 BCE to go in the most lively, interesting, true Alexandria, Egypt; 18 CE direction, trusting that, if I do, the story Central Park, New York; February 22, 1881 will take on a shape and a meaning more interesting and authentic than I could have See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, planned for it.” INTAR-29, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, SCULP-03, —George Saunders, Why I Wrote Phil DM-06, JM-03, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02 My work looks at where mystery and curiosity enter into real spaces, begging to be discovered and interacted with. Existing in a liminal space where perfect ID-01 Chia-Ming Chang plans and two-dimensional diagrams enter the third dimension—the world of My work deals with two major issues. objects—I embrace the complexities of the First, despite the unique nature of every world around me and try to find threads of individual person, we have a system of connection to share with the viewer. production that creates identical objects in large numbers. (And while there are See Also ARCH-26, DM-06, ID-03, INTAR-31, choices in the marketplace, our choices JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, are limited.) Second, in order to increase PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03 the efficiency of that system, most items

GRAPH, HAVC


of mass production are extremely simple, clean and regular. These objects are beautiful but boring. However, there is another kind of beauty called rustic beauty that is exhibited by antiques and objects from nature; they are complex, impure, irregular and full of detail and variation. In my opinion, they are much more attractive than mass-produced objects. I am not asking people to give up mass production, which provides us with good quality products and low prices. As a designer, my job is to find ways to improve mass production by adding rustic beauty and personalization to it. See Also DM-08

ID-02

tools for myself, there were probably other people like me who would also want to use those tools. Today there is a space for designers to stop thinking about creating individual objects and instead focus on creating systems for users to create objects themselves. I want to empower people in this way. I want to help them design their own products. See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, DM-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PAINT-02, TLAD-03

ID-04

My work crosses disciplines such as industrial design, science, psychology, architecture and branded environments. I develop systems that make the invisible visible using technology and digital data collection to achieve behavioral change, creating a healthier and happier society. I’m on a quest to solve design problems in ways that enable people to live better lives. I dream big but seek practical solutions.

Rene Chen My work explores how a seemingly simple everyday product, such as a chair, can evolve with humans and affect our lifestyle, how it physically shapes our anatomical structure, how we respond to it in a cultural and social context, and how we make future design decisions. See Also ARCH-06, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, DM-09, INTAR-02, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03

ID-03

Justin Couch Like many people my age, I grew up playing with Legos. Possibly the greatest toy ever made, they present an incredibly simple system that allows for almost infinite variety. There are kits to buy with specific instructions that allow kids to create professional-looking, well-designed pieces. And after multiple kits are purchased, the pieces result in a collection of parts with infinite possibility. Legos are a playground for creativity, with physical objects as the output. As I progressed through college and beyond, I began to encounter design problems for which I was sure there was a tool-based solution. Many times, I could not find those tools. I began to realize that if I wanted them, I was going to have to create them. And if I was going to create

Amy Goldfeder

See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, PAINT-08, DM-01, INTAR-32, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

ID-05

Seoung Yeon Han Design to me is a sensibility that has the warmth of a human body. It is when design becomes one with human sensibility that communication is achieved. When design harmonizes with our lives, it can bring us gifts of joy and impression. The materialization of intangible love is the power of my design philosophy and also the road I must walk for all the people I love. Therefore my greatest joy and ultimate goal is the user who joyfully engages with my product. I wish to convey life, hope and warmth through my design and encourage love for the human race, society, our culture and environment. See Also ARCH-16, INTAR-18, LDAR-11, DM-01, GLASS-01, INTAR-07, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

ID


ID-06

Meng Ting Kao By examining the current food system, I identified two major sources of waste which relate to food producers and to consumers, respectively. The former is related to the global food industry—the flow from food growth to consumption— which causes issues such as pollution, energy consumption and unbalanced distribution. The latter is food storage; after purchase, consumers store foods in improper ways that make food go bad quickly and waste both food and energy. In order to address the first problem, I aim to deliver a digital service that encourages consumers to support local food. To address the second problem, I aim to deliver a product that helps people store food properly and naturally without electricity.

“A building is much more than an architectural or engineering accomplishment it is the reflection of a community’s history and personality. Thus, reasons for recycling buildings, for preserving areas, must sometimes reach beyond the purely architectural.” —Barbaralee Diamonstein See Also ARCH-11, ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03, ID-03

INTAR-02

“Thoughts without intuitions are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.” —Immanuel Kant See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-14, ID-05, PAINT-05, TEXT-03, DM-06, DM-09, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TLAD-03

See Also ARCH-28, GRAPH-02, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, JM-06, LDAR-02

ID-07

INTAR-01

David Sharp

Kristen Bender

INTAR-03

Alper Besen

My work aims to engage the user’s curiosity and to encourage experimentation. To this end, I tend to create tools that are heavily influenced by construction kits (like building blocks and Erector Sets) and children’s science kits (especially ones that are powerful and slightly dangerous).

My design methodology is rooted in the connective nature of design thinking. I am inspired by combinatorial explorations of spatial theory, philosophy, technology and craftsmanship. Meaning is what I amsearching for. Style can be collected from advertisements and magazines, but meaning needs to be cultivated patiently.

See Also ARCH-05, DM-01, GRAPH-03, INTAR-08, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

Max Ballardo If all we aim to do, as designers and architects, were to change the interior of a building for a new use, then we can call ourselves interior remodelers because with this name we could defend our non-involved intervention. If we do aim to understand the structure, its design and its history and we architecturally reinterpret it into a new context with a new program, we can call our work Adaptive Architecture.

INTAR-04

Shivani Bhalla “What was once considered ugly will now be looked at in a new light, giving it a second life.” —Anonymous I wanted to retain the structure as the skeleton of the design and to create the intervention through the center of the form. By proposing a consumer-driven program and creating a unique experience within this existing framework, I aimed to

ID


highlight the possibility of adaptive reuse in today’s context.

INTAR-09

I embarked on my intellectual journey with the goal of helping people. I began my undergraduate studies majoring in political studies, investigating international relations and global development, later adopting psychology as a minor. Through the study of both politics and psychology I have developed a greater understanding of how people function as individuals as well as how society functions as a whole within a broad range of cultural contexts and means of communication. This combination of fields in conjunction with my desire to affect people and society positively became the basis for my exploration of design. I believe that the buildings and spaces in which we rest, work and interact must be designed to improve the human condition.

See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, TLAD-04, ARCH-05, ID-03, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TEXT-03

INTAR-05

Queenie Chow See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, ARCH-05, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-06

Michelle Duesterhoeft “It makes me feel guilty that anybody should have such a good time doing what they are supposed to do.” —Charles Eames

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

See Also LDAR-07

INTAR-07

Lauren Grant

INTAR-10

“If we do not change our direction, we are likely to end up where we are headed.” —Chinese proverb

Dana Hamdan “The creative adult is the child who has survived.” —Ursula K. Le Guin My curiosity about life has never ceased to make me think about what it means to live, work, play or sleep in a space. My architectural designs are all the works of the curious child in me. See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, PRINT-01, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

Chelsea Hoffman “As we live and as we are, simplicity— with a capital 'S'—is difficult to comprehend nowadays. We are no longer truly simple. We no longer live in simple terms or places. Life is a more complex struggle now. It is valiant to be simple: a courageous thing to even want to be simple. It is a spiritual thing to comprehend what simplicity means.” —Frank Lloyd Wright, The Natural House

See Also FURN-05, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, ARCH-07, JM-04, GRAPH-12, JM-05, FURN-04, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-05, ARCH-17

INTAR-08

Christina Hermanns

See Also TEXT-03, PAINT-06

INTAR-11

Ya Ling Huang Words, imagination, space. See Also GLASS-03, PHOTO-01, ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR


INTAR-12

Ann Hurt

INTAR-16

With every project, my goal is to deliver dynamic solutions with simple approaches. The interaction between people, the built environment and the natural environment are key elements to balance in design.

The act of re-adaptation must challenge the existing identity of the building in a way that elicits extreme opinions. Controversial architecture increases our spatial awareness by encouraging communication, discussion and reevaluation of current and past ideals. This discourse doesn’t seek resolution, but instead promotes clarity and definition through dialog and exchange of ideas and information. The reuse of 210 Westminster Street in Providence, Rhode Island reflects the fracturing and deep divisions created by the media through the program of a digital editorial newspaper and television studio. Both the program and the building itself will encourage discord and dialog by subverting the natural orders of the existing architecture and the typical concepts of privacy, workflow and gathering. The unresolved issues provoke and encourage differing opinions that promote questioning and analysis of established ideals.

See Also LDAR-06

INTAR-13

Kyoko Jackson I am interested in creating immersive environments inspired by dynamic narratives. See Also ID-07

INTAR-14

Yuki Kawae States of transition create vulnerability which results with sense of strength. They force the self away from the old, toward something new. This vulnerability signifies independence from ordinariness and comfort zones. I’m interested in the moment when people are traveling from one place to another, or interacting with one another. I observe tremendous growth in those who experience the psychological threshold within a space that inspires this transition.

See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04

INTAR-17

Jennifer Krauser

Derrick Laurion “Design works if it’s authentic, inspired, and has a clear point of view.” —Ron Johnson

See Also PRINT-02, PHOTO-05, JM-03, PAINT-09, FURN-05, LDAR-11, ARCH-02, GRAPH-12

INTAR-15

Anna Kurkalova

See Also SCULP-01

INTAR-18

“Flow and vectors often intersect unprogrammed spaces: the place of the ‘in-between,’ the space of all potentialities, is activated by the movement of bodies in it.” ­ —Bernard Tschumi, Event-Cities 2 See Also GLASS-03, ARCH-07, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-01, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, INTAR-19 PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, PAINT-09, SCULP-02

Emily Leighton I am interested in creating unique and inspirational spaces. I do this by making exhibits more interactive and accessible for the general public. See Also LDAR-10

Carolina Martins I am an architect and designer with special interests in adaptive reuse, interior design

INTAR


and sustainable environments—how little INTAR-23 details and small interventions make great experiences filled with new sensations. I like to experiment with colors, materials and light and how these create diverse environments and different experiences. I explore “interior-exterior” connections and introduce concepts of sustainability by optimizing the use of natural ventilation and natural light.

Phawadee Pantrakul The architectural space transfers the vocabularies of Jil Sander’s design identities; clarity, minimalistic, and luxurious simplicity. The design includes transparency of visual connections between floor levels. Vertical panels and horizontal walls define spaces on the open floor plan, and function as an inducement between one and the next space. Freestanding furniture emphasizes the clarity of the open floor plan. The furniture and the room are, therefore, considered as independent elements that reflect purity of Jil Sander's design.

INTAR-24

INTAR-22

Roxanna Salceda “If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise, they will kill you.” —Oscar Wilde See Also DM-02, GLASS-03, PHOTO-01, PAINT-06, ARCH-22, GRAPH-12, ID-03, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-25

Elizabeth Sall

See Also PAINT-01, PAINT-02, SCULP-01, PHOTO-04

My design examines the history of the original family, the culture of the Boston Brahmin, and how the powers of both are traditionally displayed through design. By setting up two completely separate paths through the hotel centered around a glass double helix stair, I juxtaposed the traditional with what created these empires—industry and fabrication. Both paths have constant visual access to the other in the public spaces and are different, but equally luxurious, which leaves the visitor with the question, What is today’s equivalent of the Brahmin, and how do we display power and wealth through decor?

Tamar Petersen

See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04

See Also TEXT-03, ARCH-22, DM-09, GRAPH-03, GRAPH-12, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-21

“I cannot be grasped in the here and now For I live just as well with the dead As with the unborn Somewhat closer to the heart of creation than usual But far from close enough” —Paul Klee See Also LDAR-11, PRINT-02, ARCH-02, ARCH-07, JM-04,FURN-06, GRAPH-12, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-05, ARCH-17

See Also ARCH-24, DM-06, GRAPH-02, GRAPH-16, ID-03, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-20

Joshua Rosenfeld

Sang Yung Park

I understand the world through my perception of space. Any lack in this understanding sparks my curiosity. This is why I design. See Also CER-04

INTAR-26

Amy Selvaggio “Architecture is the reaching out for the truth.” —Louis Kahn See Also DM-04

INTAR


INTAR-27

Kate Sheahan

INTAR-30

“The question of monumentality for me is no longer important, and you can replace this by other things which are generosity and poetry, and to make something where people can have some emotions.” —Philippe Lacaton

“Buildings change; they adapt to needs, times and tastes... Nothing, not even buildings, stands still.” —Ada Louise Huxtable See Also ARCH-03, ARCH-11, ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, ID-07, LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03

See Also DM-06, GRAPH-08, ARCH-08, ID-03, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-28

Mansi Tewari

INTAR-31

See Also ARCH-25, FURN-06, LDAR-03, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-06, ARCH-17, ARCH-14

INTAR-32

INTAR-29

Ariane van Dievoet For me, being a designer in the 21st century means being versatile in finding solutions, crossing the boundaries between different disciplines and looking for new challenges. I design spaces and experiences in all scales, mixing film and photography with more traditional media. I am interested in working as a product, interior, furniture, stage, retail or exhibition designer. See Also DM-02, GLASS-03, PHOTO-05, ARCH-20, GRAPH-18, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, ID-05, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

Sebastian Whyte We wanted the piece to provide a combination of features for the users, including functionality, aesthetic value and opportunity for personalization, as the users are in a transitional state and could very much benefit from feeling more comfortable in their space.

My passion lies in designing small spaces, creating experience through texture and environment. A love for materials stems from my work in the hospitality industry; understanding the atmosphere that a space will create for its users is what I love to work for. In addition, my passion for food manifests itself in my work when designing restaurants and bars. Working with earthy and natural materials also supplements my thought process of adaptive reuse. See Also SCULP-01, GLASS-02, ARCH-06, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-01, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, PAINT-06

Lynn Varland

Ke Xiao “Think of a city, and what comes to mind? Its streets. If a city’s streets look interesting, the city looks interesting; if they look dull, the city looks dull.” —Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities When I am walking in downtown Providence, abandoned spaces always draw my attention, such as the dirty and dark alleyways hidden between buildings. If we imagine the city as a single unit, then these discarded spaces are scraps of the city. Should they be discarded and remain there forever? These spaces have practical significance for the city and should not be ignored. The alleys should have specific roles functioning as a part of the city to help serve citizens and improve the quality of their lives. The narrow and small spaces located in crowded downtown are often forgotten by residents, but the truth is that they contain huge potential. With small changes, these alleys can tremendously improve the city’s environment.

INTAR


I will focus on how to use and optimize the scraps of the city to make the city healthier and cleaner. They will become public places offering various services with public restrooms, trash bins, drinking fountains and other functions. They will be safe and clean spaces that can provide conveniences to pedestrians. Water is the core concept flows through my design, since it is a symbol of purity and health. My concept represents the health of the city and influences the environment of our city like cleansing water.

JM-02

“I try to create fantastic things, magical things, things like in a dream. The world needs more fantasy. Our civilization is too mechanical. We can make the fantastic real, and then it is more real than that which actually exists.” —Salvador Dalí I’m compelled to explore the moment of transformation in between reality and fantasy. Exploring the bridge between two realms through playful exploration of materials, transforming objects’ original functions and combining materials in unexpected juxtapositions fascinates me. I enjoy symbolic and iconic mundane objects. I take these objects and twist them into something extraordinary to invoke an individual’s emotions and imaginations. I reinvent their original purposes and rebirth them into something that is surreal but humorous, playful and with the sense of failure or surprise. I create opportunities for viewers to physically engage with my work and be able to experience public but private dialogue with them. By reviving that moment, I am able to counter the gravity of current reality with opportunities for intimate refuge for me and others.

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-08, GRAPH-05, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-33

Yi Zhou My thesis attempts to deduce a design language for architectural adaptive reuse projects from the causes of the transformation of buildings over time, as well as from the resulting physical changes. See Also ARCH-16, ID-04, DM-09, GRAPH-14, ID-02, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

JM-01

Leslie Boyd The work I create forms a conversation about ideals, dreams and reality for a modern girl. It is an exploration of gender roles and feminism through the lens of my life. I explore the ways I as an individual physically, emotionally, and actively respond to the current state of gender issues, the role of feminism in popular culture, and the impressions left upon me by my childhood and family members. Altered and fabricated objects that highlight themes of femininity, dominance, and sexuality create a dialogue about the expectations and role of modern women. Humor and appropriation are two strategies I use to draw interest from the viewer and to highlight the absurdity of modern culture having to deal with such blatant inequality between the sexes. See Also CER-05, HAVC-01

Sena Huh

See Also DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, GRAPH-14

JM-03

Manuela Jimenez I am interested in exploring the feeling of loss and the emotional weight it produces. Loss is canalized through our memories and becomes alive when we recall certain events. It is a dominant presence that causes unbalance, grief, nostalgia, absence, emptiness or pain. I would like to use the narrative of a memory to express this complex feeling. I would like the viewer to connect emotionally to my pieces though this narrative, evoking in them the feeling of loss. The common thread that connects my subjects and work is the desire to give form to the intangibles that we witness but are unable to reproduce. Giving a physical

JM


form to these intangibles is creating an alternative way to remember. I believe that expressing memories of loss through making pieces generates another space separate from the mind for them to live. The object becomes an extension of our minds. That weight or imbalance becomes visible and can be experienced. Creating pieces of jewelry that reference these subjects brings the memory alive in an intimate space. Every time a piece is worn or seen, a connection is generated and it is here where I would like to evoke the memory. I would like my pieces to be experienced as the act of remembering and keeping a moment. By wearing them the memory replays in the wearer’s mind, and it is a time alone with a person or the event they would like to remember. I view this experience as a way of dealing with and understanding the complexity of these feelings.

challenge our imaginations, and perhaps make us feel uncomfortable. See Also ID-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, ARCH-05, GRAPH-05, INTAR-26, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

JM-05

I grew up in Rhode Island and attended Skidmore College, majoring in Gender Studies and Studio Art. Before pursuing my mfa in Jewelry and Metalsmithing at risd, I lived in New York City and worked in the fashion industry. My previous studies and professional experiences continue to influence my studio practice, shaping my unique perspective on wearable objects. My work reflects my interest in fashion, femininity, and feminism. The use of nontraditional materials and their relationship with the body are important aspects of the work. I often accompany my pieces with photographs of my process and of the finished piece on the body. Photographic documentation is an integral aspect of my work; I utilize these images as my sketchbook and as a tool for editing and progression. My work has most recently been on view in The risd Jewelry and Metalsmithing Triennial, the exhibition Studio Lab at risd’s Red Eye Gallery curated by classmate Jillian Matthews. Upon completion of my MFA, I intend to base my studio and design practice in New York City.

See Also ARCH-23, ARCH-30, ARCH-25, ARCH-26, PAINT-09, INTAR-29, ARCH-24, ARCH-14

JM-04

Jillian Matthews Our world is filled with violence as well as pleasure. We as humans have created much of what we both fear and delight in. We delight in our new technology, advancements in medicine and science, but we also fear the consequences of losing control of our privacy, our bodies, our environment and ultimately our own mortality. With fears of terrorist attacks, nuclear weapons, random acts of violence, illness and natural disasters being ever-present in our current society and media, we frequently seek refuge in technology and our online social circles. Because of this we are often times more distracted and less aware of the physical world which surrounds us everyday. Like the immediacy of sending a text message to a friend, we often require the visual arts to provide us with the same entertainment and instant gratification as our smart phones do. However, I think there is still value in experiencing the moments in our lives, large and small, that elicit wonder,

Kendra Pariseault

See Also LDAR-13, ARCH-23, DM-09, LDAR-12, GRAPH-04, PAINT-09, FURN-05, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, FURN-06

JM-06

Mallory Weston My jewelry is located within the absurd world of artist-made comic books, cartoons and illustrations. Artists working within these fields are unabashedly vulgar, humorous, sexual, dysfunctional, youthful and ridiculous, and these are qualities that I strive to convey in my work. Associating myself with this subject matter allows me the freedom to pursue my artwork in a way

JM


that I’m interested in without questioning LDAR-03 Frank Hammond its validity. Water brings death. Water brings birth. My material, color and line choices Water washes away our sins. Water translate the formal qualities of the hides the evidence. Water cools the fire. original drawings. I hope to seduce the Water creates memory. Water is spiritual. viewer into interacting with my work Water cleanses our skin. Water infects through materials: the alluring sheen of our wounds. Water transports our cargo. polished gold, the soft stroke of rabbit Water isolates us. Water reveals our fur against the skin, or the enticing history. Water conceals our history. undulation and surprising weight of metal Water imitates time. Water is time. that moves like fabric. I am committed to jewelry techniques and materials, although See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, I strive to integrate them into my work in INTAR-24, PRINT-04, SCULP-03, ARCH-24, non-traditional applications. By adopting ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, PAINT-07 the spirit, subject matter, and ethos of comic books and cartoons I bring my jewelry to a new level, transcending the LDAR-04 Xiaoxue Huang limitations that I’ve placed on myself as an artist working within the boundaries The concept of bringing nature back to of a craft that can seem so traditional. the city and creating more dynamic city My aim is to be uninhibited with my habitats has been rooted in my heart for object making. the past eight years, fueling my learning and practice in the field of landscape See Also ARCH-18 architecture and driving me to pay more attention to improving the quality of city habitats. LDAR-01 Shane Fagan If you don’t like it, change it. If you can help someone, do it. If you don’t care, get out of the way. See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, GRAPH-07, GRAPH-17, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, ID-05, INTAR-28, INTAR-17, PAINT-07

LDAR-02

Sarah Gould As a landscape architect, I am working with public and communal spaces to craft experiences that tie people to their environment in a positive way. My thesis aims to evoke wonder, here described by Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Standing on the bare ground, my head bathed by the blithe air and uplifted into infinite space, all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eyeball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me.”

See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-02, FURN-01, GLASS-03, INTAR-14, JM-05, PRINT-05, PAINT-05

LDAR-05

Tyler Kiggins Much of my work is focused on exploring new ways to provide greater awareness and engagement with the natural environment and wilderness. I strive to create active landscapes that provide the point of contact between humans and the environment. I have an interest in how physical exertion in the landscape can leave an impression in our minds and bodies and how these marks are formed. See Also ARCH-16, ID-04, INTAR-18, INTAR-32, FURN-06

See Also GRAPH-03

LDAR


LDAR-06

Andrew Liang

Instead of looking at small ways to impact our surroundings and quality of life, and providing the education and resources necessary for constructing and implementing them, they favor large projects which require lots of time and money. This further disconnects the built environment from the people whom it is intended to serve. My work explores the actions required to explore the imagination of the public. Can urban space be a place where physical community needs and the need for self-expression meet?

At the core of my process is the struggle between fetish of form and integrity of meaning. See Also ARCH-21, ARCH-10, GLASS-01, ID-04, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, PAINT-01, SCULP-03, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

LDAR-07

David Mazer The medium of landscape architecture can take on many forms, while the philosophies, demands and requirements are always in flux, with landscape architects being asked to take on non-traditional roles as designers. Last semester I took the Oystertecture studio at risd taught by our department head Scheri Fultineer. The studio appealed to me as a unique and non-traditional departure from landscape studios usually offered by the department and even other universities. Students took on a range of issues, from Oyster harvesting to habitat and systems that dealt with coastal soil erosion to water quality issues. My approach was to create a reef system that aggregates and serves several purposes at once. My process in Oystertecture definitely changed my perception of what the practice of landscape architecture can be or the issues it can inform and challenge, both in terms of my approach in school and in terms of the practice after graduation. Landscape is evolving, becoming richer and more complex than it has been, and the possibilities are expanded far beyond traditional notions of what a landscape firm is and how it functions. See Also DM-05

LDAR-08

Megan McLaughlin Because of lack of public funding and the complicated bureaucratic processes surrounding design, our institutions, municipalities and designers of the public realm are failing us.

See Also INTAR-22

LDAR-09

Hope McManus A predominant thread, or the weft, that weaves in and out of my work is a consciousness of the social, cultural, and ritual aspects of the landscape. Typically this has involved making a place out of a space, sculpting a point of view and exposing an existing phenomenon of a site, whether historical or elemental. In my travels, I have discovered that rituals, both the daily and the sacred, are what aggregate to form relationships between culture and environment. It is at this intersection, that we can either be productive or destructive. The warp, that which lays the foundation for the process of my work, is ecology. As an artist, my work has commented on the human relationship to its environment. As a designer, my work has considered ways of creating a relationship between human and resource, in order to influence our evolution. Almost every one of my projects has acknowledged and addressed the presence of water on the site. Whether altering its trajectory, changing its state, filtering it through vegetation or mycelium, collecting, storing, or featuring it, water has shaped my decisions of form and material. See Also GRAPH-17

LDAR


LDAR-10

David Nielsen

but at once bright, loud, and powerful. Always I seek the clarity and resonance of a single pure note—an illusive reverberation where contact is made, if only for a moment.

“Time will not consecrate that in which it has been forgotten.” —Louis Sullivan See Also ARCH-15

LDAR-11

See Also ID-04, INTAR-18, ARCH-05, DM-09, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

Shasha Pan

My urban landscape is composed of LDAR-13 Roy Small different layers. Designed landscape “Order stormed the surface offers an artifact, the final experience Where chaos set the norm of which is dependent on the perception Had there always been balance? and interpretations of the individual Surely not users. Each person will experience a Therein lies the beauty.” different version of the same landscape —Mikael Stanne as influenced by their cultural background, expectations, education and belief. I am See Also ARCH-03, ARCH-11, ARCH-14, trying to use the layering strategy to GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, PAINT-06, create a better understanding, rather than PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03 what a single layer would describe—a fixed, unchanging landscape. See Also ARCH-25, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, JM-05, INTAR-19, INTAR-01

LDAR-12

Michael Rockafellar

LDAR-14

Xinwen Su See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, ID-01, JM-01, SCULPT-05, CER-05, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01

I grew up in Seattle, hiking, kayaking, LDAR-15 Christina Vannelli camping and backpacking. I share most “...(the city), has not grown organically of these experiences with my father, who but exhibits properties of mineralogical carried me into the mountains on his back structures that depend equally on natural before I learned to walk, and continues to and synthetic processes. In its geology, the out-hike me even now in his 70s. I have city consists of a stratification of layers pursued many different self iterations: forming a consolidated entity.” film-making, computer programming, —Marc Angelil and Anna Klingmann, glass and stone sculpture, and now Hybrid Morphologies: Infrastructure, landscape architecture. Persistently, Architecture, Landscape beneath and intertwined within my permutations, my work forms a foundation See Also INTAR-17 to my experience, an emotive interface between my mind, senses, and the world. Design communicates the ideas I don’t know how to speak aloud. It occupies LDAR-16 Haipeng Zhu the between spaces where memory and Humans and nature are the most crucial emotion, sensation and experience are elements for my landscape architecture joined by delicate sinews. Like a bow design. Our world is a chaotic mass, drawn across these threads, my ideas are but an intimate relationship exists the first note on a new instrument, or an between human beings and the natural old one that I taught myself to play. Reedy, environment. Human beings are part of perhaps wavering; certain, yet uncertain;

LDAR


nature; we are supposed to coexist with other species, share habitats and integrate ourselves into real nature. Currently, what happens in modern cities is that designers and developers set a clear boundary between human and nature. We have parks, waterfronts and natural preservation zones, but these are no longer part of our daily lives. Visible and invisible, physical and spiritual boundaries also divide one person from another. My ultimate goal of landscape design is to break these boundaries and to achieve the balance between human beings and nature, the balance between preservation of limited resource and sustainable development in the future. See Also GRAPH-09

PAINT-01

in the Pacific Northwest. Artist denies psychiatric hospitalizations and little outpatient therapy history. Artist presents with ideas of reference, preoccupation with positions of power, religion and variety of dogma. Artist demonstrates an interest in death and the desire for immortality. Artist endorses feelings of hopelessness. Artist denies delusions of grandeur, intrusive thoughts, and audio or visual hallucinations. Artist denies suicidal or homicidal ideation. See Also ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-02, ID-03, INTAR-32, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

PAINT-04

Be present, focus, capture, transcribe experience, make a mistake, attempt to correct your mistakes, remember, forget, redefine your search, find something interesting, begin again... open, select, copy, paste, undo, redo, save, close, find, copy, save, screenshot, open

Claudia Bitran Right after I finish a piece I feel embarrassed, exhausted and weird. At the same time the challenges of reinventing special effects, impersonating celebrities and fantasizing with video editing fill me with thoughts, joy and adrenaline.

See Also FURN-03

See Also ARCH-30, INTAR-07 PAINT-05 PAINT-02

Joe Bochynski “The experience is of material fraught with suspense and moving toward its own consummation through a connected series of varied incidents.” —John Dewey, Art as Experience, 1934 See Also INTAR-20, SCULP-01, ARCH-21, GLASS-01, ID-04, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, DM-08

PAINT-03

Douglas Burns Assessment of Douglas J. Burns by a licensed clinical social worker: 12/12/12: Artist is a married, insured, unemployed, 31-year-old white male. Born in New Zealand, lived in Louisiana through most of grade school, with the majority of adolescence and young adulthood spent

Lauren Comito

Walter Dion Thesis excerpt: Stalactites and quartz crystals growing upon a bear skull in the Cave of Lascaux solidify for scientists and viewers alike, a definite point in time when the bear lived and died. The same can be ascertained about the mechanical structures within the dark cave, some of which are covered in oozing detritus and stalactites dating their creation to nearly a thousand years before the first temples went up in the Greek Acropolis. The question emerges: how could these miniature structures have existed so far in advance of the actual buildings they reference? Question of origins and a sense of wonderment at the potential creator of these relics arise. For the past two years much of my work has concerned itself with various notions of Western power structures via classical thought, order and actual histories. In Amphitheater, I wanted to

PAINT


talk about models of cosmology and intersecting creation myths. I wanted to talk as much about the work in the show as where they might be experienced: in an isolated cave, buried deep in mystery and wonderment. I wanted to create machines that pointed backwards in time when mechanics and technologies were still analog and powered by the raw elements. What did it mean to harness power, and how did that change our relationship as a species to the cave?

into a new language contained within the framework of a future museum. See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, SCULP-02, GRAPH-07, JM-06, PRINT-03, PRINT-05, FURN-05

PAINT-09

My work explores how different cultural and philosophical views affect the depiction of nature. I utilize Kalmakari and Ajrakh—two ancient natural dyeing methods—to create contemporary paintings in natural dyes. My present body of work is influenced by 18th Century French copperplates and American indigodyed textiles found in the risd Museum collection and by India’s ancient, but treasured Sanskrit poet and dramatist, Kalidas and his lyric poem Meghdootam. The poem’s theme centers on a man in exile who laments his anguish to a passing cloud, which then conveys his torment to his beloved wife far away. The romance between the couple and the description of nature as reflecting the protagonist’s mood greatly interests me.

See Also CER-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01

PAINT-06

Jonathan Frioux My abstractions derive from an atlas of images placed in the blurred space between wall and open air. See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-02, ID-05, INTAR-01, PHOTO-04, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, SCULP-02

PAINT-07

Rachel Grobstein “The collector’s passion borders on the chaos of memories. Everything remembered and thought, everything conscious, becomes the pedestal, the frame, the base, the lock of his property. The whole background of an item adds up to a magic encyclopedia whose quintessence is the fate of his object. Among children, collecting is only one process of renewal; other processes are the painting of objects, the cutting out of figures, the application of decals, the whole range of childlike modes of acquisition, from touching things to giving them names.” —Walter Benjamin, Unpacking My Library See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05

PAINT-08

Zach Seeger My work extracts art historical forms, styles, and applications, and reshapes them

Taniya Vaidya

See Also ARCH-06, FURN-05, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, INTAR-01, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, GRAPH-14

PHOTO-01

Scott Alario 1. An attempt toward a creation story I’m not so sure that the universe had a beginning, and neither will it have an end. Both beginnings and ends speak of time, and time is a construct that will fail when our ability to communicate it does. Energy moves in circles. Time’s last moment stands closely to its first. So how can it be said that we came to be, or came to be wondering about such things as the beginning of it all? I saw you gain consciousness. It happened. One day you weren’t, and then you were. It was something about the sheen in your eyes—lasers—they pierced me through. That’s how it must have been. One day there was just consciousness. I like to

PAINT


think it was a family, all together at once, urgently, or it could have been a slowly building sense, an awareness growing a mutually shared question, or an endless list of questions. We will live our lives wondering, and won’t ever know. In wondering is joy, and wondering together is an ecstatic experience that makes the going in circles part seem worth it.

from a desire to understand the source of the complex notions of freedom and independence that exist in our country. The American Revolution was actually an unfinished revolution, and because of this, future generations were forced to continue a contest to define freedom in our democracy. By photographing and analyzing the actions of individuals carrying out different activities within the landscape, I look to illustrate their specific notions of freedom. I view the landscape as a stage, in which individuals act out their particular rights. In this stage, the actions of individuals, whether involved in leisure or work, begin to serve as powerful metaphors for interpreting the complex ideals of our democratic self-ruling society. The physical shape of the landscape and our treatment of it have played an equal role in my interpretation of the complex and ever-changing notions of freedom. In the same way that an individual’s actions can illustrate a fundamental set of principles, the structure of our built landscape can unlock an understanding of our democratic history and our particular views toward it. The ideals within the built landscape act as a system of clues that have the power to reveal information about itself, its inhabitants and the history of previous generations. Frequently these ideals are paradoxical, as contrasting notions of freedom collide with each other in the landscape. I have embraced these collisions in my photographs, because they illustrate the struggle for harmony in a country where individuality is encouraged. My photographs are an attempt to decode the messages embedded within the landscape and serve to interpret the actions of individuals acting out their desires, even if they are inherently contradictory.

See Also INTAR-29, ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13, PRINT-05, SCULP-01

PHOTO-02

Sophie Barbasch See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, INTAR-02, ARCH-05, GRAPH-05, ID-02, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

PHOTO-03

Kevin Barton I once serendipitously discovered a plethora of photographs on eBay taken by a man named Norman between the 1940s and 1970s. A vaguely alarming obsession took hold of me as I began frantically collecting and piecing together an archive of his images before they dissipated and were scattered across the world. Over the course of several years, I was successful in compiling nearly 12,000 images taken by this individual. Utilizing my archive of the life work of this nearly forgotten photographer, I construct pieces investigating the realm in which discarded, lost and anonymous photographs have come to occupy in our time. See Also DM-07

PHOTO-04

Rob MacInnis

See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-02, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, TEXT-03, GLASS-01, LDAR-05, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

See Also SCULP-05

PHOTO-05

Keith Yahrling My photographic explorations through the historically rich region of America’s original thirteen colonies originate

PHOTO-06

Ji Yeo One group of women has serious issues with their own reflections. By being photographed with a single reflex camera,

PHOTO


they were literally confronted with their own mirror image, allowing me to record it in film. The other group of women highlight the deep rift between selfperception and staged appearance. By combining these two groups of women, I aim to portray larger societal issues, and to illuminate the profound position the viewer occupies as aesthetic judge. By forcing viewers to confront images of women who continuously judge themselves, I bring focus to the viewers’ natural impulse to judge. In doing so it implicates viewers in the complex relationship of aesthetic judgments. My subjects are situated in the middle of the frame. They stand looking straight at the camera. We find fresh-faced candor and a soft, welcoming tenderness. We find deceit—eyes that are not windows into the soul, but rather float on the surface— deployed and practiced as polished teeth. We find detached aloofness—the gaze that recognizes the camera and the exposure it represents in passing. We find poised acknowledgment—that of people confident in what they represent. We also find an accusatory sadness—a surprised discomfort at the position that the camera places them in, as though the viewer is an uninvited guest in their world. We find eyes that are tired, that carry with them all of their history—eyes that betray the hints of a smile below them. In one photograph, a single eye pokes out as the plea of an ageless soul in an aging body. That eye contains all the confidence of women of tremendous beauty echoing as the body slowly fades. See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, CER-05, DM-04, GLASS-03, INTAR-14, JM-05, LDAR-13, SCULP-01

PRINT-01

Paloma Barhaugh-Bordas

My work investigates how objects manifest American identity, emotional attachment and, paradoxically, late capitalism and mass consumption. The images depict interaction with nature through familiar activities of leisure, communion and stasis. I corral and color code the objects mediating the event, highlighting them not only as actors, but as symbolically definitive of the activity itself. The images propose a theory for the act of seeing the everyday, and reflect on cultural practices that I am linked to as an American, but relate to as a spectator. The resulting vista is a reflection on objects in the American vernacular, the anti-artistic, the mundane, the spectacular. Through the seasons, I collect and document cycles of leisure activities. This creates flashes of memory: a few summer trips in a pop-up camper, skiing in my native Rocky Mountains, amusement park rides and swimming in hot springs. The indexicality of photography heightens the sense of nostalgia through degraded photo-based imagery. Yet I am engaging a specificity of experience that I do not know intimately, and my attention to the mass-produced and mundane irritates rather than encourages sentimentality. The pieced-together collage narrative reflects my understanding of the space and experience. Like geometric cut-out shapes, my relationship to the objects is vague and simplified. The sense of history, locality, and ownership are concealed. I reassign the identity of all man-made objects, creating a visual gestalt of symbols. These objects, colors, shapes, and compositions propose more questions than provide answers, effectively embodying the tension of being, as Richard Hamilton put it, both a consumer of and a contributor to mass culture. See Also ARCH-24, LDAR-11, INTAR-14, LDAR-13, ARCH-20, JM-04, INTAR-07, INTAR-16, INTAR-23

I build images with an affection for making and material, an impetus to respond intuitively and a continual effort to PRINT-02 Kevin Frances subvert the articulation of a singular Objects are spread across a table: books, perspective. With prints, collage and bills, an almost empty cup of coffee, a note color, I create hierarchies of objects, and to self: the sun moves across the sky. a lexicon for how we should be looking.

PRINT


Initials are scrawled on an interior wall, in round blue letters, high up near the ceiling: rthrs. A big red leather purse, and grey Nike running shoes with pink accents. Ordinary objects and events, things we have held in our hands a thousand times, paths we walk every day, all have incredible potential—the potential to knock our perception off-kilter, to make us see things anew. They have the potential to tell us a story, an epic in the scratches on a coffee table. My practice investigates this PRINT-05 transformational moment, asking the viewer to set aside the bland facts of what things are and to instead ask what they could be. See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, DM-06, ID-01, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

PRINT-03

Amanda Hu My work is the exploration of abstract shape and line on handmade paper. I like to control every aspect of the construction process, from making and dyeing abaca paper, to cutting up and reassembling intaglio prints. The deconstruction, and later reformation, of printed material is central to my practice. I view prints as units that can be cut, shaped and rejoined in order to form a new system of line or grid. Though my work is mainly on paper, I like to juxtapose materials: the coldness of wire and metal, the warmth of the laborintensive handmade paper process, and the immediacy of drawn or etched line with repeated and hand printed material. See Also ARCH-06, DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, SCULPT-05, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, TEXT-02

PRINT-04

Genevieve Lowe “As envisionaries, artists should be able to provide a way to work against the dominant culture’s rapacious view of nature, reinstate the mythical and cultural dimensions of ‘public’ experience, and at

the same time become conscious of the ideological relationships and historical constructions of place. The dialectic between place and change can provide the kind of no-one’s-land where artists thrive.” —Lucy Lippard See Also ARCH-07, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PAINT-05, SCULP-02

Jonathan Palmer “To go into solitude, a man needs to retire as much from his chamber as from society. I am not solitary whilst I read and write, though nobody is with me. But if a man would be alone, let him look at the stars. The rays that come from those heavenly worlds, will separate between him and what he touches. One might think the atmosphere was made transparent with this design, to give man, in the heavenly bodies, the perpetual presence of the sublime. Seen in the streets of cities, how great they are! If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.” —Ralph Waldo Emerson See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, INTAR-03, INTAR-04, INTAR-15, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, ARCH-20

PRINT-06

Diego Rodriguez-Warner The moment it appeared in my studio, I immediately knew that this composition caught a glimpse of what I have been struggling toward. I had to physically make it to figure out why. See Also INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-03, PHOTO-05, PAINT-05, SCULP-03, FURN-05

PRINT


PRINT-07

Saman Sajasi I grew up in Tehran, Iran until the age of 15. Due to political issues my parents decided to move to America so my brother and I could live in freedom and take advantage of the vast opportunities. Through my art, I selectively choose the aspects of each culture I want to inherit, on my own terms. The negotiation of cultures in my work reflects the first generation American experience. The Persian-Islamic art influences I inherit include pattern, detail, stylized representation, and symbolism. But I take permission from my Western influences to make art that is visceral, emotional, individualized, political, corporeal, experimental, raw, and free. See Also CER-02

PRINT-08

Justin Sorensen “Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree.” —Martin Luther See Also ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PAINT-09, SCULP-01

PRINT-09

Cole Swavely I am happiest when my mind and my body are in constant motion, and keeping up that momentum leads to good things. My work exists as a prescription for happiness, evolving as the definition changes. Having discovered the “best practices” of my own life, I make work to reinforce the physical, mental and moral development that is important to me as person and as an artist. SCULP-01 See Also INTAR-03

PRINT-10

Elisabeth Walden The genesis for my work comes from my own struggle, as a fat woman, to construct a positive identity for myself in the face

of tremendous social pressure to hate my body. I want to feel that my body is beautiful. I know that because my body is fat, many people will find it ugly, and think that I am lazy, stupid, unhealthy and a burden on the country. I am suspicious of the category of beauty, because as a feminist I know that it has been a tool of oppression; yet when I look at my body to draw it, I feel liberated and powerful because I see beauty in the folds of my skin, the soft volume of my flesh, the pale stripes of stretch marks as they run over my hips and belly. I try to create the positive representation of fat women that I have such trouble finding in the world. Initially I sought to subvert the painful mind/body split I felt through self-portraiture. I eschewed mirrors, and drew my body as I saw it when I glanced down. Through this process I found that my flesh was beautiful. I closed my eyes, breathed deeply, touched my body and then touched clay. I made bread in the shape of my belly and fed it to my friends. And finally I pressed my body against a copper plate, printed the texture of my skin on handmade paper and on fabric, and made abstract images that bulged, excessive, overflowing. The problem of embodiment—the persistence of the mind/body split in our thinking, language and culture—is not solely a fat people problem: everyone suffers from it. My art practice is my attempt at reconciliation: my search not just for acceptance or self-love but for wholeness. See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, TLAD-04, GLASS-03, CER-03, DM-04, INTAR-14, LDAR-13, PAINT-06, SCULP-01

Cody Henrichs I am in search of a connection—to The Void, to the past, to the future—for some way to link the dots of the ever-changing experiential landscape. In this way, even my largest sculptures serve as miniatures, playing out content well beyond their modest size. Precarious, and often cryptic, my objects, films, and paintings act as

PRINT


vehicles for my narrative investigations into masculinity, abandonment, nature, co-dependency, sexual desire, power, speed, love and loss. My sculpture is both a physical and conceptual structure, through which I can attempt to address these less controllable forces. This small semblance of control over such complexities proffers my work a real functionality within my life. Having designated my work as a space to address the chaos, I can see the subtle poetry of my life with more clarity.

on and off at unknown intervals like a Cheshire cat smile. See Also ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, PAINT-07, FURN-05

SCULP-04

“It has been pointed out that the abandonment of the myth was due to the development of, and new emphasis upon, the individual and individuality. Today, by contrast, our economic life and the development of our social responsibilities in an unindividualistic and communal sense have formed the proper conditions for the evolvement of such a myth. Further, the cult of materialism—which has been adopted in one way or another in many parts of the world—is a substantial basis for the evolution of symbols which could bring to life, in terms of pictorial symbols, human interaction in relation to this new myth.” —Mark Rothko

See Also INTAR-20, PAINT-01, GRAPH-04, ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PRINT-05

SCULP-02

Anna Huemmer I reconstruct remembered terrain. Often calling on every day objects I reconfigure cultural iconography through, sculpture, photography, and kinetics. My colorful kinetic installations are derived from nature and respond to the built environment. Investigating the space between our memories and our physical world the work oscillates between object and imagined. Evaluating context, site and audience are key components to the success of the temporal pieces. In conversation with an Internet audience appropriated images are reinserted objects into back into the network to be shared and consumed. The work defies conventional expectations and forces a reaction from the viewer.

See Also ARCH-19

SCULP-05

See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, INTAR-07, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04

Julie Kumar Systems are illuminated from within, playing to invisible music by turning

Quintín Rivera Toro I utilize myself as a case study with the premise that any reactions I have to social events, psychological or physical, affect my behavior as an everyday citizen, therefore possibly describing mass behavior. The work ends up being biographical as a means to highlight or criticize social manifestations. The vocabulary utilized is mostly concept based, and depending on the questions it proposes, it formally adapts to its most appropriate medium.

See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-06, PRINT-09, GRAPH-16, CER-05, DM-02, FURN-01, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05

SCULP-03

Bayne Peterson

TLAD-01

Rachel Branham See Also FURN-02

SCULP


TLAD-02

Ruthie Scarpino

TLAD-04

Nicole Van Slyke

Imagination in its pure form is not In the past I have studied and worked communication. Alone, it is simply a solely in the field of digital media. While vehicle for ideas to morph, develop I enjoyed, and still do enjoy, the process and explore the unknown. Only when of creating digital media, I find fulfillment imagination is joined with creativity do and purpose in youth development work. we find a relationship between imagination Giving teens the tools to express their and communication. While I believe in voices provides them the opportunity to the relationship between art, creation communicate and question themselves and and imagination I also feel that knowing society freely. By helping youth share their how to access it is imperative to using stories through art I hope to empower it. Imagination is not a hibernating bear, them with the confidence to be active lying dormant for the winter. It is always and engaged community members. As an present, and we as humans choose to listen artist I am constantly searching for ways to it or ignore it. Many educators choose to create, contribute and connect with my not to utilize imagination in the classroom own community through digital art. because they fear they are unable to See Also ARCH-08, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, control it. Controlling imagination is not ID-03, JM-03, GLASS-01, INTAR-20, LDAR-05, an option; it is a force of nature. PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05 Rodari once said that “a stone thrown into a pond sets in motion concentric waves, just like imagination.” For a TEXT-01 Maggie Barber moment, suspend your logical mind. The rock thrown into the pond is your “Our main difference from chimps and imagination and the waves that come from gorillas is that over the last three million it are the many communicative forms that years or so, we have been shaped less and imagination takes. Play, art, performance less by nature, and more and more by etc. … are all ripples on the surface caused culture. We have become experimental from asking questions, playing games and creatures of our own making. If we fail— problem solving. They all mandate the if we blow up or degrade the biosphere to need for the believing game, because once the point at which it can no longer sustain you stop believing you stop imagining. us—nature will merely shrug and conclude that letting apes run the laboratory was See Also ARCH-29 fun for a while but, in the end, a bad idea.” —Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

TLAD-03

Rohini Sen

“Creativity is a way of seeing and feeling things as they compose an integral whole. It is the large and general blending of interests at the point where the mind comes in contact with the world. When old and familiar things are made new in experience, there is imagination.” —John Dewey, Art as Experience See Also ARCH-07, ARCH-25, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, ID-04, DM-08, INTAR-26, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-03

See Also JM-06

TEXT-02

Agustina Bello-Decurnex Tonight they wake up from the grayscale— gray like the streets of Montevideo and the long cold humid winter without sun, numb and without emotion—from the dreariness of their routine. Now the streets are flooded with riotous colors, inundated with every shade and every hue. For tonight there are no pharmacists, bankers or plumbers, only performers in Momo’s kingdom.

TLAD, TEXT


Glitter, makeup and feathers cover their bodies, layers of magic unbinding their souls. Glitter to shine and sparkle, makeup to reveal their true face, and feathers to rise above. Their mundane mask is forgotten. See Also ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-05, ID-02, INTAR-23, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TLAD-03

TEXT-03

Jessica Bourque

While growing up, I have vehemently rebelled against customs and traditions. The explorations in my work at risd have brought me to the realization that though I may have denied these marks of identification, some of them are inherent and reside in my subconscious; for example, the way I respond to space, color, form, food and smells. I am re-discovering the very associations that my community identifies with. I chose to work with my ancestral home as my inspiration and guide. It is a 300-years-old haveli (courtyard house) and was built in a specific style of architecture that belongs to that region. The haveli is not just a house but rather a structure that embodies culture, tradition, values, status, prestige, celebrations and festivals, demanding that the people living in it be of a certain status and stature in the society.

There is a compelling relationship between the over-accumulation of stuff at a flea market (and eventually a landfill) and the personal order of our own curated collections, carefully arranged and placed within our home space. I empathize with the lost and forgotten, anticipating the chaotic nature of their displacement from See Also INTAR-20 which I may provide resurrection. Chance and possibility provoke me, fueling my hunt for the ephemeral, fleeting object that TEXT-05 Chase Taylor quietly occupies the space between the Once a space passes into the realm of present and the past. memory, it becomes an animate object. In my work, I seek to explore the It starts to breathe; it has a pulse. All at relationship between consumption, colleconce it becomes the embodiment of an era, tion and the space occurring between evocative of a feeling, a capsule of history. anxiety and desire. A play is present Once this threshold of memory is crossed, between the eagerness we have to accuthese houses no longer belong to the world mulate and the anxieties that develop of walls and structure, but begin to earn when our consumption gets out of control. the right to foundation and home. They These juxtaposed and seemingly opposite are an intrinsic part in the formation of emotions begin to overlap and inform each person’s identity, whether it be the each other. This body of work acts as a place you came from, escaped from, or vehicle to further evaluate the role of the never left. But much like a person grows up consumer in its societal context, as well and evolves, a space does too. It will never as to facilitate the navigation of a balance again be the way you remember it. It has between my personal relationship with grown, matured and evolved along with, consumption and collection. and separate from, you. See Also ARCH-28, GRAPH-14, ID-05, See Also GRAPH-03 INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, DM-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, TLAD-03

TEXT-04

Suruchi Kabra I have been trying to place myself within the realm in which I belong and investigate my experiences outside of that realm.

TEXT


TEXT-06

Sarah Wertzberger “The earth was warm under me, and warm as I crumbled it through my fingers... I kept as still as I could. Nothing happened. I did not expect anything to happen. I was something that lay under the sun and felt it, like the pumpkins, and I did not want to be anything more. I was entirely happy. Perhaps we feel like that when we die and become a part of something entire, whether it is sun and air, or goodness and knowledge. At any rate, that is happiness; to be dissolved into something complete and great. When it comes to one, it comes as naturally as sleep.� —Willa Cather, My Antonia See Also LDAR-09

TEXT


Title Author

Reading List


reading list


507 Mechanical Movements: Mechanisms and Devices Henry T. Brown A Collection of Posthumous Works Tetsuya Ishida A Hero of Our Time Mikhail Lermontov A Moveable Feast Ernest Hemingway A Selection of Snapshots Taken Felix Gonzalez-Torres A Whole New Mind Daniel Pink After: Poems Jane Hirshfield All the King’s Men Robert Penn Warren American Prospects Joel Sternfeld An Artist of the Floating World Kazuo Ishiguro ­Angels and Demons Dan Brown Angle of Yaw Ben Lerner Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy Architecture Without Architects Bernard Rudofsk ­Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression Jacques Derrida Art as Experience John Dewey Art of Memory Frances Yates Art Since 1900 Benjamin H. D. Buchloh Atmospheres Peter Zumthor reading list


Basics Fashion Design 06 J. Sissons and A. Beardsley Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success Matthew Syed Bound for Glory Woody Guthrie Breakfast at Tiffany’s Truman Capote Building Construction Illustrated Francis D.K. Ching Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers A. Osterwalder and Y. Pigneur Cat’s Cradle Kurt Vonnegut Charley Harper Todd Oldham City of White Donkeys James Tate Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess Collected Fictions Jorges Luis Borges Comeback Cities N. van Boom and H. Mommaas Company Max Barry Confederacy of Dunces John Kennedy Toole Corporate Wasteland: The Landscape and Memory of Deindustrialization S. High and D.W. Lewis Creative Evolution Henri Bergson reading list


Crying of Lot 49 Thomas Pynchon Imprint: Works 1975–2007 Daniel Eatock Delirious New York Rem Koolhaas Demian Hermann Hesse Design for Others 90% Cynthia E. Smith Design For The Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change Victor Papanek Designing Media Bill Moggridge Devil in the White City

Erik Larson

Dharma Bums Jack Kerouac Discourse of Lovers Roland Barthes DIY Guide To Home Improvement Gadamer Doctor Zhivago Boris Pasternak Dokument Stockholm: staden i tusen bilder Jeppe Wikström Don Quijote Miguel de Cervantes y Saavedra Double Game Sophie Calle Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep David K. Randall Ecce Homo Friedrich Nietzsche reading list


Ecological Urbanism M. Mostafavi and G. Doherty Empire M. Hardt and A. Negr Ender’s Game Orson Scott Card Etiquette Emily Pos Even Cowgirls Get the Blues Tom Robbins Evergreen Belva Plain Eyes of the Skin Juhani Pallasmaa Face Au Mur: Papiers Peints Contemporains Cesare Battisti Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury Fear and Trembling Amelie Nothomb Ficciones Jorge Luis Borges Fields of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant Annie Somerville Final de Juego Julio Cortazar Folding Architecture Sophia Vyzoviti Frankenstein Mary Shelley Freedom Jonathan Franzen fuse 1 N. Brody and J. Wozencroft Gates of Fire Steven Pressfield reading list


Go, Dog, Go! P.D. Eastman God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater Kurt Vonnegut Goodnight Moon Margaret Wise Brown Hadashi No Gen Keiji Nakazawa Hatchet Gary Paulsen Herzog Saul Bellow Hidden Dimension Edward T. Hall Historia General de Puerto Rico Fernando Pica Homo Aestheticus Ellen Dissanayake Hopscotch Julio Cortazar House of the Spirits Isabel Allende Howl Allen Ginsberg Imagining the House Wang Shu In & Out of Amsterdam P. van den Bossche, C. Chaffee and C. Cherix In Praise of Shadows Jorge Luis Borges In Search of Duende Frederico Garcia Lorca In Search of Lost Time Marcel Proust Innenwelt Beatrice Minda Inside/Outside Petra Blaisse Invisible Cities Italo Calvino reading list


Jesus’s Son Denis Johnson Jewel Book: International Annual of Contemporary Jewel Art Jaak van Damme Just Kids Patti Smith Kafka on the Shore Haruki Murakami Manufactured Sites: Rethinking the Post-Industrial Landscape Niall Kirkwood La Celestina Fernando de Rojas La Vida es Sueño Pedro Calderón de la Barca Landscape: Pattern, Perception, & Process Simon Bell Last Evenings on Earth Roberto Bolano Learning to Love You More M. July and H. Fletcher Leon Ferrari & Mira Schendel: Tangled Alphabets A. Giunta and L. Perez-Oramas Letters to a Young Poet Rainer Maria Rilke Life Without Objects Superstudio Light on the Prairie Nancy Plain Lines: A Brief History Tim Ingold Lord of the Flies William Golding Louise Bourgeois F. Morris and M. L. Bernadac reading list


Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes R. Andrews and J. Beardsley Meditations Marcus Aurelius Memory (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art) Ian Farr Metaphors We Live By G. Lakoff and M. Johnson Mi Planta Naranja Lima Jose Mauro De Vasconcelos Moby Dick Herman Melville Mourning Diary Roland Barthes Mr. Vertigo Paul Auster My Antonia Willa Cather Neuromancer William Gibson Never Let Me Go Kazuo Ishiguro Never Talk to Strangers Irma Joyce Non-Adhesive Binding Keith Smit Norwegian Wood Haruki Murakami Of Human Bondage W. Somerset Maugham Oh, The Places You’ll Go! Dr. Suess On Jewelery Liesbeth den Besten On the Road

Jack Kerouac

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Ken Kesey reading list


One Hundred Years of Solitude Gabriel Garcia Marquez Ordinary People Judith Guest Other People’s Children Lisa Delpit Over and Over: A Catalogue of Hand-Drawn Patterns Mike Perry Pastoralia George Saunders Pedagogies of Uplift Dr. Laura Fisher Poetics of Space Gaston Bachelard Point Omega Don DeLillio Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen

Printed Matter Karel Martens Process: A Tomato Project Steve Baker Rabelais and His World Mikhail Bakhtin Remainder Paul McCarthy Return to the City of White Donkeys James Tate Rite of Passage Arnold Van Gennep Rock Climbing New England Stewart M. Green Ruins Brian Dillon Savage Beauty Alexander McQueen Self-Help Loorie Moore reading list


Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972 Lucy Lippard S,M,L,XL R. Koolhaas and B. Mau Someplace Like Home Toby Israel Something To Put Something On

Lawrence Weiner

Sphere Michael Crichton Spinky Sulks William Steig Sticky Sublime Bill Beckley Tadao Ando: Complete Works 1975–2012 Philip Jodidio Textures of Place: Exploring Humanist Geographies P. C. Adams, S. Hoelscher, and K. Till The Alchemist Paulo Coelho The Art of Looking Sideways Alan Fletcher The Atlas of Novel Tectonics J. Reiser and N. Umemoto The Broom of the System David Foster Wallace The Chair: Rethinking Culture, Body, and Design Galen Cranz The Charter of Zurich Furio Barzon The Cid

Pierre Corneille

The Collected Poems W.B. Yeats reading list


The Complete Fairy Tales Charles Perrault The Complete Works William Shakespeare The Fabric Works Louise Bourgeois The Fat Booty of Madness Florian Hufnagl The Flat World and Education Linda Darling-Hammond The Fountainhead Ayn Rand The Grammar of Fantasy Gianni Rodari The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald The Hobbit J.R.R Tolkien The Jungle Books Rudyard Kipling The Little Prince Antoine de Saint-Exupery The Maharam Agenda Michael Maharam The Map as Art Katherine Harmon The Martian Chronicles Ray Bradbury The Medium is the Massage Marshall McLuhan The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint Brady Udall The Old Man and The Sea Errnest Hemingway The Original Boy’s Handy Book Daniel Carter Beard The Outsiders S.E. Hinton reading list


The Painted Bird Jerzy Kosisk The Penland Book of Jewelry Marthe Le Van The Phantom Tollbooth N. Juster and J. Feiffer The Place We Live Robert Adams The Power of One Bryce Courtenay The Practice of Everyday Life Michel de Certeau The Rest is Noise Alex Ross The Rings of Saturn W.G. Sebald The Road Cormac McCarthy The Sagas of Icelanders R. Kellogg and J. Smiley The Spell of the Sensuous David Abram The Sublime Simon Morley The Truth in Painting

Jacques Derrida

The Unknown American Revolution Gary B. Nash The Wreck of the Zephyr Chris van Allsburg The Year of Magical Thinking Joan Didion Theory of Objects Jean Baudrillard There’s a Wocket in My Pocket Dr. Seuss Things Georges Perec Thinking Architecture Peter Zumthor reading list


Thinking Fast and Slow Daniel Kahneman Thinking in Place: Art, Action, and Cultural Production Carol Becker This Book Will Save Your Life A. M. Homes This is San Francisco Miroslav Sasek This Matter of Culture J. Krishnamurti Toda Mafalda Quino J. Davis Quino Towards a New Architecture Le Corbusier Tree Houses: Fairy Tale Castles in the Air

Philip Jodidio

Truth and Method, Follies Hans-Georg Gadamer Type, Image, Message N. Skolos and T. Wedell Unmonumental: The Object in the 21st Century L. Hoptman, R. Flood, M. Gioni, and T. Smith Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga W. F. Fitzhugh and E. Ward Walking Dead, Issue #1 Robert Kirkman Water Takehiko Inoue Watership Down Richard Adams What I Think About When I Think About Running Haruki Murakami What It Is Lynda Barry reading list


Where the Red Fern Grows Wilson Rawls White Kenya Hara White Garden Bernard Voita Woman in the Dunes Kobo Abe World War Z Max Brooks

reading list


Project Description

Projects

Project Name Materials, Dimensions



See Also DEPT-01

DEPT-01


An understanding of place through the act of drawing (both field sketching and measured analytical drawings) gives way to an abstract set of place-specific architectural conditions. A new order is then created by imposing these architectural conditions (or set of abstractions) on a site, in a way that exposes latent potentials of the existing conditions. — Jeana Antle

Space for painting Watercolor, sumi ink; 14 in x 20 in

See Also TLAD-02

ARCH-01


This tower stitches the city, nature and urban livelihoods into cohesion. The proposal utilizes offset floor plates, shared green space and an active structural skin to allow residents to connect with the outdoors and with one another. — Royce Bixby

Residential Tower Concept Model Wood, paper, moss; 3 in x 3 in x 36 in

See Also INTAR-04, DM-04, FURN-05, LDAR-11, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, LDAR-13,INTAR-27, INTAR-04, FURN-01

ARCH-02


The urban visions executed during the mid-1800s in efforts to bring crowded, failing cities into the modern era offer a glimpse into the hyper-contextual. These designed systems generated physical and metaphysical conditions which have, over time, come to describe the very places in which they intervened. They are images that have stood the tests of time, finding their roots in ideologies motivated by past events. Consider the fabrics of Paris, Barcelona and New York. — Jim Bogle

hyper-context Digital print; three 10 in x 7 in

See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03, LDAR-03

ARCH-03


This work deals with reconnecting a group, the First Nations, who have had their sense of community forcibly removed, depriving them of any notion of power, belonging, and interconnectedness. The project investigates the cultural traditions of the First Nations in order create an infrastructure of connection, and to return some semblance of agency lost by these disparate communities. The project works at two scales: (1) the scale of the territory examining viable scenarios for reconnecting communities of Northern Ontario, and (2) that of the individual through adaptable housing typology. The larger scale of the project aims to reconnect communities, while the more intimate scale aims to reestablish communal practices that are struggling to survive. The project aims to create a culturally relevant conversation as the basis of change. Through this culturally driven architecture, I believe these communities will be able to reconnect with and regain some of what they have lost. While architecture will not solve all the issues facing these communities, it can provide a push to move the conversation forward. — Ben Crocker

Reconnecting the North: Architecture and the First Nations Rhino, Photoshop; 32 in x 32 in

See Also GRAPH-02, GRAPH-14, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, PHOTO-01

ARCH-04


Narratives, places and sites construct variations of reality that are shared through physicality. Conceptual, cultural and societal placement mirror physical placement, and they define our world by creating tension between poles of mental and physical states. Bound by this opposition, mental/ physical sites present opportunities for the regularity of life to be defined and illuminated. This piece instigates the construction of conceptual space by allowing the user to experience multiple scales. — Maxwell Dehne

3 Weeks Found objects, plaster, wood, maps; 15 boxes

See Also PRINT-02, DM-06, GRAPH-05, ID-02, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

ARCH-05


Studying the relationship between traditional and modern building paradigms in India, I am exploring the possibility for an expanded role of Vaastu Shaastra, an ancient architectural code that defined the South Asian vernacular. Through formal, thematic and contextual lenses, I will test the potential of Vaastu Shaastra to coexist with the contemporary environment. — Alexander Diaz

Vaastu Denatured Pencil, paper; 30 in x 22 in

See Also DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, INTAR-28, CER-05, GLASS-03

ARCH-06


Buildings want to move. We should let them. This thesis seeks to develop an architecture that builds around the tension between the static and the dynamic. The investigation studies movement through the structure of a ballet studio located on Hope Street in Providence. — Brett Dunnam

The Architecture of Movement Rhino, Illustrator, Photoshop; 36 in x 50 in

See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, ID-03, PHOTO-05, TLAD-03, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, INTAR-14

ARCH-07


How do we challenge the passage of time and the inevitable demise and loneliness of old age? How do we create a network of density in dwelling that transcends the passage of time and challenges old age? — Margaux Fischer

density Digital photograph, wood, museum board, thread; 9 in x 9 in x 6 in

See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-06, INTAR-08, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

ARCH-08


This map is an overlaid illustration of all the nations of Europe, beginning with the largest and ending with the smallest. By changing the countries’ opacity, they form a density that is defined not by one but by all of the European nations, thus softening and permeating the boundaries that exist today. — Carlos Gamez

Borders Boundaries & Barriers Illustrator; 8.5 in x 11 in

See Also TEXT-06

ARCH-09


My watercolor painting is a method of investigating both the visible spatial conditions of Oaxaca City and its hidden social narratives. This piece was completed at a terminus of the obsolete San Felipe Aqueduct, which served as a point of departure for a thesis proposal addressing the city’s water accessibility concerns. — Elias Gardner

8 Enero 2013, Oaxaca Ink, graphite, watercolor, gesso; 8 in x 10 in

See Also INTAR-17, GLASS-01, ID-04, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-03, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

ARCH-10


Scaffolding and construction sites litter New York City sidewalks. While they may be considered eyesores, they have come to be a familiar part of New Yorkers’ everyday routine. Due to city laws, many sidewalk sheds are assembled prematurely and sit under vacant construction sites, making them inactive and safe to utilize. My proposals explore the integration of functionality and the user experience using existing scaffolding. These designs are not limited to temporary interventions; they could also be mobile, allowing them to configure into other sites or to be developed into independent structures. I see this not only changing the way people interact with their streets but also as a way to enrich the local area. The user is typically unaware of the building’s construction timeline, creating a sense of ambiguity within the work. — Melissa Hauser

Habit: Disrupting the Urban Fabric Digital rendering, graphite; 11 ft x 17 ft

See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PRINT-09, SCULP-03

ARCH-11


Standing on the surface of Earth, we spin. A pendulum, its path constrained only by gravity, does not. We know we move when we look down and see the pendulum trace the ground. A child in her cradle, constrained to sway back and forth by the rockers that hold her, spins with the Earth. — Loren Howard

Construction of a Cradle Silver point, titanium, paper; 5 in x 7 in

See Also TLAD-01

ARCH-12


— Xinying Huang

Garden of Forking Paths Chipboard, plexiglass, mirror; 14 ft x 14 ft x 14 ft

See Also SCULP-04

ARCH-13


A threshold often delineates both the end of the external world and the beginning of the internal. The depth of this threshold is dependent upon duration; the time in which we inhabit the space between the frames. This thesis is an exploration of the frame, as a formal articulation of threshold and the reciprocal relationships it manifests. — Beau Johnson

Step into the frame Intaglio drypoint, bfk; 10 in x 22 in

See Also GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, TEXT-05, TLAD-03, DM-06

ARCH-14


In recent years, we have become detached from our immediate surroundings. The development of communication technology encourages us to disengage from our physical world. I am specifically interested in this displacement’s effect in the context of the home. This thesis explores the importance of sense of place to our mental and emotional well-being in the midst of a vast cultural shift due to the integration of communication technology into our daily lives. It demonstrates how fragments of memory can be layered to draw relationships between the past and present, self and space, memory and experience, architecture and nature. This is a home of memories. It is a space that draws from the senses and emits a sense of origin— offering a sense of place by drawing from the past, laminating memory with the present. Through my work I try to enhance the experience of place through a discovery of universal qualities that lead to satisfaction in space: color, form and texture. I use the continuous ebb and flow of memory and perception as a way to inform creation. I search to find the point where material and space hits its natural frequency and resonates. When the creak of a heavy oak door supersedes its sound and becomes home. — Lissy King

Tiles of Home Wood, paper, charcoal, ink; 12 ft x 1 ft

See Also PRINT-08

ARCH-15


My work is a utopian revisualization of how our city centers might feel alive again. This revisualization integrates architectural form in the American city-center that is socially anti-hierarchical, programmatically non-compartmentalized and spatially dense. With this, I evaluate the possibilities of height to generate dense multi-class residential areas amidst other programmatic dependencies in ways that provide for new relationships between people and the built environment of the city. — Kyle Kiser

The Proximal Metropolis Mixed media collage; 8 ft x 3 ft, 2 ft x 10 ft

See Also ID-04, INTAR-18, INTAR-32, LDAR-04, LDAR-11

ARCH-16


This thesis began by critiquing the 2007 implosion of the Stardust Hotel in Las Vegas. The demolition of this large urban artifact, a common procedure prior to the recent economic crisis, discarded the existing structure in favor of a new form. Its successor, an indefinitely unfinished casino-hotel, monumentalized a prerecession development craze. This proposal accepts the construction site as-is and reinterprets the unfinished structure into a regionally appropriate public complex. — Daniel Laster

The Infrastructure of Memory Digital collage; 1920 px x 795 px

See Also DM-09, INTAR-29, LDAR-12, GRAPH-04, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, JM-04, FURN-05

ARCH-17


2012 Fall Architecture Degree Project Board, Wooden frame — Dongseop Lee

Inescapable Space Wood; 20 in x 50 in

See Also TEXT-01

ARCH-18


The building breathes to let out exhaust, and to let in light. This model expresses my intention to animate space, perhaps allowing space to alter itself over time. Responding to site conditions or user preferences, the building is a conversation we have with its material. It can be as big as a mountain or as small as a coat. Establishing the dialog between building physiology and human psychology is the highest aim of an improvisational architecture. — John McCampbell

Improvisational Architecture Museum board, wood; 12 in x 8 in

See Also TEXT-05

ARCH-19


In my work I respond to themes of natural and man-made forms and systems, as well as violence and disaster. This project is a building that exists only because of its site. Its purpose is to provide access both physically and in terms of ecological and historical knowledge. The site is the former Naval Weapons Station in Concord, California which is slated to become a park. The image shown is a mapping exercise looking at marks on the land and exploring ways of representing and framing them. — Jacob Miller

Aerial View of Two Sites Superimposed Pencil; 18 in x 24 in

See Also PRINT-01, GRAPH-18, GRAPH-07, GRAPH-08, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

ARCH-20


A theater for the play in which the Architect is revealed to be the Minotaur. — Nicholas Walker Moore

Ariadne’s thread is water Nikon dslr 3200 camera, Behr “Gamma Sector Green” paint, canvas dropcloth, Pawtucket Falls, Narragansett Electric Building; nine-minute video (still)

See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, GLASS-01, INTAR-07, SCULP-05

ARCH-21


[media]ting architecture is an architectural thesis that explores the relationship between the body, the environment and new media technology. In today’s society, architecture can no longer exist as a static force. Architects must consider the technological effects of our perception of the world. By using new media as a tool to generate architecture, I intend to design spaces that interact with people and reconnect them with the physical environment. Although these tools rely on computation, they are not limited to the algorithm; advances in smart materials and embedded electronics propose an architecture that is dynamic and responsive to human sensor stimuli. — Camila A. Morales

[media]ting architecture Gypsum board, custom interactive led panel, Simpson strong ties; 32 in x 4 in x 116 in

See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, TLAD-04, FURN-01

ARCH-22


“I owe you the truth in painting and I will tell it to you.” —addressed to Émile Barnard, signed Paul Cézanne, October 23, 1905 — J. Harley Nalley

Dream Xerox: Memory, time, and architecture Cyanotype, kitakata paper, Canson Infinity paper, resin, wood, duct tape, screws; 30 in x 14 in x 4 in

See Also DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05

ARCH-23


A city within my imagination, derived from the conditions of an ever growing capital, Quito. — Marisa Paz

Counteracting Quito Bristol board, drafting pencil, watercolor paper; 36 in x 24 in x 2 in

See Also FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, INTAR-28, ID-05, JM-06, PAINT-07

ARCH-24


This shelter offers a physical experience with the land behind my home in rural New Hampshire. I happened upon this ideal location by chance, in a stream valley where the surrounding hemlock trees provided excellent building material. After collecting material and building there, I know the area intimately. It is more than just the woods; it has become place, experience and memory. I hope others happen upon the site and make their own stories about it. — Christopher Ross

Shelter in the Valley Hemlock tree branches, boughs, trunk; 4 ft x 23 ft x 4 ft

See Also FURN-06, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, TLAD-04

ARCH-25


In my initial thesis exploration, I analyzed a deteriorated site and exploited its negative space caused by material degeneration to create new grids and orders. — Andrew Salter

Re-ordered Hierarchies 3d model, photo collage; 12.5 in x 12.8 in

See Also TEXT-03, PRINT-02, GRAPH-11, FURN-05, LDAR-11, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, JM-04, GRAPH-12, INTAR-01

ARCH-26


The cantilever shelf was developed via the physical manipulation of oak pieces reclaimed from old shipping pallets. The existing notches in the wood, which allow a forklift to get under the pallet, were exploited in order to pinch both the cross pieces and the shelf platforms. This assembly method created an unusual condition where by the act of loading the assembly caused it to become more stable and to pinch the pieces more firmly. — Karl Sippel

Cantilever Shelf Red oak from reclaimed shipping pallets, zinc plated hardware; 6 in x 36 in x 42 in

See Also DM-07

ARCH-27


A cloak that, when deployed in public spaces, establishes personal space within its context. — Julie Sylvester

Shield of Space Window screen mesh; nine-minute motion piece (still)

See Also GRAPH-02, GRAPH-14, INTAR-01, ID-05, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03

ARCH-28


Through the act of drawing, I attempt to understand the body and the supplemental constructions that augment it simultaneously. Pinned to the wall at the shoulder, my arm draws as far out and as far in as it can. The gaze of my eyes is recorded as they unconsciously shift. A sphere at my shoulder, rotating with my movement, is inscribed with that motion. The line on that sphere is later printed in an intaglio process and is also unrolled through drafting. — Burgess Voshell

Eye Shoulder Arm Wood, felt, nylon, brass, aluminum, steel, paper, ink, camera, infrared led; 5 ft x 8 ft

See Also PRINT-09

ARCH-29


288 Paintings of the Mountain and the River is a book of woodcut prints made from two blocks of birch plywood: one with vertical grain resembling a mountain, and one with horizontal grain resembling a river. The book requires two motions to read: western and eastern. It bulges to accommodate the thickness of the images, as mountains and rivers change shape to accommodate each other. — Eugenia Yu

288 Paintings of the Mountain and the River Woodcut prints: sumi ink, kozo paper; Pages: chine-collĂŠ, Rives bfk; Book: binders board, book cloth, linen tape, thread, pvc glue; 11 in x 11 in x 7.5 in

See Also FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, GRAPH-16, ID-02, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, PAINT-01

ARCH-30


It’s a precarious world. You need to prepare for any scenario. I am attempting to equip my home and myself with a range of life saving objects. — Bjorg Hardardottir

Personal safety series: Flotation device Porcelain, hemp rope; 70 in x 15 in

See Also TEXT-04

CER-01


Ambiguous emotions occur when individuals experience mental conflict. Emotions are revealed through the motion of figure, forms and color. Visual enjoyment follows. — Ahrong Kim

The Moment Between A and B Dark clay, porcelain, underglazes, glazes, luster, decal; 8 ft x 9 ft x 14.5 in

See Also PHOTO-03

CER-02


This piece started with an idea about political prisoners and people who were killed because of their belief. It turned out to be about humanity. It consists of tiles inspired by ancient Persian charms, composed of numbers and letters in Farsi. I wanted to show the diversity of humanity, and at the same time show the unity of humanity: all humans are the same, and all of them are different. Mirrors, tiles, the grids of the tiles and arch, and the viewer’s broken mirror image express diversity. Yet all in one, it’s all one. Tiles are made of stoneware with low fire glaze and while the arch is made of high fire stone ware and glaze. — Hosseinali Saheb Ekhtiari

Unity in Diversity, Diversity in Unity High fire clay, low and high fire glaze; 120 in x 66 in x 80 in

See Also DM-01, GRAPH-10, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, ARCH-25, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05, SCULP-01

CER-03


I enjoy making installations in natural and artificial spaces. I work with both unfired and fired clay objects. I call my current work Little Bit Up. It involves repetition and process to create a quiet presence. My working title, Little Bit Up, becomes ironic in Nature, because the unfired clay melts down and flows into soil with wind, rain and snow. It is quick, fragile and gone. In artificial space, Little Bit Up, protected from the elements, rises from the ground, becoming desire and dreams of defying the natural forces of entropy and gravity. Of the four seasons, my work is spring. It is flower not fruit. A tender sprout can push a “little bit up” out of heavy clay in spring. Little Bit Up is like Elan Vital, the vital impetus suggested by Henri Bergson (1859-1941). I feel it was inherent with bright yellow, sunshine and warmth in my mind. I have wondered about the nature of art since I began to work on a painting that I finished in 2001. I explored this thought further with curiosity when I began studying ceramics in 2008. I asked “What is a work of art?” and “Who is the audience of a work that asks this question?” This is, in a way, a response to the work of Marcel Duchamp when he questioned the nature of art using ready-made objects. In this work, I use stuffed cartoon characters as a medium juxtaposed with cast ceramic objects. I hope the estrangement between everyday objects and ceramics will shake the audience’s preconceptions. I want them to wonder what is the difference between reality and fiction. After viewing Little Bit Up I hope a new perception will be created. Little Bit Up—I rise with the piling of my memories. Regenerated cartoon characters or animal toys are these memories. As I ascend, and memories accumulate, I reach forward in my life’s journey. — Hye Weon Shim

Little Bit Up Porcelain, earthenware, twigs; 7 ft (diameter)

See Also LDAR-16

CER-04


The shadow of a picnic table cast in plaster, removed from the site and installed with its painted image. My goal for this project was to capture a specific moment in time. Shadows have long interested me because they exist only in the presence of an object, light and human observation. They are the mirrors of time and the essence of memory. My desire to stop time in its tracks reflects the need to affirm my own existence and experience. — Kim Wimprine

2:30pm - Haines Memorial State Park Graphite, plaster, earth; 4.5 ft x 5 ft x 4 ft

See Also ARCH-06, ARCH-07, DM-04, DM-02, FURN-05, FURN-01, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13

CER-05


The Curtain is an experimental digital print and a sound-making project. It is the result of my attempt to create a new image- and sound-making process through crossover. Instead of using Photoshop to edit digital photographs, I used sound editing software to manipulate the them. — Namwoo Bae

The Curtain I Inkjet print; 60 in x 40 in

See Also CER-03, GRAPH-05, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, ARCH-22, ID-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

DM-01


In this collection of 16 videos, iPhones and iPads are recast as objects that they could never be due to their physical and material limitations. As these devices become the Swiss Army knives of an increasingly digitized world, My iPhone is Everything asks, What are we willing to believe technology can do? Can an iPad really grate cheese? — Liat Berdugo

My iPhone is Everything Video, iPad, Vermont extra sharp cheddar cheese; 16-video series (still)

See Also GLASS-03, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, ARCH-06, CER-05, FURN-05, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, PRINT-03, PAINT-05

DM-02


In this piece I lit a barbecue grill with my mind. Then I cooked a burger and ate it. I did this by hacking a board game headset that reads brainwaves, then using the readings to cause transistors to overheat thin copper wires wrapped around matches, which were buried under a pile of charcoal. I think the myth and expectations we attach to technology are more magical than the reality that produces it. This magical vision is surprisingly shortsighted and passive. It may provide an image or impetus for creation, but it does not create; it simply waits. We can see “magic” happen if we use the simplest and most logical route to our goal. I lit a fire with my brain. I did not stare really hard at something to do it. I used a sensor and a switch. — Ed Brown

Brain Burger Electroencephalogram (eeg) headset, microcontroller, electric matches, barbecue grill, ground chuck, hd video cameras; 44 ft 22 in two-channel synced video

See Also PRINT-04

DM-03


Big Blues Dumpster is the tragic conclusion of an iterative project about the obsolete carcass of an IBM computer I found at the CIT. The hollowed server—set on a blue pedestal representing both IBM and BSOD—is joined by a once state-ofthe art 15-inch IBM screen. It seems to be rendering an image ahead of its time, a forethought: The realtime 3D vision of itself, in a dumpster, behind a convenience store, near an empty park, close to a decommissioned bridge in the East Side of Rhode Island. It is enacted, not rendered, and through pity more than fear, it effects a catharsis. A tragedy indeed. — Cristobal Cea

Big Blues Dumpster ibm Server, ibm Monitor, wood, Unity 3; 5.5 ft x 5.5 ft x 6.2 ft, infinite loop.

See Also ARCH-06, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05

DM-04


High-resolution images of Cheetos are superimposed onto an instantly recognizable photograph of Arab-Israeli conflict in the Middle East. Privileging the giant snack foods and the suffering of the subjects equally, this piece embodies the absurdities that emerge when we become saturated with—and inured to­—exotic scenes of war and terror. Photo credits: Lisa Iaboni (Cheetos), Associated Press via Google image search — Lisa Iaboni

Cheetos Slam the Golan Heights Inkjet print; 36 in x 24 in

See Also PHOTO-04

DM-05


We live in a world of connections made by interactions with real people. Yet we spend increasing amounts of time on the Internet, creating a virtual world that relates to nearly everything we do in real life. We constantly engage and interact with each other through this virtual space, and current technology is such that we can virtually navigate real life streets and see what’s outside without having to actually go out and see. Virtual City is a visualization of the current topography of this virtual world called the World Wide Web. Using Google SketchUp Pro, Rhinoceros and 3D printing, virtualized real-life buildings were re-realized, then combined with the initial letters of major Internet sites. The heights of the individual buildings reflect on the estimated unique monthly visitors to the website that was combined with the building, thus creating an illustration of combined virtual and real world structures. Each structure sits on top of a key, where interaction between the virtual and the real world takes place. — Sang Un Jeon

Virtual City Apple keyboard, 3d printing; 4.5 in x 17 in x 4.5 in

See Also INTAR-26, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-02, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

DM-06


I was inspired by an occurrence in Shan Xi, China, where a family was forced to relocate its ancestral graves. Residential buildings had already been built around the graves in order to force them out, but the family refused to move. So the site became a “Nail Grave.” The people of my country experience repression, not only on a physical level, but also on a spiritual level. Unequal power gets applied to individuals by the government, as can be seen everywhere. A virtual island is located in the concrete city. It is full of vitality. Its soil is the human brain, and a variety of plants grow in it; the island is an amalgamation of creative thinking and individual wills. A video of Carnival represents the gravestone, suggesting that people should follow their hearts and beliefs. The cement ground and reinforced buildings allude the increasing strength of authority and systematic power. — Moke Li

Cuckoo Land cg animation; one-minute motion piece (looping)

See Also LDAR-08

DM-07


Mutation A-34 explores the future relationship between nature and technology, emerging as a hybrid between the two. The piece reflects just one of the many aspects I explored about that relationship, and delves into the merging of the synthetic with the natural. — Sophia Sobers

Mutation A-34 Plants, funnels, wire; 5 ft x 5 ft x 10 ft

See Also CER-05, GRAPH-10, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04 ARCH-05, ID-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

DM-08


This digital, mechanical, handmade marionette represents an historical figure of New England: Roger Williams, the founder of Providence. “Roger” the marionette dances in response to a recording of Providence city sounds, taken along the route from my apartment to RISD (during which I pass his iconic statue). It is a simple way to suggest the connection between Roger Williams, Providence and my personal life. We share the present moment with Roger via the energetic soundtrack of the city and the dance of this 400-year-old historic figure. — Di Tang

The Dance of Roger Williams Steel, wood, fishing line, stepper motor, Arduino; 16 in x 16 in x 19 in, five-minute kinetic (looping)

See Also ID-04, ARCH-05, GRAPH-16, ID-03, INTAR-32, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

DM-09


The Needles and Pins cabinet looks as though it is a sculpture, bound to the wall with dark metal lashings, never to be moved. As you slide your hand across it, however, parts begin to move. Two drawers slide out, lined in red felt—lust, temptation. For those who do not know the piece, a path of pins is all they will be able to take away from it. — Carley Eisenberg

Needles and Pins Fumed oak, patinated steel, red felt; 13 in x 7 in x 32 in

See Also ARCH-30, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-04, DM-02, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05

FURN-01


This is the first piece of the series Rethinking the Familiar, an exploration featuring mundane, often ignored household appliances. I distort their proportions and manipulate their materials to generate added value and create a new object that challenges the viewer’s expectations. Simplicity is a fundamental characteristic of the design. All parts are rethought and stripped down to their bare minimum. The propeller blades were designed to move air efficiently and silently. They are crafted by the layering and bending of ash veneer. The cage was reduced to a 28-inch diameter steel ring that holds the propeller, which appears to be floating on top of the base. Together with the wooden tripod, the fan reaches a total height of eight feet. — Marco Gallegos

Fan(c)Fan Powder coated steel, ash wood; 55 in x 55 in x 8 in

See Also PHOTO-01

FURN-02


“If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?” — Shakespeare — Adrianne Hee

Prick Pine, pegboard, canvas, steel, cork, paper, baking soda, red cabbage juice, balloons; 7 ft x 7 ft x 4 in

See Also PAINT-04

FURN-03


This chair started with two words from my brainstorming process: “plastic” and “easy.” The sitting surface is made out of one piece of polypropylene with six cuts, while two simple zip ties create and maintain the shape. — Chen Liu

Zip Chair Polypropylene; 24 in x 24 in x 36 in

See Also LDAR-11, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, ARCH-02, JM-04, GRAPH-12, INTAR-29, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-17, JM-02

FURN-04


The grid of a fishnet stocking, shaped over my up-turned hand held out in offering, becomes the surface for this coffee table. — Simon Lowe

Net Coffee Table Wenge; 54 in x 24 in x 15 in

See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, CER-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14

FURN-05


Walnut Window Wall is an exploration of two-dimensional tessellations and how they get expanded into the third dimension. They are meant to be situated in front of a window and adjusted to register different patterns of light throughout the day. Each day they mark both our desire for light and our desire to avoid it. They are a record of both environmental condi-tions and human interactions. — Elish Warlop

Walnut Window Wall Walnut, brass, steel; 4 ft x 10 ft

See Also ARCH-07, ARCH-24, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, TLAD-04, LDAR-05

FURN-06


Following the trace remains found in the floor of an old abandoned building, I projected vertical membrane-like walls of plastic that correspond to what might have once been a possible past architecture. The thinness of the material allows natural light to pass through the layered construction, creating ethereal inner rooms that subtly undulate as the visitor wanders through them. — Josefina Muùoz T.

Memory of this Place Plastic tarp, wire, staples; varies

See Also FURN-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, PRINT-10, ARCH-21, ID-04, INTAR-20, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

GLASS-01


The rotunda in this intimate space is filled with a pattern of light. Optical devices were used to focus the projection of casted lead crystal. — Jean Prominski

Celestial Openness Casted lead crystal, water, lenses, projected light; 14 ft x 14 ft

See Also DM-02, INTAR-02, INTAR-08, INTAR-10, INTAR-14, INTAR-19, INTAR-23, INTAR-29, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, CER-03

GLASS-02


In Mandala, I explore the materiality of glass as both liquid and solid. This piece is composed of leaf-like forms that are held in geometric order by being frozen in layers of ice. As the ice melts, so too does the pattern, dissolving into quiet chaos. — Emma Stein

Mandala Glass, ice; 36 in x 36 in x 5 in

See Also DM-02, INTAR-29, PHOTO-01, GRAPH-12, ARCH-07, CER-05, FURN-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, HAVC-01, PAINT-05, SCULP-01

GLASS-03


This poster is part of an identity system for the American Youth Circus Organization, a non-profit that promotes the participation of youth in circus arts. AYCO is the only US organization attempting to represent the circus sector as a whole, hosting national festivals and educator conferences. The design avoids patronizing stereotypes about circus as “birthday party” entertainment, focusing instead on the supportive learning environment necessary for kids to express artistic athleticism and emotional freedom. — Andy Chen

American Youth Circus Organization Print; 21.5 in x 32 in

See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-06, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-05, FURN-01, GLASS-03

GRAPH-01


Various book design projects from my time at RISD. — Justin Chen

Reading Material Paper; varies

See Also ARCH-26, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, DM-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

GRAPH-02


Ping Pong is a collaborative project that triggers visual responses from verbal questions and vice versa. Through these interactions we seek the creation of a dynamic community which prompts participants to raise questions regarding their everyday lives. By creating a system that perpetuates a continuous form of interaction and transformation, we observe the shifting meanings of visual and textual interpretation. A digital archive records each incarnation and acts as proof of the dynamic relationships, interactions, and transformations the project produces. Ping Pong Project is a participatory project initiated by Yejin Cho, Christopher Hamamoto and Jonathan Yamakami. — Yejin Cho

Ping Pong Project Silkscreen printing; 6 in x 4 in

See Also PAINT-05, ARCH-05, DM-01, ID-06, INTAR-01, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

GRAPH-03


The function of military disruption patterns is to conceal. This simple function led to my interpretation of military camouflage patterns as a metaphor for invisibility. Camouflage provides protection and unity during wartime, but it also signifies vulnerability and unfamiliarity during the return to civilian life. Soldier 1 visually describes the homecoming of an Iraq War veteran. A military camouflage print seamlessly transitions into a domestic floral pattern, blending the worlds of wartime and home life, illustrating their disparities within one unified form. Viewers may experience the transition fluidly from left to right or they may juxtapose pages out of order. The camouflage and the floral are one and the same, imparting invisibility in the form of safety as well as neglect. — Catherine Cieslewicz

Soldier 1 Paper, camouflage pattern, floral upholstery pattern; 80 in x 20 in (unfolded)

See Also ARCH-24, FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-04, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

GRAPH-04


This piece studies the mythic aspects of contemporary commercial products. The title Autopia is a combination of “automobile” and “utopia”. My research on the car branding conventions of the ten most popular American automobile companies highlighted that certain types of mythic values—human desire, fantasy, ideals and religious belief—surround our mundane consumer lifestyle. For example, many car names refer to specific places like tourist attractions and geographical features, such as the Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Canyon, Honda Ridgeline and Hyundai Santa Fe. Most of the locations are idealized places, associated with natural beauty. In Autopia, I substituted imagery of cars in mundane contexts with pictures of the idealized places referenced by their names. Reality is substituted with fantasy, and we discover our own desires, which are projected onto products. — Minsun Eo

Autopia Digital print, paper; 30 x 22 in

See Also ARCH-08, DM-09, ID-01, INTAR-26, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

GRAPH-05


This project used custom software to capture and compile every Google Streetview image between New York and San Francisco into a real-time video. Effectively reversing the timespace compression of the internet, this transit bisects and captures the essential nature of America and Americans. — Colin Frazer

I-80 Custom software, video; 43-hour 13-minute video (still)

See Also LDAR-05, DM-06, INTAR-26, LDAR-12

GRAPH-06


Data Atlas catalogs the topography of data centers around the world. Our records are going through a process of transformation, becoming immaterial to their beholders and assuming new materiality in vast digital repositories. By collecting the locations, energy use, structures and first-hand evidence about these data centers, Data Atlas aims to describe these emerging systems in a snapshot of the physical form of our digital records at this moment in time. — Christopher Hamamoto

Data Atlas Paper; 6.13 in x 9.21 in

See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

GRAPH-07


This print is one of a series of abstract digital collages that I made over the space of two months. The collages take the functional visual language of graphic design and re-present it as aesthetic form. In this, they are transformations—of function into decoration, work into play, industry into craft, public communication into personal expression. — Anther Kiley

Mr Inkjet print, paper; 6 in x 9 in

See Also DM-06, INTAR-26, ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

GRAPH-08


Seen and not Scene is an installation that facilitates the interaction between sites and people. Interactive texts are projected onto an abandoned site as abstract forms. Environmental sound activates the forms, turning them into legible text. — Min Ji Lee

Seen and not Scene Laptop, projector; n/a

See Also TEXT-02

GRAPH-09


The Secret Cipher uses Processing to transform a whispered confession into a unique, physical totem. Using a one-way encryption device, the secret is at once externalized and securely contained. The Secret Cipher gives the words we are afraid to confront a receptacle, whether we intend to reckon with them or let them go forever. Like other metaphors and symbols, the object sets up a concrete relationship that we can more readily comprehend. — Elisa Maezono

Secret Cipher Museum board, wire, thread; varies

See Also CER-03, DM-01, DM-08, INTAR-15, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, PRINT-09, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06

GRAPH-10


Interpretation of Beirut — Wael Morcos

Beirut Silkscreen print; 12 in x 16 in

See Also ARCH-02, ARCH-16, ARCH-04, ARCH-08, TEXT-03, PRINT-02, LDAR-03

GRAPH-11


This piece is a typographic experiment using an array of blinking LED lights and long-exposure photography. The text spelled out by the pattern is “God does not play dice,” the famous quote by Albert Einstein denouncing the ideas of quantum mechanics proponents regarding uncertainty. The aspect of certainty and uncertainty is portrayed through the legibility of the typography, as certain portions of the text are more legible than others. — Eugene Park

Einstein’s Dreams Arduino, leds, photography; 16 in x 11 in

See Also ARCH-08, FURN-06, ID-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, DM-06, ID-02, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PAINT-02, TEXT-02

GRAPH-12


These light bulbs create the word “bright” in Braille, a form of commuication read by touch. The concept of brightness is instantly reinforced for sighted people. The message is similarly reinforced for those who cannot see; the feeling of warmth they experience upon touching the word is associated with the warmth of sunshine. Seeing brightness and feeling warmth may be different perceptions, but they enable both the sighted and the unsighted to share the same experience. While sight dominates sighted people’s perceptual field, people with diminished sight perceive the world differently. They experience the world through their non-visual senses, and by so doing, they may perceive more than sighted persons do. By creating graphics that require the use of senses other than sight, we can encourage people to step closer and reconceive their perceptions. Along with the light bulb installation, two sentences are set in Braille and embossed writing. The first sentence reads, “Because I have to imagine what I cannot see, the world around me becomes even more bright and vivid,” followed by “Because I have to be very close to touch, every single moment becomes an intimate experience.” World Out Sight: 30 Conversations on the Unseen World—a book consisting of testimonials from blind and visually impaired people— is placed underneath the installation to encourage participants to empathize with blind people’s way of perceiving the world. — Jiwon Park

Please Touch Wood, acrylic, light bulb; Installation: 48 in x 15 in; Book: 6 in x 24 in

See Also LDAR-15

GRAPH-13


In The Knot, I compiled imagery from hundreds of amateur videos posted on YouTube by people all around the world going through the motions of knot tying. Knots are metaphors that simultaneously connote both secure unity and chaotic entanglement. The project ponders the complexities of cultural parallels and carries an encouraging spirit of interdependence. — Federico PÊrez Villoro

The Knot Printed paper, rubber bands; 6 in x 8 in

See Also ARCH-04, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, DM-09, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-01, TLAD-03, SCULP-02

GRAPH-14


“The whole landscape below is like a moving map of exquisite miniature workmanship. You have a bird's-eye view of it; literally, you see it as a bird sees it. The most familiar scenes almost instantaneously undergo a wonderful and puzzling change. There is no distinction between hill and valley. Below you is one broad tableland, streaked with the silver thread of rivers and streams; above you, a vast, shoreless expanse of blue. You are hung up somewhere in between, motionless, it seems, by an invisible thread.” —5,000 Miles in a Hot Air Balloon, Frank Hedges Butler, 1907 — Amanda Sim

away we go Digital print, laser cut heavyweight paper, vellum; 17 in x 22 in

See Also ARCH-26, DM-06, ID-03, INTAR-31, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

GRAPH-15


Abandonded Providence visually presents itself as a guidebook for tourists, while its content is a study of Providence’s cityscape and population. Through a variety of printed artifacts, the project juxtaposes photographs of unoccupied houses with data about homelessness, immigration and income, among other related subjects. The envelope enclosing the components is a folded map that states the houses’ locations. — Franziska Stetter

Abandoned Providence Paper; 5.7 in x 8 in

See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, INTAR-28, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

GRAPH-16


Stories originated from the following question: Is there something that you do on a regular basis which, even though part of your routine, carries a special meaning to you? If so, can you share that with me? The stories I received had nothing unusual or extravagant. Most of them revolved around moments spent at home, usually alone. Each spread of the book contains a line of the story and a photograph. One of the accounts led me to think about thread: the thread of narrative (and the commonality of all these narratives) and the thread used in rituals from different traditions. — Jonathan Yamakami

Stories Paper, thread; 140 mm x 140 mm

See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, INTAR-28, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

GRAPH-17


Edition of 2,500 double-sided postcards. — Raine Vasquez

Two Lovers (Cleopatra’s Needles) Offset lithography; 5 in x 8 in

See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, SCULP-03, DM-06, JM-03, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

HAVC-01


DTools (Damaging Tools) is a series of hammers with different patterns. They allow users to create rustic beauty and personalize mass-produced objects, like the stool in this project. The stool has two layers of coating on its seating surface: a thick inner layer of red paint, with an outer layer of plastic mixed with blue pigment. When hammered, the outer layer cracks off, allowing red-colored patterns to appear. — Chia-Ming Chang

DTools Plastic, paint, metal, wood; 4.3 in x 1.2 in x 13.6 in

See Also DM-08

ID-01


This piece is a task seating design that encourages movement in order to make sitting more fun and more active. It simultaneously relieves stress on the spine. — Rene Chen

Rethinking Task Seating Wood, metal, foam, fabric; 1.25 ft x 1.25 ft x 2 ft

See Also ARCH-06, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, DM-09, INTAR-02, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03

ID-02


Auxin, from the Greek for “to grow or increase” is a class of plant hormones that help direct growth and development. Auxin is distributed throughout the leaves as they develop. Veins grow toward this hormone, branching and combining to create the intricate web that we observe. I wrote a computer program in Processing that simulates this vein formation. The program randomly distributes “auxin” inside a cubic volume. Veins then “grow” toward the auxin, creating the 3D form presented here. Every time the program runs, a unique form is created. The “veins” become perfect vessels for a flower bud or two. For this piece, the form was 3D-printed in ceramics through Shapeways. — Justin Couch

Auxin 3d-printed ceramics; 4 in x 4 in x 4 in

See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, INTAR-07, PRINT-01, DM-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PAINT-02, TLAD-03

ID-03


Pause Emote: A Therapeutic Tool for Mental Healthcare is a mobile application for mental healthcare that facilitates communication between patient and provider. Patients identify and log emotional experiences outside of the provider’s office as an extension of treatment. Through the sharing of emotional data visualization, patients are able to better communicate their experience and providers are better able to manage, diagnose and treat their patients. — Amy Goldfeder

Pause Emote Mobile application; n/a

See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, PAINT-08, DM-01, INTAR-32, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-02

ID-04


My project focuses on design thinking methods of documentary research and how mobile technology could enrich our community, society and environment on the basis of design social responsibility. Mobile Micro Solution is helping people gain opportunity and accessibility in three areas: Information, Evidence, and Verification. — Seoung Yeon Han

Mobile Micro Solution Digital system; 1.8 ft x 4.2 ft

See Also ARCH-16, INTAR-18, LDAR-11, DM-01, GLASS-01, INTAR-07, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

ID-05


This piece is a natural and energy-free food storage product. When water is added, it gradually evaporates from the ceramic surface, creating the appropriate temperature and humidity for storing fruits and vegetables. This is a better environment than that of a refrigerator, which is normally too cold and dry for most fruits and vegetables. — Meng Ting Kao

Eating and Living with Seasons / The Natural Food System Ceramics; 10 in x 5 in, 8 in x 5 in, 6 in x 9 in

See Also ARCH-28, GRAPH-02, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, TEXT-03, JM-06, LDAR-02

ID-06


Machine Remix is an open-source kit of components that can be assembled into accessible, hackable, mutatable household machines. The goal is to create safe and easy opportunities for users to experiment and create their own tools, such as coffee bean roasters, sous-vide cookers, swamp coolers, and waste-heat power generators. — David Sharp

Machine Remix Icons; n/a

See Also ARCH-05, DM-01, GRAPH-03, INTAR-08, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

ID-07


The A/V Core is a project that repurposes a former 22-story prison into a city hybrid that combines audio and video technologies with businesses. The building also provides living units for Cambridge, MA residents. — Max Ballardo

Audio / Video Core cad, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop; 36 in x 48 in

See Also ARCH-11, ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03, ID-03

INTAR-01


“And this is good old Boston, The home of the bean and the cod, Where the Lowells talk only to Cabots, And the Cabots talk only to God.” Through the exploration of materials, analysis of connections, and an abstract system of order and decoration, the 15 Commonwealth luxury hotel will provide a dialog between historic ideals of the past and a newly adapted design of the present day “Boston Brahmin.” — Kristen Bender

Boston Toast Digital rendering; n/a

See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-14, ID-05, PAINT-05, TEXT-03, DM-06, DM-09, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TLAD-03

INTAR-02


The host building consists of multiple layers of additions. Each intervention is built with different materials, giving the building a chaotic interior. The project aims to convert this mess into a tranquil and serene meditation space. Instead of completely reshaping the building, I strive to create a balance between the glorification of change and the admiration of the existing. The idea was to use the materials that were of the same body (somatic) but morph them into new forms. This is achieved by disassembling and rearranging structural elements and surface materials. — Alper Besen

Somatic Morphing Pencil; 6 in x 6 in

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-03


The project proposes the adaptive reuse of a 23-story "brutalist" jail and courthouse building located in a very prominent part of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Metropolitan Hybrids studio aims to revive and maintain continuity of the building that might otherwise be demolished, and repurpose this "Monster Structure" to benefit the community and city. Explorations began with a detailed site study and possibility analysis at urban and interior scales. This work of this studio will also be displayed in a gallery in Boston in the coming months. — Shivani Bhalla

The Floating Mall: Adaptive Reuse of the Middlesex County Jail 3d/2d drawings, rendering; 46 in x 33 in print

See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, TLAD-04, ARCH-05, ID-03, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TEXT-03

INTAR-04


This design creates a narrative environment for the National Oz Museum, including some of the key elements of the story in the exhibition environment. — Queenie Chow

National Museum of Oz Photoshop; 7.8 in x 11 in

See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04, ARCH-05, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-05


Using the abandoned Middlesex County Jail as a case study, this project is an investigation of hybridity in the adaptive reuse of a high-rise shell to explore the concept of the urban core. Many large industries are currently leaving Boston, but some remain. For example, athletic wear companies such as Puma, Saucony, New Balance and Reebok still have their headquarters in the Boston area. Clearly these companies find it beneficial to be located near the research and design resources the region offers. This project integrates design and athletic wear with high tech material research while transforming the building into a branding tool through various applications on the facade and throughout the path of circulation. — Michelle Duesterhoeft

Metropolitan Hybrids Revit, Photoshop; n/a

See Also LDAR-07

INTAR-06


Under-the-counter composting unit. — Lauren Grant

TerraPreta Rhino digital model; 12 in x 8 in x 20 in

See Also FURN-05, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, ARCH-07, JM-04, GRAPH-12, JM-05, FURN-04, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-05, ARCH-17

INTAR-07


The building in study is the Middlesex County Jail. It will be refurbished to accommodate a program to benefit the jail's neighborhood and the city of Cambridge. In the face of increasing land values, this proposal is a scheme that challenges the concept of zoos, which usually take up large areas of land to create artificial, restrictive environments for animals. The new typology of an interactive digital zoo comes as the result of compacting the program of the zoo for an urban context, minimizing the use of land and exploring the possibilities of implementing cutting-edge technology to create artificial animals and environments. — Dana Hamdan

inside the cage – An interactive zoo in a former prison Revit; 9.5 ft x 8 ft

See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, PRINT-01, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

INTAR-08


Changing trends in technology play a large role in how we access and share information. Wireless devices mobilized us. As a result many schools now offer online educational programs allowing people to study anywhere at anytime. Though this is convenient, much of the educational process is lost as people spend more time in isolation. My concept for a new urban core in Cambridge is the Universal University, which explores how we ought to accommodate the future of education. The overall design aims to enhance the learning process through cross-disciplinary collaboration and cohabitation as well as promote opportunities for organic social interaction. The image represents the merging of programs as individual study niches overlook the aquatic center. — Christina Hermanns

Universal University Rhino, V-Ray, Photoshop; n/a

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-22, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-09


One of the most inspiring things about Antigua, Guatemala, is the abundance of color. It is found in the architecture, plants, animals and culture. La Concepcion’s ruins are beautiful and historic. My idea was to create a lush, colorful garden to juxtapose against the neutral colors found in the ruins. From the exterior, only glimpses of this garden can be seen through the paneless windows and the boughs of the trees that peek over the ruins’ edge. From the interior, the windows and ruins frame views of the city and the surrounding volcanoes. — Chelsea Hoffman

La Concepcion Artist Residency Photoshop, photographs; 15 in x 10 in

See Also TEXT-03, PAINT-06

INTAR-10


Flattering speech, deceit and conspiracy are all like fancy candies with poisonous syrup inside. Only if you see through the lies will you get the truth. Don’t blind yourself. White is symbolic of origin, purity, nature and truth, and is ironically contradictory to the tragic atmosphere of the play. The black cover is symbolic of deceit and lies. The enclosure space seems penetrable yet unbreakable. Vertical lines gesture as if to break through the space, to see by the eyes of the soul instead of physical eyes. Perhaps the blind perceive the world around us better than the sighted, seeing with the eyes of the soul. — Ya Ling Huang

Set Design: King Lear Foam core, wire; 12 in x 7 in x 8 in

See Also GLASS-03, PHOTO-01, ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-16, ID-06, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-11


Located in La Antigua, Guatemala, this artist retreat features separate work studios on the site to provide multiple vantage points for viewing the church ruins of La Concepcion. Wooden studios provide natural daylight and shade screens for the artist to control sun exposure. Stone benches and a central event space serve as areas for artists and visitors to gather. The wood ages and weathers over time, as do the ruins on site. The stone benches mimic the ruins. — Ann Hurt

Art & Ruins | Artist Retreat SketchUp, Photoshop; 24 in x 42 in

See Also LDAR-06

INTAR-12


If Oz was a real country, what would the National Museum look like? The lobby would be bathed in green light recalling the brilliant glow of the Emerald City, “the wall of which glistened with countless emeralds” (from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz). — Kyoko Jackson

National Oz Museum Museum board, Photoshop; 8.5 in x 11 in

See Also ID-07

INTAR-13


Birth, coming of age, marriage, parenthood, advancement to higher status and death: these events mark accomplishments, awareness of self and the next possible steps in life. Such rites of passage occur between two stages: the new and the old. How one transitions from one to another requires acknowledgment of this cross-over, physically and mentally. In traditional settings, frontiers were marked by natural features: rivers, mountains or forests. However, these boundaries are diminishing in modern times. Highways connect the states, airports connect countries, and the Internet connects the world. The Fox Point hurricane barrier in Providence, Rhode Island, however, does the opposite. This infrastructure separates the ocean from the civilization of the city. It is a physical and a mental threshold between the two worlds. My thesis proposes a place to hold a rite of passage, and architecturally formulates the space of transition from one status of self to another. — Yuki Kawae

Study Model: Place to hold Rite of Passage Bass wood, pink foam, paper; varies

See Also PRINT-02, PHOTO-05, JM-03, PAINT-09, FURN-05, LDAR-11, ARCH-02, GRAPH-12

INTAR-14


In order to compete with larger cities, small cities must increase activity. Looking at different age groups in Cambridge, patterns in people’s activities can be observed. People in all age groups spend most of their time at work or school and at home. The time between leisure and work is the transition space between the two, also known as the third space. Applying this in design, leisure and work anchor the building on east and west facades, with various aspects of daily activity bridging the two. Although many of the spaces have specific functions, all are public spaces and facilitate circulation through the building. — Jennifer Krauser

trans/action Revit, Photoshop, InDesign; 16 in x 16 in

See Also GLASS-03, ARCH-07, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-01, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, PAINT-09, SCULP-02

INTAR-15


Corner of Westminster St. and Eddy St. — Anna Kurkalova

Conflict & Controversy Photoshop; 9 in x 18 in

See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04

INTAR-16


Six Within Six is a guerrilla biophilia project, an intervention that invites six natural planters into the six windows located on the sixth floor of the RISD CIT building. The project examines a variety of biophilic attributes that can help to mend breaches: parts to wholes, views and vistas, natural material, curiosity and enticement, etc. It houses these aspects within a small-scale design, bringing a sense of well-being and productivity to those who interact with the piece(s). — Derrick Laurion

Six Within Six Found wood, flora; varies

See Also SCULP-01

INTAR-17


Due to new advents in technology, scientists know more then ever about the hibernation patterns of bears. I designed this exhibit as a narrative environment allowing visitors to experience the world of black bears and the secrets of hibernation. From an abstracted forest pathway, visitors move through the seasons as if they were the bears themselves. They end their experience in a science lab where they learn how studying bears has helped human development. — Emily Leighton

snooze: The Sleeping Bear Wood, acrylic, paint; 1/2 in = 1 ft scale model

See Also LDAR-10

INTAR-18


This design proposes the adaptive reuse of the Cambridge County Jail into an art core, integrating new technologies with the fine arts. These hybrid art pieces pass through prototyping and production processes and are ultimately exhibited. The process will be shown to visitors throughout the building by inserting a ramp/stair system that will go inside and outside the building with green spaces in between the ramps as break points. The Atrium space, filled with light and fresh air, has a final set of ramps guides visitors to the green roof and the sky chilling bar with amazing views of the city. — Carolina Martins

Art Core for the Artists of a New Era Chipboard, balsa wood; 2 ft x 1 ft x 3 ft

See Also ARCH-24, DM-06, GRAPH-02, GRAPH-16, ID-03, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-19


This adaptive reuse project simplifies historical decorative elements through researching and analyzing the host building at 15 Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. The adjacent Newbury street inspired the development of a luxury designer hotel to attract designers, tourists, and the young and trendy. The project transfers the design vocabulary of fashion house Jil Sander, incorporating elements such as clarity, minimalism, and luxurious simplicity, into the host building. The design includes a transparency of visual connections between floor levels. Vertical panels and horizontal walls define spaces in the open floor plan, and function as inducements between spaces. Freestanding furniture emphasizes the clarity of the open floor plan, allowing both the furniture and the room to be considered as independent elements that reflect the purity of Jil Sander’s design. — Phawadee Pantrakul

Jil Sander Hotel Digital rendering, cardboard; 67 ft x 50 ft x 76 ft

See Also TEXT-03, ARCH-22, DM-09, GRAPH-03, GRAPH-12, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-20


Mobile Art Class Photoshop, Illustrator; n/a

See Also PAINT-01, PAINT-02, SCULP-01, PHOTO-04

This project aims to make art more accessible to low-income populations. Art is available primarily to the elite; lower incomes are often hindered by lack of awareness, financial restrictions, transportation issues and a general uneasiness about participating in arts organizations. Strategies used by small local businesses and outreach programs could potentially be used to make art more accessible to the general public. For example, urban mobile businesses such as hotdog vendors and food trucks travel to find customers. Their outreach service meets the needs of people who lack time and money. Why not apply this concept to the distribution of art for equality? As Rhode Island struggles through a financial crisis, the towns of Central Falls, Pawtucket and Woonsocket have the highest unemployment rates and lowest income levels. Moreover, art-related industry and education do not have the resources to fully serve the public, especially in Central Falls where there are no art education programs or businesses at all. To resolve this issue, a mobile art class will be housed in a van and travel to these three towns to provide art classes to local residents. In addition, it will be part of a host structure that functions as a gallery, a site for paying classes, a gift shop and management office. The artwork made by students will be displayed in the gallery and sold in the gift shop, allowing the mobile art unit program to be partially financed through the sale of student works and paid classes within the host building. In promoting art in a mobile way, a unique intersection is created within the host structure between the moving and the fixed. The architecture of the place where the host building and the mobile unit interact is an expression of the flexibility of the program. — Sang Yung Park

INTAR-21


This piece examines the traces of force acting on a body of mass that produces structural form. — Tamar Petersen

Designing Crowdness Plaster, trash bag, dowels; 12 in x 10 in x 7 in

See Also CER-04

INTAR-22


This project involves the adaptive reuse of a specific site and infrastructure within Providence Place Mall in Downtown Providence, transforming and extending the WaterFire event by re-imagining the urban experience. The concept of dematerialization creates a dynamic space for social interaction, contemplation, and urban ritual. — Joshua Rosenfeld

Ideogramming: WaterFire Rhino; n/wa

See Also LDAR-11, PRINT-02, ARCH-02, ARCH-07, JM-04, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, LDAR-12, LDAR-03, ARCH-05, ARCH-17

INTAR-23


The cloud creates a private enclave within a larger semi-private space. It is about meshing the horizontal with the vertical: creating a bed canopy while maintaining the elements of a bed curtain. The cloud incites interaction for the residents of a women’s shelter, drawing their attention to the ceiling, away from the clutter of their lives and room. The cloud brings them closer to time, to a private moment away, or even a moment with the other women in the room through interaction with the other clouds above them. The cloud was formed from a blank slate, a simple piece of fabric-like a metaphor for the women in the shelter who are in a transitional point in their lives, starting fresh or heading towards a new direction. — Roxanna Salceda

Tessellation Cloud Buckram, leds; 6 ft x 9 ft

See Also DM-02, GLASS-03, PHOTO-01, PAINT-06, ARCH-22, GRAPH-12, ID-03, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-24


Reconsidering Decoration Studio Final: Small Urban Hotel design, set in Boston, Massachusetts. — Elizabeth Sall

Oliver + Oakes Restaurant Digital rendering; n/a

See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, LDAR-02, PRINT-04

INTAR-25


Considering the publishing house as a new type of urban hub for Cambridge, MA, this adaptive reuse project vertically integrates the processes of publishing, from creation to editing, to printing, distribution and sales. As it is, the publishing industry is dying as a physical world and growing as a digital entrepreneurial undertaking. The pixilated publishing house will combine shared resources with public infiltration and programs in order to address the future of publishing in Cambridge. — Amy Selvaggio

Pixelated Publishing House Revit, Photoshop; n/a

See Also DM-04

INTAR-26


The Seed School is a prototype schoolhouse for tropical climates that includes water catchment and passive cooling systems. — Kate Sheahan

The Seed School Chainsaw, teak; 10 m x 10 m

See Also DM-06, GRAPH-08, ARCH-08, ID-03, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-27


This adaptive reuse project takes the form of a mansion on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. The original historic paneling of the house was reused as jigsaw paneling, redefining the concept of decoration. The atrium lobby was designed to showcase the history of the building; exposed brickwork in private spaces was kept to retain the house’s existing skeleton. The entire ground level was designed to be a bar, lounge and billiards room which could cater to the city of Boston, not just the hotel’s guests. — Mansi Tewari

Hotel for the Boston Brahmin Computer software; ten-minute animation

See Also SCULP-01, GLASS-02, ARCH-06, CER-03, DM-04, FURN-01, GRAPH-01, JM-05, LDAR-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, PAINT-06

INTAR-28


Benchestool is a modular seating unit that can be used as an individual stool, or as a bench when multiple elements come together. Originally designed for a small studio in New York, this versatile seating solution offers easy and elegant storage, making it ideal for small spaces. I created two series of four seats, using the technique of bent lamination. — Ariane van Dievoet

Benchestool Italian poplar ply and mahogany, foam (mold); 16 in x 12 in x 18 in

See Also DM-02, GLASS-03, PHOTO-05, ARCH-20, GRAPH-18, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, ID-05, JM-06, LDAR-02, PAINT-07

INTAR-29


This is the wall hanging selection from a light fixture series based off of the design of an abacus. Each bulb, with a brass handle and bright, cloth covered cord, slides along the wooden rail. The cords hang freely to the floor, are bound together at the base, and function on a single dimmer switch. The lamp lends a soft, candlelight like glow to a room. — Lynn Varland

Abacus Wood, brass, cloth-covered yellow, green, grey lamp cord; 24 in x 4 in x 14 in

See Also ARCH-03, ARCH-11, ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, ID-07, LDAR-03, LDAR-12, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03

INTAR-30


The Wonderwall is a multifunctional furniture piece for residents of a family shelter. It is a door cover that is used to slide over and conceal unused doorways in order to provide acoustic and visual privacy between neighboring rooms while offering a place for residents to hang their personal objects and add a degree of personalization to the space. (Co-designed with Ariane van Dievoet, Interior Architecture graduate student) — Sebastian Whyte

Wonderwall Laminated Italian poplar plies, fabric, felt, steel hardware; 4 ft x 7 ft (approximately)

See Also ARCH-25, FURN-06, LDAR-03, GRAPH-04, GRAPH-06, ARCH-17, ARCH-14

INTAR-31


Overwhelmed by piles of trash, obscure spaces in cities, such as the narrow spaces between buildings or the bottoms of bridges, are often forgotten and overlooked. These small and ignored corners negatively impact the overall health of a city. Applying the Roman saying, “mens sana in corpore sano” (sound mind, healthy body), the rejuvenation of even insignificant areas are instrumental to the positive rehabilitation of the urban fabric. — Ke Xiao

Life Between Cities Metal, glass; 23 ft x 480 ft

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, PHOTO-01, ARCH-08, GRAPH-05, ID-06, JM-01, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

INTAR-32


Knotting is a method for securing or fastening linear material through tying or interweaving. When knotted, strings go though a certain path to link together. Before the invention of writing, ancient people in China, India and Peru used knots for recording. Even in modern times, there are still areas where knots are used to document events. An architectural adaptive reuse is to make a knot between the buildings’ past and future, freezing a past memory and moving beyond it. — Yi Zhou

transition Cardboard, Photoshop; 4 ft x 12 ft x 6 ft

See Also ARCH-16, ID-04, DM-09, GRAPH-14, ID-02, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

INTAR-33


This image is from a small group of work I made in my first year at RISD that has acted as a major precedent to my thesis exploration. By reappropriating imagery and language belonging to the American hunting culture I had grown up with, I was able to humorously comment on the underlying objectification of women and animals that it has embraced. — Leslie Boyd

Detail shot from “Find One With a Big Rack and Mount It” Fabric transfer, Swarovski crystals, hunting coveralls; 7.5 in x 4.5 in

See Also CER-05, HAVC-01

JM-01


— Sena Huh

Wha Myun Jo Jung Felt, wood, brass; 8 in x 4 in x 5.5 in

See Also DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, GRAPH-14, INTAR-19, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

JM-02


Loss has no visual expression, form or color. In these pieces I adopt the form of a bag, full, or in some cases empty, to represent the weight we drag when experiencing the sentiment of loss. — Manuela Jimenez

Portraits of the Intangible Cotton fabric, plastic pellets, clear epoxy resin; 8 in x 12 in x 9 in

See Also ARCH-23, ARCH-30, ARCH-25, ARCH-26, PAINT-09, INTAR-29, ARCH-24, ARCH-14

JM-03


This piece was part of an exploration of dark energy and emptiness. I manifested these ideas through constructing hollow forms which were meant to act as wearable “viewing devices.” This body of work led me to my current research on terror and the sublime. — Jillian Matthews

Viewing Device #1 Wood, acrylic paint, neoprene rubber; 6 in x 3.5 in x 3 in (24 in strap)

See Also ID-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, ARCH-05, GRAPH-05, INTAR-26, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

JM-04


Amelia was exhibited at OBJECT Rotterdam 2013 in Holland. — Kendra Pariseault

Amelia Latex, wood fiber, glass crystals; 40 in x 70 in

See Also LDAR-13, ARCH-23, DM-09, LDAR-12, GRAPH-04, PAINT-09, FURN-05, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, FURN-06

JM-05


This piece marks the beginning of my thesis work, which is an exploration of the themes and imagery found within artist-made comic books and cartoons. In addition to referencing comic book subject matter, I hope to seduce the viewer into interacting with the piece though my material choices and commitment to craftsmanship. — Mallory Weston

Cottontails #1 & #2 Gold-filled bronze, nickel, rabbit fur, cotton, thread; 13 in x 7 in x 0.5 in

See Also ARCH-18

JM-06


This image came from an animated short I created to depict riding sweet snowmobiles in the winter wilderness to communicate with aliens through glowing meditation pods. — Shane Fagan

Night Communications Computer, brain; 29.167 in x 16.727 in

See Also ARCH-24, ARCH-20, GRAPH-07, GRAPH-17, GRAPH-10, GRAPH-08, ID-05, INTAR-28, INTAR-17, PAINT-07

LDAR-01


Hanging translucent tubes, shifting slightly in the flow of air, channel light down their lengths. Quiet and understated, the piece is not meant to be observed so much as experienced. Walking among the chimes, you shift attention from the moving spots of concentrated glow above to the dappled patterns on the floor below. — Sarah Gould

Light Chimes Paper, tape, fishing line; 7 ft x 1 ft x 4 ft

See Also GRAPH-03

LDAR-02


I want to understand the relationship of people and the river through small tests that engage people who are directly interacting with the waterfront. I placed Mason jars along the Providence River with notebooks encouraging people to leave their thoughts. This piece displays some of the writings I found in these notebooks. In this display, I filled the Mason jars with water from the river where each notebook was located. Ultimately, this piece was about linking the river and memory, capturing snippets of the river and people’s thoughts. — Frank Hammond

Message In A Bottle River water, Mason jars, notebooks, photography; 2 ft x 8 ft

See Also CER-05, DM-08, GRAPH-10, INTAR-24, PRINT-04, SCULP-03, ARCH-24, ID-05, INTAR-17, JM-06, PAINT-07

LDAR-03


For nature, the bell tolls. During recent decades, urban expansion has occupied more land inside and outside of the city, leaving only 17% truly open, unused and untouched, according to scientific research. Due to the non-compensatory relationship between humans and nature, the effort to bring nature’s claims closer to the 83% of human habitats is as important as it is to protect the 17% that remains. This project is the record of my exploration of this topic. — Xiaoxue Huang

Integrating nature and the city Paint, chipboard; 36 in x 48 in

See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-02, FURN-01, GLASS-03, INTAR-14, JM-05,PRINT-05, PAINT-05

LDAR-04


To explore new ways that we may engage with the landscape we must first understand current methods of engagement with site. This is an attempt to begin the process of understanding, through documentation and interaction with the central region of Texas to create a regional experience-based map through the viewpoint of a cyclist. — Tyler Kiggins

Searching for Shade on Purgatory Road Camera, bike, sweat; five-second intervals

See Also GRAPH-06, ARCH-16, ID-04, INTAR-18, INTAR-32, FURN-06

LDAR-05


A 200-ton berm exists at the San Diego-Tijuana border. Its one agenda is to hinder crossing. This project is a rethinking of this object’s role in its contentious spatial context. A monument of obstruction transforms into a monument of industry, economy and technology. — Andrew Liang

Border Technologies Paper, graphite; 18 in x 24 in

See Also ARCH-21, ARCH-10, GLASS-01, ID-04, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, PAINT-01, SCULP-03, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

LDAR-06


The Bio-Reef system I propose is a strategic artificial reef system that creates a habitat for oysters and other marine life, while mitigating wave impact. There are two modular systems, one designed for salt water ponds and another for offshore placement at a larger scale. The design is based on investigations of form found in constructed wave barriers, skeletal structures and marine life. — David Mazer

Bio-Reef and Wave Mitigation Sytem Fiber reinforced concrete, Rhino rendering; 9 ft x 11 ft, 5 ft x 6 ft

See Also DM-05

LDAR-07


I imagine this piece as a public service to those who pass by, work and visit the CIT building. How can I provide a service in a form that increases the dialogue around how we envision our public space? I chose to use lowcost, simple materials, permitting the viewer an understanding of the constructed environment—an understanding which is often absent. — Megan McLaughlin

imagine the potential of your surroundings Tires, soil, tarp, wheatberries; 3 ft x 12 ft x 7 ft

See Also INTAR-22

LDAR-08


Hanging a work in process in a gallery renegotiates the relationship between maker and viewer. My thesis process seeks to discover a balance between bottom-up emergent realities and top-down design. The landscape is a canvas upon which we all share in mark making; the city a fabric, collectively woven. PLEASE PARTICIPATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF THIS WORK. — Hope McManus

For: Process Wood, screws, rusted fencing swords, yarn, plastic bags; 2.5 ft x 4 in x 5 ft

See Also GRAPH-17

LDAR-09


The beginnings of a thesis investigation into the behavior of sand, and landscapes that experience high rates of flux. The movement of sand is a geologic process that occurs over all scales of time. This conceptual model sits on swivels and when rotated, builds a dunescape. — David Nielsen

dunescapes Plexi, wood, sand; 24 in x 18 in x 12 in

See Also ARCH-15

LDAR-10


The work utilizes a series of different layers to represent an urban landscape. Materials such as wire, transparent plastic paper, wood and wax combine together to represent a more abstract perception of people towards the landscape. The removable layers create interactions; by manipulating them and changing the order of the layers, a new image will emerge. — Shasha Pan

Layered Landscape Plastic, wire, wood; 18 in x 12 in

See Also ARCH-25, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, INTAR-14, PRINT-02, JM-05, INTAR-19, INTAR-01

LDAR-11


The intent of Gray / Green is to test the interactivity of this particular sculptural form. Will people find the structures compelling enough to play with them? What kinds of forms and combinations will they come up with? Designed to be very light and easy to reposition, each monolith is slightly smaller than a person’s body. The choice of colors was an abstraction referencing the urban built environment (gray), and urban green space (green). — Michael Rockafellar

Gray / Green Rigid foam insulation, paper mache, paint; three forms, 12 in x 12 in x 6 ft each

See Also ID-04, INTAR-18, ARCH-05, DM-09, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-02, JM-03, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, PAINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

LDAR-12


This is a strictly abstract/conceptual image relating to some thesis ideas developed over the course of the year so far. — Roy Small

Recalibration Computer, brain; 18 in x 24 in

See Also ARCH-03, ARCH-11, ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, PAINT-06, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, SCULP-03

LDAR-13


The inspiration for this project comes from the amazing tidal effects happening on the seashore. Following the principles of liquid effects, the spaces are connected in a non-linear way. While walking through the site, the view is continually changing and movements undulate between the water and the land. Because the zone between the high tide and the low tide is amplified, tidal effects can be easily observed in addition to the habitats of plants and animals. Depressions in the landform are made to collect runoff in the site, and some depressions below the high tide line can be home to certain creatures living in mixed salt and fresh water. If there is no rain, some depressions can be used as gathering places. — Xinwen Su

Fluidity Clay, chipboard, digital rendering; varies

See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, ID-01, JM-01, SCULPT-05, CER-05, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01

LDAR-14


This piece is a response to the beginning of my thesis process: exploring the progression of agriculture, resource extraction and a future life. — Christina Vannelli

Source, Buffer, Point Found materials, mixed media, wire; 4 ft x 5 ft

See Also INTAR-17

LDAR-15


This is a jigsaw game of city blocks in Manhattan. I gave visitors the chance to break the boundaries and re-organize the urban space themselves. They can move and re-arrange those hundreds of city blocks in any variety of ways to make the Manhattan they would like. — Haipeng Zhu

Break the boundaries in Manhattan Wood, acrylic; 36 in x 36 in x 2 in

See Also GRAPH-09

LDAR-16


I remade 20 of Britney Spears’s most popular videos. I started by making miniature maquettes of her sets, copying every element through small dioramas made with craft materials. I then made the costumes with a glue gun, paint and canvas. I learned all the choreographies of her dancers, and all of Britney’s moves and gestures. With the help of my green screen and After Effects I could insert myself in all of these small handmade sets. It’s like a collection of good-looking bloopers. — Claudia Bitran

tour Mixed media maquettes, canvas, glue gun, plastic, my body, makeup, video; video loop (still)

See Also ARCH-30, INTAR-07

PAINT-01


Dancers in an awkward recital. — Joe Bochynski

Group Portrait Mixed building materials; 7 ft tall (approximately)

See Also INTAR-20, SCULP-01, ARCH-21, GLASS-01, ID-04, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, DM-08

PAINT-02


During the Zhou dynasty, it was believed that the deceased spent eternity inside their tomb. These final resting places included all the comforts of domestic life. I imagine that at some point in this eternal state, these items would cease to entertain. The tomb would feel more like a jail cell then a celestial realm. My work from the first three semesters of graduate school became the contents of this tomb. — Douglas Burns

The Tomb Mixed media; five-minute video (still)

See Also ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-02, ID-03, INTAR-32, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-09, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

PAINT-03


The compartmentalization of memory. Determine procedure, construct, labor, forget, construct, capture, extract, reformat, store in a remote digital location, disregard and transcribe back into the physical realm. — Lauren Comito

The location Digital print, fabric, dowels; 72 in x 54 in

See Also FURN-03

PAINT-04


Amphitheatre is an architectural maquette that rotates like a carousel while an overhead mechanism drips and covers it with paint. — Walter Dion

Amphitheatre Various wood, paint, cardboard, electric motor, wire, steel; 40 x 40 x 120 in

See Also CER-03, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01

PAINT-05


My studio neighbor (J. Bochynski) and I took a painting crate, turned it into a formalist painting and then a boat. The vessel launched an unorchestrated course, with two huddled figures at battle with the sea. From livid shifts of weather and water, and the imagined conceptual space of the boat, arose a video that mimics, in diagrammatic space, this plunge into a different ground. The painting, sketched and erased, anchors my view of the beauty of failed efforts. — Jonathan Frioux

yat Crate, video, tarp, acyrlic, canvas; 3 ft x 14 ft x 7 ft, two-minute video

See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-02, ID-05, INTAR-01, PHOTO-04, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, SCULP-02

PAINT-06


This is a version of the underworld (hell, not criminal) which includes a river of trash, a giant painted moth fixed to a ticking clock, and Walter of “The Big Lebowski” as one of the heads of Cerberus. I was interested in the liminal spaces that objects occupy in basements, storage units and backyards, where you put things that you aren’t using, but can’t bring yourself to throw away. Like souls stranded in the realm of shadows, these objects occupy an ambiguous status in terms of memory and sentiment, consigned to be out of sight but not completely out of mind. — Rachel Grobstein

Hella Gouache, cut paper, spray paint, foam insulation, clock, battery; 22 in x 48 in

See Also ARCH-11, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PRINT-09, SCULP-02, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05

PAINT-07


Blue Slab, Red G; White and blue with orange J, WW II book binder, slashed canvas with image of the virtual museum as backing. — Zach Seeger

Red G, Orange J Mixed media assemblage, acrylic, collage on canvas; 63 in x 36 in, 48 in x 26 in

See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, SCULP-02, GRAPH-07, JM-06, PRINT-03, PRINT-05, FURN-05

PAINT-08


This project is using the traditional techniques of Ajrakh and Kalamkari to create contemporary paintings. My focus is on resist dyeing with natural indigo within the natural dyeing techniques. I have also been looking at American resist dyed indigo textiles in the RISD Museum. Kalidas, a classical Sanskrit poet whose work influenced Indian art, has been greatly influential. — Taniya Vaidya

The River has missed you... Natural dye, handwoven fabric; 32 in x 48 in

See Also ARCH-06, FURN-05, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PRINT-02, SCULPT-05, INTAR-01, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, GRAPH-14

PAINT-09


What We Conjure is taken from a series of images of the same title. It’s an autobiographical story, a contemporary folk tale, which I'm creating along with my partner, our four-year-old daughter and our dog. Through photography, I set out to make a fable for my daughter, but reality has leaked its way into the myth. The images tell of both chaos and ecstatic joy. — Scott Alario

What We Conjure Archival pigment print; 30 in x 24 in

See Also INTAR-29, ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13, PRINT-05, SCULP-01

PHOTO-01


In 2011, I got a new phone number and started soliciting good night messages from men on craigslist in an attempt to heal from a breakup. This grew into a collection of male voices (and later written texts) that articulate a certain model of femininity and more generally, a model of how people relate to each other. What surfaces is a catalog of human desires and needs—for security, catharsis, sabotage and forgiveness. I make videos, audio installations, and books. This project is called Training to be a Girl and involves responses from craigslist as well as transcriptions of my own psychic readings, dream excerpts, and photographs. — Sophie Barbasch

Training to be a Girl Text, books, photographs; 15 hardcover books, 6 in x 9 in each

See Also DM-02, GLASS-02, INTAR-02, ARCH-05, GRAPH-05, ID-02, JM-03, LDAR-11, PRINT-02, TLAD-03, TEXT-03

PHOTO-02


These 20 head shots, once meant to single out the individuals from the crowd and portray their unique likenesses, have since lost any connection to their personal stories and histories. They fail to function as a memory aid as once intended, and upon viewing, their homogeneity reduces them to a visual common denominator. Layering the photographs melts them together and results in an individual that does not exist, erasing anything unique while highlighting similarities. — Kevin Barton

Twenty Handsome Men Inkjet print, large format negatives; 44 in x 44 in

See Also DM-07

PHOTO-03


Two dozen speakers are bound to a tree, facing inward. They play an audio translation of scientific data measuring background radiation left over from the Big Bang. — Rob MacInnis

It Takes an Ocean Not to Break Speakers, amplifier, audio player, bungie cords; 4 ft x 4 ft x 18 ft

See Also SCULP-05

PHOTO-04


The boundary of the United States of America's original thirteen colonies encompasses roughly the country's entire eastern coast, from Maine to Georgia and from the shores of the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Mountains. It is within this historically significant boundary that the American Revolution was staged, and it is also the area of concentration for my project, For the Revolution. — Keith Yahrling

Huntington Beach, James River, Newport News, Virginia, July 23, 2012 Archival inkjet print; 44 in x 36 in

See Also ARCH-04, GRAPH-02, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, TEXT-03, GLASS-01, LDAR-05, PAINT-08, SCULP-05, TLAD-04

PHOTO-05


Inmate of the Panopticon project is a combination of two different types of women. One group exhibits extreme self-regulation and distorted notions of beauty, leading to eating disorders. The second group of women is made up of aspiring actresses and models living in Hollywood, California, who are interested in being represented because they have dreams of fame. — Ji Yeo

Joanna Archival inkjet print; 55 in x 44 in

See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, HAVC-01, TLAD-03, CER-05, DM-04, GLASS-03, INTAR-14, JM-05, LDAR-13, SCULP-01

PHOTO-06


Using color, light, texture and scale, this image re-imagines an interior from the American vernacular. — Paloma Barhaugh-Bordas

Still Life with Cartons and Flowers Gum transfer, silkscreen, monoprint collage, ink; 48 in x 32 in

See Also ARCH-24, LDAR-11, INTAR-14, LDAR-13, ARCH-20, JM-04, INTAR-07, INTAR-16, INTAR-23

PRINT-01


In New Apartment, New City, a character moves into an apartment, buys furniture, eats dinner and has a party. You could say nothing really happens. — Kevin Frances

New Apartment, New City: Scene 2 Japanese woodblock print; 30 in x 22 in

See Also ARCH-30, FURN-01, GLASS-01, GRAPH-15, ID-02, DM-06, ID-01, INTAR-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, TLAD-03, TEXT-02

PRINT-02


This piece is part of an ongoing study of print on handmade paper. — Amanda Hu

In Honor of Ink, paper, wood; 32 in x 56 in x 3 in

See Also ARCH-06, DM-04, FURN-05, GRAPH-17, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, SCULPT-05, INTAR-31, PHOTO-01, TEXT-02

PRINT-03


Butte Bank Basin Bend Break is composed from composite photographs of a diorama I made in my studio. The photo was then printed and worked back into using etching and handwork. — Genevieve Lowe

Butte Bank Basin Bend Break Etching, inkjet, graphite, ink, charcoal; 50 in x 30 in

See Also ARCH-07, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PAINT-05, SCULP-02

PRINT-04


This work is a graphite drawing on a glass sculpture. It is a re-interpretation of Masaccio’s Expulsion from the Garden of Eden. I used soil from several gardens and contaminated urban lots. Using water and grow lights, invasive and nonnative species of plants grow through the cracks of the glass bricks. — Jonathan Palmer

The expulsion from the Garden of Eden Hand cast glass, earth, sand, growing weeds, graphite; 72 in x 84 in

See Also CER-03, CER-05, DM-01, DM-08, GRAPH-05, GRAPH-10, INTAR-03, INTAR-04, INTAR-15, INTAR-24, LDAR-02, ARCH-20

PRINT-05


This piece is a large painted and carved wooden panel exploring a graphic lineage and collapse through mediated collage. — Diego Rodriguez-Warner

Steel String of Man With Harmonica Acrylic, gouache, spray paint, sumi-e ink, woodstain, hand carved panel; 33 in x 44 in

See Also INTAR-27, JM-05, LDAR-03, PHOTO-05, PAINT-05, SCULP-03, FURN-05

PRINT-06


My work explores my studies of Whirling Dervishes. I started to digitally manipulate calligraphy drawings of Whirling Dervishes into complex geometrical Islamic patterns. After studying the large patterns, I was very intrigued by how a simple figure could be turned into a geometric form and an image of the unknown, and how in Islamic art geometric forms are used to represent God. The tile mural that I have made utilizes the patterns that I have been creating. The reason why I have chosen to use tiles is because it is one of the oldest forms of art making in Iran. As a contemporary Iranian artist, I would like to use traditional forms of Persian art making with a contemporary twist. — Saman Sajasi

Dance, Dance, Dance Silkscreen, tiles; 3 ft x 6 ft

See Also CER-02

PRINT-07


Last winter, I went out into the woods, bringing some gold leaf along with me, and proceeded to cover a rock. After I finished, I went back to my studio and started drawing again. — Justin Sorensen

The Transfiguration Gold leaf; varies

See Also ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, GRAPH-01, INTAR-14, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PAINT-09, SCULP-01

PRINT-08


Boxing State 2 is a series of woodcuts derived from my boxing workouts. — Cole Swavely

Boxing State 2 Woodcut; 22 in x 30 in

See Also INTAR-03

PRINT-09


This is the first of a series of prints that make up my thesis. They are body prints, recording the texture of my skin and the shapes my flesh makes when pressed against the copper plate. Simultaneously abstract and highly literal, formal and performative, they reflect my struggle over the last two years to record and reimagine my relationship with my body. — Elisabeth Walden

...So I pressed the copper between my flesh and the bathroom wall Softground etching with Spit Bite, printed a la poupeille on handmade kozo paper; 14 in x 24 in

See Also ARCH-07, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, ID-03, PHOTO-05, TLAD-04, GLASS-03, CER-03, DM-04, INTAR-14, LDAR-13, PAINT-06, SCULP-01

PRINT-10


A chance encounter, with something you cannot plan for. — Cody Henrichs

The Proclaimers Wood, metal, sweater, plastic; 7 ft x 3 ft x 9 ft

See Also INTAR-20, PAINT-01, GRAPH-04, ARCH-06, CER-05, DM-04, FURN-05, GLASS-03, JM-05, LDAR-13, PHOTO-05, PRINT-05

SCULP-01


Windshield wipers are not intended to be noticed when they are operating. These wipers paint a double rainbow, activating the invisible border that separates you from the rest of the world. The rainbow wipers highlight the constant action happening in threshold spaces. Seeing a double rainbow is rare, and awesome. Now you can see one every time you get in your car! — Anna Huemmer

Oh my god, what does it mean?! Kinetic sculpture; varies

See Also ARCH-14, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-06, PRINT-09, GRAPH-16, CER-05, DM-02, FURN-01, GLASS-03, JM-05, PHOTO-05

SCULP-02


Daylight is a material, like bubbling water or plastic strings, flooding a wall of matter in a prismatic yellow room. — Julie Kumar

An Imitation of a Light Daylight, tubing, water pumps, fluorescent lights, programmed electronics, mixed media; 12 ft x 2.5 in x 10 ft

See Also ARCH-14, GRAPH-01, ID-07, INTAR-29, LDAR-03, PAINT-07, PRINT-09, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04, PAINT-07, FURN-05

SCULP-03


I made this piece by welding steel over a wooden form to create a skin around it. Through this process, the wood eventually burned out, leaving a hollow steel object. — Bayne Peterson

Earpiece 2 Steel; 2 ft 8 in x 8 in x 3 in

See Also ARCH-19

SCULP-04


"This Is My Land" is a staged performance referring to the subject of expansionism, where empires have forcefully claimed land as their own. The splitting of lumber with axes serves as a “meaningful” display of violence, where the logic behind this action is justified, as the need for fire in any civilized place. I’d like to thank fellow performer, Mr. Yuki Kawae for his inspiring collaboration in this project. — QuintÍn Rivera Toro

“This Is My Land” Lumber, axes, paint; 30-minute performance

See Also ARCH-23, DM-04, FURN-05, ID-01, JM-01, LDAR-13, PAINT-08, PRINT-02, INTAR-07, GLASS-01, PHOTO-04, TLAD-04

SCULP-05


Educational researchers, theorists and policy-makers have written copious literature and developed a variety of action plans steered towards teaching higher-order thinking skills to students within public education. However, little consideration has been given to the potential impact of art education in addressing the teaching of these skills. Attention to art education as a crucial change agent within public education has been limited and aimless. We must recognize arts education as an agent of change in educational equity, reenergize and adapt arts education as an essential curricular component and instigate education reform that facilitates new metrics and structures for a changing global society. The purpose of my thesis work is to explain the history, necessity and impact of art educa-tion in the American public school system, while acknowledging areas of strength and concern as we move into the 21st century. Using prediction models, education theory, case studies and student performance data, as well as interviews and personal narratives, I present thorough reflection and earnest objectives, presented in an accessible format for wide-spread impact. I do not pretend to know all the answers, but I do wish to engage the public in meaningful discourse on complex issues. — Rachel Branham

(selection from) No Magic Bullets Graphite, India ink; 11 in x 14 in

See Also FURN-02

TLAD-01


Trashed Needlework is a piece created as part of a Trash Fashion and Art workshop I facilitated through Project Open Door. This program at Central Falls High School invited students to learn about fashion through the manipulation of trash materials. Participants learned sewing, embroidery, pattern building and clothing construction. This embroidery piece is by the very talented Ana Santos. — Ruthie Scarpino

Trashed Needlework Found image, newspaper, needle, thread; 8 in x 11 in

See Also ARCH-29

TLAD-02


Throughout this academic year at RISD, my prints have been enkindled by my ruminations on pedagogy as an arts educator. Being deeply inspired about the value of the imagination and the cultivation of intuition as learning tools, this intaglio piece begins a conversation about the sources of imagination. In what ways do our experiences transpose themselves upon what we imagine? Can we tighten our intuitive senses by assimilating the interplay between experience and imagination? — Rohini Sen

Invigorating Imagination I Carandache crayon and sugar lift on copper plate; 9 ft x 13 ft

See Also ARCH-07, ARCH-25, FURN-06, GRAPH-12, PHOTO-05, HAVC-01, ID-04, DM-08, INTAR-26, JM-01, LDAR-11, TEXT-03

TLAD-03


With the help of the Providence community and RISD I was able to meet and work with students who have a desire to learn digital art. As both an educator and an artist I was able to become a part of their artistic learning process. These students are the inspiration behind my documentary-style thesis that profiles youth on their creative digital journey and observes them as they develop themselves and new perspectives. I am extremely grateful to the Providence youth who are a part of this piece and thank them for teaching me so much. — Nicole Van Slyke

The Rendered Generation: A Profile of Youth on their Exploration of Digital Art in Providence, RI Sony hxr-nx70u nxcam compact camcorder, amazing local youth, the programs they are attending; 20-minute video

See Also ARCH-08, FURN-06, GRAPH-04, ID-03, JM-03, GLASS-01, INTAR-20, LDAR-05, PHOTO-04, PAINT-08, SCULP-05

TLAD-04


This piece is part of a larger collection that investigates how clothes can be implemented as a means of protection. — Maggie Barber

Untitled Alpaca, human hair; size 6

See Also JM-06

TEXT-01


Treated as a drawing, a navy blue mesh floats over to the surface of a silk cloth. The repeated structure slowly unravels. It is a moment frozen in time, a snapshot of the transformation of this material. When the tide comes up the water eventually retreats leaving the memory of the waves on the surface of the sand. — Agustina Bello-Decurnex

Tidal Silk, poly; size 4

See Also ARCH-08, DM-08, GRAPH-05, ID-02, INTAR-23, JM-01, LDAR-11, PHOTO-01, PRINT-02, TLAD-03

TEXT-02


In and out of use, forgotten and found, deaccessioned and collected, stuff often finds itself in a transitory space. I am interested in the oppositions of these flux states that fall between the collected and discarded, the familiar and strange. In looking at images of trash heaps in garbage dumps, I feel immediately attracted to the beauty present in the build-up of materials; the uninhibited shapes the junk takes on, the juxtapositions of colors and materials and the overlaps and mutations that occur in this place of disposal. This digital print represents the anxiety and desire present within my act of collecting and accumulating. — Jessica Bourque

Accumulation Watercolor, gouache, digital; 40 in x 46 in

See Also ARCH-28, GRAPH-14, ID-05, INTAR-01, PAINT-05, PHOTO-04, DM-08, JM-03, LDAR-11, TLAD-03

TEXT-03


This Jacquard fabric is a representation of my childhood memories of feeling lost in my ancestral home, superimposed by memories of being fascinated by the same place as an adult. The concentric lines in beige and cream-colored mohair depict the feeling of repetitive meanderings in the huge house. The darker-lined layer of imagery floating on top creates moments of intrigue through using shinier material within the filled shapes. Both layers seem equally active so as to emphasize the simultaneous recollection of the dual memories. — Suruchi Kabra

Untitled Mohair, rayon, metallic yarn; 1.5 yds x 54 in

See Also INTAR-20

TEXT-04


This is the first iteration in the Jacquard process of translating a two dimensional image into a three dimensional woven textile. Through both material and color exploration, I hope to translate a feeling of movement through memory. — Chase Taylor

Smoke and Mirrors Mohair, polyester, cotton yarns; 4.5 ft x 6 ft

See Also GRAPH-03

TEXT-05


This Jacquard weaving was developed from my ink drawings of imaginary characters. It was inspired by moments of transcendence such as spontaneous dance parties. — Sarah Wertzberger

F.U.N. Town Cotton warp, Rayon weft; 65 in x 55 in

See Also LDAR-09

TEXT-06


Process

process


process


process


process


process


process


process


process


process


process


process


process


Etc.


Canada PAINT-05

ARCH-06 ARCH-14 ARCH-25 FURN-01 GRAPH-08 INTAR-01 INTAR-02 INTAR-28 JM-06 PRINT-09 TLAD-04

Midwest ARCH-14 ARCH-16 GLASS-03 INTAR-06 SCULP-01

RISD

West Coast ARCH-10 GRAPH-15 INTAR-13 INTAR-16 INTAR-18 INTAR-24 INTAR-27 LDAR-02 LDAR-12 PRINT-01 PRINT-05 SCULP-02

New York City ARCH-03 ARCH-09 ARCH-30 DM-01 DM-06 FURN-03 GRAPH-01 GRAPH-02 GRAPH-03 GRAPH-05 GRAPH-14 GRAPH-16 INTAR-03 INTAR-04 INTAR-07 INTAR-10 INTAR-19 INTAR-23

INTAR-29 INTAR-31 JM-03 PAINT-01 PAINT-02 PAINT-06 PAINT-08 PHOTO-05 HAVC-01 TEXT-01 TEXT-03

Staying in Providence Philadelphia JM-01 JM-06 PHOTO-05

ARCH-08 GRAPH-06 ID-07 PRINT-10


Where Are You Going?

Mars PHOTO-04

Unknown

Europe ARCH-24

Asia ID-01 TLAD-03

Caribbean FURN-05 SCULP-05

ARCH-01 ARCH-02 ARCH-04 ARCH-05 ARCH-07 ARCH-11 ARCH-12 ARCH-13 ARCH-15 ARCH-17 ARCH-18 ARCH-19 ARCH-20 ARCH-21 ARCH-22 ARCH-23 ARCH-26 ARCH-27 ARCH-28 ARCH-29 CER-01 CER-02 CER-03 CER-04 CER-05 DM-02 DM-03 DM-04 DM-05 DM-07 DM-08 DM-09 FURN-02 FURN-04

FURN-06 GLASS-01 GLASS-02 GRAPH-04 GRAPH-07 GRAPH-09 GRAPH-10 GRAPH-11 GRAPH-12 GRAPH-13 GRAPH-17 ID-02 ID-03 ID-04 ID-05 ID-06 INTAR-05 INTAR-08 INTAR-09 INTAR-11 INTAR-12 INTAR-14 INTAR-15 INTAR-17 INTAR-20 INTAR-21 INTAR-22 INTAR-25 INTAR-26 INTAR-30 INTAR-32 INTAR-33 JM-02 JM-04

JM-05 LDAR-01 LDAR-03 LDAR-04 LDAR-05 LDAR-06 LDAR-07 LDAR-08 LDAR-09 LDAR-10 LDAR-11 LDAR-13 LDAR-14 LDAR-15 LDAR-16 PAINT-03 PAINT-04 PAINT-07 PAINT-09 PHOTO-01 PHOTO-02 PHOTO-03 PHOTO-06 PRINT-02 PRINT-03 PRINT-04 PRINT-06 PRINT-07 PRINT-08 SCULP-03 SCULP-04 TLAD-01 TLAD-02 TEXT-02

TEXT-04 TEXT-05 TEXT-06


rgb 13

rgb13

rgb13

©2013, Rhode Island

rgb13 is the third graduate

editorial & design

advisory board

School of Design

book based on the frame-

Zachary Futterer 

Brian Goldberg,

Published by the risd

Kinkade gd ’10 and Arianne

arch ’14

Dean of Graduate Studies

Graduate Student

Gelardin ldar ’11 for rgb11,

Alliance

and continued by Catherine

work developed by Lindsay

Jonathan Hanahan

Jennifer Liese,

gd ’14

Director,

Images of individual

Mangaser arch ’12 in

risd Writing Center

student work are

rgb12. This book is typeset

courtesy of the artists

in Prensa, designed by Cyrus

Bethany Johns,

and designers unless

Highsmith, and Klavika,

Graduate Program

otherwise specified.

designed by Eric Olson. It

Brian James  gd ’14

Cieslewicz gd ’13 and Diana

Brienne Jones 

Director,

was printed by Universal

gd ’14

Graphic Design

Wilde in Westwood,

Chloe Scheffe

Don Morton,

Finch Opaque White and

bfa gd ’15

Director,

80lb. Creator Two-Sided

Center for Student

Gloss.

Massachusetts, on 50lb.

Aaron Tobey 

Involvement

arch ’14 Amy Patenaude, Administrative Assistant, Graduate Studies


Bookmarks


RGB13: RISD Graduate Studies Annual 2013  
RGB13: RISD Graduate Studies Annual 2013