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T HE N E W F RON TI E RS ISSUE 56 • FREE


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Welcome

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Say Hello W

Our Picks MADE.COM Evadine two-seater sofa £499

Molton Brown Vetiver & Grapefruit bath & shower gel, 300ml, £20

Mango Net tote bag, £49.99

Editor-in-Chief Andrew Riley andrew@stylebham.com Creative Director Mike Raven mike@stylebham.com Account Executive Jade Woodhouse jade@stylebham.com Designer Simon Konaszczuk simon@rileyraven.co.uk

Zara Jeans in Malibu Blue, £29.99

elcome to our brand new issue of Style Birmingham! Over the past few months, we’ve been busy working on a fresh, vibrant look. For Issue 56, we’re bringing a whole new vibe to the table and we’re so excited for you to take a look. A new season means changing attitudes and ideas, which is why we’ll be focusing on the people, trends and things that look towards the future, whilst at the same time reflecting on the past. As always, we’ll be taking a look at the latest fashion trends and must-haves [page 14] to see you all the way though the warmer months. On page 51, we chat to British fashion designer and Global Ambassador for Graduate Fashion Week, Christopher Raeburn - the man who’s making a huge impact on the industry with his innovative and sustainable concepts. We pick out the products to tackle sun-damaged hair and help you create the perfect tousled beauty waves on page 81. For the gents, our grooming section on page 83 will help you find the right serum for any skin concern, from dark under-eye circles to ageing skin. On page 98, Phillip Ellis takes a look at how the present day was reimagined by filmmakers of the past, whilst Kirsty Bosley evaluates the changing landscape of Birmingham on page 130 and asks, will new buildings stand the test of time? Jam-packed with a variety of diverse shoots, from fresh-faced makeup with Bullring & Grand Central, to the designers to watch out for since Midlands Fashion Awards, we’ve got plenty to get you inspired for summer. Enjoy!

Special thanks to: Philip Ellis, Kirsty Bosley, Hollie Fox, Bev Perrott, Bethany Strong, Jamie Richards, Sarah Spence, Joseph at Established, Julyanna, Cameron and Maria at PRM, Chrissie Trattos, Chris Harris-Gibbs, Emily Round, George at Boss, Jessica, Kiera, Roxana and Natalie at Leni’s, Cecile at Bookings, Ashton Fernihough, Georgia Roberts, Suzie Gee, Yvette Shah, Elliot K at Alan Sharman, William Ashworth and Ben Appleby

Style Birmingham is created by RileyRaven Unit 606B, The Big Peg, 120 Vyse Street, Birmingham, B18 6NF rileyraven.co.uk hello@rileyraven.co.uk 0121 769 2808

All information is correct at the time of going to press. Please note that prices for items are subject to change so may vary from those mentioned, contact individual stores for definitive pricing information. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, without prior permission. We make every effort to ensure that firms and organisations mentioned are reputable, however, we can give no guarantee that they will fulfil their obligations in all circumstances. Contributors’ opinions do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or of Style Birmingham Ltd. Any material submitted is done so at the owner’s risk, and the company can take no responsibility for the safe storage or return of such material.

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Welcome

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Contents FASHION 010 THE HOT LIST Everything you need this summer. 012 WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT… Are connected homes a thing of the future, or are they making us lazy? 014 TREND UPDATE Effortless trends to ease you into a new season. 018 FIVE KEY PIECES The little fashion musthaves that make all the difference.

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22

THE MODERN WOMAN

020 THE GRASS IS GREENER How to shop this season’s hottest colour. 022 SEASONAL STAPLES Kick back in our top men’s fashion picks. 025 THE MODERN WOMAN Laid-back looks from Next, Bullring. 038 HIT REFRESH Give your wardrobe a new lease of life with Bullring & Grand Central. 058 EXPRESS YOURSELF Go bright and bold with Harvey Nichols Birmingham. 072 NEW KID ON THE BLOCK Say hello to Birmingham’s new Emporio Armani store. 074 EASE IN TO THE SEASON The temperature’s rising at Mailbox Birmingham. 105 THE NEXT GENERATION Watch out for these Midlands Fashion Awards winners. 121 ICONIC DESIGNS Just a few of the most influential pieces from the last 100 years. 130 THE BRUTAL TRUTH Kirsty Bosley explores Birmingham’s changing urban landscape.

BEAUTY & GROOMING 081 BACK TO YOUR ROOTS We’ve got your summer hair care sorted. 083 SKIN DEEP The serums to buy to keep your skin smooth and plump.

Laid-back looks from Next, Bullring 084 BOTTLED UP Freshen up with these gorgeous scents from Harvey Nichols Birmingham. 086 SOFT FOCUS Switch up your makeup routine with Bullring & Grand Central. 094 THE SPRITZ FOR YOUR BITS Say hello to The Perfect V. 096 HYALURONIC ACID: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW The skincare saviour everyone’s talking about!

FEATURES 034 STYLE HAS NO GENDER Philip Ellis takes a look at the future of genderless fashion.

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048 WHERE TO FOR #METOO? Hollie Fox talks about the recent movement and where we go from here. 051 THE MAN BEHIND THE BRAND Christopher Raeburn talks about the importance of sustainability in fashion. 098 THE FUTURE ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE How did artists and writers imagine the 21st century? 114 REVIVAL TECHNOLOGY A welcome reminder or time to grow up? 118 MOSELEY: THE PLACE TO BE Buzzing with bars and restaurants, there are plenty of hidden gems to discover here.

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138 GOIN’ UP GOIN’ DOWN What we’re loving and loathing. 9


Hotlist

GET STRIPEY

For the guys, this striped yellow tee is best worn with dark denim jeans for a laid-back weekend look. New Look Men Pale yellow stripe long sleeve, £14.99

THE FEMALE GAZE

These chic cat-eye glasses are a must-have this summer. Mango Acetate frame sunglasses, £17.99

FOR THE MODERN WOMAN

British playwright, novelist and poet Deborah Levy explores what it means to transform your life as a modern day woman in this ‘living autobiography’. The Cost of Living, £12.99, Foyles

CALM DOWN

Skin feeling irritated after shaving? This soothing balm calms using witch hazel and calendula whilst preventing spots. Neal’s Yard Men’s calming aftershave balm, £15.50

THE HOT LIST

BLUE BOY

The denim revival is well and truly underway. Embrace the popular trend with this lightweight jacket with handy front pockets. Zara Man Flowing denim jacket, £29.99

A little bit of everything we’re loving this season, from books to backpacks KICK BACK

Luckily for us, this season’s biggest shoe trend is a comfortable one. Dress up your casual look with a pair of practical slingbacks for an effortless but stylish look. Next Block slingback heels, £36

THE BIGGER THE BETTER

The Eastpak x Raf Simons exclusive collection has landed at Harvey Nichols Birmingham and we can’t get enough. Eastpak X Raf Simons Vinyl backpack, £200, Harvey Nichols 10


LUXE LOTION

LOOSE FIT

Awaken your complexion and transform your skin with this luxurious and silky hydrator. La Mer The treatment lotion, £105, Harvey Nichols

A pair of high waisted wide leg jeans will take you all the way through the warmer months. Pair these with a loose blouse, plain tee or lightweight jumper - the options are endless. Topshop MOTO tobacco cropped wide leg jeans, £40

LEATHER GOODS

Pair statement print dresses with a subtle minibag. This smooth leather bag with optional detachable shoulder strap is big enough for all the essentials, meaning you won’t have to carry too much around. Emporio Armani Mini bag with shaped detail, £360

TOUCH OF SILVER

Made from 925 sterling silver with green stone detailing, this hand-finished Thomas Sabo ring is an elegant gift for the lady in your life. Thomas Sabo Green stone ring, £69

SUNSHINE SHADE

Bring a pop of sunshine to every occasion in this standout lemon suit. Whether you’re wearing it as separates or a co-ord, it’s sure to turn heads for all the right reasons. Topshop Lemon trousers, £30, lemon jacket, £49

PINK HUES

If you’re looking to add a bit of Scandi design into your home, this is the armchair for you. This neat, contemporary piece of furniture also has a matching sofa to make your room the perfect Nordic space. MADE.COM Becca armchair in Dusty Pink, £399

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Opinion

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We need to talk about...

Words: Mike Raven

CONNECTED HOMES

@Mike_raven

A

lexa, good morning... That’s how my day starts, everyday. And I love it. Who would have thought this little round dot on my side table would bring me such joy? I’m sure when I was younger, I dreamed of the day that I could turn a light on with my voice, let alone play music, boil a kettle and even order a taxi. It sounds like absolute madness, but the time has finally arrived and I’m living for it! Now there are sceptics who say the connected home is making us lazy, to whom I say “good day to you”, and stroll off chuckling to myself about their primitive way of living. Of course, I could get up and turn on the lights using the switch on the wall (Alexa can sometimes be aloof, and leave me reluctantly shuffling off my seat to actually use my finger to flick a switch), or even look outside to find out what the weather is like. But, these people are missing the point. The thing I love the most about having a virtual assistant to do all of these things for me, is that I get a chance to focus on me. Sure turning on a light, or even going out to get milk if I’ve ran out isn’t the end of the world - but why would I do that when I can sit back, relax and catch up on the latest episode of American Crime Story, or better yet go for a run and release all of those endorphins to make myself feel great? Of course we can all do

“Of course I could get up and turn on the lights using the switch on the wall, but these people are missing the point.”

those things AND still go about our daily lives, but I’m an advocate for simplifying the little things so that I have more time for me and the things I love. And it’s not just about talking to a strange women in the corner of the room. She’s just the icing on the cake, why not time everything to be autonomous. 6am: Lights on, turn the thermostat up, 6:05: Mariah Carey playlist (don’t judge), 6:30: Turn on kitchen lights and boil the kettle. See what I’m getting at? Your life will be changed for the better (Mariah Carey playlist optional, sort of). I’m not saying there aren’t pitfalls, obviously not every appliance comes ready and waiting for you to wail random commands at it, in the hope that it turns on and off, and there have been instances of Alexa randomly cackling when asked to perform minor tasks. There is also the whole concept of privacy. It’s a bit scary that Alexa might be listening to everything I say, but then again so is my phone, and maybe even my computer; and judging by the adverts I keep getting so is Facebook. That being said, I’m not changing my mind and I’m on a mission to convert all sceptics. Alexa is here to stay, and maybe one day (hopefully) our apartments and houses will come readily connected, but for now I’ll settle for a few lights and a kettle. “Alexa, order seven packets of crisps and a Toblerone.”

Still not convinced? Tweet us @Stylebham and tell us your thoughts. Want more? Check out stylebham.com

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Trends

SIES MARJAN

TREND UPDATE

Ease into summer with these effortless trends, fresh off the catwalk

MAX MARA

MICHAEL KORS

JW ANDERSON

SIES MARJAN MICHAEL KORS

SIES MARJAN MICHAEL KORS

From stylish beachwear at Michael Kors to seductive silks at Sies Marjan; this unisex shade dominated catwalks. For an understated seasonal look, mix pastels with neutral whites and don’t be afraid to combine different textures like silk, satin and wool. 14

MICHAEL KORS

LUXE LAVENDER


SONIA RYKEL MICHAEL KORS

MIU MIU

SIES MARJAN

MICHAEL KORS

ROLAND MOURET

MICHAEL KORS

RALPH & RUSSO

LACOSTE

LACOSTE

LACOSTE

THE BIGGER, THE BETTER

Ditch the tight clothing this summer and allow for loose, oversized and baggy fits. Exaggerated sleeves were showcased at Ralph & Russo, whilst Michael Kors focused on relaxed suiting reminiscent of the 90’s. Not only will you be comfier throughout the warmer months, this look also requires minimal effort. 15


Trends

SONIA RYKEL

JUMP IN

MAX MARA

Whether you’re heading out to a formal gathering, a laid-back summer BBQ or a brunch date, the versatile jumpsuit can be worn a variety of ways. For casual looks, opt for a drop crotch style to ensure maximum comfort and if you’re heading off to work, a tailored suit jumpsuit is the power piece everybody should own.

SONIA RYKEL

PRINGLE OF SCOTLAND MAX MARA

MAX MARA SONIA RYKEL

RALPH & RUSSON

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Shopping

FIVE KEY PIECES The wardrobe essentials you need in your life this summer

Pared Eyewear

Mango Acetate frame sunglasses, £17.99

THE SUNGLASSES

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Zara Geometric sunglasses, £19.99 Max Mara

Wave goodbye to tiny 90’s sunglasses that dominated last season and hello to oversized statement glasses in every colour. Think cat-eye, oval and square shapes to embrace one of the biggest trends of the season. These are a chic way to take your look to the next level.

Topshop Willis rectangle frame sunglasses, £16


The Bag Zara Straw bag with rounded handles, £29.99

New Look Rust button front midi wrap, £22.99

Topshop Shelley straw basket bag, £26

Mango Striped midi dress, £29.99

It’s the bag that symbolises summer; the straw arm candy is back and better than ever in bigger sizes and fun shapes. Whether you’re opting for a straw tote to take down to the beach or a basket bag just for the small essentials, there are plenty of ways to wear this seasonal trend.

The Dress New Look Pale pink wrap front midi dress, £22.99

If you’re on the hunt for a dress to fit multiple occasions, the midi is your new best friend. Dress down with plain white trainers and a denim jacket, or add a heel and a clutch for a formal look. Either way, this looser alternative to tight, uncomfortable dresses is the best option for the warmer months.

Michael Kors

River Island White textured wide leg trousers, £45

Roland Mouret

Alexander McQueen Runway Leather platform trainers, £360, Selfridges

THE TROUSERS

Reiss Leo cropped wide-leg jeans, £95

Office Chunky lace up trainers, £39

You can’t go wrong with a pair of loose fit white jeans or trousers for summer. Perfectly paired with a crisp white shirt to ooze effortlessness or a cropped light jumper on cooler evenings, this flattering high waisted shape will tuck you in at the right place, or add a belt to accentuate the waist even further.

Zara Contrasting flatform sneakers, £49.99

The Shoes

It’s the chunkier the better when it comes to trainers. Following the Gucci and Balenciaga ‘ugly dad shoes’ craze that recently swept across catwalks, high streets and designers alike have released a variety of shapes and styles to embrace the trend. From clean-cut Alexander McQueens to the more affordable basics from Office, there’s a chunky trainer to fit every budget. 19


Shopping

THE GRASS IS GREENER Think light olive hues, standout emerald suits and bold summer prints Self-Portrait Open-shoulder maxi dress, £340

The Bright One: Jade

Stripes, checks and flourishing florals are a bold and refreshing way to embrace the new season. Go big or go home by clashing oranges, pinks and yellows to bring all the attention your way.

Michael Kors Topshop Double breasted suit jacket, £49

Upgrade your formal wardrobe with a bold tailored option. Deeper green shades work best with flattering jumpsuits and fitted suits. Add minimal gold accessories and barelythere heels for a sophisticated occasion. 20

Zara Checked dress with buttons, £39.99

gth silk Mid-len Sandro lfridges 369, Se dress £

The Formal One: Emerald

H&M Crepe jumpsuit, £39.99


Mango

Chloé Nile Leather Cross-body bag, £1,190, Selfridges

H&M Wide lyocell-blend trousers, £39.99

New Look Asymetric button front jumpsuit, £22.99

Mango Modal suit trousers, £35.99

The Laid-back One: Olive

For en effortless and lightweight outfit, try playing around with loose-fit olives. Ideal for travelling, this shade can easily be dressed up or down depending on your mood and occasion. Pair with straw accessories to create the perfect summer ensemble, or classic white trainers and a slogan tee for a sports luxe feel.

The Finishing Touches: Gold Accents

Kate Sylvester

Karen Millen Clean utility dress, £127

H&M Wide trouse rs, £39.99

Thomas Sabo Classic hoope earrings, £98

Whether it’s handbag hardware, simple necklaces or hoop earrings, adding a few small golden accents will seamlessly bring your whole look together.

Thomas Sabo ‘Glam Spirit’ watch, £229

The Durable One: Khaki

This modern utility trend is both practical and stylish. Oversized shirts, wide-leg trousers and belted shift dresses are all staple pieces for this look, softened with more neutral shades of stone, ecru and white to bring the tone down. 21


Shopping BOSS Slim-fit t-shirt, £65

TOPMAN Off white denim jacket, £50 BOSS Relaxed-fit pleated cotton chinos, £169

A SOFTER PALETTE

Forget dark knits, denim and leather and embrace the warmer months in lighter shades and fabrics. If the thought of wearing white is too daunting, try off-white shades to create a contemporary, modern feel.

What We Wear

Se aso na l S ta p le s It’s time to kick back, relax and enjoy summer in style with our pick of men’s must-haves Gucci Printed silk shirt, £870, Harvey Nichols

Zara

New Look Black and green stripe shirt, £17.99

RESORT SHIRTS

Zara Floral voile shirt, £25.99

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These statement short-sleeved shirts are back with a bang for summer. With a looser fit and open collar, this lightweight option will keep you cool in more ways than one. Experiment with tropical prints, playful florals and statement stripes to create an eclectic poolside look.


THE STYLISH TRAVELLER

Zara Jogging trousers with side stripes, £25.99

H&M Slim linen suit trousers, £24.99

Whatever mode of transport you’re using, if you’re escaping city life for somewhere exotic, you need to be comfortable. Bring it back to basics and opt for striped joggers or cotton shorts and most importantly, a staple pair of trainers. To make any outfit look instantly more stylish, simply add sunglasses.

Zara Sandro Woven bomber jacket, £475, Selfridges

Emporio Armani Cupro Trousers with darts, £360 Paul Smith Canvas tote bag, £150

ASOS

Zara Cotton bermuda shorts, £19.99

Paul Smith Slim-fit short-sleeve cotton shirt, £195

H&M Brushed cotton shirt, £34.99

Relaxed Suiting Alexander McQueen Runner leather trainers, £460, Selfridges

Throw away the suiting rulebook and forget what you thought you knew about clean-cut tailoring, because now’s the time for relaxed suits. If you’re attending a summer wedding abroad, lighter fabrics are the perfect option, so consider cotton and linen when choosing your outfit. 23


CONTACT: +44 (0) 20 77 20 97 25 UK@THOMASSABO.COM


Orange tie front jumpsuit, ÂŁ28

The Modern Women Reinvent your look with laidback jumpsuits and culottes for a contemporary feel with Next, Bullring

Photography: Mike Raven, Photography Assistant: Simon Konaszczuk, Styling: Jade Woodhouse Hair: Bev Perrott, Makeup: Bethany Strong, Model: Roxanna at Bookings

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70s Chic

Pink/red stripe midi dress, ÂŁ32

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Pink denim dungaree shorts, ÂŁ34

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70s Chic

White casual shirt, £22 black top stitch detail culottes, £38 grey suede point slingbacks, £58

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70s Chic

Twist vest, ÂŁ22 black top-stitch detail culottes, ÂŁ38

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Blue tencel jumpsuit, £35 denim blue bow slip-on skaters, £35

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70s Chic

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Ecru twill belted culottes, ÂŁ35 red stripe tie back stitch sweater, ÂŁ30

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ASOS x GLAAD

Social

Words: Philip Ellis / @Philip_Ellis

STYLE HAS NO GENDER As a society, we’re questioning the old-fashioned gender binary — and this conversation is being reflected both on the runway and at the makeup counter

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River Island

T

he world’s “first gender-free clothing store” opened in Manhattan this March. Founded by fashion industry veteran Rob Smith, who has worked for brands as diverse as Nike and Victoria’s Secret, The Phluid Project doesn’t have male or female sections, instead displaying clothing simply by category, such as jeans or knitwear. While The Phluid Project claims to be the first store where every single item can be worn across any gender, it is by no means the first to explore the idea; last year John Lewis announced its children’s clothing lines would not be categorised by gender, and ASOS collaborated with GLAAD on a unisex collection. In February this year, River Island launched its “Labels are for clothes, not people” campaign. So what does genderless fashion actually look like in 2018? Jaden Smith might have donned a skirt for Louis Vuitton two years ago, but examples like this remain a rarity. I’m reminded of a quote by the character Julie from Ian McEwan’s novel The Cement Garden, immortalised by Charlotte Gainsbourg in the film adaptation and later borrowed by Madonna in her single What It Feels Like For A Girl. It perfectly encapsulates the old guard of clothing binaries, in which “unisex” really just means encouraging women to dress more like men, while failing to challenge men’s preconceptions of what is and isn’t acceptable to

Nicopanda x MAC

wear. It goes like this: “Girls can wear jeans and cut their hair short and wear shirts and boots because it’s OK to be a boy; for girls it’s like promotion. But for a boy to look like a girl is degrading, according to you, because secretly you believe that being a girl is degrading.” Until now, a fair few brands’ views of unisex fashion seemed to mirror that sentiment and err on the side of caution with muted colour tones and loose-fitting, masculine-of-centre styles. If they did blur gender lines, it pretty much extended to “cute girls in oversized menswear” and “boys with abs in crop tops.” (Or, of course, rompers.) Thankfully, a more expressive and colourful unisex style is emerging thanks to players like Nicopanda, who recently partnered with MAC on a new genderless makeup line, and the aforementioned Phluid Project store, which certainly covers some of the easier bases of genderless style, stocking lines from streetwear brands like Champion and FILA in sizes suitable for all body types. But it doesn’t end there; shoppers will also find garments from more niche labels, such as Gypsy Sport and Meat. This burgeoning commercial trend doesn’t exist in a vacuum; it is a response to growing market demand for gender non-conforming style, which makes perfect sense when you consider that only 44 per cent of Gen Zers (13 to 20 year olds) in the United States buy clothes exclusively designed for their own gender, according to research by J. Walter Thompson Intelligence. In the same study, more than half of 35


Social

respondents stated that they know somebody who uses gender-neutral pronouns. Fashion houses have been pushing gender boundaries on the runway for years; androgynous supermodel Andreja Pejić walked the catwalk for Jean-Paul Gaultier in both men and women’s shows before coming out as trans in 2013. More recently, there has been an emergence of high profile transgender models who have mass market appeal, like Munroe Bergdorf, who was the first trans spokesmodel for L’Oreal and has since been the face of an Illamasqua campaign; Hari Nef, who was the first trans woman to grace the cover of Elle magazine in the United Kingdom; and Orange Is The New Black star Laverne Cox, who teamed up with ORLY on her “Celebrate Yourself” nail polish collection. On YouTube, male influencers like Jeffree Star, James Charles and Manny MUA have been able to leverage their love of makeup into careers, complete with their own cosmetics lines, fashion shows and endorsements. Not only that, but they are often the first ones teen girls will turn to when it comes to beauty tutorials; these younger audiences don’t even question the idea of a man in makeup. And why should they? What we tend to think of as gendered trends these days are relatively new inventions. High heels, makeup, brightly coloured clothes and wigs were all en vogue among men in the court of Louis XVI, for instance. In fact, throughout history a flamboyant appearance has been more associated with your class and standing in society than with your gender. In Ancient Egypt, makeup and jewellery were used as a way to show off your wealth, but they were also means of warding off illness and misfortune; it was believed that wearing certain colours and stones invoked the protection of

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From left: Andreja Pejić for Jean-Paul Gaultier, Hari Nef for Elle Magazine

Images: Getty, Elle Magazine, GUESS and Kye

“HIGH-HEELED SHOES WERE WORN BY MEN FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS”

the gods. In Elizabethan England, pale skin was all the rage thanks to Queen Elizabeth I, and so men and women alike would cake themselves in white makeup. Again, this was aesthetic-asstatus-symbol; a white complexion signified that you were wealthy enough to not have to spend all day labouring outside, and could spend your leisure time indoors. (Ironically, these days, a tan signifies that you have the leisure time to bask on a sun lounger.) Similarly, high-heeled shoes were worn by men for hundreds of years. The Persian cavalry brought the trend to Europe in the 10th Century; they were a practical option for riding on horseback. As with the Elizabethan pale skin trend, heels eventually became associated with the upper classes, as they suggested that you didn’t spend much time walking around. Heels weren’t gendered; they were worn by men and women alike until the 18th Century, when the French Revolution put an end to aristocratic fashions. And up until the early 1900s the colour pink, which was drummed into my generation as being “for girls” while growing up, was considered primarily a male colour, as it was seen to be a diluted version of red, the colour of the military and hot-blooded masculinity. Conversely, the light blue we associate with baby boys was deemed dainty and more suited to girls.


From top: Guess His and Hers Collcetion, Kye FW17

It was toward the end of the 18th Century that men’s fashion began to lose its shine, thanks to what historians call the Great Male Renunciation, during which conventional male attire began to eschew bright colours, ornate jewellery, and highheeled shoes, becoming less of a class signifier and more of a gender signifier. In his book The Descent of Man, artist Grayson Perry describes the traditionally masculine look of the last hundred years as “default man”, characterised most often by a bland grey suit which has the purpose of blending in rather than standing out. “An erroneous subtext that hovers around gender is that femininity is more applied, more of a show than masculinity,” he writes. “The female wardrobe is seen as one extraneous addition, all artifice, hairdos, makeup, frills and heels, while men’s clothes are entirely necessary for function and little more.” The implication here, of course, is that the drab way in which men are encouraged to present themselves to the world is more serious, more genuine, than feminine gender expression. This boxy, ill-fitting, off-the-rack brand of masculinity is being rejected by young men all over the world. In Japan, there is the phenomenon of “jendaresu-kei” or “genderless style”, which is seeing more and more young men in Tokyo’s vibrant Harajuku district reject the traditional suit in favour of more adventurous fashion, beauty and grooming trends. This often crosses over with “kawaii”, an aesthetic which is all about looking carefree and cute. In South Korea, the competitive term “ulzzang” (which translates to “good-looking”, or more literally “best face”) has morphed into an entire online subculture in and of itself, wherein young men and women go all out with the makeup and filters to create an idealised version of themselves. Fashion, like gender, is a construct. And just as the way we think about gender identity will surely continue to evolve in the future, so too will the seemingly arbitrary divides between what we think of as “male” or “female” style. It is possible to imagine a fashion-fluid future in which every shop on the high street follows the example of these forward-looking subcultures and the brands catering to them, where there is no such thing as a men’s or women’s section, and where you will see people of all gender identities and sexual orientations trying on products at the makeup counter. And what could be more exciting, more liberating, than that? When the limitations placed on what we are and aren’t “supposed” to like are taken away, we will be able to express ourselves more fully and authentically than ever before. 37


Hit Refresh.

Give your wardrobe a new lease of life with these timeless trends at Bullring and Grand Central Birmingham

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REISS, SELFRIDGES

Shirt, ÂŁ95, Shorts, ÂŁ65

Photography: Mike Raven, Photography Assistant: Simon Konaszczuk, Styling: Jade Woodhouse, Hair: Jamie Richards, Makeup: Sarah Spence, Models: Joseph at Established and Julyanna at PRM

Wardrobe refresh


G-STAR RAW

She wears: Shirt, £75, Trousers, £140. He wears: Jacket, £145, Trousers, £160

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Wardrobe refresh

JOHN LEWIS, GAP, DUNE

Top, Modern Rarity at John Lewis £65, Trousers, Gap £49.95, Heels, Dune £80, Bracelet, Accessorize £8 40


GAP

T-shirt, £8.95, Trousers, £49.95

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Wardrobe refresh

G-STAR RAW

Jacket, £145, Trousers, £160, Trainers, £90

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NEEDLE & THREAD, SELFRIDGES Dress, £450

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Wardrobe refresh

GAP

Jumper, ÂŁ34.95

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45


Wardrobe refresh

G-STAR RAW

Shirt, £75, Trousers, £140

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THOM BROWNE, SELFRIDGES Jacket, £2470, Trousers, £1360

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Equality

Where to for #MeToo? Words: Hollie Fox / @holliefox

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Below: Women march across the world in support of the #MeToo campaign

Images: Shutterstock

“The most powerful way to explode the myth of individual responsibility, is simply to stand beside another woman and say ‘me too’”, said Sophie Walker of the Women’s Equality Party. It’s been a little over six months since the #MeToo movement pulsated through the social media sphere in a phenomenal way. A movement that not only exposed the abuse of power in Hollywood and prompted investigations into sexual misconduct in Parliament but reminded us that almost every woman has a similar story to tell. Half a year later, sexual politics still remains at the forefront of our minds. For many, #MeToo was the icebreaker for a new kind of conversation. Following the widespread support for the #MeToo movement, and outrage at the system of control that facilitated the loathsome behaviour of powerful men like Harvey Weinstein, over 300 female Hollywood Figures signed an open letter of solidarity for “courageous individuals [who] revealed the dark truth of ongoing sexual harassment and assault...in the entertainment industry.” In true Elle Woods fashion, Reese Witherspoon, and other notable women in the industry, spearheaded the Time’s Up campaign, which provides legal assistance to women who have been harassed in the workplace. They aimed to address “the systemic inequality and injustice in the workplace that have kept underrepresented groups from reaching their full potential.” “Time is up. We are no longer going to be harassed, we are no longer going to be mistreated or discriminated against or paid less money,” said Witherspoon, at an event honouring International Women’s Day at UN Headquarters. “We are going to create more opportunities for each other.” While the #MeToo movement has paved the way for huge progress, activists are worried that the hype can only take us so far. Laura Bates, founder of the #EverydaySexism movement, describes how she hopes #MeToo will bring about change. “I feel both wary and excited,” she confessed in an interview with The Guardian, “Part of me wants to believe that this really is a tipping point, and another part of me remembers the wise words of veteran feminist, Cynthia Enloe, who

recently asked: “How many tipping points have we had?” If this is the tipping point, what lies on the other side? Speaking at the United State of Women Summit in L.A., community organiser, Tarana Burke, who first used the phrase “Me Too” in 2006, called for activists to start taking action. “Me too was just two words; it’s two magic words that galvanised the world,” Burke said. “The work that needs to happen now is what happens after you said ‘me too’.” A call to action might just be what the movement needs, for as quickly as the conversation started, there were people ready to shut it down. With significant celebrity voices, from Liam Neeson to Brigitte Bardot, referring to the movement as a “witch hunt”. As amusing as it might be to imagine Meryl Streep throwing a bucket of water over Harvey Weinstein’s head, the backlash to #MeToo is often rooted in victim-blaming and accusing those who speak out of simply “hating men”. “The vast majority are being hypocritical and ridiculous,” said Bardot. “Lots of actresses try to play the tease with producers to get a role.” So, where to now? What happens after you’ve said “me too”? Speaking at the debate: “Has the #MeToo Movement Gone Too Far?”, WEP Leader, Sophie Walker, reminds us why it’s important that we continue to have this conversation: “#MeToo is challenging entrenched messages about individual responsibility.” “It’s in collective organising that women find strength.” It’s important that we are optimistic about the future and about the progress we’ve made towards creating an environment that means those who were brave enough to share their #MeToo stories, never feel silenced ever again. We can do this by supporting charities that help sexual assault survivors, by using our right to vote to make sure our representatives see these issues as a priority (Birmingham now has a Women’s Equality Party branch), and by pushing for reform in our workplaces and our justice system. Turning #MeToo from a hashtag into hope isn’t going to be easy, but that’s why it’s important.


#TRENDING S H O P F O R S TAT E M E N T P I E C E S I N OV E R 70 OF YOU R FAVOU R I TE S TOR E S

T H E L O O K S YO U WA N T, F R O M R E TA I L E R S YO U L O V E ALL TOGETHER IN ONE PL ACE.


THE MAN BEHIND THE BRAND Words: Jade Woodhouse

In an era of cheap fastfashion brands and increasing environmental concerns, sustainability is more important now than ever before. We spoke to fashion designer Christopher Raeburn about how a few small steps can make a big impact 51


Fashion

Christopher Raeuburn AW18

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Mango Committed Sustainable

H&M Conscious Exclusive Collection 2018

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silk map anorak, a tote bag made of parachutes and a bucket hat created using only pre-flown kites - these are just a few items from Christopher Raeburn’s collections. They’re all remade, all recycled and most importantly, all gradually transforming the fashion industry’s impact on the environment one piece at a time. And sustainability has always been a fascination of Christopher’s, having already established his eco-friendly ideas during his studies at London’s Royal College of Art, where he graduated back in 2006. “Even going all the way back to my degree, I worked around the idea called Remade in England. It was about the deconstruction and reuse of original military materials which I made into useful contemporary pieces.” “The first collection I ever showed at London Fashion Week was just eight garments made from one parachute which I bought very affordably. It’s creativity that’s helped to build my business rather than spending loads of money. There’s definitely ways to build businesses through creativity.” “It’s already been 12 years since I left and I’ve been running my own business for nearly 10 years, which I’ve grown very organically. Our whole business focuses around responsible design, so lots of remaking and recycling.” Whilst he still maintains the same outlook when designing menswear, womenswear and accessories collections, he’s certainly come a long way since his student days, with his constantly developing concepts allowing his work to remain relevant in an everchanging and evolving society. “We actually still use a lot of parachutes, it’s really one of the most iconic fabrics we work with but over the years we’ve developed this. We’ve worked with everything from 1950s maps and blankets to life rafts. You name it, we’ll deconstruct it and make it into something new.”

“You name it, we’ll deconstruct it and make it into something new.”

“The very nature of fashion is that it’s always changing. We’ve never been too worried about trends or the way things can shift rapidly. It’s about making sure our clothes are relevant, useful and, where possible, making things that are timeless.” If we applied this attitude to the way we buy clothes and invested in quality key pieces that transcend a faddish trend, we’d all be contributing to a healthier planet. But, for a lot of people, this is easier said than done and only in the last few years have we seen high street shops offer more environmentally-friendly collections, such as H&M’s Concious, Zara’s Join Life and Mango’s Committed Sustainable. Now, more than ever, it’s all too easy to browse the internet and get a whole outfit for under £30 delivered to your doorstep in less than 24 hours. 53


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REMADE Studio

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“Having the chance to speak about the incredible work the graduates are doing around the world is a real honour and something that I’m really looking forward to getting my teeth into.”

When asked about whether it’s possible to get the balance right between living a more sustainable life and not spending too much money, Christopher makes the point that, a lot of the time, reusing and recycling is actually often cheaper than buying. “It’s all about balance. As a business we don’t for a minute pretend to be perfect or to do everything completely responsibly, but it’s about transparency and balancing what you’re able to do.” And for sourcing his own materials, Christopher also adopts a hands-on approach. “It’s so important for me to physically go to destinations around the world, whether it be flea markets or warehouses, to find all this amazing stuff. I’ve always felt that it’s a lot like archaeology because you’re going out and seeing things with your own eyes. You also have to consider early on what that original item might be able to become in the future.” “This is a business that has always been looking outwards; we want to be connected with what’s happening in society and what’s happening in communities. All of that is influenced through politics and economics. We’re hoping to inspire and educate in our own way without preaching with the work that we’re doing every day.” Unlike a lot of fashion designers, Christopher regularly opens the doors of his REMADE studio in Hackney to the public. As a working environment for his team in the day, the creative space which used to be home to the the old Burberry textile factory, hosts workshops, events and even Table Tennis Tuesdays. His inclusive attitude and down-to-earth nature is what sets him apart from the rest. He may be offering advice and words of wisdom to graduates across the country, but he still holds opinions from those around him in high regard. “Over the years I’ve taken little bits of advice from lots of people to grow the business.

It’s important be as sponge-like as you can. Respectfully listen to experiences from whichever mentor or advisor you might be talking to and then make your own decision once you’ve spoken to a few people. That’s the key to any business really.” It’s these innovative, forward-thinking ideas that have resulted in Christopher taking on a huge role as Global Ambassador for Graduate Fashion Week this year, joining the likes of Julien McDonald, Holly Fulton and Henry Holland who also support the event. Founded in 1991, the charity organisation celebrates and showcases students and graduates, helping them build contacts, gain experience and get a taste of life after university in the fast-paced, and sometimes intimidating, world of fashion. “I think it’s a perfect platform for change, and one that’s grown steadily over the years. As a result, companies are looking to Graduate Fashion Week every year with a trust of new ideas and sense of excitement.” “Having the chance to speak about the incredible work the graduates are doing around the world is a real honour and something that I’m really looking forward to getting my teeth into.” This year, Graduate Fashion Week will be taking place from Sunday 3 June to Wednesday 6 June, with a jam-packed schedule of shows featuring some of the finest talent across the country. “I’m very fortunate to be able to review a lot of different portfolios, whether that be through applicants at my own company or through Graduate Fashion Week and I’ve certainly been impressed by the all round package that graduates need to increase their opportunities for employment.” Whilst the final catwalk shows are important, Christopher highlights how the process both beforehand and behind the scenes is integral to the final outcome of the graduates, and something a lot of people don’t see. “It’s not just about the creative side any more. There’s a lot more going on in terms of understanding the mechanics behind the industry

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and it’s definitely about bringing together the business and marketing all of the different key elements that really need to work together to make somebody a success. From my own experience, I’ve found that nowadays a lot of the graduates are actually a lot better prepared for life in the real world and employment.” And it’s definitely a stark contrast to his own time at university, where social media channels that are part of our everyday lives today didn’t even exist. “Ten years ago, we didn’t have Instagram and people couldn’t make their own web shops, they couldn’t make the items essentially for sale to the whole world. Now there are fantastic businesses that have been started very recently and actually do everything online. If that’s underpinned by responsible thinking, sourcing and a really structured plan for growth, then it’s really exciting.” “I’m glad to have lived through the period that I have with the business, but the world that graduates are going into is fantastic, there are so many ways for them to play within the industry” In fact, what really catapulted his brand was when Blake Lively wore a Christopher Raeburn parka coat on a full page of US Vogue in 2011. “It was like an analogue way of things going viral, because we had people seeing that and walking in with the magazine to Barney’s in the US saying ‘I want to buy that coat.” “I’m really grateful to have gone through that period. I’d still really urge young designers to go about things incredibly professionally. If you make life easy for journalists, you’ll find a lot of people want to help you.” With a career built on absorbing knowledge from those around him, alongside a determination to really make a change, Christopher is proof that living a more sustainable life doesn’t necessarily mean changing your whole lifestyle. It can just mean reconsidering the smaller decisions we make every single day and, where possible, making choices that benefit the world around us. Like the cyclical nature of fashion, where trends inevitably come back around after a few years, before you throw something away it might be worth considering that “as opposed to thinking about one moment in time where once it’s gone and everything around it is redundant”, you could actually reuse it in a different way to give it a new lease of life. You never know, this attitude might end up giving you a new lease of life as well. Graduate Fashion Week takes place from Sunday 3 June - Wednesday 6 June 2018. To find out more, visit graduatefashionweek.com 56


DELI VERI N G SA RTORIAL EXCELLENCE


SS18

E XP RES S

YOURSELF

Maria wears: Alice + Olivia Cicely printed jersey t-shirt, £125, Alice + Olivia Katz striped pleated silk-blend skirt, £675 Cameron wears: Dsquared2 Hawaii Shirt, £380, Solid Homme Slim-leg wool blend trousers, £285

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Stand out in bold prints and daring shades with Harvey Nichols Birmingham

Photography: Mike Raven, Photography Assistant: Simon Konaszczuk, Styling: Jade Woodhouse, Makeup: Sophie Lloyd at Fenty Beauty, Hair: James Ganley at James Bushell Hair, Models: Cameron and Mariia at PRM

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SS18

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Solid Homme Colour block stripe shirt, £255, Neuw, Lou slim weekend jean, £145

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SS18

Dsquared2 Hawaii shirt, £380

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Alice + Olivia Cicely printed jersey t-shirt, ÂŁ125, Alice + Olivia Katz striped pleated silk-blend skirt

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SS18 Gestuz Stripe dress, £145, Marc Jacobs Embossed tote, £280

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J.Lindeberg Swim shorts, £75, J.Lindeberg David cotton jacquard shirt, £115, New Balance Low top trainer, £175

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SS18

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Cameron wears: Solid Homme Colour block stripe shirt, £255, Neuw, Lou slim weekend jean, £145 Maria wears: Samsoe & Samsoe Pink strap cami, £65, Missoni M, Lurex zigzag trousers, £455

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SS18

Maria wears: Gestuz stripe Dress, £145, Marc Jacobs Embossed tote, £280, Cameron Wears: J.Lindeberg David cotton jacquard shirt, £115

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70s Chic

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

Emporio Armani is the young, playful and always stylish sibling to the classically Italian Giorgio Armani

N “PLAYING WITH FASHION, WITHOUT FORSAKING BEAUTY: THIS IS THE MESSAGE OF THE COLLECTION” 72

ow open on Level 2 at Mailbox, the luxurious Giorgio Armani store boasts a fine collection of formal tailoring, laid-back athleisure and Ready-toWear garments. This is the place for young professionals seeking a contemporary, modern style. As one of the most iconic names in fashion history, Giorgio Armani has certainly made an impact on the industry in the past 40 years. He’s come a long way since his days as a sales associate on the shop floor of a popular Italian department store, having established Emporio Armani back in the early 1980s as a sub-brand of the already incredibly successful Giorgio Armani brand. Since then, he’s been hailed by The Telegraph as ‘the man who invented redcarpet dressing’, having dressed a variety of Hollywood celebrities at glamorous events, including Lady Gaga’s most recent Armani Privé gown at the 2018 Grammy Awards. He’s also developed relationships with some of the biggest names in the world, from Rihanna’s Armani Jeans collection to an Emporio Armani campaign

starring Calvin Harris and underwear shoots with the likes of Cristiano Ronaldo and David Beckham. Since streamlining his brands last year, the Emporio Armani has become a key focus, offering a new vision in the form of a variety of garish prints, playful fabrics and sporty staples. Showcased at Tobacco Dock last year for London Fashion Week, the latest collection has arrived in the stylish Mailbox store fresh off the catwalk, featuring almost-intangible materials: technical cotton fabrics, and silk and voile all enhanced by a muted palette of pastel hues. Key items include windbreakers, duster coats, T-shirts, dresses, suits, jackets, cargo pants and shorts, designed to wear layered, mixed and matched as elements of a personal expression. This is a collection dedicated to freespirited, dynamic women, unabashedly showing their legs with a sporty spring in their step. A celebration of feminine beauty in all its nuances, whether with high heels or sneakers, the SS18 collection highlights that being yourself is what really counts. We take a look at the key pieces you can expect to find this season.


Japaneseinspired pattern jacket, £720

Printed Jackets Step into spring with a lighter jacket that doesn’t compromise on style. Seen in both male and female collections, the SS18 runway welcomed both Japaneseinspired and botanical prints for a super summery feel. Keep it simple in plain black or navy, or mix it up with a printed bomber jacket paired with smart trousers and brogues for an evening look.

Blouson in floral pattern technical fabric, £900

Preppy Perfection

High-waisted silk and ottoman trousers, £360

Embrace your inner Blair Waldorf and pair patterned co-ords with playful accessories to really switch up your formalwear. Whether you’re opting for a beret, neckerchief or houndstooth, these small picks will make a big impact on your outfit.

Double breasted trench with belt, £450

A-line dress in circle pattern fabric, £450

Re-invented Suiting Renowned for his high-end suits and impeccable tailoring, Giorgio Armani has established a place in fashion for his expertise in formalwear over the years. However, the SS18 catwalk saw the classic suit completely reinvented for the modern workplace. Forget uncomfortable fabrics, boxy fits and shoulder pads, this season is all about being comfortable whilst looking sharp.

Silk palazzo trousers, £530

Single-breasted silk and ottoman jacket, £54

Shoulder bag, £550

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New Season

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Jacket, £720, trousers, £320 all Emporio Armani

EASE IN TO THE SEASON Loosen up in these staples from Mailbox, Birmingham

Photography: RileyRaven, Makeup: Chrissie Trattos, Hair: Chris Harris-Gibbs and Emily Round, Models: George at Boss and Jessica at Leni’s

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New Season

Jumper, £60, jeans, £115 trainers, £85, bag, £115 all Tommy Hillfiger 76


Left: Trousers, £200, top, £155 all Emporio Armani Below: Jacket, £595, jeans, £175 all Gieves & Hawkes

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New Season

Right: Dress, £395, L.K.Bennett and shoes, £139, Daniel Footwear Below: Jumper, £175, Nicole Farhi trousers, £225, Nicole Farhi all Harvey Nichols

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George wears shirt, £108, trousers, £129 all Hugo Boss

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OUR NEW-LOOK

NOW OPEN AT RESORTS WORLD ResortsWorldBirmingham.co.uk 80


Aveda Damage remedy intensive restructuring treatment, £24.50, Debenhams

Ouai Dry shampoo, £24, John Lewis L’Oreal Botanicals scalp hair mask, £9.99, Boots

TAKE OFF YOUR MASK Aussie 3 minute miracle reconstructor 250ml, £4.99, Superdrug

Fight the effects of heat products and restore shine with a deep mask treatment. Simply leave on wet hair for one-three minutes (or longer if you need) and wash out. And for tackling colour damaged hair, try plant oil based products to dramatically improve appearance by strengthening and restoring hair from its roots.

Kiehl’s Magic elixir hair conditioning concentrate, £30

Ouai Hair oil, £24.50, Harvey Nichols

FRESH AND CLEAN

Oribe Gold lust shampoo, £36, Harvey Nichols

Absorb excess oils and skip the oftenlaborious task of hair washing with a dry shampoo. Not only will it clean and replenish greasy hair, the right dry shampoo won’t leave hair feeling chalky, so it can be better to do your research and invest in a high-end one.

BACK TO YOUR ROOTS With summer comes sun-kissed skin, strolls on the beach and, all-too-often, damaged hair. We take a look at the best products on the market to bring your locks back to life Sisley Precious hair care oil, £75, House of Fraser

Original & Mineral Surf bomb sea salt spray, £21, John Lewis

Bumble and Bumble Surf spray, £23, Boots

SPRITZ IT LUXURY OILS

If you’ve spent a little too much time in the sun, you’ll soon start to notice the damaging effects on your hair, whether this be brittle split ends or bleaching. To smooth and nourish dry hair, simply spritz a small amount of enriching hair oil through the lengths after a bath or shower and leave to air dry.

A good salt spray is a must-have for transforming limp and lifeless hair into a full-bodied look, especially if you’re on holiday. Just a few sprays will leave you with effortless, beachy waves as salt pulls moisture from the hair to leave you with more texture and body.

Umberto Giannini Catch a Wave coconut oil spray, £7

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WIN! A luxury two night stay at Staying Cool Apartments and two VIP Weekend Tickets for Birmingham Pride! Head to stylebham.com for your chance to win!


FOR ANTI-AGEING

This 100% vegan serum has a gel-like texture which easily absorbs into the skin to help target the early signs of ageing. Designed to gradually smooth fine lines and wrinkles using a variety of natural ingredients, this will improve the overall look and feel of your skin when used daily. The Body Shop Drops of Youth™ concentrate, £26

FOR DRY SKIN

Packed with pure essential oils and botanicals, this awardwinning cult favourite is a common go-to product for those looking to hydrate and add radiance. Simply apply all over the face before bed and let the concentrate work its magic. Kiehl’s Midnight recovery concentrate, £38

Skin Deep

Guys, whether you’re looking to improve texture, combat undereye circles or add radiance, there’s a serum out there for you

FOR A TIGHT BUDGET It’s the affordable skincare brand that’s taken the beauty world by storm, The Ordinary offers simple skincare solutions to common skin issues. If you want to see visible results, this small but strong treatment will revitalise skin, even out skin tone and soften wrinkles but it should be also used with care and always alongside a high SPF.. The Ordinary Retinol 0.2% in squalane 30ml, £4.50

FOR THE EYES

Whether you’ve been running yourself into the ground with long days at work or enjoying a few too many late nights, combat dull and tired skin with this Clinique Anti-Fatigue Serum. Use daily to give your eyes a fresher, brighter look in one simple step. Clarins Anti-fatigue eye serum, £30

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Fragrance

Whether you’re fresh, fruity, delicate or distinctive there’s a scent for you at Harvey Nichols Birmingham

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1.Caudalie The Des Vignes Fresh Fragrance 50ml, £27.00, 2.Versace, Pour Femme Dylan Blue Eau De Parfum, £74.00, 3.Creed Virgin Island Water Eau De Parfum, £155, 4.Floral Street Wonderland Peony Eau De Parfum, £55.00, 5.Acqua Di Parma Chinotto di Liguria Eau De Toilette, £98, 6.Hermès Eau De Citron Noir De Cologne, £77.00, 7.Maison Margiela Replica Flower Market, £95, 8.Trussardi The Black Rose Eau De Parfum, £77.50

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ONE FOR THE LADIES 7

As well as the perfect place for retail therapy, Harvey Nichols Birmingham offers a host of events to ensure the perfect day out with your bestie. TREAT YOURSELF

From La Mer facials to Lancôme makeovers, the one-stop-beauty-shop offers innovative services and the latest top to toe treatments, you simply sit back and relax while you’re buffed and polished to perfection. Call 0121 616 6019 or email beautyconciergebirmingham@ harveynichols.com for more details

AFTERNOON TEA

Tuck in to a delicious assortment of handmade sandwiches, scones and pastries with a glass of Harvey Nichols Champagne. Afternoon tea costs £22 per person or £30 with Champagne and is served in the most stylish surroundings daily from 3.30-5.30pm. To book, please call 0121 616 6028

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COCKTAIL MASTERCLASSES

Learn how to make and shake three signature cocktails before trying your hand at mixing up your own. Each month is different, focused around a specific theme and ingredient. Masterclasses cost £30 per person or £45 including a three course meal. For bookings, please contact reservations.birmingham@ harveynichols.com

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This season, we’re all about the small touches that make a big difference so we’ve teamed up with Bullring & Grand Central to bring you the best products for fuss-free makeup

All products available at Bullring & Grand Central. Photography: Mike Raven, Models: Kiera at Leni’s and Cecile at Bookings, Hair: Chris at HarrisGibbs, Makeup: Chrissie Trattos

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THE PERFECT GLOW The phrase “strobing”refers to a technique of highlighting without contouring; simply apply the Strobe Cream, £12, MAC or NARS Illuminator in Copacabana, £23, Selfridges all over the face to instantly rejuvenate and boost the appearance of dull skin, or for a super affordable option, the Revolution Strobe Highlighter in Flash, £3, Superdrug is a great choice. 88


F R E S H FA C E D The last thing you want in the warmer months is thick, cakey foundation so opt for a BB cream for a natural “barely-there” look and feel. Designed to give you a subtle coverage, the Actively Correcting & Beautifying BB Cream, £24.50, Kiehl’s or Daily Protection BB Cream, £9.90, Kiko Milano both have SPF coverage, so you can protect your skin as the heat rises. 89


Beauty

MAKING ME BLUSH Blusher adds a natural flush to your face, as well as adding shape to make you look fresh-faced and youthful. Cheek tints are great if you’re in a bit of a rush and both the Benefit Posietint Poppy-Pink Tinted Lip & Cheek Stain, £25.50, John Lewis and Chanel Rouge Coco Lip Blush in Teasing Pink, £28, John Lewis also double up as a lip stain. 90


THE GOLDEN TOUCH If you’re bored of conventional eyeshadow, try stepping out of your comfort zone with a graphic eye. At the moment, we’re loving standout metallics, so try Always Sharp 3D Liner in Antiqued Green with Gold, £17, Smashbox or Liquid Eyeliner in The Future is Gold, £8.90, Kiko Milano for a gorgeous golden eye. To avoid overdoing it, try to keep the base and lips minimal. 91


Beauty

GET GLOSSY Combine Clear Lipglass, £15.50, MAC with a loose pigment (we recommend NYX Professional Makeup Shimmer Pigment in Luna, £5.50, Boots) to create an ethereal eye look. Perfect for the summer months, this alternative to a matte eye is an easy way to change your look without buying loads of new products. Lightly pat the gloss onto your shadow and you’re good to go! 92


PUCKER UP Mastering the art of a deep bold lip with a liner. Carefully draw an outline in a deep berry or brown liner before applying Charlotte Tilbury Matte Revolution Lipstick in Glastonberry, £24, Selfridges. We recommend the NYX Slide On Lip Liner Pencil in Dark Soul, £6, Boots for an affordable option or Charlotte Tilbury Lip Cheat Liner in Bad Romance, £18, Selfridges for a high-end pout. 93


The Perfect V

YOUR CHANCE TO WIN!

We’re giving one lucky reader the chance to win the whole collection from The Perfect V worth more than £300! Head to stylebham.com/win.

Give your bikini area the TLC it deserves with The Perfect V, the new beauty collection that targets and pampers the delicate area to break the taboo on feminine products. Encouraging women to feel beautiful all over, The Perfect V range serves as the perfect preparation if you’re spending your summer by the pool in a bikini, lounging on the beach or if you simply want a little pick-me-up. The beautifully packaged collection features a variety of luxurious products, including the Shades of V Luminizer to highlight and soften, the VV Exfoliator to refine and renew and the VV Beauty Mist (pictured) to refresh and revitalise. All products are dermatologically tested and fragrance, SLS and paraben free, exclusive to Harvey Nichols in the UK.

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THE SPRITZ FOR YOUR BITS


Photography: Ben Appleby

NEW BEAUTY TREND ALERT!

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70s Chic Glossier

Hyaluronic Acid: Everything you need to know Despite the slightly scary (and very scientific) name, this easily accessible product is now cropping up on most beauty aisles and here’s why

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ou’ve probably heard about hyaluronic acid in the last year or so, as the popularity of acids is on the rise in the beauty world. However, what you probably don’t know is that our bodies already produce hyaluronic acid as a natural lubricant – it simply decreases in age. It can be found in a variety of product types, most commonly serums and moisturisers, and the key benefits include plumping and smoothing the skin. Depending on the type of product you choose, different formulations will give you different results, from rehydrating dry skin to locking in moisture or reducing fine lines. We take a look at some of the best hyaluronic acid products for every budget and every skin concern.

3. Pestle & Mortar Hyaluronic Serum, £36 Bringing it back to basics is Pestle & Mortar, the brand that prides itself on simple yet effective skincare solutions. This cruelty-free range recently landed at Harvey Nichols Birmingham and we can’t get enough of the fuss-free, simplistic packaging. Smooth two-three drops of the Hyaluronic Serum on clean skin every morning and night for an intense treatment which will soften skin over time.

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1. The Ordinary Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5, £5.90

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4. Rodial Dragon’s Blood Hyaluronic Tonic, £34

For just £5.90 for 30ml, The Ordinary Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5 is one of the most affordable products on our list. Once you get past the scientific jargon, you’ll find that because hyaluronic acid is “too large of a molecule to penetrate the skin”, it can commonly “sit on the surface and draw moisture out” but this oil-free, alcohol-free and vegan serum actually works to offer deep hydration and a plumping effect.

Give your skin an instant boost with the Rodial Dragon’s Blood Hyaluronic Toner. Perfect if you’re jetting off somewhere exotic and need a little spritz throughout the day to keep your skin feeling fresh, this travel-friendly tonic also contains rose water to calm the skin and Vitamin B3 to brighten.

2. Glossier Super Bounce, £24

Aside from the cute pastel packaging, this serum is the perfect addition to your bathroom cabinet. Glossier recommends using it once a day before the Priming Moisturiser and the clue’s in the name as it claims to make skin ‘bounce’ back. This will allow for plump skin and create the perfect base for applying makeup without making your skin oily.

2 Glossier

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Back to the future

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THE FUTURE ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE


Words: Philip Ellis / @Philip_Ellis Illustration: Karolis Strautniekas / Folio Art

How did the artists and writers of the past imagine the 21st Century? And how does it compare to our own vision of the future?

W Clockwise from left: Frank Tinsley’s 1957 interpretation of mail by rocket. Google’s driverless car, food of the future - Huel, and Amazon’s new Prime Air drone which can deliver items in less than 30 minutes from ordering.

“There will come a time when it isn’t ‘they’re spying on me’ through my phone’ anymore. Eventually, it will be ‘my phone is spying on me’.”

e have always been fascinated by what the future holds, and science fiction in particular has been the canvas on which we have speculated about the shape of things to come. But how accurate have we been so far? Futuristic artists in the Fifties and Sixties envisioned flying cars and colonies on other planets, shiny metallic worlds where human beings floated around in silver spacesuits and goldfish bowl helmets. It’s safe to say, we’re not quite there yet. However, some depictions of the future came close; in 1957, illustrator Frank Tinsley imagined mail being delivered by rockets; now we have same-day shipping via flying drone. Classic sci-fi embraced the trope of entire meals being served in the form of a pill; nowadays the nutritionally complete powder Huel, short for “human fuel,” is being touted as the food of the future. (Although personally, it doesn’t look half as good on Instagram as a stack of pancakes.) In fact, a number of “what if?” scenarios from the 20th Century are eerily relevant to the present day. Driverless cars are on their way to becoming a norm, just as Total Recall promised. We converse via video-chat and make delicious hot coffee with the push of a button, just like The Jetsons. Smartphones, tablets, virtual reality, and even seemingly pedestrian sliding doors were all first presented to us as wondrous inventions in the utopian future of Star Trek. And then, of course, there is Philip K. Dick. His novels predicted all kinds of technological developments, from the authorities tracking criminals via satellite surveillance, to weapons being operated by remote control. And a quote often attributed to him in the Seventies sums up current fears about data snooping: “There will come a time when it isn’t ‘they’re spying on me through my phone’ anymore. Eventually, it will be ‘my phone is spying on me’.” He wasn’t even wrong about the then-bonkers notion of cloning pets, as evidenced by this year’s Variety story in which Barbra Streisand admitted to paying a small fortune for genetic duplicates of her beloved dog Samantha. Perhaps what made Dick’s work so prescient was his understanding of the time he was living in and the people around him. After all, science fiction takes us to the future to talk about the now, to explore and better understand contemporary concerns. The 1951 classic black and white film The Day The Earth Stood Still is a Cold War allegory in which the giant robot named Gort is something of an enforcer, entrusted by Earth’s alien neighbours with all responsibilities of keeping the peace. The slightest hint of violence from us mere mortals, and he unleashes hell. “In matters of aggression, we have given them absolute power over us,” explains Klaatu, the film’s extra-terrestrial visitor. “Your choice is simple,” he

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Back to the future

Images: Daimler/AG, Tesla, Taschen

Driverless cars are on their way to becoming a norm... Clockwise from left the Mercedes F 015 and the Tesla Roadster both with self-driving techonology.

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‘Don’t worry, that’s not to say your virtual assistant is planning to kill you.’

Stanley Kubrick’s vision for mobile communication

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continues. “Join us and live in peace, or pursue your present course and face obliteration.” The all-powerful robot in this story is a stand-in for weapons of mass destruction, and the entire film is steeped in the fear and paranoia of the Atomic Age. The artificially intelligent (AI) being which holds power over life and death is a commonly occurring trope, and one that strikes a nerve in 2018, with AIs becoming an increasingly ubiquitous part of daily life. In 2001: A Space Odyssey, the sentient computer HAL 9000z describes himself as “fool-proof and incapable of making an error,” and insists that any incidents which occur on the mission are a result of human error. His refusal to acknowledge any fallibility on his part leads him to make a series of increasingly extreme unilateral decisions, disabling the spaceship’s life support systems and ultimately murdering the crew he is designed to serve. But don’t worry, that’s not to say your virtual assistant is planning to kill you. A much more recent, relevant and romantic depiction of AI is Spike Jonze’s Her, set in a near-future in which we don’t stare at screens or type out commands; everything we do is via voice. This was first hinted at in Star Trek with the computer system voiced by Majel Barrett, but Her showed us a less overtly futuristic, more accessible vision. It’s easier to imagine ourselves living in that world, because we practically do already; Scarlett Johansson’s Samantha could easily be a distant cousin of the voice-controlled Siri and Alexa. And it is this future we are more likely heading towards, not some Terminator hell-scape. We are inviting AI into our lives because it makes things easier and more convenient; our homes are becoming increasingly “smart” and technology-driven and Jetsons-esque. But concerns around AI persist, especially pertaining to the very real possibility that advances

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Images: John P. Johnson/HBO

Back to the future

in automation, robotics and machine learning will lead to a loss of jobs for human beings — not just in areas like driving, where autonomous vehicles are ostensibly safer and less prone to errors, but fields such as medicine, where AIs are quicker and more meticulous in analysing symptoms and diagnosing illness. Fear of the Singularity, the point at which the intellect of machines surpasses our own, is another common trope in media, which is viscerally examined in the 2014 film Ex Machina and HBO drama series Westworld, both of which see androids turn on their creators. The ethics of developing artificial intelligence in the real world are themselves informed and influenced by the science fiction author Isaac Asimov, whose book I, Robot outlined three laws by which all robots must operate, the first of which is that a robot must never cause harm to a human being, or let harm come to them through inaction. But we have to add new rules to the list, to ensure that machine thinking fits into human living. Computers can analyse and process data at a rate far superior to the human brain, but as the last century of asking “what if?” proves, it’s human creativity and imagination that will really drive society forward. All that being said, I’m still waiting on my Back To The Future hover board.

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Clockwise from top: Ava the robot from Ex Machina, Isaac Asimov’s classic novel I, Robot and Jonathan Nolan’s award winning television series Westworld all explored the future through humanoid’s.


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Following Midlands Fashion Awards, say hello to the designers to watch out for this year

THE NEXT GENERATION Photography: Ashton Fernihough, Photography Assistant: Georgia Roberts, Styling: Jade Woodhouse, Makeup: Sarah Spence and Suzie Gee, Hair: Yvette Shah, Models: Elliot K at Alan Sharman and Natalie at Leni’s

DIONNE REEVES Midlands Independent Designer of The Year 105


Midlands Fashion Awards

NATASHA SMITH Midlands Emerging Designer of The Year

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DIONNE REEVES Midlands Independent Designer of The Year

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Midlands Fashion Awards

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HARRIET ECCLESTON Midlands Young Designer of The Year

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Midlands Fashion Awards

DIONNE REEVES Midlands Independent Designer of The Year

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NATASHA SMITH Midlands Emerging Designer of The Year

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Midlands Fashion Awards

DIONNE REEVES Midlands Independent Designer of The Year

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and more...

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Technostalgia

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Whilst looking through one of my drawers the other day – one of those drawers we all have that’s filled with junk we probably don’t need – I came across an item that took me by surprise. It was a small rectangular device about the size of a cigarette lighter, wrapped in wires. I let out a small chuckle as I realised what it was – my first ever mp3 player.

I

amused myself for the next couple of minutes, pressing the buttons and imagining the naivety of a teenage me, proud of owning something that could hold a now-laughable 30 songs in a 128gb memory. Then, looking up, I noticed something else. Hanging from my bedroom door handle in a large carrier bag was a newlypurchased Tame Impala LP. Yes, that’s LP as in Long Playing Record. Vinyl. “What’s happened here?” I thought to myself. “Is this progress?” Glancing back at my old mp3 player, I felt a bit sorry for laughing at its outdatedness. You see, it’s a device in limbo. It’s caught in a technological purgatory, neither advanced enough to compete with modern gadgetry, nor old enough to gain the retro-cool that my vinyl record has acquired.

It’s fair to say in the last couple of years revival technology, led by vinyl, has experienced an incredible boom. 4.1 million vinyl albums were sold in the UK last year – a 25-year high. This growth shows no sign of slowing, with the format poised to overtake digital music sales in the near future, with the popularity of music streaming also having an effect. I must admit, I can understand the appeal of a vinyl record. They have a unique, warm sound and they’re just nice objects to own. The latter is probably the main reason for their resurgence as

Two of the best selling vinyls from 2017

Words: William Ashworth / @WillAshworth34

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Technostalgia

Sony Walkman Sports WM-B53 with auto reverse

A MODERN TAKE FOR THE TAPE... well as this wider technological snap back. Human beings like to own physical things – tangible objects that they can touch. A computer file containing your most loved songs somehow just doesn’t cut it. But is there a limit? Last year also saw an unexpected rise of another music format that was assumed dead – the cassette tape. Sales in 2017 almost hit the 20,000 mark, up 112% from the previous year. This I’m afraid, is where I may have to press eject. Who’s buying these? And why? Do people still own tape players? I’ve seen one for sale in Urban Outfitters, no doubt for a ridiculous price, so surely it’s more bother than it’s worth? Well, they’re certainly selling. You might think that cassette album 116

The Elbow concept cassette player brings the Walkman into the 21st Century. Listen to any cassette simply by clipping onto the outside! It’s already won two design awards, but sadly won’t be coming to market... maybe its for the best.

releases are the preserve of the übercool indie/hipster bands, desperate to cultivate an unconventional and contrarian image. You’d be wrong. Last year, releases on this old format were made by some of the most mainstream acts around, including Jay-Z, Kasabian, The Script, Arcade Fire and Lana Del Rey. Even Kylie Minogue is set to get in on the act and lead the charge up the cassette charts when her album drops this year. Although I have sympathy for desiring a physical copy when buying music, I just don’t see the advantage that a cassette has over vinyl, or even CD for that matter. The sound is inferior, tape decks are few and far between, and you’ll find it pretty hard to appreciate any album artwork on the meagre surface area the front of a case provides. It may just to be down to simple hipster posturing. A sense that vinyl may have strayed too far into the mainstream and that cassettes represent new, old ground up for grabs to the cool kids. Another answer for their re-entry into the marketplace will be good old nostalgia. Despite their shortcomings, cassettes will certainly have a special place in the hearts of many “of-acertain-age” consumers keen to relive a small part of their youth. Indeed, there is a whole narrative of clichés associated with them: using a pencil to wind up the ribbon, recording the charts from a radio using stop and record to edit out the talking, compiling a mix of songs for your crush with a Biro-written synopsis on the label – all this is wrapped up in their mythology.

Lana Del Rey, Lust for Life is out on cassette

SALES IN 2017 ALMOST HIT THE 20,000 MARK, UP 112% FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR.


Originally launched in 1985, the NES was re-released last year in a miniturised version.

But music technology isn’t the only thing having a nostalgic renaissance. The trend has branched out in all manner of ways. The video games market for example has seen a big shift towards retro gaming. Last year Nintendo released shrunken down versions of their eighties and nineties consoles, the NES and the SNES with great success. So much so, later this year there are also plans to re-release the N64. Then there are Polaroid cameras that are making a comeback, as well as an upturn in the sale of physical books, after a decadelong lull in the wake of the Kindle effect. Added to this, there’s even been movement in the mobile phone market. 2017 was the year that the fabled Nokia 3310 was rereleased in order to satisfy those who wish to eschew the all-singing, all-dancing phones of The Nokia 3310 was re-released in May today in favour of longer battery 2017 and only costs life, simpler functionality and £49, we challenge you increased durability. to a game of snake! However, I do have a degree of sympathy for people who yearn for this simpler recent past. The trance-like state people have let their smartphones impose on them is an obvious and growing problem – one that needs a solution. But should that solution involve taking backward steps? I think it’s maybe time to grow up a bit and admit to ourselves a few home truths. Polaroid photos are quaint but your iPhone takes better ones, playing an 8-bit version of Mario may be fun for a while but will soon wear thin, and for all the charm a vinyl (and cassette?) album has, for everyday life, sourcing music digitally is just the easier and more practical option. So what’s the answer?

“You may find that your average millennial would baulk at purchasing the latest Alt-J cassette if you told him or her that the ribbon would likely be choking a turtle in a couple of years’ time.”

LONG LIVE POLAROID: The classic SX70, famously used by Andy Warhol is the original instant camera. £379.99, polaroid.com

I think we should bear in mind that the digital age is still really only in its infancy. Remember when you would switch channel on the TV and it would instantaneously change? That half a second delay of modern digital systems can be frustrating, but it will improve eventually. With regards to revival technology, my philosophy is to try and stick to vintage. Particularly with music, it seems more authentic to me to own a vinyl record with provenance rather than a reissued version of a modern album that was never recorded for the format. And then there’s the environmental issue to consider. It’s a total incongruity that the obsession for these technologies, most of which are made from plastic, should come at a time when we’re all being told we must cut down on our consumption of the material. You may find that your average millennial would baulk at purchasing the latest Alt-J cassette if you told him or her that the ribbon would likely be choking a turtle in a couple of years’ time. And as for my old mp3 player? I think I’m going to hold on to it for now. I can see at some point down the line a hipster of the future will be willing to pay me a pretty penny for it on eBay… 117


Moseley

Illustration: Victoria Brown

Moseley: The Place to Be

Less than a 15-minute drive out of the city centre lies Moseley, a leafy and cosmopolitan area of Birmingham with plenty of hidden gems to enjoy every night of the week

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CUBAN EMBASSY

Embrace the spirit of Cuba without even having to leave Moseley High Street at the Cuban Embassy. With an extensive drinks menu of more than 120 rums and a tucked away terrace, this buzzing venue also comes to life with live music from all genres six nights a week. Open until 2am on Fridays and Saturdays, it’s a fun alternative to a night out in the city centre and on the weekend, expect the upstairs room to be packed full of a fun crowd as the drinks keep flowing.

THE PRINCE OF WALES

This is by far one of Moseley’s most popular pub venues, hosting everything from beer pong tournaments to live music and even rum festivals. The fun doesn’t end in the pub, and if you head out the back you’ll discover a huge undercover space complete with a wine shed, cigar shack, tiki cocktail bar and various snugs to cosy up in if the weather’s a bit chilly. This place is heaving at the weekends with people of all ages, so get down early!


DAMASCENA COFFEE

If you’re looking for an evening of relaxed dining, tuck into a Middle Eastern feast at this cosy independent cafe and delicatessen. Located in the heart of Moseley on Alcester Road, Damascena is well known for its delicious falafels, soft flatbreads and selection of teas.

THE DARK HORSE

Home to our favourite quiz in Birmingham, Rafiki’s Cuisine (if you haven’t been, you need to go), The Dark Horse is a friendly, laidback pub serving smokehouse classics. Head here if you want casual dining, particularly if you’re a meat lover, as you can expect a menu of brisket, ribs and wing platters.

ZINDIYA

For a chilled dining experience inspired by the street markets of India, Zindiya Streatery & Bar is the place to be, offering a selection of authentic dishes including Pani Puri, Pav Bhaji and Falooda, not forgetting the traditional Lassi drink. If you want to get a bit tipsy, check out the cocktail menu which takes different flavours from all over India, infusing spices like garam masala, cumin and chai for drinks you’ve never tried before. It’s worth noting that food will come out as it’s prepared, so expect different plates at different times throughout your meal.

CARTERS OF MOSELEY

Having been awarded a Michelin star back in 2016, Carters of Moseley is well-known as one of the finest culinary experiences in Birmingham and beyond. Owned by chef Brad Carter and opened back in 2010, this fine dining restaurant is renowned for simple, quality food made from the finest British ingredients. With Evening Menu prices starting from £45 for four courses on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, it’s also reasonable on price.

Our Favourites Paneer Tikka, £7, Zindiya This popular South Asian cheese is cooked over charcoal and served with yoghurt dip and salad.

Chicken Panang, £11.45, Sabai Sabai A rich panang sauce with coconut milk, kaffir lime leaves, sweet peppers and red chillies.

THE PATRICK KAVANAGH

Following a refurb last year, The Patrick Kavanagh (also known as ‘PatKav’) is the place to be if you want to sit back, enjoy a pint and watch some live sports. With a bold blue exterior and traditional pub feel, it’s a fussfree choice for a more affordable evening.

Embassy Chicken Cubano, The Cuban Embassy, £6.95 Crispy blackened chicken with chorizo and Monterey Jack cheese

SABAI SABAI

The multi-award winning restaurant, which also has restaurants in Harborne, Stratford-upon-Avon and Waterloo Street in the city centre, has a menu packed full of mouthwatering Thai dishes. With a little bit of everything from Thai Red Curry and Pad Thai to Lobster Tail and Spicy Prawn Soup, this is an ideal place if you’re looking for oriental food in stylish surroundings.

Hummus Shawarma, £5.65, Damascena This traditional Middle Eastern dish involves hummus topped with lamb or chicken shawarma and is served with two flatbreads.

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Everything you need to know about the city. From fashion and beauty to culture, food and drink.


ICONIC We look back on the most influential pieces of the last 100 years, from lemon squeezers to lounge chairs

DESIGNS

Alessi Juicy Salif Lemon Squeezer by Philippe Starck It might have been branded “the most controversial lemon squeezer of the century”, but why shouldn’t you squeeze your lemons in style?

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Design

Arco Floor Lamp

Designed by Achille Castiglioni, this floor lamp is inspired by urban street lights and made from stainless steel with a marble base.

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Braun Calculator

Did you know? The original Apple iPhone calculator was based on this timeless design.

123


Design

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Barcelona Chair

This chair dates back to the Barcelona Exposition of 1929 and is still regarded as one of the most iconic pieces of the 20th century.

Eames Lounge Chair

Named after Charles and Ray Eames, the married couple who designed it, this is one of the most famous designs in history, combining luxurious comfort with fine craftsmanship. 125


Design

Apple iPhone

This game-changing piece of technology, released over 10 years ago, revolutionised the smartphone and continues to be reinvented by Apple year-on-year.

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Mi Ming Chair

A contemporary piece by Philippe Starck and Eugeni Quitllet, the transparent Mi Ming Chair looks towards the future with innovative design.

127


Design

Rayban G15

These classic sunglasses will always remain a staple for both men and women.

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The city

The brutal truth:

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A changing city and vision

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The city

The city that we know and love today is a stark contrast to the Birmingham it was just half a century ago, with new building developments cropping up every few months. But will they really last? Words: Kirsty Bosley / @Bozzers

F

rom the glowing red brick and terracotta Victoria Law Courts on Corporation Street to the glimmering glass facade of the Rotunda and the light, gleaming marble of the Town Hall, Birmingham is a patchwork of architectural statements. Reminders of their time, of the ambitious architects responsible for their creation and of the industries and rituals that required their existence, these buildings are chapters of Birmingham’s ongoing story, markers on a timeline stretching back many hundreds of years. Some are firm favourites among residents and visitors alike, while others, particularly the later, more radical developments, are cause for debate among those who enjoy their modern design and those who feel they’re ill-fitting on our skyline. With a regeneration underway, the foundations laid for a host of new developments and blueprints drawn up for future projects, the city is set to change drastically over the coming years. But how will these new projects, popping up on the skyline like spring daffodils, stand the test of time? What does Birmingham look like in the years to come? And what does it tell the wider world about who we are as a city? 132


To make any sense of the future, we must first look to our past. Regardless of the intention when they were built, their appearance or their function, each of the buildings that make up our urban landscape has something in common: they document our heritage. Beside one another, they stand as monuments of Birmingham’s industrial heyday, its post-war regeneration, its future-focused creativity. With Gothic splendour sitting in harmony beside squared-off post-war concrete structures and freeflowing ‘blobitecture’, the city’s buildings are as diverse and contrasting as the Brummies that live, work and spend quality time in them. “When it comes to architecture, Birmingham has always been a forward-looking city,” says Steve Townsend, associate director at city-based Associated Architects. The practice has created many award-winning buildings in the region since business began half a century ago, including Birmingham City University’s Parkside and Curzon buildings and the University of Birmingham New Library. They were also responsible for the refurbishment of Birmingham’s iconic Town Hall. Steve believes that it’s with our architecture that we Brummies can show the world what our city is all about. “This goes right back to the days of Joseph Chamberlain, whose vision for the city included impressive Parisian style boulevards and grand civic buildings,” he says. “Throughout the decades this trend has continued, as individuals have made their mark imposing their vision for the future. “These layers of history tell a story of an ambitious, confident city. And while in retrospect there were urban planning mistakes, we should on

Victoria Law Courts, Corporation Street

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The city

the whole be proud of this past and respectful of our rich and important heritage.” It’s being respectful of our history that inspired campaign group Brutiful Birmingham to jump into action in the face of criticism of, and threat to, the city’s post-war Brutalist and modernist structures. Prince Charles once described Central Library as resembling “a place where books are incinerated, not kept”. While John Madin’s 1974 concrete creation didn’t impress royalty, campaigners including Brutiful Birmingham founding member Mary Keating, fought

against plans to demolish it. “Birmingham was the second most bombed city in the UK outside of London and there was a lot of damage, with a lot of good Victorian buildings swept away,” Mary says. “In that time, Victorian buildings weren’t really appreciated – they were old hat and everyone wanted bright shiny ones! This is the same with the more modern buildings too – they have a bad reputation. “Birmingham was very bold after the Second World War in terms of what it commissioned for its architecture. The Central Library was a fantastic building, as was Pebble Mill Studios. 134

Birmingham was good at it, and it seems we’ve lost our nerve somewhere along the line.” Not that Mary believes all late 20th Century structures to be perfect. “There are, of course, some aspects of that architecture that simply aren’t good, but it seems it’s all being tarred with the same brush – just a ‘concrete jungle’ that should all be demolished. The philosophy behind Brutalist architecture was about monumental buildings for the people. They were honest buildings, created for us as part of the post-war plans for the future. “There was a feeling of huge optimism when they were built. The idea that it’s all poorly made with poor materials is a stereotype that’s quite difficult to break away from.” For Mary, our focus strictly on the future at the expense of our past is a concern. “We’ve got very little Brutalist architecture left in Birmingham now, so we are campaigning to save all of our late 20th Century architecture, which includes modernist architecture too. “Birmingham’s motto is ‘Forward’, and there’s not much focus on looking backwards. Some of the best of our past has been wiped away, and now it’s happening with late 20th Century architecture too. “The city planners are a bit behind the times. In London, they’re celebrating it, with the areas surrounding buildings like the Barbican and the National Gallery becoming very gentrified. Birmingham is lagging behind in acknowledging that these buildings are very desirable. “It’s like modern art. You have to work at seeing what’s wonderful about it.


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The city

2one2 by Moda Living and Glenn Howells Architects

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“What our mix of architecture says about us is that we have been a very successful city. All of the styles of buildings side by side show the confidence of Birmingham. I think we’ve lost that. While it’s not true of all of our new buildings, with many, you could be anywhere. What’s distinctive about any of them? They’re generally clad – are they going to last like the solid structures of the past?” Only time will tell how long Birmingham’s new buildings will last on its skyline, but the impression it’ll leave on those that visit will be seen much sooner. The eyes of the world will be focused on us in 2022 when we host the Commonwealth Games, and established businesses are turning to Birmingham for new headquarters outside of the capital. “Architecture, more than any other discipline, has the power to show the outside world we mean business,” says Steve. “Bold, iconic architecture puts us on the world stage and gives us a talking point. We’re telling the rest of the world we have the confidence to invest in our city and we have a plan for the future.” Birmingham’s appearance to a wider audience is important, but Steve believes it’s having the home crowd at the heart of plans that will ensure the city’s new structures stand the test of time. “As a practice that was founded in Birmingham 50 years ago, we have seen the city transform and we have been lucky enough to be involved with many projects that have shaped the skyline,” he says. “Trends may have come and gone in those 50 years, but one thing that hasn’t changed is the principle that underpins our work – putting people at the centre of design. “We believe that’s the key to creating architecture that stands the test of time. It’s thoughtful architecture, designed for people; creating places for people to live, work and enjoy the city, for the better.” And while Mary campaigns for a future for our older structures, she’s looking forward to what’s to come too. “We want people to be a bit more discerning about their heritage, but I am sure we’ll have some gems in all of the new architecture. We need to recognise them, because they’ll be of our time.” And so what will these buildings look like? Well, at first glance, none are scheduled to be quite as futuristic-looking as the bubbling Selfridges building or the intricate Library of Birmingham. But we are set to gain more curves with the completion of rounded, sparkling One Chamberlain Square. It’ll flank the historic space alongside neighbouring Two Chamberlain Square, which is set to bring ‘a striking, contemporary addition’ to the area, with floor to ceiling glazing and strong, geometric lines reaching into the sky. These, along with the towering 42 storey 2one2 building planned for Broad Street and other ambitious erections in the area will change how we locals, and visitors from further afield, see the city for as long as they remain standing – or remain in vogue. As long as we Brummies can embrace them as monuments of this time of change, and they don’t come at the expense of the fine buildings that have made Birmingham the city that it is today, then they’re sure to stand the test of time, seeing us into what promises to be a bright, sparkling future.


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On the radar

Vivid Shadows

Go bold or go home with your eyeshadow this summer. Forget dark smokey eyes, instead use one bright colour to create a bold eye look that will really get you noticed.

Statement earrings

Bored of the same old studs? From wooden hoops to resin drops and extravagant diamonds, there’s a statement earring out there for every outfit, you just need to find the perfect one for you.

Hubble contact lenses

ASOS @rupikaur

Subscription Living

It seems you can get a subscription box for just about anything these days, including contact lenses, laundry capsules and toothbrushes. If you lead a busy lifestyle, these monthly arrivals will make your life that little bit easier.

Instapoetry

You might have heard of @rupikaur, the poet with a huge social media following who writes beautifully and openly on themes of mental health, discrimination and womanhood. If you’re looking for a few words to get you though the day, follow @mazadohta and @atticus as well.

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ORDO Toothbrush

From toothbrush subscription boxes to over-the top cocktails, this is what we’re loving and loathing this season

Wet Wipes

After the recent discovery by Water UK that 93% of blocked sewage pipes are caused by wet wipes, it’s time to ditch the wipes for eco-friendly alternatives like micellar water and hot cloth cleansers.

Shocktails

There’s nothing worse than being stood at a bar for 20 minutes, waiting for your cocktail to be made, and when it finally arrives (with edible petals, sparklers and smoking from the top) it tastes awful. We’re sick of cocktails that sound better than they taste, sometimes it’s just easier to stick to what you know.

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Insta-story reporters

With Instagram stories, less is more. We don’t need to hear you chat for five minutes to the camera about the highs and lows of your day, and we definitely don’t need your life guru tips. Unfollow.


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NITRO CIRCUS

DEF LEPPARD

THE FOUR TOPS & THE TEMPTATIONS

UB40

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 13-14 SEP 18

50 CENT

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 18 SEP 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 24 SEP 18

EARLY DOORS LIVE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 28 SEP 18

BABBU MAAN

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 29 SEP 18

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: OVO

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 3-7 OCT 18

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 17 NOV 18 ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 20 NOV 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 22 NOV 18

THE BIRMINGHAM INTERNATIONAL TATTOO

GENTING ARENA – 21 SEP 18

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 24-25 NOV 18

PRIVATE BOOKING SERVICE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 15 DEC 18 ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 17 DEC 18 ARENA BIRMINGHAM - 21 DEC 18

ELF - A CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR

GENTING ARENA - 20-24 DEC 18

FRANK TURNER

FREE RADIO LIVE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM - 22 JAN 19

PETE TONG – IBIZA CLASSICS

GENTING ARENA - 12 FEB 19

GENTING ARENA – 24 NOV 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 28 NOV 18

TEARS FOR FEARS

PROFESSOR BRIAN COX LIVE ARENA BIRMINGHAM - 23 FEB 19

THE HUMAN LEAGUE

40 YEARS OF DISCO

FRANKIE VALLI & THE FOUR SEASONS

UB40 FEAT ALI CAMPBELL, ASTRO & MICKEY VIRTUE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 1 DEC 18

GENTING ARENA – 1 DEC 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 26-28 JUL 18

GUARANTEED TICKETS

GENTING ARENA – 8 DEC 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 4 SEP 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 26 SEP 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 20 JUL 18

JEFF WAYNE’S WAR OF THE WORLDS

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 13 DEC 18

BARRY MANILOW

GENTING ARENA – 26 JUN 18

JASON MANFORD

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 2 DEC 18

ANDRE RIEU

FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS JASON DERULO

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 7 JUL 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 15 NOV 18

STAR WARS A NEW HOPE – FILM WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA

NOEL FITZPATRICK IS SUPERVET

SHANIA TWAIN

ROGER WATERS

GENTING ARENA – 27 OCT 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 3-7 OCT 18

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 16 NOV 18

GENTING ARENA – 31 AUG 18

LENNY KRAVITZ

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 27 & 28 JUN 18

ENRIQUE IGLESIAS THE AUSTRALIAN PINK FLOYD

KEVIN HART

KYLIE

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 20 JUN 18

JEFF LYNNE’S ELO

GENTING ARENA – 7 AUG 18

KATY PERRY

ARENA BIRMINGHAM – 18 JUN 18

GENTING ARENA – 31 AUG 18

@amplifynews

ACCESS TO PRIVATE LOUNGES

THE HOTTEST SEATS IN TOWN

GENTING ARENA - 24 MAR 19

ARENA BIRMINGHAM - 29 MAR 19

EXCLUSIVE ENTRANCES

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