Page 1


S TO N E S , WA L L S , S T E P S & E L E M E N T S W I T H S T Y L E ™

Introducing... Andover™ 5511 Pavers ■ Available in three textures for design flexibility: ■

Clefted

Clefted & Tumbled ■ Smooth & Chamfered

■ 5 1⁄2" x 11" x 2 3⁄4" size - ASTM C936 - packaged separately ■ Designed for traditional or permeable pavement projects ■ Matching border course for our Andover Collection

Clefted

Clefted & Tumbled

Smooth & Chamfered

With GrandStone inset

Standard Set-Stone Pattern

Andover™ GrandStone ■ Modular with Andover Collection ■ 16 1⁄2" x 22" x 2 3⁄4" size - packaged separately ■ Create elegant and dramatic pedestrian pavements ■

Walkways, patios, pool decks and courtyards

IDEAL CONCRETE BLOCK CO. Westford and Waltham, MA ■ 800-24-IDEAL Serving New England Since 1923

IDEALCONCRETEBLOCK.COM


pro grow news Summer 2015

contents Features

8

Topsfield — An Engaging Place for a Summer Meeting

10 Paul Mahoney: Friend and Leader 14 Pollinators in the Landscape

Departments

5 President’s Message

6 Committee Reports 20 Irrigation Water Testing 22 Business Focus 26 Safety Sense 29 Marketplace/Ad Index 30 Plant for Success On the cover — Orange echinacea and bright green sedum make a lively color combination Summer|2015

|

3


pro grow news Summer 2015

committees

board PRESIDENT Tim Lomasney One Source Horticulture Tel: (978) 470-1934

EDUCATION & RESEARCH COMMITTEE

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

Kathy Bergmann, MCH — Chair Bergmann Construction Tel: (508) 533-3831

Rene Fontaine, MCH — Chair New England Botanicals, Inc. Tel: (508) 962-1064

VICE PRESIDENT Jim Stucchi, MCH Ahronian Landscape and Design, Inc. Tel: (508) 429-3844

Tim Hay, MCH — Vice Chair Bigelow Nurseries, Inc. Tel: (508) 845-2143

David Ahronian, MCH — Vice Chair Ahronian Landscape & Design, Inc. Tel: (508) 429-3844

SECRETARY/TREASURER Tim Hay, MCH Bigelow Nurseries, Inc. Tel: (508) 845-2143 PAST PRESIDENT Mary Jesch Cornucopia Gardeners Tel: (508) 879-1822

FINANCIAL COMMITTEE (FINCOM) Steve Corrigan, MCH — Chair Mountain View Landscapes & Lawncare, Inc. Tel: (413) 536-7555 Chuck Baker, MCH — Vice Chair Strictly Pruning Tel: (508) 429-7189 GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COMMITTEE

MASSACHUSETTS CERTIFIED HORTICULTURIST BOARD (MCH) Cheryl Salatino, MCH — Chair Dancing Shadows Garden Designs Tel: (978) 460-2180 Jack Elicone, MCH — Vice Chair J.A. Crowdle Corporation Tel: (617) 527-5706

DIRECTORS Chris O’Brien, MCH Howard Designs, Inc.

Chris O’Brien, MCH — Chair Howard Designs, Inc. Tel: (617) 244-7269

PRODUCTS COMMITTEE

Kerry Preston, MCH Wisteria & Rose, Inc.

HISTORY COMMITTEE

Peter Mezitt, MCH — ­­ Vice Chair Weston Nurseries, Inc. Tel: (508) 435-3414

Peter Mezitt, MCH Weston Nurseries, Inc.

David Vetelino, MCH Vetelino Landscape, Inc. Jean Dooley, MCH Mahoney Garden Centers

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS DIRECTOR Henry Gillet Tel: (508) 567-6288 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rena M. Sumner Tel: (413) 369-4731 Fax: (413) 369-4962

Philip Boucher, MCH — Chair Elysian Garden Designs Tel: (508) 695-9630

Mark Ahronian, MCH — Chair Ahronian Landscaping & Design, Inc. Tel: (508) 429-3844

Skott Rebello, MCH — Vice Chair Harborside P.S. Tel: (508) 994-9208 MAGAZINE COMMITTEE Walter Swift, MCH — Chair Swift’s Creative Landscape, Inc. Tel: (508) 478-3768 Gaele McCully, MCLP — Vice Chair Mahoney’s Garden Center Tel: (781) 729-5900

DIRECTOR Michelle Harvey, MCH Lakeview Nurseries Tel: (978) 342-3770 EDUCATION COMMITTEE Kathy Bergmann, MCH Bergmann Construction Tel: (508) 533-3831 Tim Hay, MCH Bigelow Nurseries, Inc. Tel: (508) 845-2143 The Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association, Inc. is proud to be a founding partner of New England Grows.

pro grow news Massachusetts Nursery & Landscape Association P.O. Box 387 Conway, MA 01341 mnlaoffice@aol.com www.mnla.com www.PlantSomethingMA.org www.mnlafoundation.org

ProGrowNews is published quarterly by the Massachusetts Nursery & Landscape Association (MNLA), P.O. Box 387, Conway, MA 01341, tel. (413) 369-4731. Articles do not necessarily reflect the view or position of MNLA. Editorial coverage or permission to advertise does not constitute endorsement of the company covered or of an advertiser’s products or services, nor does ProGrowNews make any claims or guarantees as to the accuracy or validity of the advertiser’s offer. (c) 2014 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in print or electronically without the express written permission of the MNLA.


President’s Message

Spring 2015: Something for Everyone By Timothy Lomasney

W

hat has spring meant to you this year? For me, I’ve seen a lot of firsts. I saw employees at the golf course snowblowing greens just to get down to the tarps — in April! Earlier in April, I remember discussing the best method to melt the 3- to 4-foot snowbanks around our backyard hockey rink. I noticed that the most popular house adornment had become the leaning extension ladder, a fixture for weeks on many homes in Massachusetts. But one of the special characteristics of people in our industry is that we roll with the seasons and appreciate this May’s warmer-than-normal start and all the business it brings us. Who remembers worrying about damaged plants in February when many yards already look picture-perfect in early May? In March, we had another successful Plant Something exhibit and demonstration at the Boston Flower Show, where many of our visitors reported a serious case of cabin fever and were thrilled to be exposed to all the beautiful plants, flower arrangements, and landscape displays. I’m sure these same people were charging into garden centers as soon as the weather turned nice. Mass Ag Day at the State House was on March 31st this year. Getting in front of our legislators is an important task for

the benefit of our membership, and I thank all the members and board members who participated. Building these relationships and asking for support can help us in times of crisis or when regulations get in the way of our members being successful in their businesses. We’ve got events for everyone on the MNLA calendar. By the time you read this, the Tour de Fleur bus will have taken us to five retail garden centers south of Boston on June 17th, and the Down to Earth Summer Conference on July 23rd will be here before you know it. This summer’s event will be held at the historic Topsfield Fair Grounds, a venue that offers space to do some things that we haven’t done at past conferences. The MFGA benefit golf tournament will be held August 4th at Stow Acres Garden Center. And finally, we are in the early and exciting stages of building a new model for our annual meeting, scheduled for the first quarter of 2016. Join us at an upcoming MNLA event to learn more about this exciting new program. Timothy Lomasney, One Source Horticulture MNLA President

REGISTER BY JUNE 20 FOR THE BEST PRICE!

JULY 23, 2015 Topsfield Fairgrounds Topsfield, MA

What’s new for 2015 • • • •

Meet our speakers Grab a bib for a lobster clambake Enjoy local craft beers Catch up with friends

Who should attend? YOU! Why attend? Professionals in the green industry will not want to miss this great summer opportunity for education, recertification, and networking! Summer|2015 For more information and to register, please visit mnla.com.

|

5


MNLA Committees

Excavation — It Has Begun

What IS That?

By Philip Boucher, MCH

By Kathy Bergmann, MCH

I

M

n the off season this year, the History Committee, under the direction of vice chair Skott Rebello, MCH, began the process of gleaning the many boxes in our stored collection. The archives, known as the MNLA Cornell/Davis historical collection, honor the work and efforts of the two deceased members who accumulated and saved this material. At our committee meeting last fall, we felt MNLA was missing a platform to help us in our work and also help us reach out to the membership to showcase and explain our mission. Our archives would be the most relevant story we could provide for newer individuals to our association, because memories and first-hand knowledge obtained from papers, images, and historical accounts over the course of 105 years has become more important. Surprisingly, this process of sorting by such a small group has become a bonding experience. We find the work of holding and reading old papers, catalogs, and books both absorbing and powerful. The work is dusty and sometimes tedious, and it is challenging to decide on the value and relevance of each piece, but adding verbal tidbits of information about people or events as they are uncovered helps us keep things light. We are processing by following a rough historical outline, and with each surprise or detailed account, we realize we are not discovering anything new, but simply viewing it with fresh eyes. It feels like breaking new ground to debate what is general history and what is germane to the association. Our work will not be done with just these steps, as this process is creating a new talent for the committee as well: the art of curating. Cataloging and storing properly will be the next necessary step in developing a comprehensive inventory that is accessible to our membership. Digitizing photographs and pertinent articles will also be a huge task in pursuing our mission to prepare and build a usable permanent collection. We are also planning to revive the traveling exhibit of years ago, and will be working on a multimedia show that can be disbursed to members via a variety of methods. We are also seeking a means to accept and integrate new materials into the collection. Have an idea? Contact Skott Rebello, MCH, at 508-994-9630. And next time you see them, thank Scott, Patti Souza, MCH, and our advisor, Dick Bemis, MCH and MNLA past-president.

y husband and I were in one of those big box stores picking up some nails recently. Walking through the gardening area on our way out, we came upon what has become all too common: There was a customer with a plastic bag filled with what used to be maple leaves and a couple of little green caterpillars. She approached an employee who sported a pin that said something like “I know everything. Just ask me.” “What’s killing my tree?” she asked. Without even looking at the bag, he said, “Winter moth,” and handed her a big spray bottle of death and destruction. “Go home and spray it.” Didn’t ask what kind of tree or where it was growing. Didn’t explain that winter moth was within weeks of being done for the year. Didn’t offer ways to slow the blight next spring or how to help the plant for the rest of this year. Didn’t suggest something that would be less harmful to honeybees and other pollinators, or when in the day to spray most safely. Just “Go home and spray.” I don’t know if it was the look on my face or the small growl that escaped my lips, but my husband had me by the back of my shirt and out the door in seconds. Driving home, I thought of my co-workers and of the MNLA and MCH people I know. We’re educated, intelligent horticulturists who truly care about what we sell and what we do. Think of how excited we are by the person who brings in the fungus or insect we don’t know — what IS that??? Think of how we try to educate our customers, not just about what’s killing their tree, but about design and plant choice and the best way to keep those plants happy and healthy. Think of the customers who thank us for our time and our knowledge and come back again and again because of who we are and what we know. You should all be proud of yourselves. Think about that. See you at Summer Conference!

Kathy Bergmann, MCH, Bergmann Construction Education Committee Chair

Philip Boucher, MCH, Elysian Garden Design History Committee Chair

|6

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Just Getting Started By Chris O’Brien, MCH

T

he wheels of state government have slowly begun to turn following last fall’s election. That is understandable given the extremely high turnover in state offices, starting with the executive department. The new governor, Charlie Baker, has appointed new leadership to virtually every department, and it takes time to get going on tasks ranging from the profound to the trivial: move people in, organize a staff, establish reporting relationships, find the coffee and restrooms, etc. In the legislature, the Senate has a new leadership team led by Stanley Rosenberg (D-Amherst). In the House, Robert DeLeo (D-Winthrop) continues as speaker, but an unusually large number of new faces have been elected to seats in the chamber. The focus of the legislature’s work right now is completion of the state budget. Once that important task is finished, the legislature will begin serious consideration of the thousands of bills filed earlier this year. In the meantime, Governor Baker has directed state agencies to begin a one-year review of state regulations. He wants regulations that do not “unduly and adversely affect Massachusetts citizens and customers of the Commonwealth.” Furthermore, the order says that state rules should not exceed federal requirements. The process has only just started, but there could be substantial change in Massachusetts regulations in the offing. The business of governing is just getting started for many officials, but the agenda is large and ambitious. MNLA will be watching out for the interests of its members. We welcome hearing from you regarding what you think are the most important issues.

Time to Join the Team By Mark Ahronian, MCH

W

e are proud to be the only nursery/landscaping association with its own premier product line, and with their new 21st-century plastic bags, MNLA products are hot sellers this year. More and more members tell me they recognize that having a marketing niche that major box stores don’t have pays dividends. Try our line of grass seed and fertilizer products and look professional doing it. Many of my customers notice the MNLA bag and ask where they can get more. They recognize that what they see us using is the professional brand. Our partner, Valley Green, is committed to our product line and has made many improvements over the last few years. MNLA makes a 10 percent royalty on all MNLA products sold, and the money helps to defray the cost of MNLA’s educational programs. Every time you buy a bag, you help keep costs down for you and your fellow members. You and the company you work for belong to a bigger team: MNLA, your resource for success. MNLA products were designed for Massachusetts soils with the help of UMass Extension specialists. Check out our prices at MNLA.com, and be sure to watch the new MNLA product videos designed to help your bottom line.  

Mark Ahronian, MCH, Ahronian Landscaping & Design, Inc. Products Committee Chair

Chris O’Brien, MCH, Howard Garden Designs, Inc. Government Relations Committee Chair

Summer|2015

|

7


MNLA EVENTS

Topsfield — An Engaging Place for a Summer Meeting By Philip Boucher, MCH

M

ention the North Shore and one’s mind goes immediately to the thought of a cool, rocky coast, fleets of commercial and pleasure boats dotting the bays, and great seafood. Yet Essex County offers much more. Over the past 300 years, it has had a proud industrial and manufacturing past in shipbuilding, textiles, lumber, and furniture making. It has also long been known for its enduring working landscape of dairy farms, vegetable growers, plant nurseries, orchards, and beekeepers, as well as small forest plantations.

Essex County is home to one of the oldest agricultural societies in America, founded in 1818, with a list of members that is a kaleidoscope of the notables in the plant and political world. The county is also home to one of the oldest agricultural fairs in America: Topsfield Fair Grounds, which is the location for the 2015 MNLA Summer meeting on July 23rd. The fairgrounds and venue offer up a wonderful look at Essex County and Massachusetts in earlier times that influenced agriculture across a young nation. This was part of the Golden Age of Massachusetts agriculture.

Always well stocked! And backed by experience...

51 employees with 10 + years - 15 are MCH’s

Catalog & Availability upon request

1028 Horseneck Road Westport, MA 02790

508-636-4573 Fax 508-636-3397

Visit www.sylvannursery.com

|8

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Facts about Agriculture in Essex County— • Developed the Hubbard squash we still grow along, with the Danvers onion and countless other vegetable and flower hybrids. • From the late-18th through mid-19th century, was a haven for plantsmen, especially pomologists in fruit hybrids. The pears of Robert Manning and William Bartlett alone brought fame to this little piece of Massachusetts. • Considered the Eastern Mass official weigh-in point for giant pumpkins. • Innovative farming and plant production methods broke ground here first with metal plows. • Developed countless animal-drawn mechanical farm implements such as manure spreaders, scythes, and mowing machines. • Introduced new breeds of cattle, sheep, pigs, and other livestock that took hold in a rapidly-growing early America. • The venue annually educates and entertains more than 15,000 students and teachers in topics from healthy eating to saving honeybees. • Annually awards more than 22 scholarships to posthigh school students pursuing agricultural studies. Topsfield Fairgrounds is an historic location as well as a venue for educating the public about agriculture and showcasing the individual efforts of farmers and growers in competition and exposition. It provides opportunities for the public — young and old — to enjoy modern agriculture and develop an understanding of where their food comes from and agriculture’s importance to the local economy for Essex growers. Come to the Summer Meeting at Topsfield on July 23 and discover an insightful look at Massachusetts Agriculture through the years. The Education Committee has put together an excellent program for the day, so plan to attend to see what you can learn.

payroll is not your job But when you spend hours logging hours, it may feel like it’s your most important (and time consuming) “to-do.” Furthermore, without giving close attention to state and federal regulations, you can put your business at risk of costly fines. Our specialists stay up-to-date on farm payroll rules and filing deadlines, and can keep your payroll timely and accurate, allowing you to focus on the job you love — a job we value, because

we are you.

For more information, watch our video at FarmCreditEast.com/Payroll.

FarmCreditEast.com Bedford, NH · 800.825.3252 Claverack, NY · 800.362.4404 Dayville, CT · 800.327.6785 Enfield, CT · 800.562.2235 Middleboro, MA · 800.946.0506

Philip Boucher, MCH, Elysian Garden Design MNLA History Committee Chair Summer|2015

|

9


Paul Mahoney: Friend and Although books could be written about his career, I remember the friend and MNLA leader.

By Tim Lomasney

P

when Paul was both laughing and making others laugh at the aul Mahoney is an entrepreneur, a next table, but I also heard him talking business, and it was risk taker, an investor in his comobvious to me then that he was a leader among this group of munity, and the patriarch of his fampeople. ily business. He is a successful retailer who Paul was president of MNA in 1972 and 1973. He rememhas expanded his business in a time when bers the association as a smaller group, with close personal national chains and box stores are creating a relationships among many of the members. Paul admired and challenge for many green industry retailers looked up to MNA past-presidents Dennis Dowd and Bob to even keep their doors open. Now, Mahoney and his wife Kennedy, as well as members Alexander Heimlich, Arthur Doris enjoy a part-time place in the everyday managing of the Gaklis, and Phil Flag among others. Association relationbusiness, having handed down the business to their sons and ships strengthened the relationships, which were different daughters. than those typical in today’s marketplace. There was a little Books could be written, and perhaps will be, about Paul’s less territoriality, allowing a free-flowing sharing of informalife and career; I will just write about the man, Paul Mahoney, tion and consolidated buying trips when nursery stock growas a friend and a leader of MNLA. Paul ers were visited by a large caravan of and Doris were nice enough to sit with Massachusetts nursery and garden cenme over coffee and doughnuts last year ter owners. to pass along most of the information in Paul described the first time a group this article. of MNA members ventured farther When I attended my first winter south to see what New Jersey growers meeting in Hyannis almost 30 years had to offer after they’d cleaned out ago, I vaguely remember the tradeshow New England vendors of their yearly piece of the event, but I vividly rememavailability. In those days before digital ber the socializing that went on away photography and even fax machines, it from the floor and after hours. Many of was how they best shopped for product. the people I was first meeting seemed to Summer and winter meetings be like most of the great people I’d met brought the MNA group together and in my handful of years as a part time helped build comradery. Ideas were garden center and nursery employee. shared and business was conducted, There didn’t seem to be a shy person in but the social aspect of these times was the mix, and conversation and laughter just as important. One funny story was filled every barstool and lobby area at the time Paul and a friend outside work the hotel. decided to charter a jet to take their I do, however, remember Paul employees to Hawaii. When the friend Mahoney standing out from the crowd. came up way short in his commitment, I remember stopping by a party where it fell to Paul to find some additional Paul with sons Paul Jr. and Peter, 1967 the Mahoney family was generously travelers. During the Eastern Regional hosting a crowd of MNA members. I Nursery Association meeting at the remember later that night in the lounge Concord in New York that winter, word

|10

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Leader was spread that Paul had a deal on a nice trip to Hawaii. The trip sold out and quickly became an industry-centric journey with many MNA members buying in. People were committing on the spot, writing checks and handing over cash to hold their spot dur ing the convention, at dinner, and after hours. Hawaii is a fond memory for all those who took part. The issues the association addressed during Paul’s time of leadership were not as complicated as some we currently face. Gus and John Schumacher were able to get some time at the state house with Governor Dukakis and his wife, Kitty, who became a great supporter of our industry, encourThe first of many New England Spring Flower aging comShow award-winning exhibits, circa 1968. Doris munities and Paul Mahoney with four of their six chilto invest in dren: Susan, Peter, Tom, and Paul Jr. their landscapes and beautify public spaces. The issue of labor shortages concerned the nursery industry, but solutions were easier to find and only casually regulated. Plants and pests were dealt with more simply, and solutions to problems were shared amongst association members. Paul has always considered his business’ memberships in groups and associations important. The New England Nurseryman’s Association, Massachusetts Flower Growers

Summer|2015

The beginning of Mahoney’s: Paul sells Christmas trees and wreaths from his roadside farmstand alongside longtime employee Jim Admunsen (Santa Claus)

Association, Garden Centers of America, and East Coast Garden Centers are just a few that enjoyed Mahoney’s as an active participating member. It is important to keep horticulture in front of consumers now that much of what once was America’s farmland is taken over by urban sprawl, and these professional associations still help promote and educate members and consumers on the importance of horticulture in every community. These associations also connect Mahoney’s to other businesses across the United States. MNLA has Paul teaching Paul Jr. how to ball-andmeant a great burlap, 1975 deal to Paul. There have always been topics of interest and concern to bring everybody together, providing opportunity to mix with his peers. He is proudly an MCH — one of the first to pass the test — and has always encouraged his employees

|

11


Paul growing Azaleas circa 1975

to get involved so that they might learn from others and share what has worked for them. Many family members have followed in his footsteps as association leaders. Paul will always be involved, and that’s a great thing for our association. Whether we want to learn from him or have a good laugh, we are a fortunate to have Paul Mahoney as a member. Tim Lomasney is an independent sales representative at K & S Associates, owner of One Source Horticulture, and president of MNLA.

Paul keeps a watchful eye on his prized geraniums at the Woburn growing facility in Woburn, 1994

|12

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Paul always insisted on staying until closing time. Pictured in Winchester, Christmas 2014

Paul circa 2003 among his sought-after hanging baskets, a crop he is proud of every year

Summer|2015

New England Spring Flower Show: Paul, Doris, and daughter Susan at Mahoney’s retail booth selling gardenias, geraniums, and lilies, 1968

Mahoney’s annual Ask the Experts Spring Gardening Event 2015

|

13


Pollinators in the The importance of pollinators and the causes of their decline. By Mandy Bayer

C

oncerns about honeybee populations and monarch butterfly migration have brought attention to the need to protect and support pollinators in the landscape. To understand the importance of pollinators, it is necessary to have an understanding of pollination. There are two types of pollination: self-pollination in which a plant is able to pollinate itself without outside help, and cross-pollination, which is pollination aided by animals, wind, and water. The majority of pollination is cross-pollination, with animal-assisted pollination accounting for around 75 percent. Pollination results in better quality of some fruits (such as tomato) and is necessary for fruit development and seed production. Almost all fruit and grain crops grown in the U.S. require pollination (over 150 crops), and crops dependent on pollinators are estimated by the USDA to be worth more than $10 billion per year. Pollinator Decline Pollinator decline is an area of concern and controversy, with growing consensus that it is not a singular cause, but a combination of multiple stressors leading to population declines. Pesticides, with a focus on neonicotinoids, are one of the most controversial contributors to decline. The concern with pesticides and herbicides is twofold: 1) the direct health implications of pesticides on pollinators and 2) the use of herbicides in cropping systems, which creates monocultures that poorly support pollinators by reducing the variety of flowering plants in the area. The issue with neonicotinoid insecticides is that they travel systemically throughout the plant, including to pollen and nectar, increasing the likelihood of pollinator contact. Loss of suitable habitats, contributed to by urbanization and land conversion, is another cause of concern. A combination of habitats is needed for food, nesting, mating areas, and migration. Urbanization has led to the fragmentation of habitats and the disruption of some migratory pathways. Land conversion from diverse natural landscapes to intensive cropping areas that are almost monocultures decreases

|14

the variety of pollen and nectar sources for pollinators. Flowers vary in protein content and nutrient composition, so a diet of a singular plant species has the potential to impact pollinator health. Transportation of bees and an increase of commercial bee colony trade have contributed to the spread of parasites and diseases outside of the normal range. The spread of parasites and pathogens is problematic, because the new host species often lacks resistance, increasing the likelihood of death. The impact of current and future climate change on pollinators is not yet well understood. Historically, changes in climate have caused the native ranges of plants and animals to shift to where conditions are more favorable. Many plants and pollinators have evolved to have a mutualistic dependency, so with potential range shifts, there is concern that plants and pollinators will shift in different directions. Range shifts due to climate change have already been observed with some butterflies. Another concern is the alteration of bloom time and pollinator emergence. Climate change has the potential to lead to earlier warmer temperatures in the spring, which could disrupt the synchronization of flower development and pollinator emergence. There may also be increased potential for flower and bud damage due to the increased frequency of late frost events if warmer temperatures come early. The good news is that urban landscapes have great potential to support pollinators, both as nectar and pollen sources and as pollinator habitats. Information on best management practices for pollinators and landscaping to attract pollinators will be coming in future issues of Pro|Grow|News. Pollinator Plant Spotlight: Milkweed Many plants and their pollinators have evolved together, creating mutualistic dependencies. Milkweed (Asclepias spp.) is the larval host plant for the monarch butterfly, meaning that milkweed is the only plant that monarch caterpillars feed on. Milkweed contains toxins that are not harmful to monarch caterpillars, but are poisonous to many animals, providing protection for monarchs both as larval caterpillars and as adult butterflies. www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Landscape Abelia x ‘Mardi Gras’

Milkweed species for the Northeast: Asclepias incarnata

Swamp milkweed

Asclepias tuberosa

Butterflyweed

Asclepias verticillata

Whorled milkweed

Asclepias exaltata

Poke milkweed

Pollinator Highlight: Butterflies and Moths Butterflies have four life stages: egg, caterpillar, pupa, and adult. All have differing habitat needs. There are many habitat options for butterfly eggs including leaves or branches of various plants and the soil. Larval — caterpillar — host plants are much more limited (i.e., monarch butterflies and milkweed) and need to provide the caterpillar with both food and shelter. At the pupa stage, butterflies need a protected area such as shrubs, tall grasses, or fallen branches. As adults, butterflies need plants that provide a nectar source. Butterflies are attracted to flowers that are brightly colored, open during the day, and provide a good landing platform. Nectar is usually hidden deeply within the flower, but but-

terflies use nectar guides to find it. Nectar guides are markings on flowers that are not visible to humans, but are seen by pollinators to direct them to nectar. While some butterfly species migrate in the winter, others hibernate, requiring leaf litter, bark, or other landscape debris as cover. Moths can be either nocturnal or day-time pollinators depending on the type, with the majority being nocturnal. They are very important for the pollination of night blooming flowers. They are generally attracted to white or dull colored flowers that are heavily fragranced. Plant features attracting butterflies: Bright colored flowers Wide landing pad Tubular flowers Plant features attracting moths: Pale/dull colored flowers Strongly sweet fragrance (especially at night) Tubular flowe

Plants that attract butterflies (nectar sources):

Annuals Scientific Name

Common Name

Size

Color

Bloom Time

Cosmos bipinnatus

Cosmos

12-48”

pink, red, white

June to frost

Lantana camara

Lantana

36-48”

yellow, pink, white, orange, red, purple, mixed

July to frost

Tagetes erecta

African marigold

12-48”

yellow, orange, white

June to frost

Tagetes patula

French marigold

6-12”

yellow, orange, red, bicolor

June to frost

Tithonia rotundifolia

Mexican sunflower

48-72”

orange-red

July to September

Tropaeolum

nasturtium

12-36”

red, orange, yellow, or cream

May to September

Zinnia spp.

zinnia

6-48”

red, orange, yellow, pink, white, purple, cream

June to frost

|

15


Lantana camara

Perennials Scientific Name

|16

Common Name

Size

Color

Bloom Time

Native

Allium cultivars

ornamental onion

12-60”

purple, lavender

May-June

Asclepias incarnata

swamp milkweed

48-60”

white, pink, mauve

July - August

*

Asclepias purpurascens

purple milkweed

24-36”

pink to purple

May- July

*

Asclepias tuberosa

butterfly weed

12-30”

yellow/orange

June-August

*

Aster spp.

Aster

12-24”

purple, blue, lavender, white

August - September

some

Coreopsis cultivars

tickseed

12-24”

yellows

June - October

Coreopsis rosea

tickseed

12-36’

pink

June - September

*

Dianthus barbatus

sweet William

12-24”

red, pink, white, bicolor

May - frost

Echinacea cultivars

coneflower

6-48”

purple, pink, white, yellow, orange, lime

June - August

Echinacea purpurea

purple coneflower

24-60”

purple/pink

June - August

*

Eutrochium purpureum

Joe Pye weed

60-84”

pink

July - September

*

Gaillardia spp.

blanketflower

8-36”

yellow, orange, red

May - September

Helenium cultivars

sneezeweed

12-48”

red, orange, yellow

August - October

Lavandula angustifolia cultivars

English lavender

8-36”

purple, lavender, pink, blue

June - October

Leucanthemum x superbum

shasta daisy

22-36”

white

July - September

Liatris spicata

blazing star

8-18”

purple

July - August

*

Lobelia cardinalis

cardinal flower

24-48”

red, white, or pink

July - September

*

Lobelia siphilitica

blue cardinal flower

24-36”

blue

July - September

*

Monarda cultivars

bee balm

8-36”

reds, pinks, or purples

June - August

Phlox paniculata cultivars

garden phlox

12-48”

pink, red, white, purple, lavender, bicolor

July - September

Phlox subulata

creeping phlox

4-6”

red, purple, lavender, pink, white

March - May

*

Rudbeckia fulgida

black-eyed Susan

24-36”

yellow/orange

June - October

Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’

pincushion flower

12-18”

lavender blue

April - frost

Sedum spp.

stonecrop

2-18”

pink, red, white

July - September

Symphyotrichum novaeangliae

New England aster

36-72”

deep pink purple

August - September

*

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Tagetes patula

Shrubs and Trees Scientific Name Common Name

Size

Color

Bloom Time

Aesculus parviflora

bottlebrush buckeye

8-12’

white

June-July

Buddleja alternifolia

alternate-leaved butterfly bush

8-15’

lilac purple

May

Buddleja davidii cultivars

butterfly bush

3-12’

lilac, purple, pink, red, white

June - September

Ceanothus americanus

New Jersey tea

3-4’

white

May - July

*

Cephalanthus occidentalis

buttonbush

5-12’

white

June

*

Clethra alnifolia and cultivars

sweet pepperbush/ summersweet

2-8’

white, pink

July - August

*

Fothergilla gardenii

dwarf fothergilla

1.5-3’

white

April-May

Kalmia latifolia cultivars

mountain laurel

2-15’

pink, white, multicolor

May - June

*

Kolkwitzia amabilis

beautybush

6-10’

pink

April-May

Lindera benzoin

spicebush

6-12’

yellow/green

March

*

Rhododendron spp.

Rhododendron and azalea

Syringa vulgaris cultivars

common lilac

3-16’

lavender, purple, white, pink, blue

May

Vaccinium spp./cultivars

blueberry

3-12’

white

May

*

Viburnum spp.

viburnum

2-20’

white

April - June

some

Aesculus glabra

Ohio buckeye

20-40’

greenish yellow

April - May

Amelanchier spp.

Serviceberry

Cornus florida and cultivars

flowering dogwood

15-30’

white, pink

April - May

*

Malus cultivars

flowering crabapple

7-30’

white, pink, coral

Prunus spp.

cherry, flowering almond

10-40’

white, pink

March - April

Native

Zinnia angustifolia Summer|2015

|

17


Host Plants for caterpillars: Sources: Goulson, D., E. Nicholls, C. Native Botias, and E.L. Rotheray. 2015.

Larval Host Plants Scientific Name

Common Name

Size

Alcea rosea

hollyhock

5-8’

Anethum graveolens

dill

3-5’

Asclepias spp.

milkweed

24-60”

Artemisia spp.

wormwood

6-36”

Aster spp.

aster

12-24”

Carex

sedge

0.5-1.5’

Echinacea purpurea

coneflower

18-36”

Panicum

switch grass

2.5-6’

Petroselinum crispum

parsley

0.5-1’

Schizachyrium scoparium

little bluestem

2-4’

Sedum spp.

stonecrop

2-18”

Viola spp.

violet

4-12”

some

Aesculus glabra

Ohio buckeye

20-40’

Amelanchier spp.

serviceberry

15-30’

some

Betula spp.

birch

30-70’

some

Carpinus caroliniana

hornbeam

20-35’

*

Ceanothus americanus

New Jersey tea

3-4’

*

Cephalanthus occidentalis

buttonbush

5-12’

*

Cercis canadensis

redbud

20-30’

*

Clethra alnifolia and cultivars

sweet pepperbush/ summerweet

2-8’

*

Cornus florida

flowering dogwood

15-30’

Cornus alternifolia

pagoda dogwood

15-25’

Fraxinus spp.

ash

35-80’

some

Lindera benzoin

spicebush

6-12’

*

Populus spp.

poplar, aspen

30-80’

some

Quercus spp.

oak

30-80’

some

Rhododendron spp.

rhododendron and azalea

2-12’

some

Rhus spp.

sumac

1.5-30’

some

Sassafras albidum

sassafras

30-60’

*

Salix spp.

willow

20-40’+

some

Syringa vulgaris cultivars

common lilac

3-16’

Vaccinium spp./cultivars

blueberry

3-12’

*

Viburnum spp.

viburnum

2-20’

some

Ulmus spp.

elm

30-80’

some

Mandy Bayer is Assistant Professor of Sustainable Landscape Horticulture at the UMass Amherst Stockbridge School of Agriculture. All photos by Mandy Bayer

|18

 

Bee declines driven by combined stress from parasites, pesticides, and lack of flowers. Science 26 Feb 2015. USDA Forest Service. Pollinators. http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ pollinators/animals/ USDA Forest Service. Plant Milkweed for Monarchs. http:// www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/Monarch_Butterfly/documents/MilkweedInfoSheet.pdf University of Maine Extension. Landscaping for Butterflies in Maine. http://umaine.edu/ publications/7151e/ Massachusetts Butterfly Club. http://www.naba.org/chapters/ nabambc/downloads/Butterfly%20 gardening%20101%20-%20 Western%20Massachusetts.pdf USDA Natural Resources Concervation Service and the Wildlife Habitat Council. Native Pollinators. https://plants. usda.gov/pollinators/Native_ Pollinators.pdf UMass Center for Agriculture Food and the Environment. Protecting Bees and Pollinators from Pesticides in Home Gardens and Landscapes. http://ag.umass. edu/fact-sheets/protecting-beespollinators-from-pesticides-inhome-gardens-landscapes Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/plantfinder/ plantfindersearch.aspx

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS

LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES

NURSERY STOCK

STONE YARD

SEASONAL DECOR

New England’s most comprehensive horticultural grower and distributor. We cultivate and sustain over 250 acres of annuals, perennials and nursery stock, complimented by a premium selection of soil mixes, stone, and landscape supplies. Our goal is to supply our customers with the best service, quality, and selection in the industry.

110 Codjer Lane, Sudbury, MA 01776 978.443.7177 www.cavicchio.com


Plant Knowledge

Testing Irrigation Water for Water-Borne Pathogens

July 23rd

Save the Date Today! You can hear Bill McCurry explore this and other incomegenerating ideas at the “Down to Earth” Summer Conference & Trade Show. July 23, 2015 Topsfield Fair Topsfield, Massachusetts To register, visit MNLA.com. You can also read Bill’s monthly column, “Profit Planet,” in Green Profit magazine.

|20

N

ursery irrigation systems occasionally become contaminated with plant pathogens. Wells and municipal water sources are highly unlikely to contain plant pathogens, but rivers, irrigation ponds, sources of run-off water, and irrigation ditches may become contaminated. Phytophthora species are of particular concern to nursery growers. While potentially devastating to very young plants, problems caused by Pythium species are infrequently encountered in nursery settings. If you are concerned that your source for irrigation water may be harboring plant pathogenic Pythium or Phytophthora, and you would like to have it tested, water may be hand-carried to the lab or sent via mail. Ideally, about 3 liters (3/4 gallon) of water should be tested, but this makes for a heavy package and is costly to ship. Alternatively, collect 500 ml (about 1 quart) water in a clean plastic bottle. Cap tightly and refrigerate if not shipping immediately. Keep in mind that if the contamination level is less than 1 or 2 spores per pint or quart, it is unlikely that the pathogen will be detected. Preventing Contamination Keep watering nozzles off the ground where they can become contaminated with soil. If you use a source of surface water such as a river or pond, keep plant waste and compost piles as far as possible from the water. Any plant material known to be infected with Pythium or Phytophthora should be disposed of off-site. There are many treatment methods and systems available to purify water before it enters or re-enters an irrigation system. More information on this topic can be found at the Oregon Association of Nurseries website: www. oan.org. Sample Submission Send all samples by next-day delivery. Please include a submission form, which can be found along guidelines for sending specimens, at www.umass.edu. Click on Services, then Vegetable & Floriculture Diagnostics. Laboratory tests may take several days to yield results. The lab does not routinely screen irrigation water for other plant pathogens. This may be done under special circumstances; however, other pathogens are more easily and accurately diagnosed by examination of plant material. Reference: Biology, Detection, and Management of Plant Pathogens in Irrigation Water. Hong, Moorman, Wohanka, and Büttner, Eds. APS Press, 2014. www. apsnet.org

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Endorsed Insurance Provider of the

MORE YOUR ALLY

T H AN YO U R

AGENT

With FARM FAMILY, you’ll get an agent who has the know-how and products to help you properly manage your family’s risks. An open appointment book, along with options for home, auto and life coverage, means you can feel good that you’re getting more an ally than just an agent. Wherever you are in Massachusetts, there’s a Farm Family agent close to you. Give us a call for more information. Richard Blair Carver (508) 866-9150

Kay Spencer Middleboro (508) 747-8181

Francis Bingham Norwood (781) 255-2002

Heather Montalvo Westford (978) 467-1001

Mark Sylvia Centerville (508) 957-2125

Andrew Brodeur Middleboro (508) 747-8181

Tim Viles South Deerfield (413) 665-8200

Sean Rooney Wilbraham (413) 887-8817

Chad Meyer Easthampton (413) 203-5180

Jason Charette North Andover (978) 208-4713

Diane Mason-Arnold Southwick (413) 569-2307

Maureen O’Mara Williamstown (413) 458-5584

Bob Sinopoli Great Barrington (413) 528-1710

Richard Simonian Northborough (508) 393-9327

John Pagliaro Southwick (413) 569-2307

Mick Dolan Williamstown (413) 458-5584

* Photo by Jennifer Gunn

Associate Agent

Dominic Sinopoli Great Barrington (413) 207-5044

Jeff Pichierri Northborough (508) 393-9327

Dale Johnson Topsfield (978) 887-8304

Thomas Carroll Worcester (508) 752-3300

Martin West Marlborough (508) 485-3800

Kevin Sullivan Northborough (508) 393-9327

Don Ludwig Westford (978) 467-1001

Steve Charette General Agent North Andover (978) 686-0170

Associate Agent

All coverages are subject to the terms and conditions of the policy in the year of its issue. Products may vary by state. Certain products may not be available in all states. Property/casualty products offered by Farm Family Casualty Insurance Company and United Farm Family Insurance Company. Life products offered by Farm Family Life Insurance Summer|2015 Company. Home Offices: Glenmont, New York.

|

21

93676


Business Focus

Six Wishes of a Dying Landscaper By Jeffrey Scott

I

f you die with the most toys and fastest cars, have you succeeded? Research shows that at the end of your life you will measure your success differently. Dying with the fastest cars won’t get you into heaven — and there is always someone with a faster car. Use this checklist to make sure your business is giving you the life of your dreams.

1. “I wish I let myself be successful.” Entrepreneurs try hard to bend the will of the universe to their own vision, and yet the world has its own way of working things out. You choose to be frustrated or be happy. Aim for success, not perfection. • What could you do at work and at home to create more happiness?

4

|22

• How much more could you accomplish if you aimed for success as your goal instead of perfection?

2. “I should have nurtured my inner circle.” Don’t work so hard that you forgo the relationships you had built along the way. Take time out to reconnect your inner circle, the friends, family, and confidants who helped you along the way. • Who do you need to reconnect with from your past? From your present? • When is the best time of your day, week, or month to do so? (For me, it is the weekend.) Bring joy into your life and your friends’ lives by staying in contact with them.

(888) 889-9996

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Jeffrey Scott, MBA, author and consultant, is an expert in growth and profit maximization in the lawn and landscape industry. Now devoted to helping others achieve success, he facilitates the Leader’s Edge peer group for landscape business owners. To learn more, visit www.GetTheLeadersEdge.com.

3. “I should have had the courage to state what’s on

my mind.” If you are thinking or feeling something, say it. Don’t worry so much about offending people. Bonnie Ware found that dying people wish they had expressed their feelings more and suppressed them less. This holds true for entrepreneurs and business leaders. Being passive-aggressive won’t help the other person, and it won’t help you.

4. “I wish I had played more, worked less”

The old expression that no one ever died wishing they worked harder is true; a practical solution is that of a better work/life balance. Take time out to enjoy the fruits of your hard labor. This comes from choice, time management skills, efficiency, and priority. Just because you are working for your family, doesn’t mean your family wants you to always be working.

We know you work hard. Let us work harder.

Lean on us for some of your business demands - we know we can work harder for you. This is why we’ve implemented the Partners Program and Business Solutions, and the Px3 Maintenance Package. Px3 helps you with the planning process by providing customized bids for each project. We can accurately estimate the square footage of any property. Customers who join our Partners Program earn points on every John Deere Landscapes purchase and redeem those points at an online store, for various industry events, or for cash on account. Program members are also eligible for our Business Solutions, which can help reduce your day-to-day business expenses. Please contact your local branch to learn more about these opportunities. We are eager to help you with as many of your business challenges as possible! Summer|2015

800-347-4272 www.JohnDeereLandscapes.com

|

23


It’s Spray Season www.oescoinc.com

OESCO has sprayers for every application For spraying fields, orchards, or nursery stock -when watering, fertilizing or performing pest control, OESCO has the equipment you need.

• •

What personal activities do you want to do this week? Schedule it before you schedule work. What family activities do you want to do this year? Schedule them now, before work takes over.

5. “Whose life was I living?”

Most expectations are self-imposed, coming from self-talk, both positive and negative. Don’t go to your death bed trying to please everyone else. The key to entrepreneurial success is embracing your own vision and seeing it through. • What expectations do you have for yourself that you want to fulfill this year? • What would success look like a year from now if you followed your own compass?

6. “I should have taken more actions and risks.”

The biggest regret you will have on your death bed is not “what you did” but rather “what you didn’t do.” What idea do you have in your brain or your heart that you are holding yourself back from doing? • List out the two big ideas you have been carrying around in your head. Talk about them with someone you trust and make a plan to “just do it.”

Rears 50-gallon Nifty Tank

Honda 5.5 HP engine, AR30 pump. Stainless steel tank, mechanical agitation. Skid or trailer models. Long life, low maintenance.

Breakthrough Idea: Sometimes you can learn more from the dying than the living. Take Action: Score yourself 0 to 10 on each of these regrets, and identify one action you can take to raise your score in each area.

Special thanks to Bonnie Ware, who wrote “The Top 5 Regrets of the Dying.” Copyright 2015 Jeffrey Scott.

Hortus Humorous Gregson-Clark V-100 ST

Base width of 38.5” fits well in medium and full size pickup trucks -- and even in vans.

800-634-5557. CALL OR STOP BY. You will always be able to speak to a knowledgeable & friendly person who can help.

7AM-5PM, Mon.-Fri. & 7AM-noon, Sat. since 1954

YEARS

www.oescoinc.com 8 Ashfield Road P.O. Box 540 Conway, MA 01341

|24

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association presents…

Plant Geek Day Wednesday, August 19, 2015 • 7:30AM—3PM The Historic Wakefield Estate & Arboretum 1465 Brush Hill Road, Milton, MA 02186

Knowledge, networking & fun! Take the Plant Geek Challenge and benefit from these educational topics: Pruning • Managing Invasives without Pesticides • Reading the Landscape • Assessing Tree Health • Encourage Clients to Plant Trees as Energy Cost Savers

Visit www.mnla.com today to register online or download a mail-in registration form.

An expanded MCH Day! Sharing a great educational opportunity with all nursery & landscape professionals within the industry!

Early registration pricing* $45 MCH & MNLA members $65 non-members $200 per sponsor each sponsorship includes sign recognition and one free registration

*All registrations submitted after August 12, 2015 will require an additional $10 per person.

Summer|2015

|

25


Safety Sense

Jobsite Hazard Inspections

O

ne of the easiest and most effective ways to reduce injuries in our industry is to conduct jobsite inspections that identify hazards and potential hazards. Inspections should take place before work begins, regularly throughout shifts, and any time conditions change. Entire crews should be actively engaged in these inspections and related meetings. This brings potentially dangerous conditions and situations to everyone’s attention and gives all crew members an opportunity to offer solutions. Jobsite inspections and meetings can be conducted quickly, and the time spent on them pays dividends in reduced accident and insurance costs and saved lives. Checklist for Employers, Supervisors and Crew Leaders 3• Jobsite inspections are key to complying with federal OSHA’s General Duty Clause, which requires you to provide a workplace free from hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm. • 3 Make conducting these inspections part of your company’s written safety and health policy. The policy should describe the responsibilities of management, field supervisors, crew leaders, and crew members.

New England Wetland Plants, Inc.

3

3

Wholesale Native Plant Nursery Your source for...

3 3

Trees, Shrubs, Ferns, Flowering Perennials, and Grasses Coastal and Inland Wetland Plants Specialty Seed Mixes Coir Logs, Straw Wattles, Blankets and Mats

Employees Should: 3• Note hazards, potential hazards, and unsafe conditions during jobsite inspections. 3• Look for slip/trip hazards including wet grass, sprinkler heads, spills, tool cords, and steps that are uneven, steep, or narrow. 3• Look for and pick up sticks, rocks, glass, and other loose debris that mowers, lines trimmers, or leaf blowers could launch as projectiles. 3• Check for overhead utility lines in areas where ladders, pole pruners, or other equipment/tools could come near them. 3• Notice the location of retaining walls, holes, drop-offs, and other elevation changes that could pose risks for those operating mowers and other machines. Evaluate ground conditions. Wet grass or unstable soil could cause machines to lose traction or overturn. Employees Should Not: 3• Begin operating line trimmers, leaf blowers, mowers, and other equipment until ground conditions and tools/ equipment have been inspected and debris has been picked up. • 3 Dig anywhere until all underground utilities are verified and marked. 3• Fail to notice clues pointing to the existence of private underground utility lines that utility companies don’t mark. These include landscape lighting, water features, sprinkler systems, and outbuildings. 3• Assume someone else will inspect the jobsite and let you know about hazards. Safety is everyone’s responsibility.

3

|26

3• Train field supervisors, crew leaders, and crew members to correctly conduct jobsite inspections and hold successful follow-up meetings. 3• Teach employees to promptly report hazards and potential hazards and encourage them to share safety suggestions and concerns. 3• Take action quickly when hazards or potential hazards can be eliminated. 3• If digging will take place, ensure all utility companies have marked their lines, and make sure private lines are marked. 3• Ensure each crew holds a short meeting before beginning work at any jobsite to discuss hazards and potential hazards and how they will be addressed. Document this meeting in writing.

820 West Street, Amherst, MA 01002 Phone: (413) 548-8000 Fax: (413) 549-4000 Email: info@newp.com Web: www.newp.com www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


The finest Taxus and Boxwoods in the industry and so much more.

sF Aesculu

Mandarin

Lights Aza

t. McNa

Autumn Blaz

lea

Little Lim Magic

ir

irea Carpet Sp

e Hydran

e Maple

gea

See Availability List on our website! FairviewEvergreen.com

Summer|2015

|

27

7463 West Ridge Rd. P.O. Box E Fairview PA 16415 800.458.2234 e-mail: info@FairviewEvergreen.com


Rhododendron ‘Olga Mezitt’,

a Weston Nurseries Introduction & 2007 Cary Award Winner

We’re just not plants anymore…

Now a Techo-Bloc Dealer!

Annuals Ÿ Perennials Premium Nursery Stock Bulk Mulch, Soil, Stone & Compost Ÿ Stone Yard & Masonry Ÿ Planters & Containers Contractor Tools Ÿ Grass Seed Fertilizers Ÿ Landscape & Hardscape Supplies

www.WestonNurseries.com/Commercial-sales Frankland Rd Ÿ Hopkinton Ÿ (508) 293-8028 160 Pine Hill Rd Ÿ Chelmsford Ÿ (978) 349-0055

CommSales@WestonNurseries.com

Prides Corner Farms We are all about You need fewer hassles You need someone who will listen You need a partner that believes in you You need someone who has your back You need product that will not be in big box stores You need a company that will be there now and in the future

We Live This Everyday! Call (800)437-5168 www.pridescorner.com |28

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


Advertiser Index

MARKETPLACE

Acorn Tree and Landscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Amherst Nurseries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bigelow Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Cavicchio Landscape Supplies, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Coronis Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Fairview Evergreen Nuseries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Farm Credit East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Farm Family Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Ideal Concrete Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 John Deere Landscapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Motz & Son Nursery

Motz & Son Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Wholesale Growers of ... Shade and Flowering TreeS

Netafim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

FruiT TreeS

New England Wetland Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

dwarf, Semi-dwarf & Standard combinaTion FruiT TreeS (4 in 1)

Northeast Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

eSpalier appleS

OESCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

Semi-dwarf, combination & one Variety

Prides Corners Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

walnuTS and FilberTS deciduouS ShrubS

Savage Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Write for our stock and price: 11445 N.W. Skyline Blvd. Portland, Oregon 97231

Sylvan Nurseries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Valley Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Phone 503-645-1342 Fax 503-645-6856

Weston Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

 

For Advertising Information—

coronis consulting __________________

Call Debbie Rauen

Sharing over 35 years of business & landscape success Laurence S. Coronis  603.721.9812   www.coronisconsulting.com 

Summer|2015

(817) 501-2403

debbie.parksand rec@yahoo

|

29


Plant for Success

Pinus ridgida — Pitch Pine Why Pitch Pine Shines By Ian Anderson, MCH

P

itch pine is typically a broader, shorter American pine with crooked, sometimes sprawling stems and branches. Found naturally on nutrient-poor, excessively freedraining soils in full sun, it can handle conditions of drought that would kill most other plants. Windy ridgelines holding only four or five inches of gravely dirt provide some of its most picturesque haunts. This physiological capability can come in handy when dealing with the sterile, compacted fill around most newly constructed homes. It also has a very high degree of salt tolerance which makes it perfect for seashore conditions. In exposed sites, the pitch pine shows its characteristic broad and crooked silhouette to greatest effect, and it looks excellent around large boulders and seascapes. Some Japanese gardening aficionados tout the pitch pine for its ability to sprout from old wood, a trait that gives a good pruner more styling options with this species. Aesthetically, the pitch pine would be a stand-in for Japanese black pine in those landscapes, with the former being naturally more inclined to make crooked shapes. For sustainable gardening and xeriscaping, this tree is hard to beat. It’s a New England native, low maintenance, and has visual interest year round. Facts and Figures Pitch pine is one of the hard pines; it carries three stiff, slightly twisted needles in each fascicle, giving the tree a bristly texture that complements its sculptural habit. The foliage is a light shade of green. This tree can produce up to three whorls of branches in one year. It is not a stickler for poor soils, but

I’ve observed that on fertile sites, it grows telephone pole straight and the character is lost. Two cautionary notes: pitch pine cones are painfully prickly, and this tree is very hard to transplant. In the wild, this tree pairs with bear berry, bear oak, low bush blueberry, tough grasses, and red cedar. Northern bayberry is a good companion near the ocean. On productive timberland or places where forest fires are suppressed, pitch pine will be over-topped and replaced by red oak and white pine. The size of this plant can be controlled by skilled pruning. This is labor intensive, but can add greatly to the aesthetic value if done well. Plant: Pinus ridgida — Pitch Pine Type: Tree Exposure: Evergreen Size: Variable, up to sixty feet with almost equal width. Often smaller. Hardiness Zone: 4 to 7 Soil: Slightly acidic sandy Growth Rate: Moderate slowing with age Ian Anderson, MCH, is a Seasonal Horticulturist/ Arborist at RFK Greenway Conservatory

|30

www.mnla.com

pro|grow|news


"ĔĠģğ5ģĖĖĒğĕ-ĒğĕĤĔĒġĖ %ĖĤĚĘğĒğĕ$ĠğĤĥģĦĔĥĚĠğ0ėėĖģĚğĘ-ĒģĘĖ5ģĖĖ5ģĒğĤġĝĒğĥĚğĘ

7JTJUPVSNBUVSFTQFDJNFOUSFFGBSN0WFS NBUVSFUSFFTUPJOTUBOUMZFTUBCMJTIZPVSMBOETDBQF 3FMPDBUFZPVSNBUVSFQMBOUNBUFSJBM DSFBUFJOTUBOUTIBEF QSJWBDZBOECFBVUZ 8FPGGFSBXJEFTFMFDUJPOPGNBUVSFTQFDJNFOUSFFT+BQBOFTF.BQMF %PHXPPE #FFDI 4VHBS.BQMF 4QSVDF FUD t."$FSUJmFE"SCPSJTU t0XOFS0QFSBUFE t)PSUJDVMUVSBM$POTVMUBOU t1MBOUJOH1MBOT "MFBEFSJO/FX&OHMBOEJOMBSHFUSFFBOETISVCUSBOTQMBOUJOH

Harvard, MA • Tel: 978.635.0409 • Fax: 978.635.9840 • acorntree@me.com )BSWBSE ."t5FMt'BYtBDPSOUSFF!BPMDPN


Servicing the green industry for over 30 years

Landscape Contractors

Golf Course Superintendents

Lighting and Irrigation Designers

Masons

Arborists

Turf Managers

Growers

Retailers

6 Dearborn Rd, Peabody, MA 01960 -

(978) 535-6551 www.northeastnursery.com

Profile for Association Publishing Partners

ProGrowNews Summer 2015 Issue  

Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association

ProGrowNews Summer 2015 Issue  

Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association

Profile for rick_r