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Allergies, Asthma Gifting your children with and Sinus meaningful experiences Not wrapped, but remembered

during the holiday season

Do you or your child suffer from food allergy? Sick of carrying an Epipen?

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f you’re like most families in America, the approach of the holiday season brings with it the anticipation of a month filled with family togetherness and merry memory making – in other words, the holidays as you’ve always imagined them.

Newer testing available to determine if food allergy is present. Often times food allergy is over diagnosed. We can help.

2940 Lincoln Avenue Suite 200 Oceanside, NY 11572 Phone: 516-307-9140 Fax: 516-706-6770 www.longislandallergies.com

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foods, drugs,ant bites, or insect stings)

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• Angioedema (swelling of the body, often the face or hands)

• Recurrent sinus/ear infections

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Dr. Fiorillo-Quinn

Dr. Florillo-Quinn is board certified in Pediatric/Adult Allergy & Immunology. We can help with: • Asthma • Allergic rhinitis • Eczema/Allergic Skin disorders • Drug, food, and insect allergy • Latex allergy • Urticaria (hives, welts) • Anaphylaxis (severe reactions to

I want a Car

Lawrence Woodmere Academy Building Success Stories, One Graduate At A Time

It is possible to consciously create the holiday you want, if you make your list early and check it twice. “The key to enjoying a really meaningful holiday season with your family is to plan ahead and to do it purposefully,” says Andrea, coauthor along with her husband, David, of the book “Letters From Home: A Wake-up Call for Success & Wealth. “Like anything else, the family time, parties, and bonding you’re envisioning don’ t just happen. They are created by design.” Andrea, a self-confessed “Martha Stewart type,” knows from personal experience that when your quest to bring a fairytale holiday to life makes you feel more like Scrooge than Santa Claus, something’s wrong. Instead of breaking the bank to shower your kids with material things this holiday season, the Reisers suggest giving them the gift of a meaningful experience instead. Time spent together, not a new video game system or wardrobe, will truly stick with them and shape their worldviews. Here are some ideas to get you started. Choose an event to attend together. Get a schedule of local holiday-themed concerts, plays, parades, shows, and other events, and choose a few to attend as a family. Your kids (and you!) will enjoy counting down to these outings, and you’ll have an even better time attending them. Plus, everyone will remember the live performance of White Christmas or the holiday-themed magic show much longer than they will a bevy of action figures under the tree. Even better? In most communities there are plenty of events to choose contined on page 3

CoImwpant a uter

Morning Coffee, Information Session and Tour Upper School November 15 8:30-9:30 AM Middle School November 16 8:30-9:30 AM Lower School November 17 8:30-9:30 AM

As each new holiday season arrives, we promise our selves that we will not repeat the mistakes made in years past: the guilt we feel from overspending, the exhaustion we feel from overbooking, or the constant frustration over kids who misbehave and act ungrateful. And as the holiday music starts to play anew each year , we make the same promise to ourselves that this is the year we are going to do things differently . And yet – things always seem to stay the same. Don’t despair, though, say Andrea and David Reiser.

• College Preparatory since 1912 • Teachers who change lives • Small classes and big opportunities • A vibrant diversity thrives here • A strong sense of community

Publishers CLIFFORD RICHNER STUART RICHNER Executive Editor JOHN C. O’CONNELL Section Editor KAREN BLOOM Editorial Designer JEFFREY A. NEGRIN

Come See For Yourself Contact The Admissions Team at 516-394-1827 to RSVP 336 Woodmere Boulevard, Woodmere, New York 11598

www.lawrencewoodmere.org

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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Vice President of Sales RHONDA GLICKMAN Account Executives MIMMA BARONE JOAN BATTINO ROBERT CUMMINGS NANCY FRIEDMAN ELLEN FRISCH

Account Executives JILL KAPLAN VICKI KAPLAN KAREN RESNICK TRICIA SKINNER Cover Design JEFFREY A. NEGRIN

South Shore Parents Today is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2011 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com


contined from page 2 from that are free to the public! It just goes to show that you don’t have to spend a mint to make memories over the holidays. Remember: There really is no place like home for the holidays. Making special holiday memories doesn’t always have to mean going somewhere. In fact, some of your most treasured experiences can be created inside the four walls of your house, and they don’t have to cost a lot of money or cause a lot of stress to be perfect! Take a regular weeknight dinner and turn it into a magical holiday meal by dimming the lights, lighting candles on the table, and playing soft holiday music in the background. Serve sparkling juice or cider in special glasses and pull out the fancy china for once. It’s a special night you and your family won’ t soon forget! Set your family up for success. On the best of days, kids will be kid – and their propensity for energy, misbehavior, and hi-jinks grows exponentially when they’re excited. Whenever your family is preparing for any sort of event this season, don’ t assume that the “usual” rules are at the forefront of young minds. Go over your expectations – and potential consequences – beforehand so that you don’ t spend the whole time scolding and correcting. And as a parent, take the time to remind yourself that children are often overstimulated, overexcited, and saturated with sugar this time of year. If you don’t think your brood can handle sitting still for an hour-long concert, then make the choice not to go. You’ll save yourself a lot of stress, anger, and disappointment in the long run. Make meaningful conversation. Conversation is There really is no place like home at holiday time. Help your family get back the holiday the foundation upon which any memorable event is you’ve always wanted and make your “merry” more meaningful this year. built. So to make the most of outings and experiences this holiday season, have a few meaningful topics up in-a-lifetime event. In fact, your family can make “routine” holiday tasks your sleeve to engage your family. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself griping into beloved traditions. For example, get everyone together to wrap gifts about chore lists, homework, and soccer schedules during your special for friends and family, and share hot chocolate and cookies while you’re outing – instead of the things you really wanted to share. For example, as curling ribbon and cutting paper. Or let everyone climb into special holiyou drive around your neighborhood looking at Christmas lights, you day pajamas, then pile in the car and look at all of the beautiful holiday may want to ask your kids about their favorite Christmas memories. Or , lights in your town. before attending a church service or local event, sit down and talk about Give thanks. As the saying goes, “Remember the reason for the seawhat Christmas truly means to each member of your family. You may be son.” Depending on your family’s beliefs and background, that “reason” surprised at the answers – and it will make each event and activity that might differ from your neighbor’s, but one thing’s for sure: This is a time much more meaningful. to be grateful and to count blessings. Whenever your family visits a friend or attends a special event, make sure to point out to your children how fortunate they are to have such individuals and opportunities in their lives – and point out that not every child around the world is so privileged. Give back. If your family is counting its blessings, the natural next step is to reach out to those whose holiday seasons might not be filled with much cheer. Consider donating to a charity instead of giving as many gifts, volunteering at a soup kitchen, or caroling at a nursing home. This is the perfect time of year to teach children that it truly is better to give than to receive – and it can actually feel really good, too. These experiences will instill values in your children and broaden their perspective on holiday privileges. Live in the moment. It’s easy to get caught up in the hoopla of the Dress up! It’s amazing how getting all dolled up can take an event holidays, and not living in the moment is a downright joy robber. If you’re from “okay” to “outstanding.” If you frame your holiday outings as constantly setting your sights on the next holiday party or dance recital on opportunities instead of as obligations, your kids probably won’ t mind your calendar, you won’t be fully enjoying the activity you’re currently putting on their fancy duds…and they’ll definitely remember the fact that doing. Reveling in the now and accepting the (minor) flaws that might Mom and Dad thought that they were mature enough to attend such a come along allows you to truly experience the benefits of living in the special event! (And you can take the opportunity to snap some photos present. Those moments with family and friends will be that much everyone will enjoy looking at for years to come.) sweeter. Make something out of nothing. A meaningful experience doesn’ t have to cost a massive amount of money, and it doesn’t have to be a once-

FAMILY BONDS Keeping the kids focused during the holiday season

The holidays are a time for family and friends, new traditions and old. And many parents may look forward to the school break as a time to bond with their children. It’s also important that children engage in some educational activities over the holidays, especially those that continue to develop reading and math skills. “Take advantage of the break from your regular routines to show your children how learning is an everyday activity,” says Emily Kirkpatrick, vice president of National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). “The days leading up to the holidays are an exciting time, and many children are thrilled to do something new.” Whether you’re a parent, grandparent, aunt or uncle, take the time to participate in some enjoyable activities with the kids.

Creating holiday cards with your kids can bring you closer together.

READ HOLIDAY STORIES In the weeks before the holidays, gather your family’ s favorite holiday books and read one story or chapter together nightly. Have children participate in following along, turning pages and by asking them questions about the story. Reading the characters in funny voices and acting out the stories can help even the biggest Grinch warm to reading.

LEARN FUN FACTS Do you know why all snowflakes are different? Or why we make New Year’s resolutions? If you don’t, finding out the answers can be fun with your child. Educational websites like W onderopolis.org, created by the N CFL, lets parents and children explore short videos that explain the answers to many trivia questions – including why people kiss under mistletoe!

MAKE HOLIDAY CARDS Have kids make a list of recipients. Then help them write holiday messages and decorate holiday cards before mailing them. If kids are too little to write a message, have them help you create one and then sign their names or add drawings. Grandparents will appreciate these more than storebought cards.

VOLUNTEER TOGETHER Whether it’s in your local soup kitchen or hospital, the holidays are a great time to teach kids about the importance of volunteering and spreading joy. If you think it might be difficult for your family to spend a day with strangers, consider baking cookies or a cake for an elderly neighbor or relative. Have kids read recipes, measure ingredients and keep things organized. This helps develop reading, counting and organizational skills while sharing. Remember, the memories you make now will stay with your children for a lifetime.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Not wrapped, but remembered

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Bethlehem Nursery School Children learn best by doing and experiencing. Bethlehem Nursery School provides an environment that is child-centered, interactive, and “hands-on”, nurturing a child’s development socially, emotionally, cognitively, spiritually, and physically. The school’s director, teachers, and assistants are dedicated, loving, experienced and certified. Bethlehem Nursery School is a New Y ork State licensed school and offers a variety of program sessions to accommodate the developmental needs of children and parents’ schedules. Along with full day sessions, there are half-day morning and afternoon sessions, and a “lunch buddies” program with options for a half-day morning class plus lunch or lunch and a half-day afternoon class. Each program provides a literacy-based educational experience in the context of math and reading readiness activities, music and movement, art, dramatic play, block play, sand and water tables, and much more. The school’ s outdoor play area and large indoor gym area allow children the opportunity to develop their gross motor skills and interact through supervised play. At Bethlehem, children develop a positive self-concept, and grow in their ability to relate to other children and adults in a faithbased setting. For more information or to arrange a tour, please call 516-223-3400 or visit us on the web at www .bethlehemns.org. Bethlehem Nursery School 516-223-3400 www.bethlehemns.org

South Shore

PARENTS TODAY CAMP AND SCHOOL FALL/ WINTER

Dr. Fiorillo-Quinn Dr. Fiorillo-Quinn is board certified in Pediatric and Adult Allergy/Immunolgy. She has a gentle bedside manner which has earned her the Patient’ s Choice Award in 2009 and the Compassionate Doctor Award in 2010. The mission of our practice is to provide compassionate and comprehensive medical care for all of our patients. Dr . Fiorillo-Quinn has an excellent patient record. Her goal is to keep you and your family healthy. Newer testing is available to determine if a food allergy is present. Often foot allergy is over-diagnosed. We can help. 516-307-9140 Longislandallergies.com

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Tutor Time of East Rockaway and Baldwin Tutor Time, a state licensed childcare program awarded “Center of Excellence,” is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. The center has indoor and outdoor playgrounds. The CPR certified staff provides a caring and stimulating environment throughout the year . We offer three distinct camp programs. Our Cub Camp includes children 18 months to 3 years. Our Mini-Travel Camp provides our pre-kindergarten students with weekly trips in addition to the basic Cub Camp program. Our Adventure T ravel Camp is available for 4, 6, 8, or 10 week sessions for children 6-12 years old. Several enrichment programs are also offered, as well as a Mommy and Me Class. Full and part time programs are available. T utor Time is open 12 months, 6:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Tutor Time of East Rockaway 516-596-1010 Tutor Time of Baldwin 516-377-3337

Mathnasium Mathnasium, a math-only learning center for kids, has opened its newest location inynbrook L at 381 Sunrise Highway. “It is ver y exciting to be a part of helping the kids of our community succeed by offering them an opportunity to develop a better understanding of math concepts,” said Mamoon Mubashir , Director with Mathnasium of L ynbrook. “Our goal is to eliminate the confusion and intimidation that often accompanies the subject of math and replace it with understanding and passion.” Mathnasium’s program is for students in 2nd through 12th Grade who may need to boost their math skills or need an extra challenge. In addition to math tutoring, homework help and test prep are available. Mathnasium’s approach is to determine what a student knows and does not know, then tailor a personalized and prescriptive learning program. The goal is to significantly increase a child’s math skills, understanding of math concepts, and overall school perfor mance, while building confidence and positive attitude toward the subject. In celebration of its arrival in L ynbrook, Mathnasium is offering Complimentar y Assessments and W eekly Trials. “Mathnasium of Lynbrook provides both instruction and practice - all in a welcoming, comfortable environment,” said Mubashir . For more information about Mathnasium of L ynbrook, please contact Beenish Raza at (516) 881-7997 or Lynbrook@ mathnasium.com. Mathnasium 516-881-7997 lynbrook@mathnasium.com

iSchool of Music & Art If you’re searching for musical instruction that teaches through inspiration rather than demonstration, look no further. iSchool was founded on the belief that true learning comes through connection with music, art or anything you seek to better yourself. That’s why we provide an inspiring, imaginative and innovative curriculum to keep that connection fresh and the appreciation of music and art genuine. iSchool offers private instruction, rock bands for ages 6-18 and takes great pride in our program quality. We provide instruction for piano, voice, drums, guitar , saxophone, flute, clarinet and violin. Music Together®, a program for children from birth through age 7, is also offered at our facility by While They’re Little, Inc. iSchool of Music & Art 516-442-2230

East Coast Sports Academy East Coast Sports Academy , located in Oceanside, provides a safe, fun and educational environment where both beginner and experienced players can excel. Y our child will learn the basic fundamentals of games and be able to specialize in the position of their choice. Each player will learn the importance of teamwork, sportsmanship and fair play . Our staff consists of some of the top high school coaches from around Long Island. Current and former professional players round out the staff. A certified athletic trainer is present during all camp sessions. Registration for now underway for the NEW Lil Big Leaguers program for 3 to 5 year olds and Thanksgiving Baseball and Sports Camp for boys and girls 6 to 12 years old. ECSA is also home to Jump Kingdom. An inflatable bouncy house is one of the facility’s many attractions. Jump Kingdom hosts birthday parties and has open jump dates, too. Sports and Jump combo parties are available. Call for details. East Coast Sports Academy 516-208-7168

Lawrence Woodmere Academy Lawrence Woodmere Academy is a premier college preparatory school for students in Pre -School through Grade 12. Our hallmark is a dedication to individual student attention and student success, supported by a masterful faculty. Students thrive in our dynamic and diverse educational environment. At Lawrence Woodmere Academy, students, families and educators embrace quality education with shared priorities, passions and commitments in an environment that values wisdom and nurtures personal, community and global responsibility. Lawrence Woodmere Academy 516-374-9000


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Festivities without the frustration

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Coping with holiday stress he holidays are a time for family, fun and festivities. So why are you so stressed ?

Use calming techniques to grapple with the hustle and bustle of the season.

tions (e.g. coffee, vanilla extract, rosemary). Close your eyes and inhale. The smell should ground you in the present, allowing you to savor your time in the kitchen. My Sunshine: Family dynamics are complicated and can get strained during the holidays. If you find yourself getting annoyed with a loved one, consider humming the song “Y ou Are My Sunshine” and remember that your time together is limited. If your buttons really get pushed, excuse yourself and throw cool water on your face or place a wet towel on your neck. Cool relief to the body brings relief to the mind as well. Touch Tank: It’s easy in the hustle and bustle of the holidays to forget to appreciate all the beautiful decorations, not to mention the beauty of the season. Consider keeping a small box or basket of seasonal treasures – pinecones, smooth stones, mistletoe and chestnuts. Whenever you feel tense or overwhelmed, take a few moments to finger each object. Simple appreciation tends to restore inner calm. “We often think we need to change our circumstances to feel peaceful or that we need to be immersed in spa-like surroundings to find tranquility ,” says Bush. “But inner peace requires no extra time or money – just a shift in attention.” Let peace on earth begin with you this holiday season. 508522

Actually, stress is associated with positive life events as much as negative ones. It’ s normal to feel over whelmed when planning family meals, shopping for gifts, decorating the house or figuring out what to do with the kids during their holiday break. “Stress causes an unhealthy ‘high alert!’ response that wears down the body ,” says Ashley Davis Bush, author of the book “Shortcuts to Inner Peace: 70 Simple Paths to Everyday Serenity.” “Through intentionally summoning a feeling of inner calm, we literally change the chemistry of our bodies.” If you’re looking to keep a calm head in the midst of visiting relatives and busy shopping malls, try some of Bush’s favorite shortcuts this holiday season: Play It Again, Sam: When you find yourself grumbling over a nagging task (hanging lights, preparing the guest room), play or sing a specific song. It doesn’ t have to be holiday-related; any upbeat tune will help! Remember This: When waiting in line to purchase gifts or groceries, ask yourself “What do I need to remember?” Keep asking yourself this question until you start to get substantial answers like “I need to remember what really matters in life.” Stop ‘N’ Smell: Before you being cooking a holiday meal, take time to smell your ingredients. Or pull a fragrant item from your pantry that triggers positive emo-


Harmonious holidays

Away from the classroom

Make it a festive season, not a stressful one

Ideas for family fun during the school break

By Carleton Kendrick Ed.M., LCSW

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Heightened emotions and unrealistic expectations can threaten your family’ s harmony during the holidays. But, with a little planning and understanding, you can keep the atmosphere merry this season. Keep cherished childhood traditions and consider establishing new ones for your family. Involve everyone, including your children, when creating new traditions. Sometimes traditions lose their importance for a family. Recognize when it’s time to let them go. Plan, organize, and prioritize to avoid burnout, disappointment and fatigue. Create a holiday-planning task schedule. Time spent together as a family is priceless. Create annual Ask others to share the responsibilities family customs that can be enjoyed every holiday season, and assign tasks to family members. without letting unrealistic expectations interfere. Create some time alone for yourself. Reflect on what is precious to you about the holidays and reconnect with your spirit. Examine the differences between your holiday expectations and what is really possible. Establish realistic holiday goals. Share with family and friends any worries aboutmeeting your holiday expectations. Before getting together with family or relatives, anticipate and prepare for any difficulties. Don’ t expect your family or relatives to change their personalities because they are visiting your home. Don’ t bring up old family quarrels during the holidays. Don’t feed into the commercialism of the holidays. Plan free or low-cost activities and celebrations. Create and practice a holiday family tradition that helps those in need. Don’t spend money beyond your means. Consider gifts of help or special times together rather than gifts of things. Discuss gift-giving costs and realistic expectations with all family members well before the holidays. Create a new family tradition to keep the post-holiday blahs at bay . Talk about the fun you’ve had and what the holidays mean to your family, then think about what you might do differently next year. Permission granted by www.FamilyEducation.com © 2000 - 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Bethlehem Nursery School 1375 Grand Avenue, Baldwin Serving the Community Since 1976 We are a New York State Licensed School

Program Choices for Ages 30 months - 5 years Full-day (9:00-3:30 & FREE early drop-off and late pick-up)

Lunch Buddies (AM: Class+Lunch or PM: Lunch+Class) Half-day (AM and PM)

Early drop-off and late pick-up available for all programs

Reg ister Now for Fall/Winterr Our dedicated, certified teachers and assistants facilitate a comprehensive, child-centered, developmental program.

For more information or to arrange a tour

Call 223-3400

or please visit us on the Web at:

www.bethlehemns.org

O on-site, certified director is Our available to answer your questions

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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oliday break can be the perfect respite for school-aged children.

Although not quite halfway through the school year, the timing of the school vacation does come when kids might be preoccupied with the holiday season and all that comes with it. Kids may be distracted about parties and presents, but parents maybe preoccupied with finding ways their kids can spend their time during the vacation period – typically a 10 day to two-week hiatus from school that begins shortly before Christmas and ends with kids’ return to school shortly after New Year’s Day. With a little planning, parents facing the dilemma of finding something productive for the kids to do during the holiday vacation, will find it’ s not such a dilemma after all. Take a vacation or staycation. Vacation is the easy way out if finances and timing permit. The break might mark the only time until summer that parents can spend quality time with their kids completely away from the distractions of everyday life. Vacation can mean a trip to warmer climates or simply packing up the car to go spend time with the grandparents. If there’s any vacation time to spare, consider hitting the road. Teach kids some practical lesGet the family away from the video games. Reading during the sons. Kids likely won’ t miss the holiday break can be a fun and beneficial hobby for kids, as well as classroom during winter break, but mom and dad. that doesn’t mean there aren’t enjoyable ways for kids to learn while they’re away from school. T each kids practical lessons, like how to cook a favorite meal or how to fix things around the house. This gives parents a chance to spend some quality time with their kids while encouraging kids to learn beyond the classroom. And who knows, such lessons at home may uncover a child’s hidden talent. Encourage kids to read for pleasure. Reading improves vocabulary and can stimulate a child’s imagination. During the winter break, encourage kids to read a book or the daily newspaper for pleasure, assuring them there won’t be any quizzes or tests after each chapter . Get the ball rolling with a few books given as presents during Christmas or Hanukkah. Or take a trip to the local library and let kids choose their own books. Head outdoors. The weather may be chilly, but bundle up and go outside for a long walk or some outdoor adventures if the temperatures permit. Everyone will enjoy a break from being indoors and some healthy exercise is good for the entire family.


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Crafting memories

As we begin to think about planning and decorating for the holidays, why not create some new family traditions by involving the kids in creating personalized holiday decorations. From adorning the tree, to creating a decoration for your Hanukkah party, to taking a family photo for greeting cards, create a unique experience while taking a DIY (do-it-yourself) approach that will also help with the holiday budget. The best part about doing it yourself is the memorable moments you spend with your loved ones. This is after all, the reason for the season. Also, as a family, you can create lasting gifts and keepsakes that set you apart from the crowd.

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ids can’t help but catch the holiday spirit when they’re up to their elbows in crafts.

Save yourself a stressful, expensive day at the mall buying stocking time to share family photos with friends. Use these photos to create cards, stuffers and holiday décor, and plan a pre-holiday family get-together instead. ornaments and personalized bookmarks and notebooks. By taking advantage of everybody’ s crafting skills, you can create personalWith a little craftiness, and a little wit, you can really customize the look ized ornaments and gifts made by the family, for the family. and feel of your holiday this year. Make sure you have plenty of craft supplies on hand that are appropriate for all ages. Provide glitter , paint, ribbon, fabric, popsicle sticks, crayons and paper –and get to work! You can either work without direction, creating ideas from scratch, or provide your guests with instructions for specific projects. Decorating with pinecones and creating paper chain gar lands from old magazines are a few ideas to get you started. And the terrific thing is these supplies are free! For creative inspiration, visit your neighborhood craft store, or checkout the websites that provide step by step instructions for creating homemade holiday décor. Kids, grandparents, uncles, cousins, everybody can participate, no matter what their skill level. This get-together can also double as a perfect photo opportunity. It’s easy to get a family portrait when you have everyone gathered in one place. And the holidays are the best Create special holiday memories by encouraging your family’s creativity.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Involve the family in a holiday craft pr oject


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New Lynbrook open

• Thanksgiving Baseball & Sports Camp

November 25th - 27th 10am - 2pm • Boys & Girls 6 to 12 yrs old

• New Lil’ Big Leaguers for 3 to 5 year olds.

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We are math specialists who help kids not only learn math, but love math. Whether your child is struggling to stay at grade level, has already fallen behind, or needs to be challenged, we will develop an individualized learning plan to ensure success.

Birthday party package Includes: • Party Hostess & Instructors • Private Party Room • Pizza & Refreshments • 1 Hour In Play Area • Bouncy House • Bouncy Slide • Obstacle Course With Slide • Paper Goods • 1 ½ and 2 Hour Parties Available • Sports & Jump Combo Parties! Birthday Child is always FREE!

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

location now

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George Harrison Revisited

The magical journey of the Beatles era returns to the Hofstra stage when The Godfrey Townsend Band, with musicians from the Alan Parsons Project, join the Indian Kirtan ensemble Gauravani and Kindred Spirits to perform “Here Comes the Sun” – The Musical, Mystical Journey of George Harrison. This celebration of the music and spiritualism of the legendary musician commemorates the 10th anniversary of Harrison’s passing. Singer-guitarist Godfrey Townsend, with Hofstra Professor Joshua M. Greene as host, leads the dynamic program, which features those beloved tunes from The Beatles’ songbook, with Indian Kirtan music and meditative chanting. Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $15. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. (516) 463-6644.

Let’s put on a show!

Behind the scenes of community theater

Now add some music …

La Cenerentola (Cinderella)

Capitol Heights Lyric Opera presents La Cenerentola (the Cinderella story) – the ultimate rags to riches tale – told by Gioachino Rossini in one of the most delightful comic operas ever written. Mezzo-soprano Frances Devine is the lovely Angelina, who is treated like a maid by her father and selfish stepsisters until her goodness and beauty win her a kingdom and the hand of Prince Ramiro, sung by tenor Marcos Vigil. Saturday, Nov. 5, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theater, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. (516) 334-5280. TREASURE HUNTING

Book/Ephemera Fair

Book lovers – and folks who love to browse among interesting items – will find much to explore at the annual Book & Ephemera Fair. Exhibitors from Long Island and across the nation gather to present an array of rare and unusual old books, maps and prints, among other items. You’ll also find a wide selection of antiques and vintage memorabilia. From the frivolous to the sublime, a we a l t h o f out-of-print books, posters and prints, are waiting for you along with a treasure trove of other incredible finds. $6, $3 ages 12-21. Hofstra University’s Student Center Multipurpose Room, 200 Hofstra Dr., Hempstead.

Mary Malloy/Herald

WILLIAM O’BRIEN, who plays young Patrick Dennis, rehearses a scene with Reneé Socci, who plays the title role in Island Park Theatre Group’s “Mame.” By MARY MALLOY mmalloy@liherald.com

“We’ve gotta have a g reat show, with a million laughs ... and color ... and a lot of lights to make it sparkle. And songs – w onderful songs. And after w e get the people in that hall, we’ve gotta star t ‘em in laughing right away. Oh, can’t you just see it?” – J udy Garland, “Babes In Arms,” 1939. Yes, we can see it – b ut we only see the final product. Putting on a sho w involves planning, decision-making, scripts, music, stage production, props, lighting and a host of other details that, if done right, the audience will r eally never know about. Who are some of the people w ho make it look so easy?

The producer

“I really don’t think the p ublic knows how involved it is putting on a show,” said John Cestaro, president of the Island P ark Theatre Group board of directors and producer of Island Park Theatre Group’s latest musical, “Mame,” set to open in November. Cestaro, a retired bank vice

president, is currently broker/owner of JVC Realty Corp in Island Park. He has been with IPTG for 20 years, and has been pr oducer for the last 12. T he other boar d members ar e Hillary Kass Nussdorf, Reneé Socci, Sal Canepa, Frank Cestaro, Barbra Rubin-Perry, and Debby Wilson. Cestaro has appeared on stage in many Long Beach and Island P ark productions, including “Fiddler on the R oof,” “The Sound of Music” – and e ven as M. Woolsey Lindsey in Long Beach Theatre Guild’s production of “Mame.”

The directors

Hillary Kass Nussdorf, 59, has been with Island Park Theatre Group for 25 years and currently serves on its board as vice president. “It takes so much with so few people and so little time ,” said Nussdorf. “When we put out the casting call, w e’ve already been working on the sho w for three to six months.” Having been a part of both pr ofessional and community theater, Nussdorf is well aware that with local thea ter and performers, life g ets in the way. “People – including me – have jobs and families … it’s a big commitment, we

Although this her first y ear with the Island Park Theatre Group and her first time as a musical dir ector, Danielle Reed, 23, of Freeport, is no stranger to the arts. “I started performing in grammar school, and got involved in community theater in college,” she said. Reed has also directed children for choral and band perf ormances. She works as an administra tor for the non-profit organization, “Belief for Relief,” as well as teaching at the Rockville Centre Music Studio and the Y oung Musicians Institute, in Hempstead. She also performs at local venues and is pr oficient in many languages and instruments. “Being a [musical] dir ector gives me so much more perspective on how hard directors work and worry about the final pr oduct,” Reed said. “I’ve had motivational directors and

Continued on STEPPING OUT TWO

IPTG’S ‘MAME’ The Island Park Theatre Group (IPTG) was formed in the 1980s as a means of bringing wholesome Broadway-like shows to the Island Park and neighboring communities. In the early 90s, IPTG moved from the Island Park Methodist Church to the professional stage of the Lincoln Orens Middle School. IPTG is self-funded, and relies on advertising, dues and sponsors to produce its shows. This season’s production is the musical “Mame” at the Lincoln Orens School, at Trafalgar Blvd, Island Park. Performances: Nov 12, 8 p.m.; Nov. 13, 3 p.m.; Nov. 18, 8 p.m.; Nov. 19, 8 p.m.; and Nov. 20, 3 p.m. For tickets and more information, call (516) 431-3320.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

ON STAGE

understand that – but we do have to live up to professional standards.” By day, Nussdorf works in the health office at East Elementary Sc hool in Long Beach. She also runs “Center Stage Studios,” a city-endorsed and sc hool-approved acting program for children. She also teac hes ballroom dancing and offers private lessons. Assistant Director Debby Wilson has been involved with community theatre since 1998 – her first sho w was IPTG’s “Once Upon a Mattress.” She has w orked with this g roup and the Long Beach Theatre Guild. “Mame is my first experience with sta ge directing, and I am very glad to be able to learn by working alongside a r eal pro like Hillary,” said Wilson, who works for Long Beach public schools as a secr etary in the Compr ehensive Arts (music/fine arts) department. “So I guess you could say that my day job is not all that different from my night job. “Being on this end of the process is very creative, but in a muc h different way. We have to come up with the sta ging and the set tha t gives the actors what they need to work with.”


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nity theater creates wonderful friendships that last beyond the closing night.”

DIRECTOR Hillary Kass Nussdorf, right, and Assistant Director Debby Wilson watch as the actors run through a scene.

Let’s put on a show! also some so-so dir ectors, but I realize that all of them had to plan, recruit, direct, and do it all again the following years.” Besides planning the music f or the production ahead of time, Reed works with the cast and books musicians f or the final rehearsals and performances.

Add the choreography …

Sal Canepa, 38, of Oceanside lik es to move – and he lik es to make others move as well. Like Nussdorf, he has a no-nonsensebut-lets-still-have-fun style of teaching. With

IPTG since 1994, he has starred in many shows, and has c horeographed and musically directed several shows as well. “Being c horeographer requires doing most of the work even before auditions,” he said. One of his most tr easured memories was doing “Into the W oods” with IPTG in 1995-96. “It had an extr emely talented cast and was a life-altering experience. “Although it takes months to prepare a musical before auditions, and months of rehearsals, the end pr oduct is al ways a delightful accomplishment.” Cane pa said. “It’s wonderful to have returning cast members and thrilling to see ne w faces. Commu-

Reneé Socci, 51 , of Valley Stream, has been singing all her life. She studied opera in college, and performed in Long Island operatic productions during those years and into her twenties. She’s been a private vocal coach and piano teac her for 35 years, and works for Holy Name of Mary Chur ch as their principal cantor, singing at weddings and funerals, and is in charge of all of their cantors and the f olk group. She also w orks part time for a local attorney. “There is no other feeling lik e working with a group of wonderful people all committed to having fun and putting to gether a show,” Socci said. “T he show itself is the gravy. For a few hours, you are someone else, living in a ma gical world where everyone breaks into song and dance a t the drop of a hat. It’s pure joy with just enough stress to keep you on your toes. It’s also better than sitting on the couc h at night, munching on chips in front of the TV! Socci’s first show with IPTG was its 1991 production of “The Sound of Music,” playing the part of Maria. Since then she’s played “Dolly” in “Hello Doll y,” “Fiona” in Brig adoon, “Sister Mary Amnesia” in “Nunsense,” and the queen in “Once Upon a Ma ttress,” among other parts. She has also musically directed “The Wizard of Oz,” “Oliver,” and the three revue performances that IPTG has done. “I have not acted in an IPTG sho w in 12 years!” “I don’t think people r ealize how much work goes into putting on a thea trical production,” Socci said. “The long hours preparing – every step is thought out first, in g reat

Why support community theater?

The Island Park Theatre Group is just one of a handful of high-caliber perf ormance groups around. “I think the pub lic enjoys an inexpensive night out at the theatre,” said Cestaro. “and local community theatre is their best bet.” “We provide a way for them to just ‘sit back, relax, and enjo y,’ as J ohn Cestaro announces to the audience bef ore every show,” Socci said. “W e don’t make any money personally, but we love to hear the audience laugh – that’s our payment. If we can make them forget their troubles while we play in our ma gical little w orld, then we’re a success.” “If we do our job w ell, the general public knows nothing a bout the amount of work that goes into each production,” said Wilson, summing up the experience . “The magic of theatre is tha t the audience g ets to escape into the alter nate reality that the entire staff and cast has cr eated for them. If the audience enjo ys the play and believes in the c haracters and the scenes that we’ve produced – and maybe they walk out humming the tunes – then al l of our hard work, our blood, sweat and tears has been worthwhile and it’ s a lot c heaper than Broadway!”

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

The sensational ‘Mame’

detail. Will the right people audition? W ill anyone come to see the sho w? Will we have enough money for all our expenses?” “It’s a lot of hard work, and time consuming,” said Oceanside r esident Linda Bakal, who plays Mrs. Burnside. “But w e have so much fun. We come from all walks of life, and we’re all different ages, but it’s like one big f amily – and man y of us stay friends after the show ends.”


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A White House Tour – Part Two Harriet Baker and Barry H. Kaplan explore the life and times of our nation’s presidents and first ladies, including the Washingtons, Jeffersons, Nixons, and Clintons, in a staged reading, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2 p.m. Tickets required. Oceanside Library, 30 Davison Ave., Oceanside. 766-6500.

“Air, Fire, Water, “Earth” An exhibit in which the four elements are used as a metaphor for the world we live in. Works of Ron Erlich, Richard Sigmund, Linda Stojak, and Don Resnick are featured. Opening Sunday, Nov. 6, through Dec. 15. Molloy College’s Publiic Square Art Gallery, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. 678-5000 ext. 6549 or artgallery@molloy.edu. Burton Silverman: The Humanist Spirit A exhibit showcasing the works of contemporary artist Burton Silverman, who demonstrates the continuing power of the realist tradition in the 21st century. Through Silverman’s use of contemporary realist portraiture, this exhibition examines the commonalities of existence of “everyman.” Silverman is known for his ability to carefully balance formal visual elements in his realistic representations. Through Dec. 16. Hofstra University’s Emily Lowe Gallery, Emily Lowe Hall, South Campus South Campus, Hempstead. 463-5672. BESA – Code Of Honor : Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During The Holocaust This exhibit describes, through documents and photographs, the heroic efforts of Albanian Muslims to rescue Albanian Jews during the Holocaust. Through Nov. 14. Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County, 100 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove. 571-8040 ext. 100 or www.holocaust-nassau.org. Ripped: The Allure of Collage An exhibit of approximately 50 collages, by a diverse range of European and American artists, that demonstrates the medium’s broad and surprising power. Artists represented include Romare Bearden, Joseph Cornell, Salvador Dali, George Grosz, Jane Hammond, Hannah Hoch, Ray Johnson, Roy Lichtentstein, and Conrad MarcaRelli. Through Jan. 8. Heckscher Museum of Art, Main St. and Prime Ave., Huntington. (631) 351-3250 or www.heckscher.org. Exploraciones Contemporaneas Latin America’s varied artistic voices are on view in this exhibit that reflects the broad

David Ostwald’s Gully Low Jazz Band The popular Dixieland band performs traditional jazz favorites, Thursday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Tickets required. Hewlett-Woodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

The Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company’s “ Midtown to the Met 2” Take a stroll across town and back again when the Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company presents some of the most beloved and familiar tunes to grace the Great White Way and opera houses worldwide, Sunday, Nov. 20, at 3 p.m., in Garden City. Conceived by co-Directors David Groeger and Valerie Grehan, and produced by the Gilbert & Sullivan Light Opera Company of Long Island, “Midtown to the Met 2: More of the Best of Broadway and Opera” is a light-hearted revue of songs diversity of Latin culture today. Artists include Vik Muniz of Brazil, Cuban-American DEMI, Manuel Esnoz of Argentina, and Darío Escobar of Guatemala. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, Contemporary Collectors Circle Gallery, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Francisco Goya: Los Caprichos

A new exhibition featuring an early first edition of Los Caprichos, a set of 80 etchings by Spanish artist Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, that were published in 1799. It is one of the most influential series of graphic images in the history of Western art. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Afternoon Movie See “Tree of Life,” the story of a Texas family, with Brad Pitt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2:30 p.m.; also “Zookeeper,” comedy with Kevin James, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. Friday Film See “Bridesmaids ,” Friday, Nov. 4, 1 and 6:45 p.m. Baldwin Public Library, 2385 Grand Ave., Baldwin. 223-6228.

Theater/ Music Camelot The classic musical with music with the beloved Lerner and Loewe score, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 3-4, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 5, 3 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $60. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport. (631) 261-2900 or www.engemantheater.com. Jake’s Women Neil Simon’s comedy about a writer and his struggling marriage, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4-5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors, $16 students, $15 ages 12 and under; $25 at door. Studio Theatre, 141 S. Wellwood Ave., Lindenhurst. (631) 226-8400 or www.studiotheatreli.com. Josh Groban “Straight To You” Tour with rock/jazz pianist ELEW, Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $98.50 and $58.50. Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale. (800) 745-3000 or www.tickemaster.com. Broadway Unplugged A revue of hit Broadway songs, Saturday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $30, includes wine and cheese, coffee and dessert. Merrick Theatre & Center for the Arts, 2222 Hewlett Ave., Merrick. 868-6400.

we all love to listen to and sing along with. From “Rigoletto” and “The Magic Flute” to “Godspell” and “Wicked,” this show will please both opera and musical theater fans alike in a friendly and casual ‘coffee house’ setting. Tickets are $20, including complimentary light fare and dessert; available at www.gilbertandsullivanli.com. Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island, 38 Old Country Rd., Garden City. Cougat’s Nougats! The heyday of Xavier Cugat is brought to life with original arrangements of his hits, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. Program includes a 13-piece orchestra, the Tango Romantico dancers, and a special appearance by Bob Spiotto. $30, $25, seniors, $20 students. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. 463-6644. The Curious Savage John Patrick’s heartwarming comedy about money and greed, presented by the Lantern Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 1:30 p.m. $18, $16 seniors and students Saturdays. Congregation B’Nai Israel, 91 N. Bayview Ave., North Freeport. 221-4485.

(800) 745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com or www.tillescenter.org.

A Grand Night For Singing Tony-nominated musical featuring the tunes of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors and students, $14 youth. BroadHollow Theatre, BayWay Arts Center, 265 E. Main St., East Islip. (631) 581-2700 or www.broadhollow.org.

My Fair Lady The classic musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. $20, $25 seniors and students. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com.

Idina Menzel The Broadway headlines Tilles Center’s annual gala concert , Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. $175, $125, $80, and $50. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, C.W. Post Campus, Rte. 25A, Brookville.

A Jimmy Moore Sampler A musical revue, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. Program includes songs from “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Showboat,” “Carmen’s Toreador aria, along with popular hits from Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, and more. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. I Hear Music Vocalists Susan Winter and Rick Jensen perform a unique blend of pop, jazz and cabaret, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. Tickets required. Peninsula Public Library, 280 Central Ave., Lawrence. 239-3262.

Nightmare In The Attic A Revolutionary War tale based on the occupation of Rock Hall by American patriots in 1776, Sunday, Nov. 6, 6:30 p.m. $20, $15, seniors, $10 students. Reservations required. Lawrence Middle School (next to Rock Hall Museum), 195 Broadway, Lawrence. 239-1157.

Musical Manners & Mores Of 19th Century America Baritone Frank Hendricks and pianist Linda Pratt perform period music, Thursday, Nov. 10, 1 p.m. HewlettWoodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

Family How I Became A Pirate Musical story of adventure and finding one’s own heart, based on the book by Melinda Long, presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Saturday, Nov. 5, 11 a.m. Audiences are encouraged to come dressed in their pirate best. $10. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com. The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow Learn the real story behind the legend of the headless horseman, in this audience participation play, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 2 p.m. $10, $8 children. Vanderbilt Museum Carriage House Theater, Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Rd., Centerport. 293-0674 or www.arenaplayers.org. Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrate the Vietnamese festival tradition of TetTrung-Thu, in conjunction the visiting exhibit “Dragons and Fairies,” Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 12-4 p.m. With varied activities, including Vietnamese cuisine to sample. Free with museum admission. Long Island Children’s Museum, Museum Row, Garden City. 224-5800 or www.licm.org.

Send arts and entertainment events to kbloom@liherald.com

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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f you’re like most families in America, the approach of the holiday season brings with it the anticipation of a month filled with family togetherness and merry memory making – in other words, the holidays as you’ve always imagined them.

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It is possible to consciously create the holiday you want, if you make your list early and check it twice. “The key to enjoying a really meaningful holiday season with your family is to plan ahead and to do it purposefully,” says Andrea, coauthor along with her husband, David, of the book “Letters From Home: A Wake-up Call for Success & Wealth. “Like anything else, the family time, parties, and bonding you’re envisioning don’ t just happen. They are created by design.” Andrea, a self-confessed “Martha Stewart type,” knows from personal experience that when your quest to bring a fairytale holiday to life makes you feel more like Scrooge than Santa Claus, something’s wrong. Instead of breaking the bank to shower your kids with material things this holiday season, the Reisers suggest giving them the gift of a meaningful experience instead. Time spent together, not a new video game system or wardrobe, will truly stick with them and shape their worldviews. Here are some ideas to get you started. Choose an event to attend together. Get a schedule of local holiday-themed concerts, plays, parades, shows, and other events, and choose a few to attend as a family. Your kids (and you!) will enjoy counting down to these outings, and you’ll have an even better time attending them. Plus, everyone will remember the live performance of White Christmas or the holiday-themed magic show much longer than they will a bevy of action figures under the tree. Even better? In most communities there are plenty of events to choose contined on page 3

It has often been

said that “It takes a

As each new holiday season arrives, we promise our selves that we will not repeat the mistakes made in years past: the guilt we feel from overspending, the exhaustion we feel from overbooking, or the constant frustration over kids who misbehave and act ungrateful. And as the holiday music starts to play anew each year , we make the same promise to ourselves that this is the year we are going to do things differently . And yet – things always seem to stay the same. Don’t despair, though, say Andrea and David Reiser.

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contined from page 2 from that are free to the public! It just goes to show that you don’t have to spend a mint to make memories over the holidays. Remember: There really is no place like home for the holidays. Making special holiday memories doesn’t always have to mean going somewhere. In fact, some of your most treasured experiences can be created inside the four walls of your house, and they don’t have to cost a lot of money or cause a lot of stress to be perfect! Take a regular weeknight dinner and turn it into a magical holiday meal by dimming the lights, lighting candles on the table, and playing soft holiday music in the background. Serve sparkling juice or cider in special glasses and pull out the fancy china for once. It’s a special night you and your family won’ t soon forget! Set your family up for success. On the best of days, kids will be kid – and their propensity for energy, misbehavior, and hi-jinks grows exponentially when they’re excited. Whenever your family is preparing for any sort of event this season, don’ t assume that the “usual” rules are at the forefront of young minds. Go over your expectations – and potential consequences – beforehand so that you don’ t spend the whole time scolding and correcting. And as a parent, take the time to remind yourself that children are often overstimulated, overexcited, and saturated with sugar this time of year. If you don’t think your brood can handle sitting still for an hour-long concert, then make the choice not to go. You’ll save yourself a lot of stress, anger, and disappointment in the long run. Make meaningful conversation. Conversation is There really is no place like home at holiday time. Help your family get back the holiday the foundation upon which any memorable event is you’ve always wanted and make your “merry” more meaningful this year. built. So to make the most of outings and experiences this holiday season, have a few meaningful topics up in-a-lifetime event. In fact, your family can make “routine” holiday tasks your sleeve to engage your family. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself griping into beloved traditions. For example, get everyone together to wrap gifts about chore lists, homework, and soccer schedules during your special for friends and family, and share hot chocolate and cookies while you’re outing – instead of the things you really wanted to share. For example, as curling ribbon and cutting paper. Or let everyone climb into special holiyou drive around your neighborhood looking at Christmas lights, you day pajamas, then pile in the car and look at all of the beautiful holiday may want to ask your kids about their favorite Christmas memories. Or , lights in your town. before attending a church service or local event, sit down and talk about Give thanks. As the saying goes, “Remember the reason for the seawhat Christmas truly means to each member of your family. You may be son.” Depending on your family’s beliefs and background, that “reason” surprised at the answers – and it will make each event and activity that might differ from your neighbor’s, but one thing’s for sure: This is a time much more meaningful. to be grateful and to count blessings. Whenever your family visits a friend or attends a special event, make sure to point out to your children how fortunate they are to have such individuals and opportunities in their lives – and point out that not every child around the world is so privileged. Give back. If your family is counting its blessings, the natural next step is to reach out to those whose holiday seasons might not be filled with much cheer. Consider donating to a charity instead of giving as many gifts, volunteering at a soup kitchen, or caroling at a nursing home. This is the perfect time of year to teach children that it truly is better to give than to receive – and it can actually feel really good, too. These experiences will instill values in your children and broaden their perspective on holiday privileges. Live in the moment. It’s easy to get caught up in the hoopla of the Dress up! It’s amazing how getting all dolled up can take an event holidays, and not living in the moment is a downright joy robber. If you’re from “okay” to “outstanding.” If you frame your holiday outings as constantly setting your sights on the next holiday party or dance recital on opportunities instead of as obligations, your kids probably won’ t mind your calendar, you won’t be fully enjoying the activity you’re currently putting on their fancy duds…and they’ll definitely remember the fact that doing. Reveling in the now and accepting the (minor) flaws that might Mom and Dad thought that they were mature enough to attend such a come along allows you to truly experience the benefits of living in the special event! (And you can take the opportunity to snap some photos present. Those moments with family and friends will be that much everyone will enjoy looking at for years to come.) sweeter. Make something out of nothing. A meaningful experience doesn’ t have to cost a massive amount of money, and it doesn’t have to be a once-

FAMILY BONDS Keeping the kids focused during the holiday season

The holidays are a time for family and friends, new traditions and old. And many parents may look forward to the school break as a time to bond with their children. It’s also important that children engage in some educational activities over the holidays, especially those that continue to develop reading and math skills. “Take advantage of the break from your regular routines to show your children how learning is an everyday activity,” says Emily Kirkpatrick, vice president of National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). “The days leading up to the holidays are an exciting time, and many children are thrilled to do something new.” Whether you’re a parent, grandparent, aunt or uncle, take the time to participate in some enjoyable activities with the kids.

Creating holiday cards with your kids can bring you closer together.

READ HOLIDAY STORIES In the weeks before the holidays, gather your family’ s favorite holiday books and read one story or chapter together nightly. Have children participate in following along, turning pages and by asking them questions about the story. Reading the characters in funny voices and acting out the stories can help even the biggest Grinch warm to reading.

LEARN FUN FACTS Do you know why all snowflakes are different? Or why we make New Year’s resolutions? If you don’t, finding out the answers can be fun with your child. Educational websites like W onderopolis.org, created by the N CFL, lets parents and children explore short videos that explain the answers to many trivia questions – including why people kiss under mistletoe!

MAKE HOLIDAY CARDS Have kids make a list of recipients. Then help them write holiday messages and decorate holiday cards before mailing them. If kids are too little to write a message, have them help you create one and then sign their names or add drawings. Grandparents will appreciate these more than storebought cards.

VOLUNTEER TOGETHER Whether it’s in your local soup kitchen or hospital, the holidays are a great time to teach kids about the importance of volunteering and spreading joy. If you think it might be difficult for your family to spend a day with strangers, consider baking cookies or a cake for an elderly neighbor or relative. Have kids read recipes, measure ingredients and keep things organized. This helps develop reading, counting and organizational skills while sharing. Remember, the memories you make now will stay with your children for a lifetime.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Not wrapped, but remembered

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The Brandeis School The Brandeis School of Lawrence Long Island is a Solomon Schechter Day School for children from Nurser y to 8th Grade. For over eighty years, Brandeis students have thrived in an atmosphere that nourishes the Jewish soul and provides excellence in education in both secular and Judaic subjects. T echnology supports the development of critical thinking skills in an environment of differentiated instruction. Students are instilled with a love and respect for Jewish values and a strong commitment to the State of Israel. The Brandeis School 516-371-4747 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

Jewish Early Learning Center of Merrick-Bellmore The Jewish Early Learning Center of Merrick-Bellmore enables its young children to grow academically and socially through the SPICES approach to education. That is, they address the children’s Social, Physical, Intellectual, Creative, Emotional and Spiritual development. Licensed by NYS, small classes and warm, certified teachers guarantee individualized attention and the highest commitment to the students. Children are recognized for their uniqueness and the Jewish ELC does its best to cultivate their individuality through learning and playing. Jewish traditions and values along with an array of subjects like math, literacy readiness and dramatic play are incorporated into the classroom curricula. Programs focus on areas like sensory and perception development, self-help, motor skills and emotional growth. Children are encouraged to grow through learning and creative expression during indoor and outdoor playtime. Facilities include a beautiful indoor , air conditioned classroom with many windows and skylights, and a beautiful outdoor shaded playing space. Kosher breakfast, hot lunch, and snack are ser ved daily to ease the burden on parents. Flexible schedule of half days, full days and extended hours are available for children aged 12 months to 4 years old. Special discounts are offered for early registration! For a preschool or daycare experience ‘where ever y child counts’, choose the Jewish Early Learning Center of Merrick-Bellmore! Jewish Early Learning Center of Merrick-Bellmore Preschool & Daycare, & Exciting Summer Program 516-833-3057 www.JewishELC.org • www.CampGi.com

South Shore

PARENTS TODAY CAMP AND SCHOOL FALL/ WINTER

Childrens hild SSchool h l off BBallet ll t Number 68 Osborne Rd., Garden City became the home for CHILDRENS SCHOOL OF BALLET in Aug. 2011. It is a place for children to gather on an early evening or Saturday, appearing with ballet buns and slippers in tow to seek out their desire and fulfill their dreams for dance. CHILDRENS SCHOOL OF BALLET follows the methodology of the AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE® National Training Curriculum that is sweeping the nation and globe. CHILDRENS SCHOOL OF BALLET is proud to include ABT® Affiliate Teacher Carolyn Zettel-Augustyn who is certified in Primary through Level 5 of the ABT ® National Training Curriculum. An ABT ® Affiliate Teacher is a level of distinction for ABT ® Certified Teachers that successfully present students for examinations. We invite you to join us at CHILDRENS SCHOOL OF BALLET to seek out your artistic spirit, challenge your physicality in ballet technique and experience joyous dance! Childrens School of Ballet 516-476-3339 • carolyn@childrensschoolofballet.com

I.L. Peretz Jewish School At the I. L. Peretz Jewish School, in East Meadow, experience and become a part of our secular Jewish community . Serving the community for more than 50 years, we provide a child-centered, family-friendly Jewish educational environment featuring Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation, celebration of all Jewish Holidays, including High Holidays, and a music and dramatic arts program taught by a world renowned Klezmer musician. Coupled with dynamic, highly skilled staff and an innovative, exciting curriculum, we give students broad and extensive exposure to Jewish life, histor y, language, culture, and traditions. Our students develop a strong, positive sense of Jewish identity. I.L. Peretz Jewish School 516-794-0506 www.arbeterring.org

The East Meadow Jewish Center Hebrew School The East Meadow Jewish Center Hebrew School and Ilene M. Rubin Nurser y School have providing a superior Jewish education in the East Meadow community for 58 years. Our religious school has been designated as a Framework of Excellence school by the United Synagogue of Conser vative Judaism. We also serve the religious educational needs of special education students in our Randi W eingarten Center for Special Children. The nursery school gives our children a well rounded experience in both preschool and Jewish subjects. W e are proud to announce the Shalom Sunday Family Play Group, a socialization and learning group for children 2-5 years old. Our preteens and teens meet regularly at our youth groups. If these programs interest you, call us at 483-4205. The East Meadow Jewish Center Hebrew School • 516-483-4205 www.eastmeadowjc.org

e d i u G

FasTracKids/JEI Bellmore-Merrick Center We teach our kids how to learn not what to learn.We do this by helping children build their confidence, their creativity, their communication skills, their collaboration, and their critical thinking. In today’ s economic environment a good education is a requirement it’ s not optional. Our programs help children prepare for the life ahead. We believe they will have a better life if provided a better education. Come to our center and let’s start your child on a path to a better life. FasTracKids/JEI Bellmore-Merrick Center 516-224-3177 www.fastrackids.com www.jeilearning.com

Trinity Lutheran School and Early Childhood Center “Where Christian values and academic excellence prepare children, motivated by their faith and love of Christ, to live productive lives in service to others.” Trinity Lutheran School is a parochial school in the Lutheran tradition that seeks to ser ve students and families from all walks of faith. We consider it a joy and a privilege to share the word of God’s love with all people. Trinity Lutheran School offers families an excellent education for toddlers through grade 8 students in a caring, Christian environment. We are a close knit community of dedicated individuals supporting each other in the process of building a firm foundation for academic excellence, moral relationships, and a healthy Christian faith for our children. Come and explore the possibility of sending your child to Trinity Lutheran School, and see for yourself what makes us so special. Call us today at 516-931-2211 or e-mail at admissions@trinityLI.org to set up an appointment for a personal tour . Trinity Lutheran School and Early Childhood Center 516-931-2211

Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center, in North Bellmore, is the perfect “home away from home” for your child. Owned and operated by Karen and Tommy, and licensed by New York State, Sweet Tots is seriously committed to caring for children from six weeks to five years old. Open year round, the center provides itself on being able to offer a warm, friendly setting in a pre-school environment. With a ratio of one adult to every four children, our qualified, professional staff ensures that each child receives the care and attention he/she deserves. Each age-appropriate room is filled with learning activities made fun through play, arts and crafts, stor y and circle time, music and movement, and computers. Sweet T ots appreciates the physical, cognitive and cultural differences of the numerous children and makes it their mission to adapt to each child’ s individual level of readiness. As a result, even the youngest children are able to form friendships and learn the basics of getting along. Communication with parents is the center’s number one priority. Parents are urged to maintain a school-family connection. Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center 516-221-1511 • wwwsweettotscreativechildcare.com

Temple Beth Am Religious School Temple Beth Am - Religious School (The ONL Y Reform Jewish Congregation of Merrick and Bellmore. Our objective is to watch your children grow in their love of Jewish heritage and culture. Instill in our children a love and respect of Jewish life and values. We believe in strong familly links through educational programs and opportunities. A partnership between home and Jewish education. Our curriculum covers: the Bible and Jewish literature, customs and traditions, festivals, Shabbat, life cycle, histor y and of course Hebrew. Additional education programs include: Y outh Group Happenings (grades 5-12) Torah for Tots (ages 3 and 4). Temple Beth Am Religious School 516-378-2662 www.templebethammerrick.org


5B

Festivities without the frustration

Actually, stress is associated with positive life events as much as negative ones. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed when planning family meals, shopping for gifts, decorating the house or figuring out what to do with the kids during their holiday break. “Stress causes an unhealthy ‘high alert!’ response that wears down the body ,” says Ashley Davis Bush, author of the book “Shortcuts to Inner Peace: 70 Simple Paths to Everyday Serenity .” “Through intentionally summoning a feeling of inner calm, we literally change the chemistry of our bodies.” If you’re looking to keep a calm head in the midst of visiting relatives and busy shopping malls, try some of Bush’s favorite shortcuts this holiday season: Play It Again, Sam: When you find yourself grumbling over a nagging task (hanging lights, preparing the guest room), play or sing a specific song. It doesn’t have to be holiday-related; any upbeat tune will help! Remember This: When waiting in line to purchase gifts or groceries, ask yourself “What do I need to remember?” Keep asking yourself this question until you start to get substantial answers like “I need to Use calming techniques to grapple with the hustle and bustle of the season. remember what really matters in life.” Stop ‘N’ Smell: Before you being cooking a holiday during the holidays. If you find yourself getting annoyed with a loved one, meal, take time to smell your ingredients. Or pull a consider humming the song “Y ou Are My Sunshine” and remember that fragrant item from your pantry that triggers positive emotions (e.g. coffee, your time together is limited. If your buttons really get pushed, excuse your vanilla extract, rosemary). Close your eyes and inhale. The smell should self and throw cool water on your face or place a wet towel on your neck. ground you in the present, allowing you to savor your time in the kitchen. Cool relief to the body brings relief to the mind as well. My Sunshine: Family dynamics are complicated and can get strained

Touch Tank: It’s easy in the hustle and bustle of the holidays to forget to appreciate all the beautiful decorations, not to mention the beauty of the season. Consider keeping a small box or basket of seasonal treasures – pinecones, smooth stones, mistletoe and chestnuts. Whenever you feel tense or overwhelmed, take a few moments to finger each object. Simple appreciation tends to restore inner calm. “We often think we need to change our circumstances to feel peaceful or that we need to be immersed in spa-like surroundings to find tranquility,” says Bush. “But inner peace requires no extra time or money – just a shift in attention.” Let peace on earth begin with you this holiday season.

THE BRANDEIS SCHOOL

OPEN HOUSE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15TH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13TH 9:30AM-11:00AM

Come to Meet: • The Head of School, Mrs. Alese Gingold • The School Rabbi, Tomer Grossman • The Assistant Principal, Raz Levin • Nursery-8th Grades • State of the Art Science Lab • Rigorous Dual Curriculum

• Comprehensive Art and Music Program • Nurturing Staff of Certified Professionals • Small Student/Teacher Ratio

Building A Jewish Future...One Student At A Time. 25 FROST LANE • LAWRENCE, NY 11559 (516) 371-4747 • FAX (516) 371-1572 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

We look forward to greeting you! 508169

T

he holidays are a time for family, fun and festivities. So why are you so stressed ?

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Coping with holiday stress


Harmonious holidays

Away from the classroom

Make it a festive season, not a stressful one

Ideas for family fun during the school break

By Carleton Kendrick Ed.M., LCSW

H

Heightened emotions and unrealistic expectations can threaten your family’ s harmony during the holidays. But, with a little planning and understanding, you can keep the atmosphere merry this season. Keep cherished childhood traditions and consider establishing new ones for your family. Involve everyone, including your children, when creating new traditions. Sometimes traditions lose their importance for a family. Recognize when it’s time to let them go. Plan, organize, and prioritize to avoid burnout, disappointment and fatigue. Create a holiday-planning task schedule. Time spent together as a family is priceless. Create annual Ask others to share the responsibilities family customs that can be enjoyed every holiday season, and assign tasks to family members. without letting unrealistic expectations interfere. Create some time alone for yourself. Reflect on what is precious to you about the holidays and reconnect with your spirit. Examine the differences between your holiday expectations and what is really possible. Establish realistic holiday goals. Share with family and friends any worries aboutmeeting your holiday expectations. Before getting together with family or relatives, anticipate and prepare for any difficulties. Don’ t expect your family or relatives to change their personalities because they are visiting your home. Don’ t bring up old family quarrels during the holidays. Don’t feed into the commercialism of the holidays. Plan free or low-cost activities and celebrations. Create and practice a holiday family tradition that helps those in need. Don’t spend money beyond your means. Consider gifts of help or special times together rather than gifts of things. Discuss gift-giving costs and realistic expectations with all family members well before the holidays. Create a new family tradition to keep the post-holiday blahs at bay . Talk about the fun you’ve had and what the holidays mean to your family, then think about what you might do differently next year. Permission granted by www.FamilyEducation.com © 2000 - 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

6B

For more information or to schedule a tour, call Chanie at 516-833-3057 or visit www.JewishELC.org

oliday break can be the perfect respite for school-aged children.

Although not quite halfway through the school year, the timing of the school vacation does come when kids might be preoccupied with the holiday season and all that comes with it. Kids may be distracted about parties and presents, but parents maybe preoccupied with finding ways their kids can spend their time during the vacation period – typically a 10 day to two-week hiatus from school that begins shortly before Christmas and ends with kids’ return to school shortly after New Year’s Day. With a little planning, parents facing the dilemma of finding something productive for the kids to do during the holiday vacation, will find it’ s not such a dilemma after all. Take a vacation or staycation. Vacation is the easy way out if finances and timing permit. The break might mark the only time until summer that parents can spend quality time with their kids completely away from the distractions of everyday life. Vacation can mean a trip to warmer climates or simply packing up the car to go spend time with the grandparents. If there’s any vacation time to spare, consider hitting the road. Teach kids some practical lesGet the family away from the video games. Reading during the sons. Kids likely won’ t miss the holiday break can be a fun and beneficial hobby for kids, as well as classroom during winter break, but mom and dad. that doesn’t mean there aren’t enjoyable ways for kids to learn while they’re away from school. T each kids practical lessons, like how to cook a favorite meal or how to fix things around the house. This gives parents a chance to spend some quality time with their kids while encouraging kids to learn beyond the classroom. And who knows, such lessons at home may uncover a child’s hidden talent. Encourage kids to read for pleasure. Reading improves vocabulary and can stimulate a child’s imagination. During the winter break, encourage kids to read a book or the daily newspaper for pleasure, assuring them there won’t be any quizzes or tests after each chapter . Get the ball rolling with a few books given as presents during Christmas or Hanukkah. Or take a trip to the local library and let kids choose their own books. Head outdoors. The weather may be chilly, but bundle up and go outside for a long walk or some outdoor adventures if the temperatures permit. Everyone will enjoy a break from being indoors and some healthy exercise is good for the entire family.


7B

Crafting memories

As we begin to think about planning and decorating for the holidays, why not create some new family traditions by involving the kids in creating personalized holiday decorations. From adorning the tree, to creating a decoration for your Hanukkah party, to taking a family photo for greeting cards, create a unique experience while taking a DIY (do-it-yourself) approach that will also help with the holiday budget. The best part about doing it yourself is the memorable moments you spend with your loved ones. This is after all, the reason for the season. Also, as a family, you can create lasting gifts and keepsakes that set you apart from the crowd.

East Meadow Jewish Center

ARE YOU JEWISH BUT NOT RELIGIOUS?

Are you looking for a meaningful J ewish Education Program? Do you think there is no alternative to Temple Hebrew Schools? Yes, There Is!

A Traditional Jewish Synagogue Serving East Meadow for 58 Years

Learn about: • Shabbat and Holiday Services • Friday Family Services • Daily Minyan • Framework of Excellence Hebrew School • Ilene M. Rubin Nursery School – classes for 2-4 year olds & kindertime class. • Dynamic Rabbi, Education Director and Youth Leaders • Serving the Community 365 Days a Year

• Special Education Class • Award Winning Youth Group Program • Adult Education Classes • Involvement in Community Programs and the Salute to Israel Parade • Active Men's Club, Sisterhood • Handicapped Accessible Building • Member of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism

The I.L. Peretz Jewish School

A Workmen’s Circle School Chartered by the NYS Board of Regents

provides a meaningful Jewish Education Program with affordable tuition & dynamic faculty. Building Blocks of Jewish Identity Our curriculum includes: A new group for preschool kindergarten, accompanied by an adult • Jewish History & Culture Group meets once per month. • Holiday Celebrations at

no additional fee Our engaging, child-centered • Yiddish & Hebrew curriculum and faculty have made us one of the fastest growing • Jewish Music, Drama & Arts Hebrew Schools on Long Island. • Bar/Bat Mitzvah Preparation • Social Action & Community Service Projects

1400 Prospect Avenue • East Meadow, New York www.eastmeadowjc.org Discount rates for new members

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For Registration Information Call: (516) 794-0506 574 East Meadow Ave., East Meadow, NY 11554 www.arbeterring.org

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K

ids can’t help but catch the holiday spirit when they’re up to their elbows in crafts.

Save yourself a stressful, expensive day at the mall buying stocking time to share family photos with friends. Use these photos to create cards, stuffers and holiday décor, and plan a pre-holiday family get-together instead. ornaments and personalized bookmarks and notebooks. By taking advantage of everybody’ s crafting skills, you can create personalWith a little craftiness, and a little wit, you can really customize the look ized ornaments and gifts made by the family, for the family. and feel of your holiday this year. Make sure you have plenty of craft supplies on hand that are appropriate for all ages. Provide glitter , paint, ribbon, fabric, popsicle sticks, crayons and paper –and get to work! You can either work without direction, creating ideas from scratch, or provide your guests with instructions for specific projects. Decorating with pinecones and creating paper chain gar lands from old magazines are a few ideas to get you started. And the terrific thing is these supplies are free! For creative inspiration, visit your neighborhood craft store, or checkout the websites that provide step by step instructions for creating homemade holiday décor. Kids, grandparents, uncles, cousins, everybody can participate, no matter what their skill level. This get-together can also double as a perfect photo opportunity. It’s easy to get a family portrait when you have everyone gathered in one place. And the holidays are the best Create special holiday memories by encouraging your family’s creativity.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Involve the family in a holiday craft pr oject


nd ! a r G ning e Op

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Bellmore-Merrick Center

The ONLY Reform Jewish Congregation of Merrick & Bellmore

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Objectives: To watch your children grow in their love of Jewish heritage and culture

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

8B


9B

George Harrison Revisited

The magical journey of the Beatles era returns to the Hofstra stage when The Godfrey Townsend Band, with musicians from the Alan Parsons Project, join the Indian Kirtan ensemble Gauravani and Kindred Spirits to perform “Here Comes the Sun” – The Musical, Mystical Journey of George Harrison. This celebration of the music and spiritualism of the legendary musician commemorates the 10th anniversary of Harrison’s passing. Singer-guitarist Godfrey Townsend, with Hofstra Professor Joshua M. Greene as host, leads the dynamic program, which features those beloved tunes from The Beatles’ songbook, with Indian Kirtan music and meditative chanting. Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $15. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. (516) 463-6644.

Let’s put on a show!

Behind the scenes of community theater

Now add some music …

La Cenerentola (Cinderella)

Capitol Heights Lyric Opera presents La Cenerentola (the Cinderella story) – the ultimate rags to riches tale – told by Gioachino Rossini in one of the most delightful comic operas ever written. Mezzo-soprano Frances Devine is the lovely Angelina, who is treated like a maid by her father and selfish stepsisters until her goodness and beauty win her a kingdom and the hand of Prince Ramiro, sung by tenor Marcos Vigil. Saturday, Nov. 5, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theater, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. (516) 334-5280. TREASURE HUNTING

Book/Ephemera Fair

Book lovers – and folks who love to browse among interesting items – will find much to explore at the annual Book & Ephemera Fair. Exhibitors from Long Island and across the nation gather to present an array of rare and unusual old books, maps and prints, among other items. You’ll also find a wide selection of antiques and vintage memorabilia. From the frivolous to the sublime, a we a l t h o f out-of-print books, posters and prints, are waiting for you along with a treasure trove of other incredible finds. $6, $3 ages 12-21. Hofstra University’s Student Center Multipurpose Room, 200 Hofstra Dr., Hempstead.

Mary Malloy/Herald

WILLIAM O’BRIEN, who plays young Patrick Dennis, rehearses a scene with Reneé Socci, who plays the title role in Island Park Theatre Group’s “Mame.” By MARY MALLOY mmalloy@liherald.com

“We’ve gotta have a g reat show, with a million laughs ... and color ... and a lot of lights to make it sparkle. And songs – w onderful songs. And after w e get the people in that hall, we’ve gotta star t ‘em in laughing right away. Oh, can’t you just see it?” – J udy Garland, “Babes In Arms,” 1939. Yes, we can see it – b ut we only see the final product. Putting on a sho w involves planning, decision-making, scripts, music, stage production, props, lighting and a host of other details that, if done right, the audience will r eally never know about. Who are some of the people w ho make it look so easy?

The producer

“I really don’t think the p ublic knows how involved it is putting on a show,” said John Cestaro, president of the Island P ark Theatre Group board of directors and producer of Island Park Theatre Group’s latest musical, “Mame,” set to open in November. Cestaro, a retired bank vice

president, is currently broker/owner of JVC Realty Corp in Island Park. He has been with IPTG for 20 years, and has been pr oducer for the last 12. T he other boar d members ar e Hillary Kass Nussdorf, Reneé Socci, Sal Canepa, Frank Cestaro, Barbra Rubin-Perry, and Debby Wilson. Cestaro has appeared on stage in many Long Beach and Island P ark productions, including “Fiddler on the R oof,” “The Sound of Music” – and e ven as M. Woolsey Lindsey in Long Beach Theatre Guild’s production of “Mame.”

The directors

Hillary Kass Nussdorf, 59, has been with Island Park Theatre Group for 25 years and currently serves on its board as vice president. “It takes so much with so few people and so little time ,” said Nussdorf. “When we put out the casting call, w e’ve already been working on the sho w for three to six months.” Having been a part of both pr ofessional and community theater, Nussdorf is well aware that with local thea ter and performers, life g ets in the way. “People – including me – have jobs and families … it’s a big commitment, we

Although this her first y ear with the Island Park Theatre Group and her first time as a musical dir ector, Danielle Reed, 23, of Freeport, is no stranger to the arts. “I started performing in grammar school, and got involved in community theater in college,” she said. Reed has also directed children for choral and band perf ormances. She works as an administra tor for the non-profit organization, “Belief for Relief,” as well as teaching at the Rockville Centre Music Studio and the Y oung Musicians Institute, in Hempstead. She also performs at local venues and is pr oficient in many languages and instruments. “Being a [musical] dir ector gives me so much more perspective on how hard directors work and worry about the final pr oduct,” Reed said. “I’ve had motivational directors and

Continued on STEPPING OUT TWO

IPTG’S ‘MAME’ The Island Park Theatre Group (IPTG) was formed in the 1980s as a means of bringing wholesome Broadway-like shows to the Island Park and neighboring communities. In the early 90s, IPTG moved from the Island Park Methodist Church to the professional stage of the Lincoln Orens Middle School. IPTG is self-funded, and relies on advertising, dues and sponsors to produce its shows. This season’s production is the musical “Mame” at the Lincoln Orens School, at Trafalgar Blvd, Island Park. Performances: Nov 12, 8 p.m.; Nov. 13, 3 p.m.; Nov. 18, 8 p.m.; Nov. 19, 8 p.m.; and Nov. 20, 3 p.m. For tickets and more information, call (516) 431-3320.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

ON STAGE

understand that – but we do have to live up to professional standards.” By day, Nussdorf works in the health office at East Elementary Sc hool in Long Beach. She also runs “Center Stage Studios,” a city-endorsed and sc hool-approved acting program for children. She also teac hes ballroom dancing and offers private lessons. Assistant Director Debby Wilson has been involved with community theatre since 1998 – her first sho w was IPTG’s “Once Upon a Mattress.” She has w orked with this g roup and the Long Beach Theatre Guild. “Mame is my first experience with sta ge directing, and I am very glad to be able to learn by working alongside a r eal pro like Hillary,” said Wilson, who works for Long Beach public schools as a secr etary in the Compr ehensive Arts (music/fine arts) department. “So I guess you could say that my day job is not all that different from my night job. “Being on this end of the process is very creative, but in a muc h different way. We have to come up with the sta ging and the set tha t gives the actors what they need to work with.”


10B

nity theater creates wonderful friendships that last beyond the closing night.”

DIRECTOR Hillary Kass Nussdorf, right, and Assistant Director Debby Wilson watch as the actors run through a scene.

Let’s put on a show! Continued from STEPPING OUT ONE also some so-so dir ectors, but I realize that all of them had to plan, recruit, direct, and do it all again the following years.” Besides planning the music f or the production ahead of time, Reed works with the cast and books musicians f or the final rehearsals and performances.

Add the choreography …

Sal Canepa, 38, of Oceanside lik es to move – and he lik es to make others move as well. Like Nussdorf, he has a no-nonsensebut-lets-still-have-fun style of teaching. With

IPTG since 1994, he has starred in many shows, and has c horeographed and musically directed several shows as well. “Being c horeographer requires doing most of the work even before auditions,” he said. One of his most tr easured memories was doing “Into the W oods” with IPTG in 1995-96. “It had an extr emely talented cast and was a life-altering experience. “Although it takes months to prepare a musical before auditions, and months of rehearsals, the end pr oduct is al ways a delightful accomplishment.” Cane pa said. “It’s wonderful to have returning cast members and thrilling to see ne w faces. Commu-

Reneé Socci, 51 , of Valley Stream, has been singing all her life. She studied opera in college, and performed in Long Island operatic productions during those years and into her twenties. She’s been a private vocal coach and piano teac her for 35 years, and works for Holy Name of Mary Chur ch as their principal cantor, singing at weddings and funerals, and is in charge of all of their cantors and the f olk group. She also w orks part time for a local attorney. “There is no other feeling lik e working with a group of wonderful people all committed to having fun and putting to gether a show,” Socci said. “T he show itself is the gravy. For a few hours, you are someone else, living in a ma gical world where everyone breaks into song and dance a t the drop of a hat. It’s pure joy with just enough stress to keep you on your toes. It’s also better than sitting on the couc h at night, munching on chips in front of the TV! Socci’s first show with IPTG was its 1991 production of “The Sound of Music,” playing the part of Maria. Since then she’s played “Dolly” in “Hello Doll y,” “Fiona” in Brig adoon, “Sister Mary Amnesia” in “Nunsense,” and the queen in “Once Upon a Ma ttress,” among other parts. She has also musically directed “The Wizard of Oz,” “Oliver,” and the three revue performances that IPTG has done. “I have not acted in an IPTG sho w in 12 years!” “I don’t think people r ealize how much work goes into putting on a thea trical production,” Socci said. “The long hours preparing – every step is thought out first, in g reat

Why support community theater?

The Island Park Theatre Group is just one of a handful of high-caliber perf ormance groups around. “I think the pub lic enjoys an inexpensive night out at the theatre,” said Cestaro. “and local community theatre is their best bet.” “We provide a way for them to just ‘sit back, relax, and enjo y,’ as J ohn Cestaro announces to the audience bef ore every show,” Socci said. “W e don’t make any money personally, but we love to hear the audience laugh – that’s our payment. If we can make them forget their troubles while we play in our ma gical little w orld, then we’re a success.” “If we do our job w ell, the general public knows nothing a bout the amount of work that goes into each production,” said Wilson, summing up the experience . “The magic of theatre is tha t the audience g ets to escape into the alter nate reality that the entire staff and cast has cr eated for them. If the audience enjo ys the play and believes in the c haracters and the scenes that we’ve produced – and maybe they walk out humming the tunes – then al l of our hard work, our blood, sweat and tears has been worthwhile and it’ s a lot c heaper than Broadway!”

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

The sensational ‘Mame’

detail. Will the right people audition? W ill anyone come to see the sho w? Will we have enough money for all our expenses?” “It’s a lot of hard work, and time consuming,” said Oceanside r esident Linda Bakal, who plays Mrs. Burnside. “But w e have so much fun. We come from all walks of life, and we’re all different ages, but it’s like one big f amily – and man y of us stay friends after the show ends.”


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A White House Tour – Part Two Harriet Baker and Barry H. Kaplan explore the life and times of our nation’s presidents and first ladies, including the Washingtons, Jeffersons, Nixons, and Clintons, in a staged reading, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2 p.m. Tickets required. Oceanside Library, 30 Davison Ave., Oceanside. 766-6500.

“Air, Fire, Water, “Earth” An exhibit in which the four elements are used as a metaphor for the world we live in. Works of Ron Erlich, Richard Sigmund, Linda Stojak, and Don Resnick are featured. Opening Sunday, Nov. 6, through Dec. 15. Molloy College’s Publiic Square Art Gallery, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. 678-5000 ext. 6549 or artgallery@molloy.edu. Burton Silverman: The Humanist Spirit A exhibit showcasing the works of contemporary artist Burton Silverman, who demonstrates the continuing power of the realist tradition in the 21st century. Through Silverman’s use of contemporary realist portraiture, this exhibition examines the commonalities of existence of “everyman.” Silverman is known for his ability to carefully balance formal visual elements in his realistic representations. Through Dec. 16. Hofstra University’s Emily Lowe Gallery, Emily Lowe Hall, South Campus South Campus, Hempstead. 463-5672. BESA – Code Of Honor : Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During The Holocaust This exhibit describes, through documents and photographs, the heroic efforts of Albanian Muslims to rescue Albanian Jews during the Holocaust. Through Nov. 14. Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County, 100 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove. 571-8040 ext. 100 or www.holocaust-nassau.org. Ripped: The Allure of Collage An exhibit of approximately 50 collages, by a diverse range of European and American artists, that demonstrates the medium’s broad and surprising power. Artists represented include Romare Bearden, Joseph Cornell, Salvador Dali, George Grosz, Jane Hammond, Hannah Hoch, Ray Johnson, Roy Lichtentstein, and Conrad MarcaRelli. Through Jan. 8. Heckscher Museum of Art, Main St. and Prime Ave., Huntington. (631) 351-3250 or www.heckscher.org. Exploraciones Contemporaneas Latin America’s varied artistic voices are on view in this exhibit that reflects the broad

David Ostwald’s Gully Low Jazz Band The popular Dixieland band performs traditional jazz favorites, Thursday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Tickets required. Hewlett-Woodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

The Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company’s “ Midtown to the Met 2” Take a stroll across town and back again when the Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company presents some of the most beloved and familiar tunes to grace the Great White Way and opera houses worldwide, Sunday, Nov. 20, at 3 p.m., in Garden City. Conceived by co-Directors David Groeger and Valerie Grehan, and produced by the Gilbert & Sullivan Light Opera Company of Long Island, “Midtown to the Met 2: More of the Best of Broadway and Opera” is a light-hearted revue of songs diversity of Latin culture today. Artists include Vik Muniz of Brazil, Cuban-American DEMI, Manuel Esnoz of Argentina, and Darío Escobar of Guatemala. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, Contemporary Collectors Circle Gallery, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Francisco Goya: Los Caprichos

A new exhibition featuring an early first edition of Los Caprichos, a set of 80 etchings by Spanish artist Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, that were published in 1799. It is one of the most influential series of graphic images in the history of Western art. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Afternoon Movie See “Tree of Life,” the story of a Texas family, with Brad Pitt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2:30 p.m.; also “Zookeeper,” comedy with Kevin James, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. Friday Film See “Bridesmaids ,” Friday, Nov. 4, 1 and 6:45 p.m. Baldwin Public Library, 2385 Grand Ave., Baldwin. 223-6228.

Theater/ Music Camelot The classic musical with music with the beloved Lerner and Loewe score, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 3-4, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 5, 3 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $60. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport. (631) 261-2900 or www.engemantheater.com. Jake’s Women Neil Simon’s comedy about a writer and his struggling marriage, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4-5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors, $16 students, $15 ages 12 and under; $25 at door. Studio Theatre, 141 S. Wellwood Ave., Lindenhurst. (631) 226-8400 or www.studiotheatreli.com. Josh Groban “Straight To You” Tour with rock/jazz pianist ELEW, Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $98.50 and $58.50. Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale. (800) 745-3000 or www.tickemaster.com. Broadway Unplugged A revue of hit Broadway songs, Saturday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $30, includes wine and cheese, coffee and dessert. Merrick Theatre & Center for the Arts, 2222 Hewlett Ave., Merrick. 868-6400.

we all love to listen to and sing along with. From “Rigoletto” and “The Magic Flute” to “Godspell” and “Wicked,” this show will please both opera and musical theater fans alike in a friendly and casual ‘coffee house’ setting. Tickets are $20, including complimentary light fare and dessert; available at www.gilbertandsullivanli.com. Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island, 38 Old Country Rd., Garden City. Cougat’s Nougats! The heyday of Xavier Cugat is brought to life with original arrangements of his hits, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. Program includes a 13-piece orchestra, the Tango Romantico dancers, and a special appearance by Bob Spiotto. $30, $25, seniors, $20 students. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. 463-6644. The Curious Savage John Patrick’s heartwarming comedy about money and greed, presented by the Lantern Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 1:30 p.m. $18, $16 seniors and students Saturdays. Congregation B’Nai Israel, 91 N. Bayview Ave., North Freeport. 221-4485.

(800) 745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com or www.tillescenter.org.

A Grand Night For Singing Tony-nominated musical featuring the tunes of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors and students, $14 youth. BroadHollow Theatre, BayWay Arts Center, 265 E. Main St., East Islip. (631) 581-2700 or www.broadhollow.org.

My Fair Lady The classic musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. $20, $25 seniors and students. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com.

Idina Menzel The Broadway headlines Tilles Center’s annual gala concert , Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. $175, $125, $80, and $50. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, C.W. Post Campus, Rte. 25A, Brookville.

A Jimmy Moore Sampler A musical revue, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. Program includes songs from “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Showboat,” “Carmen’s Toreador aria, along with popular hits from Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, and more. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. I Hear Music Vocalists Susan Winter and Rick Jensen perform a unique blend of pop, jazz and cabaret, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. Tickets required. Peninsula Public Library, 280 Central Ave., Lawrence. 239-3262.

Nightmare In The Attic A Revolutionary War tale based on the occupation of Rock Hall by American patriots in 1776, Sunday, Nov. 6, 6:30 p.m. $20, $15, seniors, $10 students. Reservations required. Lawrence Middle School (next to Rock Hall Museum), 195 Broadway, Lawrence. 239-1157.

Musical Manners & Mores Of 19th Century America Baritone Frank Hendricks and pianist Linda Pratt perform period music, Thursday, Nov. 10, 1 p.m. HewlettWoodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

Family How I Became A Pirate Musical story of adventure and finding one’s own heart, based on the book by Melinda Long, presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Saturday, Nov. 5, 11 a.m. Audiences are encouraged to come dressed in their pirate best. $10. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com. The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow Learn the real story behind the legend of the headless horseman, in this audience participation play, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 2 p.m. $10, $8 children. Vanderbilt Museum Carriage House Theater, Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Rd., Centerport. 293-0674 or www.arenaplayers.org. Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrate the Vietnamese festival tradition of TetTrung-Thu, in conjunction the visiting exhibit “Dragons and Fairies,” Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 12-4 p.m. With varied activities, including Vietnamese cuisine to sample. Free with museum admission. Long Island Children’s Museum, Museum Row, Garden City. 224-5800 or www.licm.org.

Send arts and entertainment events to kbloom@liherald.com

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Exhibits and more...


November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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As each new holiday season to bring a fairy-tale holiday to arrives, we promise ourselves life makes you feel more like that we will not repeat the misScrooge than Santa Claus, aame takes made in years past: the something’s wrong. Instead of nt a w Ivideo g guilt we feel from overspending, breaking the bank to shower the exhaustion we feel from your kids with material things a nt a I w TV ae overbooking, or the constant this holiday season, the Reisers nt a w I new bik frustration over kids who missuggest giving them the gift of a behave and act ungrateful. And meaningful experience instead. as the holiday music starts to Time spent together, not a new play anew each year, we make video game system or wardI want a the same promise to ourselves robe, will truly stick with them Car that this is the year we are going and shape their worldviews. to do things differently. And yet Here are some ideas to get you – things always seem to stay the started. same. Choose an event to attend Don’t despair, though, say together. Get a schedule of local Andrea and David Reiser. It is holiday-themed concerts, plays, possible to consciously create parades, shows, and other the holiday you want, if you events, and choose a few to make your list early and check attend as a family . Your kids it twice. (and you!) will enjoy counting “The key to enjoying a really meaningful holiday down to these outings, and you’ll have an even better season with your family is to plan ahead and to do it time attending them. Plus, everyone will remember the purposefully,” says Andrea, coauthor along with her live performance of White Christmas or the holidayhusband, David, of the book “Letters From Home: A themed magic show much longer than they will a bevy Wake-up Call for Success & W ealth. “Like anything of action figures under the tree. Even better? In most else, the family time, parties, and bonding you’re envicommunities there are plenty of events to choose sioning don’t just happen. They are created by design.” contined on page 3 Andrea, a self-confessed “Martha Stewart type,” knows from personal experience that when your quest CoImwpant a uter

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South Shore Parents Today is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2011 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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contined from page 2 from that are free to the public! It just goes to show that you don’t have to spend a mint to make memories over the holidays. Remember: There really is no place like home for the holidays. Making special holiday memories doesn’t always have to mean going somewhere. In fact, some of your most treasured experiences can be created inside the four walls of your house, and they don’t have to cost a lot of money or cause a lot of stress to be perfect! Take a regular weeknight dinner and turn it into a magical holiday meal by dimming the lights, lighting candles on the table, and playing soft holiday music in the background. Serve sparkling juice or cider in special glasses and pull out the fancy china for once. It’s a special night you and your family won’ t soon forget! Set your family up for success. On the best of days, kids will be kid – and their propensity for energy, misbehavior, and hi-jinks grows exponentially when they’re excited. Whenever your family is preparing for any sort of event this season, don’ t assume that the “usual” rules are at the forefront of young minds. Go over your expectations – and potential consequences – beforehand so that you don’ t spend the whole time scolding and correcting. And as a parent, take the time to remind yourself that children are often overstimulated, overexcited, and saturated with sugar this time of year. If you don’t think your brood can handle sitting still for an hour-long concert, then make the choice not to go. You’ll save yourself a lot of stress, anger, and disappointment in the long run. Make meaningful conversation. Conversation is There really is no place like home at holiday time. Help your family get back the holiday the foundation upon which any memorable event is you’ve always wanted and make your “merry” more meaningful this year. built. So to make the most of outings and experiences this holiday season, have a few meaningful topics up in-a-lifetime event. In fact, your family can make “routine” holiday tasks your sleeve to engage your family. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself griping into beloved traditions. For example, get everyone together to wrap gifts about chore lists, homework, and soccer schedules during your special for friends and family, and share hot chocolate and cookies while you’re outing – instead of the things you really wanted to share. For example, as curling ribbon and cutting paper. Or let everyone climb into special holiyou drive around your neighborhood looking at Christmas lights, you day pajamas, then pile in the car and look at all of the beautiful holiday may want to ask your kids about their favorite Christmas memories. Or , lights in your town. before attending a church service or local event, sit down and talk about Give thanks. As the saying goes, “Remember the reason for the seawhat Christmas truly means to each member of your family. You may be son.” Depending on your family’s beliefs and background, that “reason” surprised at the answers – and it will make each event and activity that might differ from your neighbor’s, but one thing’s for sure: This is a time much more meaningful. to be grateful and to count blessings. Whenever your family visits a friend or attends a special event, make sure to point out to your children how fortunate they are to have such individuals and opportunities in their lives – and point out that not every child around the world is so privileged. Give back. If your family is counting its blessings, the natural next step is to reach out to those whose holiday seasons might not be filled with much cheer. Consider donating to a charity instead of giving as many gifts, volunteering at a soup kitchen, or caroling at a nursing home. This is the perfect time of year to teach children that it truly is better to give than to receive – and it can actually feel really good, too. These experiences will instill values in your children and broaden their perspective on holiday privileges. Live in the moment. It’s easy to get caught up in the hoopla of the Dress up! It’s amazing how getting all dolled up can take an event holidays, and not living in the moment is a downright joy robber. If you’re from “okay” to “outstanding.” If you frame your holiday outings as constantly setting your sights on the next holiday party or dance recital on opportunities instead of as obligations, your kids probably won’ t mind your calendar, you won’t be fully enjoying the activity you’re currently putting on their fancy duds…and they’ll definitely remember the fact that doing. Reveling in the now and accepting the (minor) flaws that might Mom and Dad thought that they were mature enough to attend such a come along allows you to truly experience the benefits of living in the special event! (And you can take the opportunity to snap some photos present. Those moments with family and friends will be that much everyone will enjoy looking at for years to come.) sweeter. Make something out of nothing. A meaningful experience doesn’ t have to cost a massive amount of money, and it doesn’t have to be a once-

FAMILY BONDS Keeping the kids focused during the holiday season

The holidays are a time for family and friends, new traditions and old. And many parents may look forward to the school break as a time to bond with their children. It’s also important that children engage in some educational activities over the holidays, especially those that continue to develop reading and math skills. “Take advantage of the break from your regular routines to show your children how learning is an everyday activity,” says Emily Kirkpatrick, vice president of National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). “The days leading up to the holidays are an exciting time, and many children are thrilled to do something new.” Whether you’re a parent, grandparent, aunt or uncle, take the time to participate in some enjoyable activities with the kids.

Creating holiday cards with your kids can bring you closer together.

READ HOLIDAY STORIES In the weeks before the holidays, gather your family’ s favorite holiday books and read one story or chapter together nightly. Have children participate in following along, turning pages and by asking them questions about the story. Reading the characters in funny voices and acting out the stories can help even the biggest Grinch warm to reading.

LEARN FUN FACTS Do you know why all snowflakes are different? Or why we make New Year’s resolutions? If you don’t, finding out the answers can be fun with your child. Educational websites like W onderopolis.org, created by the N CFL, lets parents and children explore short videos that explain the answers to many trivia questions – including why people kiss under mistletoe!

MAKE HOLIDAY CARDS Have kids make a list of recipients. Then help them write holiday messages and decorate holiday cards before mailing them. If kids are too little to write a message, have them help you create one and then sign their names or add drawings. Grandparents will appreciate these more than storebought cards.

VOLUNTEER TOGETHER Whether it’s in your local soup kitchen or hospital, the holidays are a great time to teach kids about the importance of volunteering and spreading joy. If you think it might be difficult for your family to spend a day with strangers, consider baking cookies or a cake for an elderly neighbor or relative. Have kids read recipes, measure ingredients and keep things organized. This helps develop reading, counting and organizational skills while sharing. Remember, the memories you make now will stay with your children for a lifetime.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Not wrapped, but remembered

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

The Brandeis School The Brandeis School of Lawrence Long Island is a Solomon Schechter Day School for children from Nurser y to 8th Grade. For over eighty years, Brandeis students have thrived in an atmosphere that nourishes the Jewish soul and provides excellence in education in both secular and Judaic subjects. T echnology supports the development of critical thinking skills in an environment of differentiated instruction. Students are instilled with a love and respect for Jewish values and a strong commitment to the State of Israel. The Brandeis School 516-371-4747 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

HERJC Nursery School The Early Childhood Learning Center at the Hewlett/East Rockaway Jewish Centre offers the veryfinest programming in a facility designed for young children, emphasizing individual and small group activities. W e focus on giving our children a strong foundation on which to grow socially , emotionally, academically, and spiritually, providing them with the tools necessary to be successful in their education for years to come. Our school approaches Judaism as a heritage and a tradition to be celebrated by ever yone who wants to participate. Our program includes a brand new Parenting Center, Mommy and Me classes and programs for children ages 2 through pre-Kindergarten. For more information, call Cheryl Karp at 599-1169. Hewlett/East Rockaway Jewish Centre Nursery School www.herjc.org www.facebook.com/jerjccommunity

South Shore

PARENTS TODAY CAMP AND SCHOOL FALL/ WINTER

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Tutor Time of East Rockaway and Baldwin Tutor Time, a state licensed childcare program awarded “Center of Excellence,” is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. The center has indoor and outdoor playgrounds. The CPR certified staff provides a caring and stimulating environment throughout the year . We offer three distinct camp programs. Our Cub Camp includes children 18 months to 3 years. Our Mini-Travel Camp provides our pre-kindergarten students with weekly trips in addition to the basic Cub Camp program. Our Adventure T ravel Camp is available for 4, 6, 8, or 10 week sessions for children 6-12 years old. Several enrichment programs are also offered, as well as a Mommy and Me Class. Full and part time programs are available. T utor Time is open 12 months, 6:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Tutor Time of East Rockaway 516-596-1010 Tutor Time of Baldwin 516-377-3337

Mathnasium Mathnasium, a math-only learning center for kids, has opened its newest location inynbrook L at 381 Sunrise Highway. “It is ver y exciting to be a part of helping the kids of our community succeed by offering them an opportunity to develop a better understanding of math concepts,” said Mamoon Mubashir , Director with Mathnasium of L ynbrook. “Our goal is to eliminate the confusion and intimidation that often accompanies the subject of math and replace it with understanding and passion.” Mathnasium’s program is for students in 2nd through 12th Grade who may need to boost their math skills or need an extra challenge. In addition to math tutoring, homework help and test prep are available. Mathnasium’s approach is to determine what a student knows and does not know, then tailor a personalized and prescriptive learning program. The goal is to significantly increase a child’s math skills, understanding of math concepts, and overall school perfor mance, while building confidence and positive attitude toward the subject. In celebration of its arrival in L ynbrook, Mathnasium is offering Complimentar y Assessments and W eekly Trials. “Mathnasium of Lynbrook provides both instruction and practice - all in a welcoming, comfortable environment,” said Mubashir . For more information about Mathnasium of L ynbrook, please contact Beenish Raza at (516) 881-7997 or Lynbrook@ mathnasium.com. Mathnasium 516-881-7997 lynbrook@mathnasium.com

Woodmere Music Studios Woodmere Music Studios is now celebrating its 12th year under the direction of Patricia Lee, a graduate of Northwestern University and Manhattan School of Music. Our faculty emulate from top universities and conservatories. Our staff are all professional musicians who can be found performing here and internationally . Our student body perform three recitals a year . We prepare students for NYSSMA where Patricia Lee serves as an adjudicator. We provide instruction on all levels and the full range of instuments: strings, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion, W e are now accepting new students for 2012. The school offers musicians for hire for private parties or functions. requiring classical, jazz or popular music To book a party, to register a student or just find out more information, call 516-343-4108. Woodmere Music Studios 516-343-4108

Resnick Reading Center Established in 1968, Resnick Reading Center has helped students become successful, competent and confident individuals. For director Diana Resnick Nahoum, the goal is clear – make your child independent by helping him succeed on his own. W e take a personalized approach and design an individualized program for each student. PSATs/SATs and ACTs preparation is aimed at helping each student achieve his best possible score. T utoring is available in all subject areas and students are well prepared for Regents, APs, GEDs, and all standardized exams including GREs, MCA Ts, LSATs, and RCTs. Your child’s success is our most important goal. Day, and evening sessions are available. Resnick Reading Center 516-374-5998

Lawrence Woodmere Academy Lawrence Woodmere Academy is a premier college preparatory school for students in Pre -School through Grade 12. Our hallmark is a dedication to individual student attention and student success, supported by a masterful faculty. Students thrive in our dynamic and diverse educational environment. At Lawrence Woodmere Academy, students, families and educators embrace quality education with shared priorities, passions and commitments in an environment that values wisdom and nurtures personal, community and global responsibility. Lawrence Woodmere Academy 516-374-9000


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Festivities without the frustration

Actually, stress is associated with positive life events as much as negative ones. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed when planning family meals, shopping for gifts, decorating the house or figuring out what to do with the kids during their holiday break. “Stress causes an unhealthy ‘high alert!’ response that wears down the body ,” says Ashley Davis Bush, author of the book “Shortcuts to Inner Peace: 70 Simple Paths to Everyday Serenity .” “Through intentionally summoning a feeling of inner calm, we literally change the chemistry of our bodies.” If you’re looking to keep a calm head in the midst of visiting relatives and busy shopping malls, try some of Bush’s favorite shortcuts this holiday season: Play It Again, Sam: When you find yourself grumbling over a nagging task (hanging lights, preparing the guest room), play or sing a specific song. It doesn’t have to be holiday-related; any upbeat tune will help! Remember This: When waiting in line to purchase gifts or groceries, ask yourself “What do I need to remember?” Keep asking yourself this question until you start to get substantial answers like “I need to Use calming techniques to grapple with the hustle and bustle of the season. remember what really matters in life.” Stop ‘N’ Smell: Before you being cooking a holiday during the holidays. If you find yourself getting annoyed with a loved one, meal, take time to smell your ingredients. Or pull a consider humming the song “Y ou Are My Sunshine” and remember that fragrant item from your pantry that triggers positive emotions (e.g. coffee, your time together is limited. If your buttons really get pushed, excuse your vanilla extract, rosemary). Close your eyes and inhale. The smell should self and throw cool water on your face or place a wet towel on your neck. ground you in the present, allowing you to savor your time in the kitchen. Cool relief to the body brings relief to the mind as well. My Sunshine: Family dynamics are complicated and can get strained

Touch Tank: It’s easy in the hustle and bustle of the holidays to forget to appreciate all the beautiful decorations, not to mention the beauty of the season. Consider keeping a small box or basket of seasonal treasures – pinecones, smooth stones, mistletoe and chestnuts. Whenever you feel tense or overwhelmed, take a few moments to finger each object. Simple appreciation tends to restore inner calm. “We often think we need to change our circumstances to feel peaceful or that we need to be immersed in spa-like surroundings to find tranquility,” says Bush. “But inner peace requires no extra time or money – just a shift in attention.” Let peace on earth begin with you this holiday season.

THE BRANDEIS SCHOOL

OPEN HOUSE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15TH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13TH 9:30AM-11:00AM

Come to Meet: • The Head of School, Mrs. Alese Gingold • The School Rabbi, Tomer Grossman • The Assistant Principal, Raz Levin • Nursery-8th Grades • State of the Art Science Lab • Rigorous Dual Curriculum

• Comprehensive Art and Music Program • Nurturing Staff of Certified Professionals • Small Student/Teacher Ratio

Building A Jewish Future...One Student At A Time. 25 FROST LANE • LAWRENCE, NY 11559 (516) 371-4747 • FAX (516) 371-1572 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

We look forward to greeting you! 508169

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he holidays are a time for family, fun and festivities. So why are you so stressed ?

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Coping with holiday stress


Crafting memories

Involve the family in a holiday craft pr oject

K

ids can’t help but catch the holiday spirit when they’re up to their elbows in crafts.

As we begin to think about planning and decorating for the holidays, why not create some new family traditions by involving the kids in creating personalized holiday decorations. From adorning the tree, to creating a decoration for your Hanukkah party, to taking a family photo for greeting cards, create a unique experience while taking a DIY (do-it-yourself) approach that will also help with the holiday budget. The best part about doing it yourself is the memorable moments you spend with your loved ones. This is after all, the reason for the season. Also, as a family, you can create lasting gifts and keepsakes that set you apart from the crowd.

Save yourself a stressful, expensive day at the mall buying stocking time to share family photos with friends. Use these photos to create cards, stuffers and holiday décor, and plan a pre-holiday family get-together instead. ornaments and personalized bookmarks and notebooks. By taking advantage of everybody’ s crafting skills, you can create personalWith a little craftiness, and a little wit, you can really customize the look ized ornaments and gifts made by the family, for the family. and feel of your holiday this year. Make sure you have plenty of craft supplies on hand that are appropriate for all ages. Provide glitter , paint, ribbon, fabric, popsicle sticks, crayons and paper –and get to work! You can either work without direction, creating ideas from scratch, or provide your guests with instructions for specific projects. Decorating with pinecones and creating paper chain gar lands from old magazines are a few ideas to get you started. And the terrific thing is these supplies are free! For creative inspiration, visit your neighborhood craft store, or checkout the websites that provide step by step instructions for creating homemade holiday décor. Kids, grandparents, uncles, cousins, everybody can participate, no matter what their skill level. This get-together can also double as a perfect photo opportunity. It’s easy to get a family portrait when you have everyone gathered in one place. And the holidays are the best Create special holiday memories by encouraging your family’s creativity.

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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Harmonious holidays

oliday break can be the perfect respite for school-aged children.

Although not quite halfway through the school year, the timing of the school vacation does come when kids might be preoccupied with the holiday season and all that comes with it. Kids may be distracted about parties and presents, but parents maybe preoccupied with finding ways their kids can spend their time during the vacation period – typically a 10 day to two-week hiatus from school that begins shortly before Christmas and ends with kids’ return to school shortly after New Year’s Day. With a little planning, parents facing the dilemma of finding something productive for the kids to do during the holiday vacation, will find it’s not such a dilemma after all. Take a vacation or staycation. Vacation is the easy way out if finances and timing permit. The break might mark the only time until summer that parents can spend quality time with their kids completely away from the distractions of everyday life. Vacation can mean a trip to warmer climates or simply packing up the car to go spend time with the grandparents. If there’s any vacation time to spare, consider hitting the road. Teach kids some practical lessons. Kids likely won’t miss the classroom during winter break, but that doesn’ t mean there aren’t enjoyable ways for kids to learn Get the family away from the video games. Reading during the while they’re away from school. Teach kids holiday break can be a fun and beneficial hobby for kids, as well as practical lessons, like how to cook a favormom and dad. ite meal or how to fix things around the house. This gives parents a chance to spend some quality time with their kids while encouraging kids to learn beyond the classroom. And who knows, such lessons at home may uncover a child’ s hidden talent. Encourage kids to read for pleasure. Reading improves vocabulary and can stimulate a child’s imagination. During the winter break, encourage kids to read a book or the daily newspaper for pleasure, assuring them there won’t be any quizzes or tests after each chapter . Get the ball rolling with a few books given as presents during Christmas or Hanukkah. Or take a trip to the local library and let kids choose their own books. Head outdoors. The weather may be chilly, but bundle up and go outside for a long walk or some outdoor adventures if the temperatures permit. Everyone will enjoy a break from being indoors and some healthy exercise is good for the entire family.

$25 OFF LESSON PACKAGE Enroll Now for Preferred Lesson Times

By Carleton Kendrick Ed.M., LCSW

Heightened emotions and unrealistic expectations can threaten your family’ s harmony during the holidays. But, with a little planning and understanding, you can keep the atmosphere merry this season. Keep cherished childhood traditions and consider establishing new ones for your family. Involve everyone, including your children, when creating new traditions. Sometimes traditions lose their importance for a family. Recognize when it’s time to let them go. Plan, organize, and prioritize to avoid burnout, disappointment and fatigue. Create a holiday-planning task schedule. Time spent together as a family is priceless. Create annual Ask others to share the responsibilities family customs that can be enjoyed every holiday season, and assign tasks to family members. without letting unrealistic expectations interfere. Create some time alone for yourself. Reflect on what is precious to you about the holidays and reconnect with your spirit. Examine the differences between your holiday expectations and what is really possible. Establish realistic holiday goals. Share with family and friends any worries about meeting your holiday expectations. Before getting together with family or relatives, anticipate and prepare for any difficulties. Don’ t expect your family or relatives to change their personalities because they are visiting your home. Don’ t bring up old family quarrels during the holidays. Don’t feed into the commercialism of the holidays. Plan free or low-cost activities and celebrations. Create and practice a holiday family tradition that helps those in need. Don’t spend money beyond your means. Consider gifts of help or special times together rather than gifts of things. Discuss gift-giving costs and realistic expectations with all family members well before the holidays. Create a new family tradition to keep the post-holiday blahs at bay . Talk about the fun you’ve had and what the holidays mean to your family, then think about what you might do differently next year. Permission granted by www.FamilyEducation.com © 2000 - 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Grace Lutheran School

Celebrating our 50 years of God’s Grace

1961-2011

Fall Open House Visitation/Tours

Nov. 7th & 8th 8:30 -11:30 Nursery - 6th Grade -variety of programs

Music Lessons NYSSMA Preparation Piano • Violin • Viola Cello • Sax • Guitar Voice • Flute • Drums Clarinet • Trumpet Trombone • Tuba

• 2 Years - 2 Days • 3 Years - 2,3,4 & 5 mornings, 3 afternoons & 3 and 5 full days • 4 Years - mornings & afternoons lunchbuddy program Extracurricular Activities K-6

All State - All County L.I. String Festival - Lincoln Center Acceptances to Top Universities 3 Recitals a Year

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Now Celebrating our 12th Year

Make it a festive season, not a stressful one

400 Hempstead Avenue • Malverne

(516) 599-6557

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Ideas for family fun during the school break

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Away from the classroom

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Award Winning

HERJC Early Childhood Center

Hewlett‐East Rockaway Jewish Centre Nursery School Cheryl Karp, Early Childhood Director, 516.599.1169 Congregation Etz Chaim • 295 Main St., East Rockaway, NY 11518 Andrew Warmflash, Rabbi • David Sislen, Hazzan • 516.599.2634 www.herjc.org • www.facebook.com/herjc.community

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We are proud to be a PJ Library Community www.pjLibrary.org 508596

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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9B

George Harrison Revisited

The magical journey of the Beatles era returns to the Hofstra stage when The Godfrey Townsend Band, with musicians from the Alan Parsons Project, join the Indian Kirtan ensemble Gauravani and Kindred Spirits to perform “Here Comes the Sun” – The Musical, Mystical Journey of George Harrison. This celebration of the music and spiritualism of the legendary musician commemorates the 10th anniversary of Harrison’s passing. Singer-guitarist Godfrey Townsend, with Hofstra Professor Joshua M. Greene as host, leads the dynamic program, which features those beloved tunes from The Beatles’ songbook, with Indian Kirtan music and meditative chanting. Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $15. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. (516) 463-6644.

Let’s put on a show!

Behind the scenes of community theater

Now add some music …

La Cenerentola (Cinderella)

Capitol Heights Lyric Opera presents La Cenerentola (the Cinderella story) – the ultimate rags to riches tale – told by Gioachino Rossini in one of the most delightful comic operas ever written. Mezzo-soprano Frances Devine is the lovely Angelina, who is treated like a maid by her father and selfish stepsisters until her goodness and beauty win her a kingdom and the hand of Prince Ramiro, sung by tenor Marcos Vigil. Saturday, Nov. 5, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theater, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. (516) 334-5280. TREASURE HUNTING

Book/Ephemera Fair

Book lovers – and folks who love to browse among interesting items – will find much to explore at the annual Book & Ephemera Fair. Exhibitors from Long Island and across the nation gather to present an array of rare and unusual old books, maps and prints, among other items. You’ll also find a wide selection of antiques and vintage memorabilia. From the frivolous to the sublime, a we a l t h o f out-of-print books, posters and prints, are waiting for you along with a treasure trove of other incredible finds. $6, $3 ages 12-21. Hofstra University’s Student Center Multipurpose Room, 200 Hofstra Dr., Hempstead.

Mary Malloy/Herald

WILLIAM O’BRIEN, who plays young Patrick Dennis, rehearses a scene with Reneé Socci, who plays the title role in Island Park Theatre Group’s “Mame.” By MARY MALLOY mmalloy@liherald.com

“We’ve gotta have a g reat show, with a million laughs ... and color ... and a lot of lights to make it sparkle. And songs – w onderful songs. And after w e get the people in that hall, we’ve gotta star t ‘em in laughing right away. Oh, can’t you just see it?” – J udy Garland, “Babes In Arms,” 1939. Yes, we can see it – b ut we only see the final product. Putting on a sho w involves planning, decision-making, scripts, music, stage production, props, lighting and a host of other details that, if done right, the audience will r eally never know about. Who are some of the people w ho make it look so easy?

The producer

“I really don’t think the p ublic knows how involved it is putting on a show,” said John Cestaro, president of the Island P ark Theatre Group board of directors and producer of Island Park Theatre Group’s latest musical, “Mame,” set to open in November. Cestaro, a retired bank vice

president, is currently broker/owner of JVC Realty Corp in Island Park. He has been with IPTG for 20 years, and has been pr oducer for the last 12. T he other boar d members ar e Hillary Kass Nussdorf, Reneé Socci, Sal Canepa, Frank Cestaro, Barbra Rubin-Perry, and Debby Wilson. Cestaro has appeared on stage in many Long Beach and Island P ark productions, including “Fiddler on the R oof,” “The Sound of Music” – and e ven as M. Woolsey Lindsey in Long Beach Theatre Guild’s production of “Mame.”

The directors

Hillary Kass Nussdorf, 59, has been with Island Park Theatre Group for 25 years and currently serves on its board as vice president. “It takes so much with so few people and so little time ,” said Nussdorf. “When we put out the casting call, w e’ve already been working on the sho w for three to six months.” Having been a part of both pr ofessional and community theater, Nussdorf is well aware that with local thea ter and performers, life g ets in the way. “People – including me – have jobs and families … it’s a big commitment, we

Although this her first y ear with the Island Park Theatre Group and her first time as a musical dir ector, Danielle Reed, 23, of Freeport, is no stranger to the arts. “I started performing in grammar school, and got involved in community theater in college,” she said. Reed has also directed children for choral and band perf ormances. She works as an administra tor for the non-profit organization, “Belief for Relief,” as well as teaching at the Rockville Centre Music Studio and the Y oung Musicians Institute, in Hempstead. She also performs at local venues and is pr oficient in many languages and instruments. “Being a [musical] dir ector gives me so much more perspective on how hard directors work and worry about the final pr oduct,” Reed said. “I’ve had motivational directors and

Continued on STEPPING OUT TWO

IPTG’S ‘MAME’ The Island Park Theatre Group (IPTG) was formed in the 1980s as a means of bringing wholesome Broadway-like shows to the Island Park and neighboring communities. In the early 90s, IPTG moved from the Island Park Methodist Church to the professional stage of the Lincoln Orens Middle School. IPTG is self-funded, and relies on advertising, dues and sponsors to produce its shows. This season’s production is the musical “Mame” at the Lincoln Orens School, at Trafalgar Blvd, Island Park. Performances: Nov 12, 8 p.m.; Nov. 13, 3 p.m.; Nov. 18, 8 p.m.; Nov. 19, 8 p.m.; and Nov. 20, 3 p.m. For tickets and more information, call (516) 431-3320.

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

ON STAGE

understand that – but we do have to live up to professional standards.” By day, Nussdorf works in the health office at East Elementary Sc hool in Long Beach. She also runs “Center Stage Studios,” a city-endorsed and sc hool-approved acting program for children. She also teac hes ballroom dancing and offers private lessons. Assistant Director Debby Wilson has been involved with community theatre since 1998 – her first sho w was IPTG’s “Once Upon a Mattress.” She has w orked with this g roup and the Long Beach Theatre Guild. “Mame is my first experience with sta ge directing, and I am very glad to be able to learn by working alongside a r eal pro like Hillary,” said Wilson, who works for Long Beach public schools as a secr etary in the Compr ehensive Arts (music/fine arts) department. “So I guess you could say that my day job is not all that different from my night job. “Being on this end of the process is very creative, but in a muc h different way. We have to come up with the sta ging and the set tha t gives the actors what they need to work with.”


10B

nity theater creates wonderful friendships that last beyond the closing night.”

DIRECTOR Hillary Kass Nussdorf, right, and Assistant Director Debby Wilson watch as the actors run through a scene.

Let’s put on a show! Continued from STEPPING OUT ONE also some so-so dir ectors, but I realize that all of them had to plan, recruit, direct, and do it all again the following years.” Besides planning the music f or the production ahead of time, Reed works with the cast and books musicians f or the final rehearsals and performances.

Add the choreography …

Sal Canepa, 38, of Oceanside lik es to move – and he lik es to make others move as well. Like Nussdorf, he has a no-nonsensebut-lets-still-have-fun style of teaching. With

IPTG since 1994, he has starred in many shows, and has c horeographed and musically directed several shows as well. “Being c horeographer requires doing most of the work even before auditions,” he said. One of his most tr easured memories was doing “Into the W oods” with IPTG in 1995-96. “It had an extr emely talented cast and was a life-altering experience. “Although it takes months to prepare a musical before auditions, and months of rehearsals, the end pr oduct is al ways a delightful accomplishment.” Cane pa said. “It’s wonderful to have returning cast members and thrilling to see ne w faces. Commu-

Reneé Socci, 51 , of Valley Stream, has been singing all her life. She studied opera in college, and performed in Long Island operatic productions during those years and into her twenties. She’s been a private vocal coach and piano teac her for 35 years, and works for Holy Name of Mary Chur ch as their principal cantor, singing at weddings and funerals, and is in charge of all of their cantors and the f olk group. She also w orks part time for a local attorney. “There is no other feeling lik e working with a group of wonderful people all committed to having fun and putting to gether a show,” Socci said. “T he show itself is the gravy. For a few hours, you are someone else, living in a ma gical world where everyone breaks into song and dance a t the drop of a hat. It’s pure joy with just enough stress to keep you on your toes. It’s also better than sitting on the couc h at night, munching on chips in front of the TV! Socci’s first show with IPTG was its 1991 production of “The Sound of Music,” playing the part of Maria. Since then she’s played “Dolly” in “Hello Doll y,” “Fiona” in Brig adoon, “Sister Mary Amnesia” in “Nunsense,” and the queen in “Once Upon a Ma ttress,” among other parts. She has also musically directed “The Wizard of Oz,” “Oliver,” and the three revue performances that IPTG has done. “I have not acted in an IPTG sho w in 12 years!” “I don’t think people r ealize how much work goes into putting on a thea trical production,” Socci said. “The long hours preparing – every step is thought out first, in g reat

Why support community theater?

The Island Park Theatre Group is just one of a handful of high-caliber perf ormance groups around. “I think the pub lic enjoys an inexpensive night out at the theatre,” said Cestaro. “and local community theatre is their best bet.” “We provide a way for them to just ‘sit back, relax, and enjo y,’ as J ohn Cestaro announces to the audience bef ore every show,” Socci said. “W e don’t make any money personally, but we love to hear the audience laugh – that’s our payment. If we can make them forget their troubles while we play in our ma gical little w orld, then we’re a success.” “If we do our job w ell, the general public knows nothing a bout the amount of work that goes into each production,” said Wilson, summing up the experience . “The magic of theatre is tha t the audience g ets to escape into the alter nate reality that the entire staff and cast has cr eated for them. If the audience enjo ys the play and believes in the c haracters and the scenes that we’ve produced – and maybe they walk out humming the tunes – then al l of our hard work, our blood, sweat and tears has been worthwhile and it’ s a lot c heaper than Broadway!”

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November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

The sensational ‘Mame’

detail. Will the right people audition? W ill anyone come to see the sho w? Will we have enough money for all our expenses?” “It’s a lot of hard work, and time consuming,” said Oceanside r esident Linda Bakal, who plays Mrs. Burnside. “But w e have so much fun. We come from all walks of life, and we’re all different ages, but it’s like one big f amily – and man y of us stay friends after the show ends.”


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A White House Tour – Part Two Harriet Baker and Barry H. Kaplan explore the life and times of our nation’s presidents and first ladies, including the Washingtons, Jeffersons, Nixons, and Clintons, in a staged reading, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2 p.m. Tickets required. Oceanside Library, 30 Davison Ave., Oceanside. 766-6500.

“Air, Fire, Water, “Earth” An exhibit in which the four elements are used as a metaphor for the world we live in. Works of Ron Erlich, Richard Sigmund, Linda Stojak, and Don Resnick are featured. Opening Sunday, Nov. 6, through Dec. 15. Molloy College’s Publiic Square Art Gallery, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. 678-5000 ext. 6549 or artgallery@molloy.edu. Burton Silverman: The Humanist Spirit A exhibit showcasing the works of contemporary artist Burton Silverman, who demonstrates the continuing power of the realist tradition in the 21st century. Through Silverman’s use of contemporary realist portraiture, this exhibition examines the commonalities of existence of “everyman.” Silverman is known for his ability to carefully balance formal visual elements in his realistic representations. Through Dec. 16. Hofstra University’s Emily Lowe Gallery, Emily Lowe Hall, South Campus South Campus, Hempstead. 463-5672. BESA – Code Of Honor : Muslim Albanians Who Rescued Jews During The Holocaust This exhibit describes, through documents and photographs, the heroic efforts of Albanian Muslims to rescue Albanian Jews during the Holocaust. Through Nov. 14. Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County, 100 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove. 571-8040 ext. 100 or www.holocaust-nassau.org. Ripped: The Allure of Collage An exhibit of approximately 50 collages, by a diverse range of European and American artists, that demonstrates the medium’s broad and surprising power. Artists represented include Romare Bearden, Joseph Cornell, Salvador Dali, George Grosz, Jane Hammond, Hannah Hoch, Ray Johnson, Roy Lichtentstein, and Conrad MarcaRelli. Through Jan. 8. Heckscher Museum of Art, Main St. and Prime Ave., Huntington. (631) 351-3250 or www.heckscher.org. Exploraciones Contemporaneas Latin America’s varied artistic voices are on view in this exhibit that reflects the broad

David Ostwald’s Gully Low Jazz Band The popular Dixieland band performs traditional jazz favorites, Thursday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Tickets required. Hewlett-Woodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

The Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company’s “ Midtown to the Met 2” Take a stroll across town and back again when the Gilbert and Sullivan Light Opera Company presents some of the most beloved and familiar tunes to grace the Great White Way and opera houses worldwide, Sunday, Nov. 20, at 3 p.m., in Garden City. Conceived by co-Directors David Groeger and Valerie Grehan, and produced by the Gilbert & Sullivan Light Opera Company of Long Island, “Midtown to the Met 2: More of the Best of Broadway and Opera” is a light-hearted revue of songs diversity of Latin culture today. Artists include Vik Muniz of Brazil, Cuban-American DEMI, Manuel Esnoz of Argentina, and Darío Escobar of Guatemala. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, Contemporary Collectors Circle Gallery, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Francisco Goya: Los Caprichos

A new exhibition featuring an early first edition of Los Caprichos, a set of 80 etchings by Spanish artist Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, that were published in 1799. It is one of the most influential series of graphic images in the history of Western art. Through Nov. 27. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor. 484-9337 or www.nassaumuseum.org. Afternoon Movie See “Tree of Life,” the story of a Texas family, with Brad Pitt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2:30 p.m.; also “Zookeeper,” comedy with Kevin James, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2 p.m. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. Friday Film See “Bridesmaids ,” Friday, Nov. 4, 1 and 6:45 p.m. Baldwin Public Library, 2385 Grand Ave., Baldwin. 223-6228.

Theater/ Music Camelot The classic musical with music with the beloved Lerner and Loewe score, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 3-4, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 5, 3 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $60. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport. (631) 261-2900 or www.engemantheater.com. Jake’s Women Neil Simon’s comedy about a writer and his struggling marriage, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4-5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors, $16 students, $15 ages 12 and under; $25 at door. Studio Theatre, 141 S. Wellwood Ave., Lindenhurst. (631) 226-8400 or www.studiotheatreli.com. Josh Groban “Straight To You” Tour with rock/jazz pianist ELEW, Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m. $98.50 and $58.50. Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale. (800) 745-3000 or www.tickemaster.com. Broadway Unplugged A revue of hit Broadway songs, Saturday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 and 7 p.m. $30, includes wine and cheese, coffee and dessert. Merrick Theatre & Center for the Arts, 2222 Hewlett Ave., Merrick. 868-6400.

we all love to listen to and sing along with. From “Rigoletto” and “The Magic Flute” to “Godspell” and “Wicked,” this show will please both opera and musical theater fans alike in a friendly and casual ‘coffee house’ setting. Tickets are $20, including complimentary light fare and dessert; available at www.gilbertandsullivanli.com. Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island, 38 Old Country Rd., Garden City. Cougat’s Nougats! The heyday of Xavier Cugat is brought to life with original arrangements of his hits, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. Program includes a 13-piece orchestra, the Tango Romantico dancers, and a special appearance by Bob Spiotto. $30, $25, seniors, $20 students. Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse, South Campus, Hempstead. 463-6644. The Curious Savage John Patrick’s heartwarming comedy about money and greed, presented by the Lantern Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 1:30 p.m. $18, $16 seniors and students Saturdays. Congregation B’Nai Israel, 91 N. Bayview Ave., North Freeport. 221-4485.

(800) 745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com or www.tillescenter.org.

A Grand Night For Singing Tony-nominated musical featuring the tunes of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. $20, $18 seniors and students, $14 youth. BroadHollow Theatre, BayWay Arts Center, 265 E. Main St., East Islip. (631) 581-2700 or www.broadhollow.org.

My Fair Lady The classic musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. $20, $25 seniors and students. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com.

Idina Menzel The Broadway headlines Tilles Center’s annual gala concert , Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. $175, $125, $80, and $50. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, C.W. Post Campus, Rte. 25A, Brookville.

A Jimmy Moore Sampler A musical revue, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2 p.m. Program includes songs from “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Showboat,” “Carmen’s Toreador aria, along with popular hits from Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, and more. Elmont Memorial Library Theatre, 700 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. 354-5280. I Hear Music Vocalists Susan Winter and Rick Jensen perform a unique blend of pop, jazz and cabaret, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2:30 p.m. Tickets required. Peninsula Public Library, 280 Central Ave., Lawrence. 239-3262.

Nightmare In The Attic A Revolutionary War tale based on the occupation of Rock Hall by American patriots in 1776, Sunday, Nov. 6, 6:30 p.m. $20, $15, seniors, $10 students. Reservations required. Lawrence Middle School (next to Rock Hall Museum), 195 Broadway, Lawrence. 239-1157.

Musical Manners & Mores Of 19th Century America Baritone Frank Hendricks and pianist Linda Pratt perform period music, Thursday, Nov. 10, 1 p.m. HewlettWoodmere Public Library, 1125 Broadway, Hewlett. 374-1967.

Family How I Became A Pirate Musical story of adventure and finding one’s own heart, based on the book by Melinda Long, presented by Plaza Theatrical Productions, Saturday, Nov. 5, 11 a.m. Audiences are encouraged to come dressed in their pirate best. $10. The Show Place at the Bellmore Movies, 222 Pettit Ave., Bellmore. 599-6870 or www.plazatheatrical.com. The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow Learn the real story behind the legend of the headless horseman, in this audience participation play, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 2 p.m. $10, $8 children. Vanderbilt Museum Carriage House Theater, Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Rd., Centerport. 293-0674 or www.arenaplayers.org. Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrate the Vietnamese festival tradition of TetTrung-Thu, in conjunction the visiting exhibit “Dragons and Fairies,” Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 5-6, 12-4 p.m. With varied activities, including Vietnamese cuisine to sample. Free with museum admission. Long Island Children’s Museum, Museum Row, Garden City. 224-5800 or www.licm.org.

Send arts and entertainment events to kbloom@liherald.com

November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

Exhibits and more...


November 3, 2011 — SOUTH SHORE PARENTS TODAY - Herald Community Newspapers

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Time’s a Ticking

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Holiday Magic

A look into the Trends and Must Haves for this Holiday Season Deadline: November 10 Publishing: November 24

Sweetreats

Basketball Preview

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For the Holidays Yummy Homemade Recipe Treats

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A Guide to the World of High School Basketball

South Shore Parents Today - Herald Community Newspapers November 3, 2011  

South Shore Parents Today - Herald Community Newspapers

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