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good health Back-To-School Routines A

SPECIAL

SECTION

SUPPLEMENT

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COMMUNITY

N E W S PA P E R S

Healthy

Ready for the classroom Gearing up for a strong start to the school year

E

very parent's back-to-school list should include more than just pencils and paper. Families also need to think about well-child exams, immunizations, exercise, and an emphasis on eating right. "The anticipation and preparation for another school year is exciting but also stressful for parents and children," says Dr. Charles Cutler. "By taking steps to ensure that your children start off healthy, you are well on your way to a happy and successful school year." Parents should provide psychological support, as well as make sure children receive necessary medical check-ups and immunizations. Here are some tips to help make your child's school year a healthier one. Talk with your children about their feelings for the upcoming school year. Spend time with your child talking about the upcoming school year, any fears, challenges, accomplishments, or projects that they see ahead for themselves. Go over their schedule

and discuss study habits so they feel less anxiety and stress over possible workloads. Schedule a well-child exam. Check with your primary care doctor on whether your child is due for one. This might include a history and physical examination; height, weight and blood pressure measurements; vision screening; developmental and behavioral assessments; and counseling on child safety, diet and exercise. Schedule physicals well in advance to avoid the Labor Day crunch. Also, check with the school about special forms or requirements for participating in sports and bring these to the attention of your physician. Review immunization records; keep track of visits and shots. While most children should receive their basic immunizations before age two, some diseases like tetanus, measles and hepatitis B require booster shots in later years between the ages 11 and 18. Meet with the school nurse. If your child has a chronic condition like diabetes or asth-

Preparing for school involves more than purchasing new supplies.

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ma, and needs to take medication during school hours, it's important to discuss your child's medical history with the school nurse. Give the nurse contact information for the pediatrician and/or family doctor. Plan a timetable for your child to take their medication and set up a reminder system so they won't forget. Schedule a dental appointment for your child. Get this out of the way before the school year begins to save you the hassle of scheduling it during school hours or around after-school activities or sports.


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Healthy lunches How to pack yummy food your children will actually eat

By Eric Christensen

I

Back-to-school time is the perfect opportunity to reinforce healthy eating habits.

THE NEW OCC

CREATIVE@SIX22LLC.COM

Additionally, parents often overlook a common reason children do not eat all of their packed lunch: an inability to open food containers. This is particularly the case with small children whose dexterity is still developing. If a child who is pressed for time at lunch can't open a container, he or she is likely to get frustrated and not eat what's in the container. Dornfest noted on her blog that she practices opening lunch containers with her child before using them. Finally, many parents want to also an affordable lunch. Many parents save money by purchasing reusable containers instead of single-use plastic bags. Dornfest notes that containers should be easy to clean in addition to easy to open. She adds, "A lot of wasted money is in wasted food." Don't pack food just because it's nutritious if it goes uneaten. Both Dornfest and Post suggest spending some time during the weekend preparing and portioning various snacks. Store them as appropriate, and then you can grab them and go during the week. Dornfest believes these tips should help reduce decision-making, and automatic lunch packing will be less stressful. Lastly, to make lunch packing even easier, Post says that later this year, the USDA will introduce a kidfocused MyPlate website that he hopes will be a "one-stop shop" for feeding your children nutritious, convenient and inexpensive lunches.

****

516.536.2300 | www.oceansidecc.com | 2914 Lincoln Ave | Oceanside, NY 11572

637245

n theory, packing a nutritious lunch for your children should be simple. In practice, it can be stressful for many parents. After all, parents have to balance nutritional recommendations against picky eaters, food allergies, school policies and shortened lunchtimes. Sadly, reality often falls short of our imagined ideal. But don't use that as an excuse to give up. Instead, by making small changes, parents can pack more nutritious, and more affordable, lunches that their children will actually eat. Asha Dornfest, founder of the website Parent Hacks and co-author of "Minimalist Parenting," says, "My first rule of thumb is to not put too much pressure on yourself to make it perfect." Dornfest advises parents to aim high but realize that they can offer nutritious meals during the rest of the day to balance out any midday mistakes. A good place to start when aiming high is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate dietary guidelines, which you can find at ChooseMyPlate.gov. Dr. Robert Post, associate executive director of the USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, says MyPlate guidelines "are a simple, powerful visual cue to consumers to think about choosing healthier foods during meal times." Post stresses that the icon is "suggestive of portion sizes, not prescriptive," but he thinks the icon can easily be applied to school lunches. He also notes that ChooseMyPlate.gov contains many tips on healthy meal planning and cooking nutritious meals, including SuperTracker, which helps parents analyze and improve their family's diet. Once you know what the ideal lunch should look like, Dornfest says parents should focus on "the really big nutritional categories: something with protein, a fruit or a vegetable, something crunchy, maybe an optional treat and milk or water to drink." Use these groupings to standardize lunches. Dornfest says, "If I can come up with two or three lunches that my kids like, and I keep those items on my grocery list, I'm most of the way there. ... A lot of time, kids like to have the same thing over and over again for lunch." Next, use small tricks to ensure that your children will eat the food you pack for lunch. The best trick, Post and Dornfest agree, is to involve your children in the lunch packing process. "I think the sooner the better," suggests Dornfest. "You'd be surprised what a preschooler can do. I'm not talking about making lunch from start to finish, but giving you ideas about lunch, getting the napkin and putting it in their lunchbox. It's about including them in the process as reasonable." Post adds, "Kids are more likely to enjoy the foods when it's their choice," so he advises taking your children grocery shopping and letting them pick some items for lunch. He also notes that these trips can be a great opportunity for teaching children about nutrition.


HEALTH MEMO

HEALTH MEMOS

Comfort Keepers: Expanding to your community

C

OMFORT+EEPERSISOWNEDBY/CEANS IDE RESIDENT *UDY 'EIER #OMFORT +EEPERSISAWORLDWIDEFRANCHISESER VICING .ASSAU #OUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS)TSMAINGOALISENABLINGINDEPENDENT LIVINGATHOMEWITHRESPECTANDDIGNITY  #OMFORT+EEPERSAIMSTOKEEPSENIORSIN THEIROWNHOMESWHILEPROVIDINGNON MEDI CAL CARE AND COMPANIONSHIP !LTHOUGH ELDERSARETHEMAINFOCUS ALLADULTSARESER VICED INCLUDINGPREGNANTWOMEN  4HEMANYSERVICESPROVIDEDBY#OMFORT +EEPERS INCLUDE CONVERSATION  COMPANION SHIP  MEALPREPARATION  LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING  ERRANDSERVICES GROCERYSHOPPING RESPITEOR RELIEFFORTHEFAMILY MEDICATIONREMINDERS  GROOMINGANDDRESSINGGUIDANCE INCIDENTAL TRANSPORTATION  LAUNDRY AND LINEN WASHING  RECREATIONALACTIVITIESANDCRAFTS MAILASSIS TANCEANDORGANIZATION PERIODICREVIEWAND COMMUNICATION  AND EMERGENCY MONITOR SYSTEMS#AREGIVERSARECERTIFIEDBY4HE!LZHEIMERmS!SSOCIATIONOF,ONG)SLAND  %ACHCAREGIVERISEQUIPPEDTOMEETTHENEEDSOFANYANDALLPATIENTS!LLHAVECARSAND HAVEBEENSUBJECTTOCRIMINALAND$-6BACKGROUNDCHECKS)NADDITION ALLEMPLOYEES AREBONDEDANDINSURED  !FREEIN HOMECLIENTASSESSMENTISDONESOTHATYOURLOVEDONEISASSUREDTHECORRECT CAREGIVERnMATCHoFORHISHERSPECIFICNEEDS #OMFORT+EEPERSp   %MAIL#+ COMFORTKEEPERSCOM

HEALTH MEMO

Oceanside Care Center is ready for another 50 years of supporting the community

O

CEANSIDE#ARE#ENTER HAS BEEN PROUDLY SERVING THE COMMU NITY OF /CEANSIDE FOR ALMOST  YEARS /## IS A PREMIER  BED SKILLED NURSING AND REHABILITATIONCARECENTER PRO VIDING HIGH QUALITY CARE TO EACHRESIDENTACCORDINGTOHIS ORHERNEEDS  )N HONOR OF REACHING ITS *UBILEE YEAR  /CEANSIDE #ARE #ENTER WILL BE REVAMPING ITS BUILDING AND REJUVENATING ITS IMAGE "ESIDES THE EXCITING AESTHETICDEVELOPMENTS /## WILLSOONBEENJOYINGABRAND NEWWEBSITEWITHVISITORSABLE TOTAKEASTUNNINGVIDEOTOUR OFTHEHOME/CEANSIDE#ARE #ENTER HAS ALSO GREATLY EXPANDED ITS ONLINE PRESENCE ANDSOCIALMEDIAEFFORTS  /CEANSIDE#ARE#ENTERPROVIDESTOP NOTCHSHORT TERMREHABANDLONG TERMCARETOITS RESIDENTS CONSISTINGOFPHYSICAL OCCUPATIONALANDSPEECHTHERAPY/##ISKNOWNFORITS FIRST RATESTROKEREHABPROGRAM WHICHUTILIZESUNIQUE3AEBO &LEXREHABTECHNOLOGYTHATIS THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND IN .ASSAU #OUNTY /## ALSO HAS A RENOWNED !LZHEIMERmS $EMENTIA PROGRAM AND AN EXCELLENT HOSPICE PROGRAM /THER SPECIALTY CARE SERVICES INCLUDECARDIOLOGY DENTISTRY PODIATRY NEUROLOGYANDPSYCHIATRY /CEANSIDE#ARE#ENTER ,INCOLN!VE /CEANSIDEp  

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

HEALTH MEMO

HEALTH MEMO

Your health in an emergency

Getting your ducks in order: A message from St. John’s Episcopal Hospital

L

AST /CTOBERmS 3UPERSTORM 3ANDY WAS A TERRIBLE REMINDERTHATYOUCANNEVERCOMPLETELYPREPARE FOREMERGENCIES9OUCANTAKESOMESTEPS HOW EVER TOSAFEGUARDYOURHEALTH NOMATTERWHATCOMES YOUR WAY (ERE IS SOME ADVICE FROM 2AJIV 0RASAD  -$  #HAIRMAN OF THE $EPARTMENT OF %MERGENCY -EDICINEAT3T*OHNmS%PISCOPAL(OSPITAL  $OCUMENT YOUR HISTORY $R 0RASAD RECOMMENDS THAT YOU PREPARE A PAGE OUTLINING YOUR MEDICATIONS ANDDOSAGES YOURDOCTORSmNAMESANDNUMBERS AND MEDICALHISTORYSIGNIFICANTILLNESSESANDANYCHRONIC CONDITIONS  HOSPITALIZATIONS )F YOU HAVE TO HEAD TO THE%MERGENCY2OOM THISSHEETWILLSAVEYOUTIME ANDCONFUSION+EEPTHEINFORMATIONUPDATEDANDIN ANEASYPLACETOGRAB ALONGWITHYOURINSURANCECARD  3TOCKUPONHEALTHSUPPLIES3TAYONTOPOFPRESCRIP TIONREFILLSANDMAKESUREYOUHAVEAMPLEFIRSTAIDKIT SUPPLIES  &OCUSONONEHOSPITAL$R0RASADRECOMMENDSTHAT YOU PICK A HOSPITAL FOR EMERGENCIES AND THEN MAKE SUREALLYOURPHYSICIANSrPRIMARYANDSPECIALISTSr HAVEATTENDINGPRIVILEGESATTHATHOSPITALn9OUCANNOTIMAGINEHOWMUCHEASIERAND SMOOTHERYOUR CAREWILL BE WHEN )CANCALL UPADOCTOR)KNOWORHAVEYOURRECORDS ALREADYONFILE oSAYS$R0RASAD  !VOIDEMERGENCIES3TAYCURRENTONDOCTORSmVISITSANDIMMUNIZATIONS,ISTENTOYOUR DOCTORmSORDERS!LWAYSUSESAFEHABITSBUCKLEUP WEARAHELMETIFYOUBIKE BECAREFUL AROUNDHOUSEHOLDKNIVESANDPOWERTOOLS ANDCHILDPROOFYOURHOMEIFYOUHAVESMALL CHILDREN 3T*OHNmS%PISCOPAL(OSPITAL "EACHTH3T &AR2OCKAWAYp   Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Hypnosis evolves with technology

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ITHYEARSBEHINDHERASA#LINICAL(YPNOTHERAPIST 4ERRY"IENER ##(  BELIEVESTHATTHEKEYTOASUCCESSFULRESULTISKNOWINGWHATTOSAY HOWTOSAYIT  ANDWHICHTECHNIQUESTOAPPLYONCEAPERSONISHYPNOTIZED4HISWISDOMCAN ONLYCOMEFROMEXTENSIVETRAININGANDEXPERIENCE  n%VERYONEPROCESSESINFORMATIONDIFFERENTLY oSAID"IENERn4HEREAREREASONSWHYA HABITORFEARHASFORMED WHICHSHOULDBEEXAMINEDBEFOREEFFECTIVETREATMENTCANTAKE PLACEo!THOROUGHINTAKESESSIONISDONEFIRST4HENUMBEROFHYPNOSISSESSIONSRECOM MENDEDVARIES(YPNOSISSESSIONSARETAILOREDTOTHEPERSONmSTRIGGERSANDHABITS-OTIVA TIONANDWILLINGNESSTOWORKWITHSUGGESTIONSONACONSCIOUSLEVELAREIMPORTANT4RUST ANDRAPPORTWITHTHEHYPNOTISTISVITALTOO  "IENERHASRECENTLYADDED#OMPUTERIZED#LIENT "ASED7EIGHT,OSSTOHERREPERTOIRE! SOPHISTICATEDCOMPUTERPROGRAMISUSEDTOPINPOINTPERSONALITY MENTALPROCESSING  STRENGTHSANDWEAKNESSES#OMBINEDWITHDATAGATHEREDFROMTHECLIENT SHECUSTOM DESIGNSHYPNOSISSESSIONSTOZEROINONIMPRINTSTHATNEEDTOBECHANGED7EIGHTLOSS WORKSHOPS WHICHINCLUDEGROUPHYPNOSIS WILLBEOFFEREDINTHEFUTURE  "IENERmSTRUEPASSIONISHELPINGPEOPLEWITHFEARSANDPANIC(AVINGEXPERIENCEDPHOBIAS ANDPANICATTACKSHERSELF WHICHWEREULTIMATELYHEALEDTHROUGHHYPNOSIS HERUNDERSTAND INGANDEMPATHYISPROFOUND"YCOMBINING.EURO LINGUISTIC0ROGRAMMING.,0 TECH NIQUESWITHHYPNOSIS SHECANELIMINATEORREDUCEUNWANTEDANDSOMETIMESDEVASTATING ANXIETYn0EOPLESHOULDREALIZETHEYARENmTALONE0HOBIASCANSEEMIRRATIONALSINCETHEY COMEFROMTHESUBCONSCIOUSqTHEPARTOFTHEMINDTHATRESPONDSWITHOUTLOGIC-OSTPEO PLEWHOHAVENEVEREXPERIENCEDAPHOBIASIMPLYDONmTUNDERSTANDo  5NDERSTANDINGHOWHYPNOSISWORKSBEFORETRYINGITISADVISEDn)GNOREWHATYOUmVE SEENINMOVIESORONSTAGE!HYPNOTICTRANCEISACTUALLYANATURALSTATEWEVISITFREQUENT LYWHENWEmREENGROSSEDAMOVIE ORIFWEDAYDREAMWHILEDRIVINGANDDONmTREMEMBER PASSINGCERTAINSTREETSOREXITS!HYPNOTISTINDUCESATRANCETOnREFRAMEoTHESUBCON SCIOUSPARTOFTHEMIND!GOODSUBJECTISSTRONG WILLEDANDINTELLIGENT4HEPERSONBEING HYPNOTIZEDNEVERLOSESCONTROLo(YPNOSISCANHELPWITHTRAUMA SPORTS PROCRASTINATION  SELF ESTEEM STRESS ANXIETYANDMOSTHABITS  !SAFORMER.EW9ORK#ITYTEACHER "IENERISCOMFORTABLEWORKINGWITHCHILDREN3HE HOLDSNUMEROUSCERTIFICATIONSTHOUGHTHE!MERICAN"OARDOF(YPNOTHERAPYANDTHE .ATIONAL'UILDOF(YPNOTISTS3HEHASDONESPEAKINGENGAGEMENTSANDGROUPHYPNOSIS SESSIONSFORORGANIZATIONSANDWELLNESSCENTERS  #LIENTSARESEENBYAPPOINTMENTONLY0HONECONSULTATIONSAREFREEANDCONFIDENTIAL %ASY#HANGES(YPNOSISISLOCATEDIN6ALLEY3TREAM#ONTACT4ERRY"IENER ##( AT   ORVISITWWWEASYCHANGESCOM 4ERRY"IENER ##(p  pWWWEASYCHANGESCOM Health Memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.


good health Back-To-School Routines A

SPECIAL

SECTION

SUPPLEMENT

OF THE

HERALD

COMMUNITY

N E W S PA P E R S

Healthy

Ready for the classroom Gearing up for a strong start to the school year

E

very parent's back-to-school list should include more than just pencils and paper. Families also need to think about well-child exams, immunizations, exercise, and an emphasis on eating right. "The anticipation and preparation for another school year is exciting but also stressful for parents and children," says Dr. Charles Cutler. "By taking steps to ensure that your children start off healthy, you are well on your way to a happy and successful school year." Parents should provide psychological support, as well as make sure children receive necessary medical check-ups and immunizations. Here are some tips to help make your child's school year a healthier one. Talk with your children about their feelings for the upcoming school year. Spend time with your child talking about the upcoming school year, any fears, challenges, accomplishments, or projects that they see ahead for themselves. Go over their schedule

and discuss study habits so they feel less anxiety and stress over possible workloads. Schedule a well-child exam. Check with your primary care doctor on whether your child is due for one. This might include a history and physical examination; height, weight and blood pressure measurements; vision screening; developmental and behavioral assessments; and counseling on child safety, diet and exercise. Schedule physicals well in advance to avoid the Labor Day crunch. Also, check with the school about special forms or requirements for participating in sports and bring these to the attention of your physician. Review immunization records; keep track of visits and shots. While most children should receive their basic immunizations before age two, some diseases like tetanus, measles and hepatitis B require booster shots in later years between the ages 11 and 18. Meet with the school nurse. If your child has a chronic condition like diabetes or asth-

ma, and needs to take medication during school hours, it's important to discuss your child's medical history with the school nurse. Give the nurse contact information for the pediatrician and/or family doctor. Plan a timetable for your child to take their medication and set up a reminder system so they won't forget. Schedule a dental appointment for your child. Get this out of the way before the school year begins to save you the hassle of scheduling it during school hours or around after-school activities or sports.

Preparing for school involves more than purchasing new supplies.

My Parents Always Gave Me the Best Care That's Why I Gave Them Comfort Keepers® Comfort Keepers® provides in-home care that makes a difference in the lives of seniors and other adults. For over a decade, clients and their families have entrusted their care to us in hundreds of local communities. Whether companionship and light housekeeping or medication reminders and transportation to doctor's appointments, we provide the supprt and services that improve lives and enable independent living.

AARP

B

READY

FORBACK TOSCHOOL

s e rV I C e s

ck786@comfortkeepers.com Serving Nassau County and Surrounding Areas

Comfort Keepers®

• Companionship • Meal Preparation • Light housekeeping • Transportation to Appointments • Grooming, Dressing Guidance • Medication reminders • Certified by the Alzheimer's Association of Long Island

East office independently owned and operated. © 2010 CK Franshising, Inc.

W W W. C o M f o r T K e e P e r s . C o M

EIGHTYPERCENTOF

WHATCHILDRENLEARN

OCCURSTHROUGHTHEEYES SCHEDULEYOUR2013EYEEXAM

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Healthy lunches How to pack yummy food your children will actually eat

By Eric Christensen

I

Additionally, parents often overlook a common reason children do not eat all of their packed lunch: an inability to open food containers. This is particularly the case with small children whose dexterity is still developing. If a child who is pressed for time at lunch can't open a container, he or she is likely to get frustrated and not eat what's in the container. Dornfest noted on her blog that she practices opening lunch containers with her child before using them. Finally, many parents want to also an affordable lunch. Many parents save money by purchasing reusable containers instead of single-use plastic bags. Dornfest notes that containers should be easy to clean in addition to easy to open. She adds, "A lot of wasted money is in wasted food." Don't pack food just because it's nutritious if it goes uneaten. Both Dornfest and Post suggest spending some time during the weekend preparing and portioning various snacks. Store them as appropriate, and then you can grab them and go during the week. Dornfest believes these tips should help reduce decision-making, and automatic lunch packing will be less stressful. Lastly, to make lunch packing even easier, Post says that later this year, the USDA will introduce a kidfocused MyPlate website that he hopes will be a "one-stop shop" for feeding your children nutritious, convenient and inexpensive lunches.

****

Back-to-school time is the perfect opportunity to reinforce healthy eating habits.

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n theory, packing a nutritious lunch for your children should be simple. In practice, it can be stressful for many parents. After all, parents have to balance nutritional recommendations against picky eaters, food allergies, school policies and shortened lunchtimes. Sadly, reality often falls short of our imagined ideal. But don't use that as an excuse to give up. Instead, by making small changes, parents can pack more nutritious, and more affordable, lunches that their children will actually eat. Asha Dornfest, founder of the website Parent Hacks and co-author of "Minimalist Parenting," says, "My first rule of thumb is to not put too much pressure on yourself to make it perfect." Dornfest advises parents to aim high but realize that they can offer nutritious meals during the rest of the day to balance out any midday mistakes. A good place to start when aiming high is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate dietary guidelines, which you can find at ChooseMyPlate.gov. Dr. Robert Post, associate executive director of the USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, says MyPlate guidelines "are a simple, powerful visual cue to consumers to think about choosing healthier foods during meal times." Post stresses that the icon is "suggestive of portion sizes, not prescriptive," but he thinks the icon can easily be applied to school lunches. He also notes that ChooseMyPlate.gov contains many tips on healthy meal planning and cooking nutritious meals, including SuperTracker, which helps parents analyze and improve their family's diet. Once you know what the ideal lunch should look like, Dornfest says parents should focus on "the really big nutritional categories: something with protein, a fruit or a vegetable, something crunchy, maybe an optional treat and milk or water to drink." Use these groupings to standardize lunches. Dornfest says, "If I can come up with two or three lunches that my kids like, and I keep those items on my grocery list, I'm most of the way there. ... A lot of time, kids like to have the same thing over and over again for lunch." Next, use small tricks to ensure that your children will eat the food you pack for lunch. The best trick, Post and Dornfest agree, is to involve your children in the lunch packing process. "I think the sooner the better," suggests Dornfest. "You'd be surprised what a preschooler can do. I'm not talking about making lunch from start to finish, but giving you ideas about lunch, getting the napkin and putting it in their lunchbox. It's about including them in the process as reasonable." Post adds, "Kids are more likely to enjoy the foods when it's their choice," so he advises taking your children grocery shopping and letting them pick some items for lunch. He also notes that these trips can be a great opportunity for teaching children about nutrition.

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From top to bottom

Back to the classroom with a focus on wellness

T

Getting your kids ready to start the school year involves more than finding that perfect backpack

he countdown is on and parents and kids are feeling those familiar pressures that come with getting ready to go back to school. Besides making those shopping lists, being prepared for school means taking care of health-related matters. Vaccinations, eye exams, bike helmets and healthy snacks top the back-to-school health lists from the medical professionals. “In preparing for their child’s return to school, parents should review their child’s health status, just as they check their clothes and school supplies. To succeed in school, children need to be healthy, alert and able to see properly,” says Robert Adler, M.D.

T

School Checklist Check with your doctor to confirm that 3. your child has received the recom-

mended vaccinations. “This year, the single most important health issue for younger children is to make sure they receive their recommended vaccinations,” says Jill Hoffman, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist. She also advised everyone over six months of age should receive a yearly influenza vaccine. “As we saw last year, influenza can be severe and unpredictable, Dr. Hoffman says. “This year’s vaccine will contain protection against Influenza A H1N1 (pandemic strain), H3N2 and Influenza B. Children age 9 years and younger, who have never received influenza vaccine before will need two doses, four weeks apart, for full protection.” In addition, be sure children are vaccinated for common infectious diseases such as chicken pox and measles. To see a list of recommended vaccinations for different age groups, the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) offers parents an online immunization chart. Get a complete eye exam before your 3. child starts school. According to pediatric ophthalmologist Mark Borchert, M.D., 80 percent of the learning a child does occurs through his eyes and approximately one in four school-age children have some type of vision impairment. School eye exams, while valuable, are necessarily brief and may miss many treatable problems. “Every child should have a complete eye exam by age three,” says Dr. Borchert. “Some serious eye diseases such as Amblyopia (lazy eye) or strabismus (crossed eyes) are correctable with eye patches or surgery if caught early. Once a child is seven or eight years old, the opportunity to correct the problem may be lost, resulting in permanent vision problems.” sure your child wears a properly fit3. Be ted bicycle helmet. Last year, 93 bicyclists under age 15 were killed and 12,500 sent to emergency rooms, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Head injuries accounted for 63 percent of all bicycle fatalities. “If a child has an accident, a helmet can prevent a serious brain injury,” says Jeffrey Upperman, M.D. According to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute (BHSI), all helmets sold in the U.S. must meet test requirements from the Consumer Product Safety Administration. Size is a key factor, since children grow rapidly. The helmet

Healthy habits

should be comfortable, but fit snugly. The BHSI advises that in terms of safety, there is no difference between a $20 helmet and a $120 one.

3. Snacks: plan them, don’t ban them. A recent study of 700,000 children published in the March 2010 edition of the Journal of Pediatrics, found that 37 percent were overweight and 19.4 percent were obese. “Childhood obesity is a major health issue. Being overweight may impact a child’s selfesteem, school performance, and physical health. Over time, obesity increases the risk of many diseases, including heart disease, stroke, arthritis, diabetes and cancer,” says pediatric endocrinologist Steven Mittelman, M.D. By shopping carefully, parents can get their children started in healthy eating habits. Snacking itself is not necessarily bad; young children actually need snacks. Their stomachs are small, so they often can’t get all the nutrients they need in a day through regular meals alone. Avoid soda drinks and salty, high-calorie prepackaged snack foods. Provide milk or juice and servings of fruit or vegetables instead. Each 12-ounce soft drink can contain approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar. Drinking just one can of soda a day increases a child's risk of obesity by 60 percent, according to the AAP. Get started early with a school bedtime 3. schedule. During the summer, many children fall into a vacation rhythm, staying up late and sleeping in. Sleep specialists recommend that parents start gradually imposing an earlier bedtime several weeks before school begins. “While there is a lot of variation between individuals, children need more sleep than adults,”says pediatrician Michelle A.Thompson, M.D. “Recent studies indicate children ages 6 through 9 should get 10-11 hours of sleep a night. If your child is not getting enough sleep, he may fall asleep in the car or seem grouchy and tired during the day.” Dr. Thompson said some children will need help establishing bedtime rituals that make them comfortable and drowsy. Parents need to set a regular bedtime and keep it to build

consistency in the child’s daily routine.

3. Have a family plan for sick days.

“Never send your child to school with a fever,” advises pediatrician Yvonne Gutierrez, M.D. “Even if your child says he feels OK, running a fever is an indicator that their immune system is trying to fight off something. When a child is running a fever, he is at his most contagious and this puts children and adults around him at risk. If at all possible, make arrangements for your child to stay home with caregiver.” Dr. Gutierrez recommends keeping your child home until the fever has been gone for 24 hours without medication. Colds can be contagious for at least 48 hours. If you're unsure about the best way to treat your child's cold or flu, ask your doctor, school nurse or other healthcare provider. with your child to understand their 3. Talk emotions. A parent’s responsibility goes beyond supplying food, clothing and entertainment. Parents are also responsible for their child’s emotional and social growth. According to child and adolescent psychiatrist Julienne Jacobson, M.D., it is important for parents to consistently talk to their children, to know their personalities and be alert to any changes in behavior. "To maintain a strong connection engage with your kids consistently,” says Dr. Jacobson. “Make a point to spend time with them daily and talk about their activities and interests. Listen to what they say. Let them know you are interested in what they think and how they feel. Let them know they can always feel comfortable talking to you." It’s important to be aware of what is appropriate behavior for your child’s age group. Good sources for this information are teachers and other parents. Remember you can ask teachers or school counselors for help or input if you have questions or are concerned about changes in your child's behavior.

****

he beginning of the school year is a great time to establish healthy routines and habits. Emphasizing healthy choices will help your child perform well this school year and may help establish a lifetime of healthy living. “As you shop for school supplies and clothes, schedule after-school activities and care, and plan to attend parent orientation, be sure to plan for healthy lifestyle choices, too,” says pediatrician Allen Peabody, M.D. “Eating well, staying active, getting enough rest, and encouraging habits to reduce the spread of germs are all important to discuss and plan for as families start a new school year.” Planning for meal and snack time is a great place to start. Parents and caregivers can encourage healthy lunch and snacking choices to help children maintain a balanced diet and healthy energy level. “Children should have three balanced meals a day and most will have snacks in between meals as well. Be sure to include fruits and vegetables on their plates and in their lunch boxes. Daily routines often change when school begins. The shift in daily living habits impacts how much exercise children and adults alike are able or willing to maintain as summer winds down. The beginning of the school year is a great time to emphasize the importance of keeping active throughout the year. “Most children are active all summer long, getting the regular exercise they need to stay fit and healthy,” said Dr. Peabody.“In addition to after school activities and neighborhood play time, consider adding family play time to your schedule a couple times a week. You could take a walk, go for a bike ride, or play a game of tag.” Schedules should also help children maintain a regular sleeping period, including maintaining a consistent bedtime. “I can’t overemphasize the importance of children getting enough sleep on a regular basis,” Dr. Peabody said.“Children should get 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Make sure you allot enough time for activities, dinner, and homework before bedtime.” Finally, Dr. Peabody recommends everyone review healthy habits that will help prevent the spread of germs at school and at home. Colds and illnesses can spread quickly in school and childcare environments. “Washing hands regularly, covering your sneeze, and not sharing drinks are a few simple ways to prevent the spread of germs,” Dr. Peabody said. “You can also talk with your physician about incorporating a multivitamin in your child’s diet and elect to have your child receive the flu vaccination.”


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See well for better learning

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IS YOUR HEART GETTING THE CARE IT DESERVES?

Soothe your feet, soothe your body

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UR SOCIETY IS FILLED WITHPOLLUTANTSAND TOXINS THAT EXIST IN OURAIR WATER FOOD CLOTHING AND ENVIRONMENT #IGA RETTES  ALCOHOL AND CAFFEINE AREALSOMAJORSOURCESOFTOX INS/URBODIESAREENCOUN TERING AND STORING THESE UNWANTED TOXINS ON A DAILY BASIS 4ISSUE ACID WASTES  CHEMICALS AND HEAVY METAL RESIDUES ARE BUILDING UP IN OUR BODY FASTER THAN EVER BEFORE RESULTING IN A GREATER INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND MENTALANDPHYSICALINCAPAC ITATION  /URBODIESAREDEPLETEDOF CRUCIAL LIFE GIVING ELEMENTS  LEAVINGUSFEELINGDRAINEDOF ENERGYORUNABLETOHEALNATURALLYFROMILLNESS ORMEDICALPROCEDURES  4HE$ETOX&OOT3PAISDESIGNEDTORELIEVETHESESTRAINSANDDETOXIFYTHEBODYTHROUGH THESKIN THELARGESTORGANINTHEHUMANBODY4HISION PRODUCINGTECHNOLOGYCREATESA GENTLEVIBRATIONTHATAIDSTHERELEASEOFUNWANTEDTOXINPARTICLESTHROUGHTHEPORESOFTHE SOLEOFTHEFOOT4HEREAREOVER PORESONEACHFOOTØ  #ALLFORANAPPOINTMENTTOGETTHIS MINUTE&$!APPROVEDTREATMENTAT  TODAY9OUmREJUSTMINUTESAWAYFROMAHEALTHIERLIFE $R-YLES'ROSSMAN (EWLETT!VE -ERRICKp   0OST!VE 7ESTBURYp  

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David J. Hersh, MD

Heart Health of the South Shore, PC

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Hypertension: a brief overview

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YPERTENSION ORHIGHBLOODPRESSURE ISACHRON ICCONDITIONWHEREINTHEBLOODPRESSUREPRES ENTINARTERIESISELEVATED"LOODPRESSUREIS CALCULATEDUSINGTWOPRINCIPALMEASUREMENTS4HE FIRST SYSTOLIC REFLECTSHEARTMUSCLECONTRACTIONAND THESECOND DIASTOLIC COINCIDESWITHHEARTMUSCLE RELAXATIONTHATALLOWSTHEHEARTCHAMBERSTOFILLWITH BLOOD.ORMALRESTINGBLOODPRESSURETYPICALLYFALLS WITHINTHERANGEOF MM(GSYSTOLICHIGHER NUMBER AND MM(GDIASTOLICLOWERNUMBER  (IGHBLOODPRESSUREISCOMMONLYDIAGNOSEDWHEN PERSISTENTREADINGSOFMM(GORHIGHERARE PRESENT  (YPERTENSIONISAMAJORRISKFACTORFORANUMBEROF LIFETHREATENINGCONDITIONSINCLUDINGSTROKE MYOCARDI ALINFARCTIONHEARTATTACKS HEARTFAILURE ANDCHRONIC KIDNEYDISEASE/FTENREFERREDTOASTHESILENTKILLER  HYPERTENSIONISRARELYACCOMPANIEDBYANYSYMPTOMS ORWARNINGSIGNS2OUTINEBLOODPRESSUREMONITORING ISTHEREFORENECESSARY  ,IFESTYLECHANGESMAYKEEPBLOODPRESSUREINCHECK HELPINGDECREASETHERISKOFASSO CIATEDHEALTHCOMPLICATIONS$RUGTREATMENT HOWEVER MAYPROVENECESSARYWHENTHESE CHANGESHAVENOTPRODUCEDDESIREDRESULTS  0ATIENTSSHOULDREDUCETHEIRINTAKEOFSALTANDENGAGEINREGULARAEROBICEXERCISEOR MOREMINUTESPERDAYFOR DAYSPERWEEK ALONGWITHLIMITINGALCOHOLCONSUMPTION ANDEATINGADIETRICHINFRUITSANDVEGETABLES)FDIETANDEXERCISEARENOTSUFFICIENT SEVERAL GROUPSOFMEDICATIONSAREAVAILABLEFORTREATINGELEVATEDBLOODPRESSURE(YPERTENSION SHOULDNEVERBETAKENLIGHTLYANDISAPOTENTIALLYSERIOUSMEDICALCONDITIONTHATCANBE WELLMANAGEDWITHROUTINEVISITSTOYOURDOCTOR  $AVID*(ERSH -$ ISABOARDCERTIFIED#ARDIOLOGISTIN"ELLMORE SPECIALIZINGINTHE TREATMENTOFHYPERTENSIONANDOTHERHEARTRELATEDCONDITIONS&ORANAPPOINTMENT PLEASE CALL  

Back to school, back to germs Children share more than just a classroom

S

chool-aged children spend several hours per day in the classroom in close proximity to one another. That proximity means that, in addition to sharing their time in the classroom, students often share their illnesses. Many parents understand that kids may come home from school with more than just homework. Communicable diseases and parasites may accompany kids home, and while every sniffle or fever cannot be prevented, there are ways parents can reduce their child's risk of coming home from school with an ailment passed on by a classmate. The first step toward reducing that risk is understanding some of the more common ailments.

Lice

Few children survive school without enduring at least one outbreak of lice. Lice are tiny parasites that feed on the blood of their hosts. Head lice are about two to three millimeters in length (about the size of a sesame seed). A female louse can produce between seven and 10 eggs, known as nits, per day. The nits will hatch and repeat the process of the adults. Having lice is not an indication of poor hygiene. It just means you have come into contact with someone with lice and have contracted the parasite. Sharing brushes, pillows, hats, and head-to-head contact with someone who has lice facilitates transmission. Many old wives' tales discuss how to keep lice from getting into the hair. None of these methods are necessarily effective. Should lice

climb aboard, it is essential to remove all of the nits and adult lice through careful combing and to reduce the numbers of lice until they die off. In many cases, your doctor may recommend a medicated shampoo.

Mononucleosis

Infectious mononucleosis, commonly shortened to "mono," is known as the kissing disease, according to the Mayo Clinic. Epstein-Barr virus, the virus that causes mono, is transmitted through saliva. It can be spread through kissing, but also by sharing cups and straws or if saliva is expelled through sneezing or coughing. Symptoms of mono include fatigue, sore throat, fever, swollen lymph nodes, and a soft, swollen spleen. Mono is not often serious and is even less communicable than the common cold. However, it is advisable to keep a child home from school until symptoms have subsided. There is no specific method to treat mono, but doctors may suggest a combination of bed rest, pain relievers and drinking plenty of water and fruit juices.

Oral Herpes

There is a lot of confusion about herpes circulating because two similar viruses are commonly mistaken for each other. Most of the cases of oral herpes result from the virus herpes simplex 1, or HSV-1. The oral outbreak of herpes forms cold sores or fever blisters on the lips or inside of the mouth. While these blisters — and the HSV-1 virus itself — can be spread through kissing, most young children are diagnosed

with oral herpes after they have contracted it through the sharing of utensils. Sometimes parents inadvertently pass herpes on to their kids when they kiss them goodnight. Generally, oral herpes is most contagious when a lesion or blister is present. When scabs have healed and there is no other symptom of the condition, then a person is much less likely to pass the virus to someone else. When a blister is present, the affected person should wash his or her hands frequently and avoid touching the lesion.

Strep Throat

A child will get strep throat when he or she comes in direct contact with saliva or fluids from the nose of an affected person, according to the National Institutes of Health. Strep throat is usually caused by group A streptococcus bacteria. It is most common in children between the ages of five and 15. Once a person comes in contact with the bacteria, he or she may begin to feel sick two to five days later. Chills, a sore throat, trouble moving the neck, and difficulty swallowing are some of the more common symptoms. Because strep can mimic a viral sore throat, most doctors will take a throat culture to confirm diagnosis. Should the bacteria be present, antibiotics will be prescribed for treatment. A doctor will advise when it is safe for a child to return to school.

Meningitis

Meningitis is the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known as the meninges.

Spending time in close proximity with other students increases the spread of communicable diseases among students. Knowing the symptoms can help parents quickly recognize an ailment.

There are five types of meningitis: bacterial, viral, parasitic, fungal, and noninfectious. The severity of the illness and the treatment depends on the cause. The most widely known types of meningitis are bacterial and viral. Both are contagious, but bacterial meningitis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Meningitis can be spread through exchange of respiratory and throat secretions. People who have viral meningitis find it is a less severe form and does not become serious so long as their immune system remains strong. Symptoms of a meningitis infection may include a sudden onset of fever, headache and stiff neck. Nausea, vomiting and altered mental status are also symptoms. Samples of blood or cerebrospinal fluid are collected to test for the cause of the meningitis to begin prompt treatment.


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Healthy

Ready for the classroom Gearing up for a strong start to the school year

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very parent's back-to-school list should include more than just pencils and paper. Families also need to think about well-child exams, immunizations, exercise, and an emphasis on eating right. "The anticipation and preparation for another school year is exciting but also stressful for parents and children," says Dr. Charles Cutler. "By taking steps to ensure that your children start off healthy, you are well on your way to a happy and successful school year." Parents should provide psychological support, as well as make sure children receive necessary medical check-ups and immunizations. Here are some tips to help make your child's school year a healthier one. Talk with your children about their feelings for the upcoming school year. Spend time with your child talking about the upcoming school year, any fears, challenges, accomplishments, or projects that they see ahead for themselves. Go over their schedule

and discuss study habits so they feel less anxiety and stress over possible workloads. Schedule a well-child exam. Check with your primary care doctor on whether your child is due for one. This might include a history and physical examination; height, weight and blood pressure measurements; vision screening; developmental and behavioral assessments; and counseling on child safety, diet and exercise. Schedule physicals well in advance to avoid the Labor Day crunch. Also, check with the school about special forms or requirements for participating in sports and bring these to the attention of your physician. Review immunization records; keep track of visits and shots. While most children should receive their basic immunizations before age two, some diseases like tetanus, measles and hepatitis B require booster shots in later years between the ages 11 and 18. Meet with the school nurse. If your child has a chronic condition like diabetes or asth-

ma, and needs to take medication during school hours, it's important to discuss your child's medical history with the school nurse. Give the nurse contact information for the pediatrician and/or family doctor. Plan a timetable for your child to take their medication and set up a reminder system so they won't forget. Schedule a dental appointment for your child. Get this out of the way before the school year begins to save you the hassle of scheduling it during school hours or around after-school activities or sports.

Preparing for school involves more than purchasing new supplies.

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From top to bottom

Back to the classroom with a focus on wellness

T

Getting your kids ready to start the school year involves more than finding that perfect backpack

he countdown is on and parents and kids are feeling those familiar pressures that come with getting ready to go back to school. Besides making those shopping lists, being prepared for school means taking care of health-related matters. Vaccinations, eye exams, bike helmets and healthy snacks top the back-to-school health lists from the medical professionals. “In preparing for their child’s return to school, parents should review their child’s health status, just as they check their clothes and school supplies. To succeed in school, children need to be healthy, alert and able to see properly,” says Robert Adler, M.D.

T

School Checklist with your doctor to confirm that √. Check your child has received the recom-

mended vaccinations. “This year, the single most important health issue for younger children is to make sure they receive their recommended vaccinations,” says Jill Hoffman, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist. She also advised everyone over six months of age should receive a yearly influenza vaccine. “As we saw last year, influenza can be severe and unpredictable, Dr. Hoffman says. “This year’s vaccine will contain protection against Influenza A H1N1 (pandemic strain), H3N2 and Influenza B. Children age 9 years and younger, who have never received influenza vaccine before will need two doses, four weeks apart, for full protection.” In addition, be sure children are vaccinated for common infectious diseases such as chicken pox and measles. To see a list of recommended vaccinations for different age groups, the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) offers parents an online immunization chart. a complete eye exam before your √. Get child starts school. According to pediatric ophthalmologist Mark Borchert, M.D., 80 percent of the learning a child does occurs through his eyes and approximately one in four school-age children have some type of vision impairment. School eye exams, while valuable, are necessarily brief and may miss many treatable problems. “Every child should have a complete eye exam by age three,” says Dr. Borchert. “Some serious eye diseases such as Amblyopia (lazy eye) or strabismus (crossed eyes) are correctable with eye patches or surgery if caught early. Once a child is seven or eight years old, the opportunity to correct the problem may be lost, resulting in permanent vision problems.” sure your child wears a properly fit√. Be ted bicycle helmet. Last year, 93 bicyclists under age 15 were killed and 12,500 sent to emergency rooms, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Head injuries accounted for 63 percent of all bicycle fatalities. “If a child has an accident, a helmet can prevent a serious brain injury,” says Jeffrey Upperman, M.D. According to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute (BHSI), all helmets sold in the U.S. must meet test requirements from the Consumer Product Safety Administration. Size is a key factor, since children grow rapidly. The helmet

Healthy habits

should be comfortable, but fit snugly. The BHSI advises that in terms of safety, there is no difference between a $20 helmet and a $120 one.

√. Snacks: plan them, don’t ban them. A recent study of 700,000 children published in the March 2010 edition of the Journal of Pediatrics, found that 37 percent were overweight and 19.4 percent were obese. “Childhood obesity is a major health issue. Being overweight may impact a child’s selfesteem, school performance, and physical health. Over time, obesity increases the risk of many diseases, including heart disease, stroke, arthritis, diabetes and cancer,” says pediatric endocrinologist Steven Mittelman, M.D. By shopping carefully, parents can get their children started in healthy eating habits. Snacking itself is not necessarily bad; young children actually need snacks. Their stomachs are small, so they often can’t get all the nutrients they need in a day through regular meals alone. Avoid soda drinks and salty, high-calorie prepackaged snack foods. Provide milk or juice and servings of fruit or vegetables instead. Each 12-ounce soft drink can contain approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar. Drinking just one can of soda a day increases a child's risk of obesity by 60 percent, according to the AAP. started early with a school bedtime √. Get schedule. During the summer, many children fall into a vacation rhythm, staying up late and sleeping in. Sleep specialists recommend that parents start gradually imposing an earlier bedtime several weeks before school begins. “While there is a lot of variation between individuals, children need more sleep than adults,”says pediatrician Michelle A.Thompson, M.D. “Recent studies indicate children ages 6 through 9 should get 10-11 hours of sleep a night. If your child is not getting enough sleep, he may fall asleep in the car or seem grouchy and tired during the day.” Dr. Thompson said some children will need help establishing bedtime rituals that make them comfortable and drowsy. Parents need to set a regular bedtime and keep it to build

consistency in the child’s daily routine.

√. Have a family plan for sick days.

“Never send your child to school with a fever,” advises pediatrician Yvonne Gutierrez, M.D. “Even if your child says he feels OK, running a fever is an indicator that their immune system is trying to fight off something. When a child is running a fever, he is at his most contagious and this puts children and adults around him at risk. If at all possible, make arrangements for your child to stay home with caregiver.” Dr. Gutierrez recommends keeping your child home until the fever has been gone for 24 hours without medication. Colds can be contagious for at least 48 hours. If you're unsure about the best way to treat your child's cold or flu, ask your doctor, school nurse or other healthcare provider. with your child to understand their √. Talk emotions. A parent’s responsibility goes beyond supplying food, clothing and entertainment. Parents are also responsible for their child’s emotional and social growth. According to child and adolescent psychiatrist Julienne Jacobson, M.D., it is important for parents to consistently talk to their children, to know their personalities and be alert to any changes in behavior. "To maintain a strong connection engage with your kids consistently,” says Dr. Jacobson. “Make a point to spend time with them daily and talk about their activities and interests. Listen to what they say. Let them know you are interested in what they think and how they feel. Let them know they can always feel comfortable talking to you." It’s important to be aware of what is appropriate behavior for your child’s age group. Good sources for this information are teachers and other parents. Remember you can ask teachers or school counselors for help or input if you have questions or are concerned about changes in your child's behavior.

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he beginning of the school year is a great time to establish healthy routines and habits. Emphasizing healthy choices will help your child perform well this school year and may help establish a lifetime of healthy living. “As you shop for school supplies and clothes, schedule after-school activities and care, and plan to attend parent orientation, be sure to plan for healthy lifestyle choices, too,” says pediatrician Allen Peabody, M.D. “Eating well, staying active, getting enough rest, and encouraging habits to reduce the spread of germs are all important to discuss and plan for as families start a new school year.” Planning for meal and snack time is a great place to start. Parents and caregivers can encourage healthy lunch and snacking choices to help children maintain a balanced diet and healthy energy level. “Children should have three balanced meals a day and most will have snacks in between meals as well. Be sure to include fruits and vegetables on their plates and in their lunch boxes. Daily routines often change when school begins. The shift in daily living habits impacts how much exercise children and adults alike are able or willing to maintain as summer winds down. The beginning of the school year is a great time to emphasize the importance of keeping active throughout the year. “Most children are active all summer long, getting the regular exercise they need to stay fit and healthy,” said Dr. Peabody.“In addition to after school activities and neighborhood play time, consider adding family play time to your schedule a couple times a week. You could take a walk, go for a bike ride, or play a game of tag.” Schedules should also help children maintain a regular sleeping period, including maintaining a consistent bedtime. “I can’t overemphasize the importance of children getting enough sleep on a regular basis,” Dr. Peabody said.“Children should get 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Make sure you allot enough time for activities, dinner, and homework before bedtime.” Finally, Dr. Peabody recommends everyone review healthy habits that will help prevent the spread of germs at school and at home. Colds and illnesses can spread quickly in school and childcare environments. “Washing hands regularly, covering your sneeze, and not sharing drinks are a few simple ways to prevent the spread of germs,” Dr. Peabody said. “You can also talk with your physician about incorporating a multivitamin in your child’s diet and elect to have your child receive the flu vaccination.”


Women’s Health Services at St. John’s Episcopal Hospital

HAVE YOU SCHEDULED YOUR MAMMOGRAM YET? Mammography remains the first line of defense for women in the fight against breast cancer. When you are ready to schedule yours, make it digital. St. John's Episcopal Hospital offers the only digital full-field mammography imaging services on the Rockaway Peninsula and Broad Channel. Digital mammography gives more precise images and the largest field of view currently available, making them clearer and easier to read. The images are sent electronically and virtually instantaneously to St. John's board-certified radiologists. St. John’s encourages women over the age of 40 to receive annual mammograms as recommended by the American Cancer Society.

ONLY DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY SYSTEM IN ROCKAWAY • 24-HOUR RESULTS TO YOUR DOCTOR COMPUTER ASSISTED DETECTON SYSTEM (CAD) • FRIENDLY COMFORTABLE ENVIRONMENT IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Monday through Friday 7 am to 5 pm

Please Call 718-869-7780

327 Beach 19th Street Far Rockaway, New York 11691 • www.ehs.org

642057

American College of Radiology Accreditation in Mammography, Obstetrical and General Ultrasound, Abdominal Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine CT Scan


HEALTH MEMOS

Comfort Keepers: Expanding to your community

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Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Your health in an emergency

Getting your ducks in order: A message from St. John’s Episcopal Hospital

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Healthy lunches

How to pack yummy food your children will actually eat By Eric Christensen

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n theory, packing a nutritious lunch for your children should be simple. In practice, it can be stressful for many parents. After all, parents have to balance nutritional recommendations against picky eaters, food allergies, school policies and shortened lunchtimes. Sadly, reality often falls short of our imagined ideal. But don't use that as an excuse to give up. Instead, by making small changes, parents can pack more nutritious, and more affordable, lunches that their children will actually eat. Asha Dornfest, founder of the website Parent Hacks and co-author of "Minimalist Parenting," says, "My first rule of thumb is to not put too much pressure on yourself to make it perfect." Dornfest advises parents to aim high but realize that they can offer nutritious meals during the rest of the day to balance out any midday mistakes. A good place to start when aiming high is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate dietary guidelines, which you can find at ChooseMyPlate.gov. Dr. Robert Post, associate executive director of the USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, says MyPlate guidelines "are a simple, powerful visual cue to consumers to think about choosing healthier foods during meal times." Post stresses that the icon is "suggestive of portion sizes, not prescriptive," but he thinks the icon can easily be applied to school lunches. He also

notes that ChooseMyPlate.gov contains many tips on healthy meal planning and cooking nutritious meals, including SuperTracker, which helps parents analyze and improve their family's diet. Once you know what the ideal lunch should look like, Dornfest says parents should focus on "the really big nutritional categories: something with protein, a fruit or a vegetable, something crunchy, maybe an optional treat and milk or water to drink." Use these groupings to standardize lunches. Dornfest says, "If I can come up with two or three lunches that my kids like, and I keep those items on my grocery list, I'm most of the way there. ... A lot of time, kids like to have the same thing over and over again for lunch." Next, use small tricks to ensure that your children will eat the food you pack for lunch. The best trick, Post and Dornfest agree, is to involve your children in the lunch packing process. "I think the sooner the better," suggests Dornfest. "You'd be surprised what a preschooler can do. I'm not talking about making lunch from start to finish, but giving you ideas about lunch, getting the napkin and putting it in their lunchbox. It's about including them in the process as reasonable." Post adds, "Kids are more likely to enjoy the foods when it's their choice," so he advises taking your children grocery shopping and letting them pick some items for lunch. He

also notes that these trips can be a great opportunity for teaching children about nutrition. Additionally, parents often overlook a common reason children do not eat all of their packed lunch: an inability to open food containers. This is particularly the case with small children whose dexterity is still developing. If a child who is pressed for time at lunch can't open a container, he or she is likely to get frustrated and not eat what's in the container. Dornfest noted on her blog that she practices opening lunch containers with her child before using them. Finally, many parents want to also an affordable lunch. Many parents save money by purchasing reusable containers instead of single-use plastic bags. Dornfest notes that containers should be easy to clean in addition to easy to open. She adds, "A lot of wasted money is in wasted food." Don't pack food just because it's nutritious if it goes uneaten. Both Dornfest and Post suggest spending some time during the weekend preparing and portioning various snacks. Store them as

appropriate, and then you can grab them and Back-to-school time is the perfect opportunity to reinforce healthy eating habits.

go during the week. Dornfest believes these tips should help reduce decision-making, and automatic lunch packing will be less stressful. Lastly, to make lunch packing even easier, Post says that later this year, the USDA will introduce a kidfocused MyPlate website that he hopes will be a "one-stop shop" for feeding your children nutritious, convenient and inexpensive lunches.


Good health 08 15 2013