Issuu on Google+

SPECIAL

SECTION

SU PPLEMEN T

O F

TH E

H ER A LD

good health The mind-body Leading full connection: and productive lives

W

ellness – it’s essential to living a full and productive life. We may have different ideas about what wellness means, but it involves a set of skills and strategies that prevent the onset or shorten the duration of illness and promote recovery and well-being. It’s about keeping healthy as well as getting healthy. Now, during Mental Health Month, is a good time to take stock of our overall mental health and its connection to overall health. Wellness is more than an absence of disease. It involves complete general, mental and social well-being. And mental health is an essential component of overall health and well-being. The fact is our overall well-being is tied to the balance that exists between our emotional, physical, spiritual and mental health. Whatever our situation, we are all at risk of stress given the demands of daily life and the

challenges it brings – at home, at work and in life. Steps that build and maintain well-being and help us all achieve wellness involve a balanced diet, regular exercise, enough sleep, a sense of self-worth, development of coping skills that promote resiliency, emotional awareness, and connections to family, friends and the community. These steps should be complemented by taking stock of one’s well-being through regular mental health checkups. Just as we check our blood pressure and get cancer screenings, it’s a good idea to take periodic reading of our emotional well-being. One recent study said everyone should get their mental health checked as often as they get a physical, and many doctors routinely screen for mental health, which typically include a series of questions about lifestyle, eating and drinking habits and mental wellness. But a checkup doesn’t necessarily require a spe-

COM M UNITY

N E W S PA P E R S

0(17$/ +($/7+

cial trip to the doctor. There are also online screening tools you can use. While conditions like depression are common – roughly 1 in 5 Americans have a mental health condition – they are extremely treatable. Fully embracing the concept of wellness not only improves health in the mind, body and spirit, but also maximizes one’s

potential to lead a full and productive life. Using strategies that promote resiliency and strengthen mental health and prevent mental health and substance use conditions lead to improved general health and a healthier society: greater academic achievement by our children, a more productive economy, and families that stay together.

****

Attention Seniors: Time to Make the Kids Jealous.

Introducing the new face of Assisted Living. Socialize at the game center, read a book in the fireplace lounge, or take part in the many recreational activities offered daily. All in the comfort and quality you’d expect of a first class hotel. You deserve nothing less.

www.LivingCenterALP.com ALP Certified- Medicaid Accepted. Facility Licenced by NYS Dept of Health.

431 B E AC H 20 T H S T FA R R O C K AWAY, NY 11691 · T E L: 718.327.2700 · FAX: 718.327.2223

630329

A


HEALTH MEMOS

Mercy Medical Center enhancing patient care with Electronic Medical Records

The Long Island Living Center Assisted Living Program

T

HE,ONG)SLAND,IVING#ENTER!SSISTED ,IVING0ROGRAM!,0 OFFERSPERSONAL IZEDATTENTIVECARETOOURELDERLYRESI DENTS GIVINGTHEMAHOME LIKEATMOSPHERE /URHOMEISDESIGNEDTOHELPMEETTHEPHYS ICAL EMOTIONALANDSOCIALNEEDSOFOURRESI DENTSINASAFECOMMUNITYENVIRONMENT  4HE !SSISTED ,IVING 0ROGRAM ALSO INCLUDES.URSING#ARE  HOUR#ERTIFIED (OME(EALTHAIDES 0ERSONAL#AREAIDES AND 0HYSICAL /CCUPATIONAL AND3PEECH4HERAPY  4HESTAFFOFCAREFULLYCHOSENPROFESSIONALS ISFRIENDLY COURTEOUSANDATTENTIVETOYOUR NEEDS$OCTORSAREAVAILABLERIGHTONTHE PREMISES ANDTHEON SITENURSESAREAVAILABLE ONADAILYBASISTOPROVIDEFORANYSPECIAL NEEDSYOUMAYHAVE  3OMEOFTHEMEDICALCONDITIONSORNEEDS THATCANBECAREDFORINTHE!SSISTED,IVING 0ROGRAMARE2ESPIRATORY#AREDAILYINHALA TIONTREATMENT /#ONCENTRATOR 0HYSICAL 4HERAPY 3PEECH4HERAPY /CCUPATIONAL4HERAPY #IRCULATION0ROBLEMS /NE0ERSON!SSISTTO !MBULATEAND4RANSFER .EED!SSISTANCEWITH!$,S #ATHETER $IABETES-ELLITUS $EMENTIA  3TASIS5LCER $IETARY3UPERVISION 3TABLE-EDICAL#ONDITION!SAMEMBEROFTHE,IVING#ENTER #OMMUNITY THESTAFFWOULDLIKEYOUTOBEAWAREOFTHEMANYSERVICESAVAILABLETOYOUANDARE HAPPYTOASSISTYOUWITHANYQUESTIONSYOUMAYHAVE  4HE!SSISTED,IVING0ROGRAMISLICENSEDANDAPPROVEDBYTHE.EW9ORK3TATE$EPARTMENTOF (EALTHANDBILLEDTHROUGH-EDICAID0AYMENTSFROM33! 33) AND-EDICAIDAREACCEPTEDINFULL  WITHNOFINANCIALBURDENTOTHEFAMILY

O

N *UNE   -ERCY WILL CONTINUE IN ITS QUESTFORIMPROVINGPATIENTSAFETYAND QUALITY AND ENHANCING PATIENT CARE WITHTHEIMPLEMENTATIONOFTHESTATE OF THE ART AWARD WINNING%0)#ELECTRONICMEDICALRECORD %-2 SYSTEM CUSTOMIZEDTOMEETTHEUNIQUE NEEDS OF #ATHOLIC (EALTH 3ERVICES #(3  SIX HOSPITALSANDTHEIRPATIENTS  4HE%PIC%-2SERVESMORETHANPERCENT OFTHE53POPULATIONANDHASBEENRATEDBY+,!3 ALEADINGRESEARCHFIRM ASTHE ACUTECARE%-2FORSEVENCONSECUTIVEYEARSANDTHEFOREMOSTAMBULATORY%-2FOR CONSECUTIVEYEARS #ATHOLICHEALTH3ERVICESISCURRENTLYTHEONLYSYSTEMON,ONG)SLAND USINGTHISPOWERFUL%-2  n!SAPHYSICIAN )RECOGNIZETHATHAVINGTHEBEST%-2WILLSIGNIFICANTLYENHANCEPATIENT CAREANDADDYETANOTHERREASONTHAT-ERCYISASPECIALPLACEFORRECEIVINGWORLD CLASS HEALTHCARERIGHTINYOUROWNBACKYARD oSAID-ERCYmS%XECUTIVE6ICE0RESIDENTAND#HIEF !DMINISTRATIVE/FFICER!ARON%'LATT -$n4HISWILLBEASIGNIFICANTSTEPINENHANCING ANDMAINTAININGOURPOSITIONASA53.EWS7ORLD2EPORT4OP.9(OSPITALo  )NADDITION #(3E(EALTHINCLUDESASECURE WEB BASEDPORTALCALLED-Y#HART5SING THISPORTAL WHICHISPASSWORD PROTECTEDWITHINFORMATIONTRANSMITTEDUSINGANENCRYPT EDCONNECTION ACTIVEPATIENTSOFPARTICIPATINGPHYSICIANPRACTICESCANEASILYREVIEWTHEIR MEDICALHISTORY HAVEIMPORTANTMEDICALINFORMATIONSUCHASALLERGIESANDIMMUNIZATION RECORDSATTHEIRFINGERTIPSANDVIEWTHEIRTESTANDLABRESULTSFROMTHECONVENIENCEOF HOME)TALSOALLOWSTHEMTOREVIEWDETAILSOFPASTORUPCOMINGAPPOINTMENTSANDSCHED ULENEWONES4HEYCANEVENE MAILTHEIRDOCTORmSOFFICEWITHQUESTIONSORREQUESTMEDI CATIONRENEWALSONLINE  7ITH#(3E(EALTH -ERCYCONTINUESITSDEDICATIONTOFOSTERING COMMUNICATIONANDHELPINGPATIENTSTOTAKECHARGEOFTHEIRHEALTH For information and physician referrals, call 516-62MERCY or visit www.MercyMedicalCenter.info

4OP"ESTIN+,!3!WARDS3OFTWARE0ROFESSIONAL3ERVICES‚+,!3 %NTERPRISES ,,#

4HE,ONG)SLAND,IVING#ENTER!SSISTED,IVING0ROGRAM "EACHTH3T &AR2OCKAWAY   

-ERCY-EDICAL#ENTER 2OCKVILLE#ENTREp -%2#9 WWW-ERCY-EDICAL#ENTERINFO

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

THE BRISTAL

7+(:25' ,6287

THE BEST OF LONG ISLAND ASSISTED LIVING Quality Communities By The Engel Burman Group

7G@QCLDP4GD"OÂŽPQ@I JD@KQLJD

#LKĂ?CDKBD

7+('2&725,6,1 ,6,1

'U%R­V'LHWis a rapid, safe and proven

ICI

AN-C

V

R

“When I moved to The Bristal I barely weighed 141 lbs. I was weak and out of sorts. But now I’m surrounded by pros — and pals! — who follow my health every day, who care enough to watch over me, even when I don’t. Their attention and assistance has made me stronger, and the gourmet food hasn’t hurt. The gym, pool and daily activities also keep me ďŹ t. Today, this retired submarine engineer is back to 180 lbs.... and I even won a Medal for Bocce at the 2012 Senior Games.â€? How did Lew regain his stride? Tune in at thebristal.com/lifestories

IAN

AT

E

YS

D

ED

PAT IE N T APPRO VED IC

Lew, Resident of The Bristal

AT

PH

,W­VWLPHWRJHWLQWKHNQRZ DQGJHWLQWRXFKZLWK'U%R

YS

E

PH

weight management program customized to each individuals unique needs. Created by Dr. Bo Rosenblat - a nationally recognized, board-certiďŹ ed physician with nearly two decades of experience - Dr. Bo’s team of Physicians, PAs, Nutritionists and Counselors can help you lose up to 30 lbs in 30 days and keep it off for good!

V

-CRE

Lynbrook | 516.593.2424 8 Freer Street North Woodmere | 516.336.2600 477 Hungry Harbor Road



THEBRISTAL.COM

/RFDWLRQV ,Q +HZOHWW  0DQKDVVHW

OTHER LOCATIONS: East Northport | 631.858.0100

629455

FREE, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION

Massapequa | 516.691.0706

East Meadow | 516.542.0800

North Hills | 516.869.1300

Westbury | 516.333.9828

Licensed by the NYS Dept of Health. Eligible for Most Long Term Care Policies.

630495

ZZZ'U%RV'LHWFRP


Going beyond the stigma:

The truth about mental illness

Fiction: People living with a mental illness are often violent. Fact: Actually, the vast majority of people living with mental health conditions are no more violent than anyone else. People with mental illness are much more likely to be the victims of crime. Fiction: Mental illness is a sign of weakness.

Fact: A mental illness is not caused by personal weakness — nor can it be cured by positive thinking or willpower — proper treatment is needed. Fiction: Only military personnel who have been in combat can be diagnosed with PTSD. Fact: While PTSD is prevalent in men and women who have seen combat, experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event can trigger PTSD, including violent personal assaults such as rape or robbery, natural or human-caused disasters, or accidents. Fiction: People with a mental illness will never get better. Fact: For some people, a mental illness may be a lifelong condition, like diabetes. But as with diabetes, proper treatment enables many people with a mental illness to lead fulfilling and productive lives. Fiction: Children aren't diagnosed with mental illness. Fact: Millions of children are affected by depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. As a matter of fact, 1 in 10 children live with a diagnosable mental illness. Getting treatment is essential.

Fiction: "Mental illness can't affect me!" Fact: Mental illness can affect anyone. While some illnesses have a genetic risk, mental illness can affect people of all ages, races and income levels, whether or not there is a family history.

Dr. Stein Chose Mercy. For Physical Rehab, You Should Choose Mercy, Too. o. At Mercy Medical Center, recognized as one of the Best Hospitals in N.Y. by U.S. News and World Report, we have one of the most intensive inpatient physical rehabilitation programs in the region.  Led by our board certified physiatrist, Perry Stein, MD, acknowledged as a top rehabilitation specialist by U.S. News and World Report and New York magazine, our expert team is dedicated to getting you up and functioning at your maximum abilities as quickly as possible.   If you or someone close to you has suffered a catastrophic illness or injury, or is recovering from orthopedic or neurosurgery, take a giant step forward and choose Mercy.  You’ll be glad you did.

516-62MERCY 1000 North Village Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11571 www.MercyMedicalCenter.info To learn more about the great things that Mercy doctors are doing, go to: www.MercyMedicalCenter.info/MeetTheDoctors

<($56

630332

O

ne of the best ways you can help someone with mental illness is by understanding what it is – and what it isn't. After all, myths about mental illnesses contribute to stigma, which in turn prevents those who are living with one from seeking help. The fact is, a mental illness is a disorder of the brain – your body's most important organ – and 1 in 6 adults lives with a brain-related illness including depression, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. Like most diseases of the body, mental illness has many causes – from genetics to other biological, environmental and social/cultural factors. And just as with most diseases, mental illnesses are no one's fault. The unusual behaviors associated with some illnesses are symptoms of the disease –not the cause. But most importantly, mental illnesses are treatable through medication and psychosocial therapies – allowing those who live with them the opportunity to lead full and productive lives.


Mood boosters Ways to cheer yourself up now

A

ccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, depressive disorders affect approximately 18.8 million American adults, or about 9.5 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older, in a given year. Even those who don't have a clinical illness may feel sad at some points in their lives. For those who need a quick boost, there are ways to improve mood that are easy. 1. Get organized. Tackling small goals, even just tidying up the kitchen or making the bed, can have a positive effect on your mood.

2. Eat spicy food. Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo say that the capsaicin in hot peppers triggers your brain to release endorphins. 3. Get more sleep. Getting seven to eight hours of sleep is essential to mental health. Just being shy a few hours of rest can put you in a foul mood. 4. Be nice to others. Smiling at someone and getting a response can improve mood. 5. Exercise. Get the heart pumping and you'll feel re-energized.

HEALTH MEMOS Bristal Assisted Living warns that many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked

A

ccording to Winsome Bent, RN, Executive Director of the Bristal Assisted Living Community in North Hills, many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked. “Depression and Alzheimer’s disease top the list of mental illnesses that affect older adults. Often these illnesses go undetected. Seniors are either hesitant or uneducated about where to get the appropriate help they need to feel healthier and happier.” Bent points out that primary care doctors are not necessarily trained to detect psychological disorders and can wrongly attribute symptoms to the normal aging process. Depression affects over three million American senior citizens. Seniors over the age of 65 represent 12 percent of the U.S. population, but 16 percent of suicide deaths. Depression is treatable, and once under control will allow for a better quality of life. Indications of depression include: a marked increase or decrease in sleep, loss or increase in appetite, loss of focus, inability to enjoy activities previously enjoyed, an increase in irritability, being sad or tearful for most of the day and recurrent thoughts of death and suicide. According to Bent, “depression is less likely when people’s bodies and minds remain active. Suggest activities to do together that your loved one used to enjoy: walks, an art class, a trip to the museum or the movies, anything that provides mental or physical stimulation.” The Bristal Assisted Living Communities have facilities in East Meadow, East Northport, Lynbrook, North Hills, North Woodmere, Westbury, Massapequa and White Plains. For information on The Bristal Assisted Living Communities, visit www.thebristal.com. The Bristal Assisted Living Communities • 631-580-6420 Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Understanding why we eat: Emotional attachments to food

When should my child see a Pediatric Dentist?

T

Dr. Bo’s Diet • 516-284-8248 www.DrBosDiet.com

ediatric dental visits are an important part of maintaining your child’s overall health. Just as you take your child to the pediatrician for regular check ups, you should take your child to the pediatric dentist on a regular basis. The first visit should be when the first tooth appears or by age 1, whichever comes first. Afterwards, a check-up is recommended every six months to prevent cavities and other dental problems. At each visit, Dr. Denise Cohen, a Board Certified Pediatric Dentist, will dedicate time to you and your child to discuss ways to promote your child’s dental and oral health. She will offer guidance and advice on topics including proper oral hygiene and diet. As a Board Certified Pediatric Dentist, Dr. Denise understands how important it Dr. Denise Cohen is to treat each child with warmth and patience. As a parent, she also understands that your child deserves her undivided attention and you deserve to have all of your questions answered. Dr. Denise provides skilled and compassionate treatment to each child because she would expect no less for her own child. Dr. Denise maintains her Pediatric Dental Practice in Hewlett. Dr. Denise remains active in dental education as an Attending Dentist at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center. In this role, she imparts her knowledge and provides mentorship to the next generation of pediatric dentists. Visit her on the web at www.drdenisecohen.com. Check out her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/WoodmerePediatricDentistry. Dr. Denise Cohen, Pediatric Dentistry 1315A Broadway, Hewlett • 516-459-8828 • www.DrDeniseCohen.com

Health Memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

here are numerous elements that interplay with weightstruggle in the human body. Weight-loss is not as simple as knowing what to eat. Often, it is knowing why we eat. Emotional attachments to food are deeply rooted and may be exacerbated by feelings of anxiety and depression. We tend to feed ourselves in an effort to “feel better,” making it natural for our minds to look at food as a source of comfort. Socially we have been conditioned to eat when we feel “down” and to look to food as a “pick me up.” Our brains are triggered by comfort foods, causing a release of neurotransmitters, providing “satisfaction,” causing the cycle to likely be repeated. Sometimes a depression can become severe enough to create apathy to life, health and outward appearances. When you feel badly about yourself and/ or your food choices, it is easy to beat yourself up and turn to food. This pattern of behavior can be a hard one to overcome. At Dr. Bo’s Diet we work with patients individually to assess their psychological, physiological and nutritional needs. Private weekly sessions offer a comfortable environment for our patients to uncover and discuss any emotional struggle that may exist. Dr. Bo Rosenblat is a board-certified medical doctor with office locations in Hewlett & Manhasset. For more information about Dr. Bo’s Diet, call 516-284-8248 or visit our website at www.DrBosDiet.com.

P


Research update Vitamin D might help fight symptoms of depression

P

eople experiencing the blues, feelings of depression and other mood disorders might be able to use vitamin D to alleviate symptoms of depression. New studies point to low blood levels of vitamin D as a culprit in depression. Simply increasing these levels offers marked improvement. A study conducted by VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam found that low levels of vitamin D may be linked to depression and other psychiatric illnesses. The Amsterdam research, which tracked over 1,200 people aged 65 to 95, showed that blood vitamin D levels were 14 percent lower in individuals with major and minor depression compared with non-depressed participants. A study in the United States indicated that vitamin D deficiency occurred more often in certain people, including African-Americans, city dwellers, the obese, and those suffering from depression. People with vitamin D levels below 20 ng/mL had an 85 percent increased risk of depression compared to those with vitamin D levels greater than 30 ng/mL. Vitamin D has long been recognized as a nutrient essential to the development and maintenance of strong bones. It has also recently been discovered to be of crucial importance to several aspects of overall health. Being deficient in vitamin D has been linked to a number of disorders, including cancer, autoimmune disease, diabetes, and now depression. Vitamin D, also known as the "sunshine vitamin," is one of the few vitamins the body

can produce. The body can get all the vitamin D it needs simply by being out in the sun with ample skin showing to absorb the rays. However, increased awareness about skin cancer, the importance of sunblock and wearing clothes that protect skin from harmful UV rays has decreased many people's production of vitamin D considerably. In the U.S., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found that nearly three-quarters of Americans are deficient in vitamin D. Although there are some food sources of vitamin D (salmon, tuna, mackerel and vitamin D-fortified dairy products, such as milk), the best way to get the vitamin is through moderate sun exposure. According to an article in U.S News and World Report, it's impossible to produce vitamin D from the sun during the winter if you live north of Atlanta because the sun never gets high enough in the sky for its ultraviolet B rays to penetrate the atmosphere. But during the summer, when UV-B rays hit the skin, a reaction takes place that enables skin cells to manufacture vitamin D. During the winter and for an extra boost, you will need to take an oral supplement. A doctor can help determine how much you need based on a simple blood test. With anxiety, depression, risk for heart attacks and a number of other health problems associated with low levels of vitamin D, it may be worthwhile to dicuss this with your doctor.

("&$)"'#"& %# %$%#)

        # () (%% 

       

***!(!"&$)" '#"& '% (((   #%# %$%#)

630796

     

    

WOODMERE REHABILITATION & HEALTH CARE CENTER

The Place For Caring Specialized Services â&#x20AC;˘ Short Term Rehabilitation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapies â&#x20AC;˘ Certified Ventilator Unit â&#x20AC;˘ Hemodialysis â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In-Patient and Out-Patient â&#x20AC;˘ Amputation Recovery Program â&#x20AC;˘ IV Therapy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hydration, Nutrition and Medication Administration â&#x20AC;˘ Wound Management â&#x20AC;˘ Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease/Dementia Care â&#x20AC;˘ Social Work/Discharge Planning â&#x20AC;˘ Long Term Care â&#x20AC;˘ Hospice Care â&#x20AC;˘ Glatt Kosher â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Minyan

E-mail: woodmererehab@aol.com Website: www.woodmererehab.com Most Insurances Accepted.

121 Franklin Place Woodmere, NY 11598

For exceptional care, call (516) 374-9300

630512

# #%* %# %$% !# '"&%) # #) &## (#!#$  #) '# %


S P ECIA L

SECTION

SUPPL EMENT

OF

T HE

HERAL D

good health The mind-body Leading full connection: and productive lives

W

ellness – it’s essential to living a full and productive life. We may have different ideas about what wellness means, but it involves a set of skills and strategies that prevent the onset or shorten the duration of illness and promote recovery and well-being. It’s about keeping healthy as well as getting healthy. Now, during Mental Health Month, is a good time to take stock of our overall mental health and its connection to overall health. Wellness is more than an absence of disease. It involves complete general, mental and social well-being. And mental health is an essential component of overall health and well-being. The fact is our overall well-being is tied to the balance that exists between our emotional, physical, spiritual and mental health. Whatever our situation, we are all at risk of stress given the demands of daily life and the

challenges it brings – at home, at work and in life. Steps that build and maintain well-being and help us all achieve wellness involve a balanced diet, regular exercise, enough sleep, a sense of self-worth, development of coping skills that promote resiliency, emotional awareness, and connections to family, friends and the community. These steps should be complemented by taking stock of one’s well-being through regular mental health checkups. Just as we check our blood pressure and get cancer screenings, it’s a good idea to take periodic reading of our emotional well-being. One recent study said everyone should get their mental health checked as often as they get a physical, and many doctors routinely screen for mental health, which typically include a series of questions about lifestyle, eating and drinking habits and mental wellness. But a checkup doesn’t necessarily require a spe-

C OMMUNITY

N E W S PA P E R S

0(17$/ +($/7+

cial trip to the doctor. There are also online screening tools you can use. While conditions like depression are common – roughly 1 in 5 Americans have a mental health condition – they are extremely treatable. Fully embracing the concept of wellness not only improves health in the mind, body and spirit, but also maximizes one’s

potential to lead a full and productive life. Using strategies that promote resiliency and strengthen mental health and prevent mental health and substance use conditions lead to improved general health and a healthier society: greater academic achievement by our children, a more productive economy, and families that stay together.

****

Dr. Stein Chose Mercy. For Physical Rehab, You Should Choose Mercy, Too. o. At Mercy Medical Center, recognized as one of the Best Hospitals in N.Y. by U.S. News and World Report, we have one of the most intensive inpatient physical rehabilitation programs in the region.  Led by our board certified physiatrist, Perry Stein, MD, acknowledged as a top rehabilitation specialist by U.S. News and World Report and New York magazine, our expert team is dedicated to getting you up and functioning at your maximum abilities as quickly as possible.   If you or someone close to you has suffered a catastrophic illness or injury, or is recovering from orthopedic or neurosurgery, take a giant step forward and choose Mercy.  You’ll be glad you did.

516-62MERCY 1000 North Village Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11571 www.MercyMedicalCenter.info To learn more about the great things that Mercy doctors are doing, go to: www.MercyMedicalCenter.info/MeetTheDoctors

<($56

630332

A


Going beyond the stigma:

The truth about mental illness

Research update Vitamin D might help fight symptoms of depression

O

ne of the best ways you can help someone with mental illness is by understanding what it is – and what it isn't. After all, myths about mental illnesses contribute to stigma, which in turn prevents those who are living with one from seeking help. The fact is, a mental illness is a disorder of the brain – your body's most important organ – and 1 in 6 adults lives with a brain-related illness including depression, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. Like most diseases of the body, mental illness has many causes – from genetics to other biological, environmental and social/cultural factors. And just as with most diseases, mental illnesses are no one's fault. The unusual behaviors associated with some illnesses are symptoms of the disease –not the cause. But most importantly, mental illnesses are treatable through medication and psychosocial therapies – allowing those who live with them the opportunity to lead full and productive lives.

Fiction: People living with a mental illness are often violent. Fact: Actually, the vast majority of people living with mental health conditions are no more violent than anyone else. People with mental illness are much more likely to be the victims of crime. Fiction: Mental illness is a sign of weakness. Fact: A mental illness is not caused by personal weakness — nor can it be cured by positive thinking or willpower — proper treatment is needed. Fiction: Only military personnel who have been in combat can be diagnosed with PTSD. Fact: While PTSD is prevalent in men and women who have seen combat, experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event can trigger PTSD, including violent personal assaults such as rape or robbery, natural or humancaused disasters, or accidents. Fiction: People with a mental illness will never get better. Fact: For some people, a mental illness may be a lifelong condition, like diabetes. But as with diabetes, proper treatment enables many people with a mental illness to lead fulfilling and productive lives.

P Fiction: Children aren't diagnosed with mental illness. Fact: Millions of children are affected by depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. As a matter of fact, 1 in 10 children live with a diagnosable mental illness. Getting treatment is essential. Fiction: "Mental illness can't affect me!" Fact: Mental illness can affect anyone. While some illnesses have a genetic risk, mental illness can affect people of all ages, races and income levels, whether or not there is a family history.

eople experiencing the blues, feelings of depression and other mood disorders might be able to use vitamin D to alleviate symptoms of depression. New studies point to low blood levels of vitamin D as a culprit in depression. Simply increasing these levels offers marked improvement. A study conducted by VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam found that low levels of vitamin D may be linked to depression and other psychiatric illnesses. The Amsterdam research, which tracked over 1,200 people aged 65 to 95, showed that blood vitamin D levels were 14 percent lower in individuals with major and minor depression compared with non-depressed participants. A study in the United States indicated that vitamin D deficiency occurred more often in certain people, including African-Americans, city dwellers, the obese, and those suffering from depression. People with vitamin D levels below 20 ng/ mL had an 85 percent increased risk of depression compared to those with vitamin D levels greater than 30 ng/mL. Vitamin D has long been recognized as a nutrient essential to the development and maintenance of strong bones. It has also recently been discovered to be of crucial importance to several aspects of overall health. Being deficient in vitamin D has been linked to a number of disorders, including cancer, autoimmune disease, diabetes, and now depression. Vitamin D, also known as the "sunshine vitamin," is one of the few vitamins the body can produce. The body can get all the vitamin D it needs simply by being out in the sun with ample skin showing to absorb the rays. However, increased awareness about skin cancer, the importance of sunblock and wearing clothes that protect skin from harmful UV

rays has decreased many people's production of vitamin D considerably. In the U.S., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found that nearly three-quarters of Americans are deficient in vitamin D. Although there are some food sources of vitamin D (salmon, tuna, mackerel and vitamin D-fortified dairy products, such as milk), the best way to get the vitamin is through moderate sun exposure. According to an article in

U.S News and World Report, it's impossible to produce vitamin D from the sun during the winter if you live north of Atlanta because the sun never gets high enough in the sky for its ultraviolet B rays to penetrate the atmosphere. But during the summer, when UV-B rays hit the skin, a reaction takes place that enables skin cells to manufacture vitamin D. During the winter and for an extra boost, you will need to take an oral supplement. A doctor can help determine how much you need based on a simple blood test. With anxiety, depression, risk for heart attacks and a number of other health problems associated with low levels of vitamin D, it may be worthwhile to dicuss this with your doctor.


Bristal Assisted Living warns that many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked

A

ccording to Winsome Bent, RN, Executive Director of the Bristal Assisted Living Community in North Hills, many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Depression and Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease top the list of mental illnesses that affect older adults. Often these illnesses go undetected. Seniors are either hesitant or uneducated about where to get the appropriate help they need to feel healthier and happier.â&#x20AC;? Bent points out that primary care doctors are not necessarily trained to detect psychological disorders and can wrongly attribute symptoms to the normal aging process. Depression affects over three million American senior citizens. Seniors over the age of 65 represent 12 percent of the U.S. population, but 16 percent of suicide deaths. Depression is treatable, and once under control will allow for a better quality of life. Indications of depression include: a marked increase or decrease in sleep, loss or increase in appetite, loss of focus, inability to enjoy activities previously enjoyed, an increase in irritability, being sad or tearful for most of the day and recurrent thoughts of death and suicide. According to Bent, â&#x20AC;&#x153;depression is less likely when peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bodies and minds remain active. Suggest activities to do together that your loved one used to enjoy: walks, an art class, a trip to the museum or the movies, anything that provides mental or physical stimulation.â&#x20AC;? The Bristal Assisted Living Communities have facilities in East Meadow, East Northport, Lynbrook, North Hills, North Woodmere, Westbury, Massapequa and White Plains. For information on The Bristal Assisted Living Communities, visit www.thebristal.com. The Bristal Assisted Living Communities â&#x20AC;˘ 631-580-6420 Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Mood boosters Ways to cheer yourself up now

A

ccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, depressive disorders affect approximately 18.8 million American adults, or about 9.5 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older, in a given year. Even those who don't have a clinical illness may feel sad at some points in their lives. For those who need a quick boost, there are ways to improve mood that are easy. 1. Get organized. Tackling small goals, even just tidying up the kitchen or making the bed, can have a positive effect on your mood.

THE BRISTAL

Mercy Medical Center enhancing patient care with Electronic Medical Records

THE BEST OF LONG ISLAND ASSISTED LIVING

* 2010 Top 20 Best in KLAS Awards: Software & Professional Services Š2010 KLAS Enterprises, LLC

Mercy Medical Center, Rockville Centre â&#x20AC;˘ 516-62MERCY www.MercyMedicalCenter.info Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

V

Quality Communities By The Engel Burman Group

7G@QCLDP4GD"OÂŽPQ@I JD@KQLJD

W

On June 1, Mercy will continue in its quest for improving patient safety and quality and enhancing patient care with the implementation of the state-of-the-art award-winning EPIC electronic medical record (EMR) system, customized to meet the unique needs of Catholic Health Services (CHS) six hospitals and their patients. The Epic EMR serves more than 42 percent of the U.S. population and has been rated by KLAS, a leading research firm, as the #1 acute care EMR for seven consecutive years and the foremost ambulatory EMR for 13 consecutive years*. Catholic health Services is currently the only system on Long Island using this powerful EMR. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a physician, I recognize that having the best EMR will significantly enhance patient care and add yet another reason that Mercy is a special place for receiving world-class health care right in your own backyard,â&#x20AC;? said Mercyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer Aaron E. Glatt, M.D. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a significant step in enhancing and maintaining our position as a US News & World Report Top NY Hospital.â&#x20AC;? In addition, CHS eHealth includes a secure, web-based portal called MyChart. Using this portal, which is password-protected with information transmitted using an encrypted connection, active patients of participating physician practices can easily review their medical history, have important medical information such as allergies and immunization records at their fingertips and view their test and lab results from the convenience of home. It also allows them to review details of past or upcoming appointments and schedule new ones. They can even e-mail their doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office with questions or request medication renewals online. With CHS eHealth, Mercy continues its dedication to fostering communication and helping patients to take charge of their health. For information and physician referrals, call 516-62MERCY or visit www.MercyMedicalCenter.info

2. Eat spicy food. Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo say that the capsaicin in hot peppers triggers your brain to release endorphins. 3. Get more sleep. Getting seven to eight hours of sleep is essential to mental health. Just being shy a few hours of rest can put you in a foul mood. 4. Be nice to others. Smiling at someone and getting a response can improve mood. 5. Exercise. Get the heart pumping and you'll feel re-energized.

#LKĂ?CDKBD

V Lew, Resident of The Bristal

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I moved to The Bristal I barely weighed 141 lbs. I was weak and out of sorts. But now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surrounded by pros â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and pals! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who follow my health every day, who care enough to watch over me, even when I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Their attention and assistance has made me stronger, and the gourmet food hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt. The gym, pool and daily activities also keep me ďŹ t. Today, this retired submarine engineer is back to 180 lbs.... and I even won a Medal for Bocce at the 2012 Senior Games.â&#x20AC;? How did Lew regain his stride? Tune in at thebristal.com/lifestories Lynbrook | 516.593.2424 8 Freer Street North Woodmere | 516.336.2600 477 Hungry Harbor Road THEBRISTAL.COM

OTHER LOCATIONS: East Northport | 631.858.0100 Massapequa | 516.691.0706

East Meadow | 516.542.0800

North Hills | 516.869.1300

Westbury | 516.333.9828

Licensed by the NYS Dept of Health. Eligible for Most Long Term Care Policies.

630495

HEALTH MEMOS


A

SPECIAL

SECTION

SUPPLEMENT

OF THE

HERALD

good health The mind-body Leading full connection: and productive lives

W

ellness â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essential to living a full and productive life. We may have different ideas about what wellness means, but it involves a set of skills and strategies that prevent the onset or shorten the duration of illness and promote recovery and well-being. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about keeping healthy as well as getting healthy. Now, during Mental Health Month, is a good time to take stock of our overall mental health and its connection to overall health. Wellness is more than an absence of disease. It involves complete general, mental and social well-being. And mental health is an essential component of overall health and well-being. The fact is our overall well-being is tied to the balance that exists between our emotional, physical, spiritual and mental health. Whatever our situation, we are all at risk of stress given the demands of daily life and the

challenges it brings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at home, at work and in life. Steps that build and maintain well-being and help us all achieve wellness involve a balanced diet, regular exercise, enough sleep, a sense of self-worth, development of coping skills that promote resiliency, emotional awareness, and connections to family, friends and the community. These steps should be complemented by taking stock of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-being through regular mental health checkups. Just as we check our blood pressure and get cancer screenings, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good idea to take periodic reading of our emotional well-being. One recent study said everyone should get their mental health checked as often as they get a physical, and many doctors routinely screen for mental health, which typically include a series of questions about lifestyle, eating and drinking habits and mental wellness. But a checkup doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily require a spe-

7+(:25' ,6287

COMMUNITY

N E W S PA P E R S

0(17$/ +($/7+

cial trip to the doctor. There are also online screening tools you can use. While conditions like depression are common â&#x20AC;&#x201C; roughly 1 in 5 Americans have a mental health condition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are extremely treatable. Fully embracing the concept of wellness not only improves health in the mind, body and spirit, but also maximizes oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

potential to lead a full and productive life. Using strategies that promote resiliency and strengthen mental health and prevent mental health and substance use conditions lead to improved general health and a healthier society: greater academic achievement by our children, a more productive economy, and families that stay together.

****

Dr. Myles Grossman, DABDA PODIATRIST â&#x20AC;˘ FOOT SPECIALIST GENTLE CARE AND TREATMENT OF FOOT DISORDERS

7+('2&725,6,1 ,6,1

Bunions â&#x20AC;˘ Hammer Toes â&#x20AC;˘ Ingrown Nails â&#x20AC;˘ Warts ALL INSURANCE PLANS ACCEPTED

'U%R­V'LHWis a rapid, safe and proven

ICI

AN-C

156 Post Ave., Westbury 516-334-8208

R

IAN

AT

E

YS

D

ED

PAT IE N T APPRO VED IC

CALL FOR DETAILS Wheelchair Accessible

516-379-2560

AT

PH

,W­VWLPHWRJHWLQWKHNQRZ DQGJHWLQWRXFKZLWK'U%R

YS

2174 Hewlett Ave., Merrick

E

Created by Dr. Bo Rosenblat - a nationally recognized, board-certiďŹ ed physician with nearly two decades of experience - Dr. Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team of Physicians, PAs, Nutritionists and Counselors can help you lose up to 30 lbs in 30 days and keep it off for good!

PH

weight management program customized to each individuals unique needs.

HOUSE CALLS AVAILABLE

-CRE

 /RFDWLRQV ,Q +HZOHWW  0DQKDVVHW

LASER TREATMENT FOR TOENAIL FUNGUS

630066

FREE, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION

629455

ZZZ'U%RV'LHWFRP


HEALTH MEMOS Bristal Assisted Living warns that many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked

Ease those aching feet

F

The Bristal Assisted Living Communities • 631-580-6420

or over 25 years, Dr. Myles Grossman has been providing podiatric care to his patients at his offices in Merrick and Westbury. His philosophy is simple. He treats every patient as if they were his own mother. You will never feel like you’re a number in Dr, Grossman’s office. You will feel like you’re part of his family. The office staff will greet you with a friendly smile to put even the most apprehensive patient at ease. Don’t expect to wait too long in the waiting room either. Dr. Grossman hates waiting when he goes to the doctor. Why would he expect his patients to feel any different than him? Dr. Grossman has been using lasers in the office for over two decades. They can be used in the treatment of many disorders. Laser treatment may or may not be right for you. Every patient is unique and you cannot treat everyone the same. Dr. Grossman will take the time to explain what your particular problem is and go through all the possible treatment alternatives. Together Dr. Grossman and the patient will find the treatment that might work best. Dr. Grossman participates in Medicare’s diabetic shoe program. For those that qualify, you can choose your favorite shoe with little or no out of pocket cost. He also has been working with patients with disabilities, both physical and mental, throughout his entire career. He is involved with FEGS and renders care to their group home residents. Dr. Myles Grossman 2174 Hewlett Ave., Merrick • 516-379-2560 156 Post Ave., Westbury • 516-334-8208

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

A

ccording to Winsome Bent, RN, Executive Director of the Bristal Assisted Living Community in North Hills, many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked. “Depression and Alzheimer’s disease top the list of mental illnesses that affect older adults. Often these illnesses go undetected. Seniors are either hesitant or uneducated about where to get the appropriate help they need to feel healthier and happier.” Bent points out that primary care doctors are not necessarily trained to detect psychological disorders and can wrongly attribute symptoms to the normal aging process. Depression affects over three million American senior citizens. Seniors over the age of 65 represent 12 percent of the U.S. population, but 16 percent of suicide deaths. Depression is treatable, and once under control will allow for a better quality of life. Indications of depression include: a marked increase or decrease in sleep, loss or increase in appetite, loss of focus, inability to enjoy activities previously enjoyed, an increase in irritability, being sad or tearful for most of the day and recurrent thoughts of death and suicide. According to Bent, “depression is less likely when people’s bodies and minds remain active. Suggest activities to do together that your loved one used to enjoy: walks, an art class, a trip to the museum or the movies, anything that provides mental or physical stimulation.” The Bristal Assisted Living Communities have facilities in East Meadow, East Northport, Lynbrook, North Hills, North Woodmere, Westbury, Massapequa and White Plains. For information on The Bristal Assisted Living Communities, visit www.thebristal.com.

Understanding why we eat: Emotional attachments to food

Quality care at MP Family Health

M

Dr. Bo’s Diet • 516-284-8248 www.DrBosDiet.com

P Family Health is a new medical office run by family Nurse Practitioners Dr. Michael Poliseno and Dr. Doris Gomez, who also has a Doctorate in Nursing Practice. They have more than 12 years of experience in family medicine and specialize in the prompt care of the most common diseases and conditions. Their services include diagnosis and treatment of all chronic and acute conditions. They care for all ages, from newborn to the elderly. All types of immunizations are available and physical exams for work, school and DMV are offered with no wait time. Home visits for those unable to visit their office are offered so you can be at ease that medical care is on the way. They will go to your facility, home or office and have extended hours during weekdays and weekend hours. Major insurances, Medicare, Medicaid are accepted. Office visit fees are within reason for those with no insurance, lower prices for medication and testing under their discounted health program are offered. They speak fluent Spanish for the Latino community. In addition, they also offer weight loss programs, injectable HCG diet program and nutrametrix shakes and vitamins, as well as IV vitamin therapy for many aliments. Their on-site cardiac testing, sonograms, nerve conduction and Doppler studies will ensure you have a state-of-the-art treatment. Referrals to specialists and medical testing are prompt. They look forward to seeing you. MP Family Health is located near the Merrick LIRR Station. For more information, visit www.mpfamilyhealth.com. MP Family Health 2094 Merrick Ave., Merrick 516-375-5904

Health Memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

T

here are numerous elements that interplay with weightstruggle in the human body. Weight-loss is not as simple as knowing what to eat. Often, it is knowing why we eat. Emotional attachments to food are deeply rooted and may be exacerbated by feelings of anxiety and depression. We tend to feed ourselves in an effort to “feel better,” making it natural for our minds to look at food as a source of comfort. Socially we have been conditioned to eat when we feel “down” and to look to food as a “pick me up.” Our brains are triggered by comfort foods, causing a release of neurotransmitters, providing “satisfaction,” causing the cycle to likely be repeated. Sometimes a depression can become severe enough to create apathy to life, health and outward appearances. When you feel badly about yourself and/ or your food choices, it is easy to beat yourself up and turn to food. This pattern of behavior can be a hard one to overcome. At Dr. Bo’s Diet we work with patients individually to assess their psychological, physiological and nutritional needs. Private weekly sessions offer a comfortable environment for our patients to uncover and discuss any emotional struggle that may exist. Dr. Bo Rosenblat is a board-certified medical doctor with office locations in Hewlett & Manhasset. For more information about Dr. Bo’s Diet, call 516-284-8248 or visit our website at www.DrBosDiet.com.


Going beyond the stigma:

The truth about mental illness

O

ne of the best ways you can help someone with mental illness is by understanding what it is â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and what it isn't. After all, myths about mental illnesses contribute to stigma, which in turn prevents those who are living with one from seeking help. The fact is, a mental illness is a disorder of the brain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; your body's most important organ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and 1 in 6 adults lives with a brain-related illness including depression, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. Like most diseases of the body, mental illness has many causes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from genetics to other biological, environmental and social/cultural factors. And just as with most diseases, mental illnesses are no one's fault. The unusual behaviors associated with some illnesses are symptoms of the disease â&#x20AC;&#x201C;not the cause. But most importantly, mental illnesses are treatable through medication and psychosocial therapies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; allowing those who live with them the opportunity to lead full and productive lives.

Fiction: People living with a mental illness are often violent. Fact: Actually, the vast majority of people living with mental health conditions are no more violent than anyone else. People with mental illness are much more likely to be the victims of crime. Fiction: Mental illness is a sign of weakness.

Fact: A mental illness is not caused by personal weakness â&#x20AC;&#x201D; nor can it be cured by positive thinking or willpower â&#x20AC;&#x201D; proper treatment is needed. Fiction: Only military personnel who have been in combat can be diagnosed with PTSD. Fact: While PTSD is prevalent in men and women who have seen combat, experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event can trigger PTSD, including violent personal assaults such as rape or robbery, natural or human-caused disasters, or accidents. Fiction: People with a mental illness will never get better. Fact: For some people, a mental illness may be a lifelong condition, like diabetes. But as with diabetes, proper treatment enables many people with a mental illness to lead fulfilling and productive lives. Fiction: Children aren't diagnosed with mental illness. Fact: Millions of children are affected by depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. As a matter of fact, 1 in 10 children live with a diagnosable mental illness. Getting treatment is essential.

Grand Opening

THE BRISTAL

Fiction: "Mental illness can't affect me!" Fact: Mental illness can affect anyone. While some illnesses have a genetic risk, mental illness can affect people of all ages, races and income levels, whether or not there is a family history.

THE BEST OF LONG ISLAND ASSISTED LIVING

V

Quality Communities By The Engel Burman Group

MP FAMILY HEALTH

7G@QCLDP4GD"OÂŽPQ@I JD@KQLJD

Adult and Pediatric Healthcare

#LKĂ?CDKBD

Dr. Michael Poliseno, FNP DNP Dr. Doris Gomez, FNP DNP WE OFFER: â&#x20AC;˘ Full PE for School, Work & DMV â&#x20AC;˘ On site - Blood Drawing â&#x20AC;˘ Medical Home Visit â&#x20AC;˘ FREE Vaccines for Children â&#x20AC;˘ IV Vitamin Therapy â&#x20AC;˘ HCG Weight Loss Therapy â&#x20AC;˘ Sonograms â&#x20AC;˘ Nerve Conduction Testing â&#x20AC;˘ Doppler â&#x20AC;˘ Botox â&#x20AC;˘ Sclerotherapy

TEL: 516-375-5904 FAX: 516-804-2784 Email: fnphome@aol.com www.mpfamilyhealth.com

WALK-INS WELCOME Se Habla EspaĂąol

How did Lew regain his stride? Tune in at thebristal.com/lifestories Lynbrook | 516.593.2424 8 Freer Street

Hope To See You Soon!

North Woodmere | 516.336.2600 477 Hungry Harbor Road

Appointments Available

FREE Diabetes & Hypertension Screening With This Ad FREE Discounted Physical Exams With This Ad

THEBRISTAL.COM OTHER LOCATIONS: East Northport | 631.858.0100 Massapequa | 516.691.0706

East Meadow | 516.542.0800

North Hills | 516.869.1300

Westbury | 516.333.9828

Licensed by the NYS Dept of Health. Eligible for Most Long Term Care Policies.

630495

2094 Merrick Ave. Merrick NY 11566

Lew, Resident of The Bristal

630062

Referals to All Specialists Most Major Insurances Accepted Medicare - Medicaid

V

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I moved to The Bristal I barely weighed 141 lbs. I was weak and out of sorts. But now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surrounded by pros â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and pals! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who follow my health every day, who care enough to watch over me, even when I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Their attention and assistance has made me stronger, and the gourmet food hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt. The gym, pool and daily activities also keep me ďŹ t. Today, this retired submarine engineer is back to 180 lbs.... and I even won a Medal for Bocce at the 2012 Senior Games.â&#x20AC;?


A

S P ECIA L

SECTION

SUPPL EMENT

OF

T HE

HERAL D

good health The mind-body Leading full connection: and productive lives

W

ellness â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essential to living a full and productive life. We may have different ideas about what wellness means, but it involves a set of skills and strategies that prevent the onset or shorten the duration of illness and promote recovery and well-being. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about keeping healthy as well as getting healthy. Now, during Mental Health Month, is a good time to take stock of our overall mental health and its connection to overall health. Wellness is more than an absence of disease. It involves complete general, mental and social well-being. And mental health is an essential component of overall health and well-being. The fact is our overall well-being is tied to the balance that exists between our emotional, physical, spiritual and mental health. Whatever our situation, we are all at risk of stress given the demands of daily life and the

challenges it brings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at home, at work and in life. Steps that build and maintain well-being and help us all achieve wellness involve a balanced diet, regular exercise, enough sleep, a sense of self-worth, development of coping skills that promote resiliency, emotional awareness, and connections to family, friends and the community. These steps should be complemented by taking stock of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-being through regular mental health checkups. Just as we check our blood pressure and get cancer screenings, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good idea to take periodic reading of our emotional well-being. One recent study said everyone should get their mental health checked as often as they get a physical, and many doctors routinely screen for mental health, which typically include a series of questions about lifestyle, eating and drinking habits and mental wellness. But a checkup doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily require a spe-

potential to lead a full and productive life. Using strategies that promote resiliency and strengthen mental health and prevent mental health and substance use conditions lead to improved general health and a healthier society: greater academic achievement by our children, a more productive economy, and families that stay together.

****

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR WOUND CARE TREATMENT

weight management program customized to each individuals unique needs.

ICI

AN-C

R

AT

YS

E D

IAN

AT

E

YS

IC

ED

PH

PAT IE N T APPRO VED -CRE

630484

PH

& OTHER CONDITIONS

 629455

ZZZ'U%RV'LHWFRP /RFDWLRQV ,Q +HZOHWW  0DQKDVVHW

cial trip to the doctor. There are also online screening tools you can use. While conditions like depression are common â&#x20AC;&#x201C; roughly 1 in 5 Americans have a mental health condition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are extremely treatable. Fully embracing the concept of wellness not only improves health in the mind, body and spirit, but also maximizes oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE

'U%R­V'LHWis a rapid, safe and proven

FREE, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION

0(17$/ +($/7+

EXTENDED CARE FACILITY

7+('2&725,6,1 ,6,1

,W­VWLPHWRJHWLQWKHNQRZ DQGJHWLQWRXFKZLWK'U%R

N E W S PA P E R S

PARK AVENUE

7+(:25' ,6287

Created by Dr. Bo Rosenblat - a nationally recognized, board-certiďŹ ed physician with nearly two decades of experience - Dr. Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team of Physicians, PAs, Nutritionists and Counselors can help you lose up to 30 lbs in 30 days and keep it off for good!

C OMMUNITY

425 NATIONAL BLVD â&#x20AC;˘ LONG BEACH, NY 11561 TEL: 516.431.2600 â&#x20AC;˘ FAX: 516.431.0891 If someone you know could beneďŹ t from our Hyberbaric Oxygen Therapy, we would be happy to arrange a tour of the facility at your convenience


HEALTH MEMOS

Hypnosis Can Help!

Understanding why we eat: Emotional attachments to food

3RISR3RI,]TRSWMWJSV%HYPXWERH'LMPHVIR MRE7EJI 'SQJSVXEFPI)RZMVSRQIRX

T

here are numerous elements that interplay with weightstruggle in the human body. Weight-loss is not as simple as knowing what to eat. Often, it is knowing why we eat. Emotional attachments to food are deeply rooted and may be exacerbated by feelings of anxiety and depression. We tend to feed ourselves in an effort to â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel better,â&#x20AC;? making it natural for our minds to look at food as a source of comfort. Socially we have been conditioned to eat when we feel â&#x20AC;&#x153;downâ&#x20AC;? and to look to food as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;pick me up.â&#x20AC;? Our brains are triggered by comfort foods, causing a release of neurotransmitters, providing â&#x20AC;&#x153;satisfaction,â&#x20AC;? causing the cycle to likely be repeated. Sometimes a depression can become severe enough to create apathy to life, health and outward appearances. When you feel badly about yourself and/ or your food choices, it is easy to beat yourself up and turn to food. This pattern of behavior can be a hard one to overcome. At Dr. Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diet we work with patients individually to assess their psychological, physiological and nutritional needs. Private weekly sessions offer a comfortable environment for our patients to uncover and discuss any emotional struggle that may exist. Dr. Bo Rosenblat is a board-certified medical doctor with office locations in Hewlett & Manhasset. For more information about Dr. Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diet, call 516-284-8248 or visit our website at www.DrBosDiet.com.

;IMKLXÂ&#x2C6;7QSOMRKÂ&#x2C6;7XVIWWÂ&#x2C6; %R\MIXMIWÂ&#x2C6; *IEVW  4LSFMEWÂ&#x2C6;+VMIZMRKÂ&#x2C6;9R[ERXIH,EFMXW 7IPJ)WXIIQÂ&#x2C6;'SRJMHIRGIÂ&#x2C6;7XEVXMRK3ZIV  (EXMRKÂ&#x2C6;'PYXXIVÂ&#x2C6;7XYH],EFMXW 1IQSV]Â&#x2C6;4VSGVEWXMREXMSRÂ&#x2C6;1IRSTEYWI 7PIIT-WWYIWÂ&#x2C6;7TSVXW-QTVSZIQIRXERH1SVI

Terry Biener, CCH Certified Clinical Hypnotist in practice since 1992

Easy Changes Hypnosis 516-791-6174

Gift icates Certif ble Availa

HypnoShe@aol.com www.easychanges.com Located in Valley Stream

Dr. Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diet â&#x20AC;˘ 516-284-8248 www.DrBosDiet.com



*PI\MFPI,SYVWÂ&#x2C6;&]%TTSMRXQIRX3RP] 'EPPJSVE*6))4LSRI'SRWYPXEXMSR

Health Memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

THE BRISTAL

THE BEST OF LONG ISLAND ASSISTED LIVING

V

Mercy Medical Center enhancing patient care with Electronic Medical Records

Quality Communities By The Engel Burman Group

7G@QCLDP4GD"OÂŽPQ@I JD@KQLJD

W

On June 1, Mercy will continue in its quest for improving patient safety and quality and enhancing patient care with the implementation of the state-of-the-art award-winning EPIC electronic medical record (EMR) system, customized to meet the unique needs of Catholic Health Services (CHS) six hospitals and their patients. The Epic EMR serves more than 42 percent of the U.S. population and has been rated by KLAS, a leading research firm, as the #1 acute care EMR for seven consecutive years and the foremost ambulatory EMR for 13 consecutive years*. Catholic health Services is currently the only system on Long Island using this powerful EMR. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a physician, I recognize that having the best EMR will significantly enhance patient care and add yet another reason that Mercy is a special place for receiving world-class health care right in your own backyard,â&#x20AC;? said Mercyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer Aaron E. Glatt, M.D. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a significant step in enhancing and maintaining our position as a US News & World Report Top NY Hospital.â&#x20AC;? In addition, CHS eHealth includes a secure, web-based portal called MyChart. Using this portal, which is password-protected with information transmitted using an encrypted connection, active patients of participating physician practices can easily review their medical history, have important medical information such as allergies and immunization records at their fingertips and view their test and lab results from the convenience of home. It also allows them to review details of past or upcoming appointments and schedule new ones. They can even e-mail their doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office with questions or request medication renewals online. With CHS eHealth, Mercy continues its dedication to fostering communication and helping patients to take charge of their health. For information and physician referrals, call 516-62MERCY or visit www.MercyMedicalCenter.info

#LKĂ?CDKBD

V Lew, Resident of The Bristal

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I moved to The Bristal I barely weighed 141 lbs. I was weak and out of sorts. But now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surrounded by pros â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and pals! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who follow my health every day, who care enough to watch over me, even when I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Their attention and assistance has made me stronger, and the gourmet food hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt. The gym, pool and daily activities also keep me ďŹ t. Today, this retired submarine engineer is back to 180 lbs.... and I even won a Medal for Bocce at the 2012 Senior Games.â&#x20AC;? How did Lew regain his stride? Tune in at thebristal.com/lifestories Lynbrook | 516.593.2424 8 Freer Street North Woodmere | 516.336.2600 477 Hungry Harbor Road THEBRISTAL.COM

Massapequa | 516.691.0706

* 2010 Top 20 Best in KLAS Awards: Software & Professional Services Š2010 KLAS Enterprises, LLC

East Meadow | 516.542.0800

North Hills | 516.869.1300

Westbury | 516.333.9828

Licensed by the NYS Dept of Health. Eligible for Most Long Term Care Policies.

630495

OTHER LOCATIONS: East Northport | 631.858.0100

Mercy Medical Center, Rockville Centre â&#x20AC;˘ 516-62MERCY www.MercyMedicalCenter.info Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.


Going beyond the stigma:

The truth about mental illness

Fiction: People living with a mental illness are often violent. Fact: Actually, the vast majority of people living with mental health conditions are no more violent than anyone else. People with mental illness are much more likely to be the victims of crime. Fiction: Mental illness is a sign of weakness.

Fact: A mental illness is not caused by personal weakness — nor can it be cured by positive thinking or willpower — proper treatment is needed. Fiction: Only military personnel who have been in combat can be diagnosed with PTSD. Fact: While PTSD is prevalent in men and women who have seen combat, experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event can trigger PTSD, including violent personal assaults such as rape or robbery, natural or human-caused disasters, or accidents. Fiction: People with a mental illness will never get better. Fact: For some people, a mental illness may be a lifelong condition, like diabetes. But as with diabetes, proper treatment enables many people with a mental illness to lead fulfilling and productive lives. Fiction: Children aren't diagnosed with mental illness. Fact: Millions of children are affected by depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. As a matter of fact, 1 in 10 children live with a diagnosable mental illness. Getting treatment is essential.

Fiction: "Mental illness can't affect me!" Fact: Mental illness can affect anyone. While some illnesses have a genetic risk, mental illness can affect people of all ages, races and income levels, whether or not there is a family history.

Dr. Stein Chose Mercy. For Physical Rehab, You Should Choose Mercy, Too. o. At Mercy Medical Center, recognized as one of the Best Hospitals in N.Y. by U.S. News and World Report, we have one of the most intensive inpatient physical rehabilitation programs in the region.  Led by our board certified physiatrist, Perry Stein, MD, acknowledged as a top rehabilitation specialist by U.S. News and World Report and New York magazine, our expert team is dedicated to getting you up and functioning at your maximum abilities as quickly as possible.   If you or someone close to you has suffered a catastrophic illness or injury, or is recovering from orthopedic or neurosurgery, take a giant step forward and choose Mercy.  You’ll be glad you did.

516-62MERCY 1000 North Village Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11571 www.MercyMedicalCenter.info To learn more about the great things that Mercy doctors are doing, go to: www.MercyMedicalCenter.info/MeetTheDoctors

<($56

630332

O

ne of the best ways you can help someone with mental illness is by understanding what it is – and what it isn't. After all, myths about mental illnesses contribute to stigma, which in turn prevents those who are living with one from seeking help. The fact is, a mental illness is a disorder of the brain – your body's most important organ – and 1 in 6 adults lives with a brain-related illness including depression, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. Like most diseases of the body, mental illness has many causes – from genetics to other biological, environmental and social/cultural factors. And just as with most diseases, mental illnesses are no one's fault. The unusual behaviors associated with some illnesses are symptoms of the disease –not the cause. But most importantly, mental illnesses are treatable through medication and psychosocial therapies – allowing those who live with them the opportunity to lead full and productive lives.


HEALTH MEMOS Bristal Assisted Living warns that many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked

A

ccording to Winsome Bent, RN, Executive Director of the Bristal Assisted Living Community in North Hills, many mental health issues impacting senior citizens are often overlooked. “Depression and Alzheimer’s disease top the list of mental illnesses that affect older adults. Often these illnesses go undetected. Seniors are either hesitant or uneducated about where to get the appropriate help they need to feel healthier and happier.” Bent points out that primary care doctors are not necessarily trained to detect psychological disorders and can wrongly attribute symptoms to the normal aging process. Depression affects over three million American senior citizens. Seniors over the age of 65 represent 12 percent of the U.S. population, but 16 percent of suicide deaths. Depression is treatable, and once under control will allow for a better quality of life. Indications of depression include: a marked increase or decrease in sleep, loss or increase in appetite, loss of focus, inability to enjoy activities previously enjoyed, an increase in irritability, being sad or tearful for most of the day and recurrent thoughts of death and suicide. According to Bent, “depression is less likely when people’s bodies and minds remain active. Suggest activities to do together that your loved one used to enjoy: walks, an art class, a trip to the museum or the movies, anything that provides mental or physical stimulation.” The Bristal Assisted Living Communities have facilities in East Meadow, East Northport, Lynbrook, North Hills, North Woodmere, Westbury, Massapequa and White Plains. For information on The Bristal Assisted Living Communities, visit www.thebristal.com.

Park Avenue Extended Care Facility offers Hyperbaric Medicine for Wound Care treatment

P

ark Avenue Extended Care Facility introduces Hyperbaric Medicine for Wound Care Treatment and other conditions. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, (HBOT), is a medical treatment that enhances the body’s natural healing process. The treatment takes place in a state-of-the art chamber and patients breathe 100 percent oxygen at pressures greater than standard atmospheric pressure. Park Avenue’s hyperbaric chamber is made of a full-length clear acrylic cylinder allowing for unobstructed views for the patient and staff. Some of the benefits of HBOT include improved wound healing, increased oxygen delivery to injured tissues, greater blood vessel formation, reduced swelling and decreased risk of infection. HBOT has proven to be very effective for the treatment of Wound Care. Wounds can cause serious health risks including life-threatening infections, possible amputations, and other debilitating health problems. Park Avenue Extended Care Facility utilizes HBOT as part of their Wound Care Therapy. The management of wounds can pose major challenges for both patients and their caregivers. HBOT can be utilized to treat a variety of acute and chronic problems, from ulcers on the legs and feet, caused by vascular insufficiencies and diabetes, to complex wounds such as necrotizing fasciitis and soft tissue radionecrosis. If someone you know could benefit from our Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, we would be happy to arrange a tour of the facility at your convenience. Park Avenue Extended Care Facility 425 National Blvd., Long Beach 516-431-2600

The Bristal Assisted Living Communities • 631-580-6420 Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Quality care at Rockville Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

P

hysical rehabilitation is a therapeutic program designed to assist patients who have experienced significant life changes dues to undergoing an illness, injury or surgical procedure. In short, it is step-by-step process toward recovery. While the primary goal of physical rehabilitation is to restore independence, it also addresses physical limitations and adjustments expected to impact the individual’s life in the future. Rockville Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center is a five-star rated health care facility located in scenic Rockville Centre. It has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as being one of the best facilities in the nation for 2013. At Rockville, we pride ourselves on being a “Small Facility” and “Big Family.” Our cozy, home-like setting enables each resident and family member to develop comfortable and often long-lasting relationships with staff members, while receiving outstanding short-term rehabilitation or long-term care. In addition to top-notch rehabilitation and nursing services, each resident has the opportunity to participate in exciting activity programs and trips, as well as enjoying a restaurant-quality menu. Visitors are welcome 24 hours a day and we invite family pets to visit too. Our brand new rehabilitation suite and dining area is now open. We invite you to stop in for a tour to see our newly renovated short-term rehabilitation unit and find out how Rockville Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center can help you or your loved one experience a different kind of health care. Rockville Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 50 Maine Ave., Rockville Centre • 516-536-8000 Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.

Hypnosis evolves with technology

P

With 20 years behind her as a Clinical Hypnotherapist, Terry Biener, CCH, believes that the key to a successful result is knowing what to say, how to say it, and which techniques to apply once a person is hypnotized. This wisdom can only come from extensive training and experience. “Everyone processes information differently,” said Biener. “There are reasons why a habit or fear has formed, which should be examined before effective treatment can take place.” A thorough intake session is done first. The number of hypnosis sessions recommended varies. Hypnosis sessions are tailored to the person’s triggers and habits. Motivation and willingness to work with suggestions on a conscious level are important. Trust and rapport with the hypnotist is vital too. Biener has recently added Computerized Client-Based Weight Loss to her repertoire. A sophisticated computer program is used to pinpoint personality, mental processing, strengths and weaknesses. Combined with data gathered from the client, she custom designs hypnosis sessions to zero in on imprints that need to be changed. Weight loss workshops, which include group hypnosis, will be offered in the future. Biener’s true passion is helping people with fears and panic. Having experienced phobias and panic attacks herself, which were ultimately healed through hypnosis, her understanding and empathy is profound. By combining Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP) techniques with hypnosis, she can eliminate or reduce unwanted and sometimes devastating anxiety. “People should realize they aren’t alone. Phobias can seem irrational since they come from the subconscious –the part of the mind that responds without logic. Most people who have never experienced a phobia simply don’t understand.” Understanding how hypnosis works before trying it is advised. “Ignore what you’ve seen in movies or on stage. A hypnotic trance is actually a natural state we visit frequently; when we’re engrossed a movie, or if we daydream while driving and don’t remember passing certain streets or exits. A hypnotist induces a trance to “reframe” the subconscious part of the mind. A good subject is strong-willed and intelligent. The person being hypnotized never loses control.” Hypnosis can help with trauma, sports, procrastination, self-esteem, stress, anxiety and most habits. As a former New York City teacher, Biener is comfortable working with children. She holds numerous certifications though the American Board of Hypnotherapy and the National Guild of Hypnotists. She has done speaking engagements and group hypnosis sessions for organizations and wellness centers. Clients are seen by appointment only. Phone consultations are free and confidential. Easy Changes Hypnosis is located in Valley Stream. Contact Terry Biener, CCH, at 516-791-6174 or visit www.easychanges.com. Terry Biener, CCH • 516-791-6174 • www.easychanges.com Health memos are supplied by advertisers and are not written by the Herald editorial staff.


Sleeping with the enemy By Linda Fiveson

T

his is a contribution from one of my clients who asked to remain anonymous. I think it is a topic many of us can relate to in our quest to normalize our eating habits and arrive at a weight that satisfies us. — Linda Fiveson. “I just woke up from a carb coma induced sleep. It’s midnight and I’m doing something I haven’t done before. I’m writing about something that totally embarrasses me; a binge, a diet mentality. I knew I was starting with my nutritionist in the morning and decided to say one last hurrah to carbs sort of like when I smoked a pack of cigarettes in one evening before I quit. Let’s start with my eating day. It started off normally with only an egg and a cup of coffee for breakfast. In the afternoon, I attended a business meeting where I snacked on veggies and dip, two small pieces of cheese and seltzer. As I was leaving the meeting, I impulsively grabbed and ate one small cookie. I then went to the auto body shop to find out that I needed a new bumper on my new Lexus due to Stan’s little accident a couple of weeks ago. I was on my way home and decided impulsively to stop off at Waldbaums shopping center to buy dinner for my husband and myself. It was at that moment, without previous thought or planning, that I decided to have one final meal with carbs before starting my “Diet,” a term I've often been told not to use since a "diet" is finite and doesn’t work. I called my husband and he agreed to a meal from Cheeburger Cheeburger. I ordered us each a

1/3 lb. cheeseburger and got a side combo of fries and onion rings for us to share. I finished the whole burger and got close to half of the combo. Immediately after the meal, I thought about what I could eat next. Since I didn’t have any sugar stuff in the house, I made myself a bowl of cereal and milk. After my husband went into the bedroom to watch TV, I decided I needed more so I made myself a bowl of pasta which I finished. Within 10 minutes, I was fast asleep on the couch. I’m now up feeling totally lousy. I’m all drugged up from the carbs; my body feels all swollen and I hate myself. I didn’t stop myself from taking that itty bitty bite. Instead, I fell right into “the last supper mentality” before starting a diet. It doesn’t work. It never worked and I know that it can no longer be part of my behavior patterns. When I wake up in the morning, I’ll feel totally horrible, but the good thing is I can take different options in the future. It’s not like the hell my friends are feeling when they wake up realizing that their only son just took his own life. That’s a forever hell. I’m fortunate that I can change my fate, not alone, but with the help of my HP, my sponsors, my nutritionist, accepting that I have no option. I feel horrible, but I’m not in despair. Next time I’ll write before I take that itty bitty bite when the disease starts to talk to me again. Here we go, carb withdrawl. Nobody’s fault but my own...” I thought my client’s writing the letter to me from the middle of a night binge was something we all can relate to. The

insanity of knowing we are always going to be confronted by that "other" person who lives inside of us "forever"! It's not a psychosis, it's a multiple personality. We have so many voices that we have to listen to all of the time. They are the voices of decision and indecision. We are aware of every voice and all of the things that we do to stimulate the situation. If we start to think about eating wrong, it's not just a thought, it's a lengthy conversation. If we feel fat, we not only change what we're wearing, but whom we are seeing and we certainly prohibit ourselves from anything new – clothes, people, parties, and activities. The reality is that this makes us feel even worse. Did you ever think about how you wake up and go to sleep with the same conversations? It's like "sleeping with the enemy.” Why can't we get rid of this? Because it IS who we are, it’s just another aspect of our psyche. So,

what's the answer? Since there is no cure, we have to accept that there is only one way – to avoid the food that we have no control over. Simply put, we can't flirt with the food if we don't want to indulge. Flirtation is just keeping the appetite open, at some point we have to shut it down. It's easier to have no decision about what we're eating than the constant indecision. Doubt means Don't! Linda Fiveson is a nutritionist in Syosset. In addition to counseling, she manufactures and sells her own line of foods that are all free of flour, sugar, gluten and refined carbohydrates. For more information call (516) 496-2300 or visit her website at www.lindafiveson.com.

A Small Facility, A Large Family

★★★★★

For short-term residents, our physical and occupational therapy is outcome-oriented, allowing them to return to the community as quickly as possible. For long-term residents, we strive to help them grow stronger and more enabled as their stay progresses. Our residents’ quality of care is as important to us as it is to you.

Our Staff Includes:

• Doctors • 24-Hour Skilled Nursing Care • Physical Therapists • Occupational Therapists • Speech Therapists • Dieticians • Social Workers • Recreational Personnel

Our Facility/Services Include:

• Dedicated Short-Term Rehabilitation Unit • Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy • Wound, Respiratory and Dementia Care • Long-Term and Hospice Care • Tracheostomy Care and Ostomy Care • Cardiac Rehabilitation • Religious Services

• New Rehab Suite • Private and Semi-Private Rooms • Complimentary TV & Phone Service • Outdoor Garden • Pain Management • IV Therapy/Nutrition

Contact us today at 516-536-8000 for more information or to set up a tour.

50 Maine Avenue, Rockville Centre, NY 11570 • www.rockvillerehab.com

630353

5 STAR RATED CENTER

Let us pave the way from hospital to home for your loved one.


Good health 05 30 2013