Richmond magazine - April 2022

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LOCAL

A GREEN INFUSION With federal funding, Richmond plans to invest millions in parks and community centers in long-neglected neighborhoods

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n South Richmond, wedged between Interstate 95 and Richmond Highway, a row of small brick colonials built in the 1940s front Ruffin Road across from a sea of cracked asphalt and rusted-out chain-link fences. There are basketball and tennis courts, a baseball field, and an aging community center, but on most days, the area looks abandoned. Aside from a handful of roads that were repaved a few years ago, this neighborhood has received little attention from the city. It’s part of what used to be Chesterfield County before annexation in 1970. The single-story Thomas B. Smith Community Center was built more than 30 years ago. On a sunny Saturday afternoon in early March, however, the city is hosting the first in a series of “community engagement” events under a tent next to the basketball courts. Mayor Levar Stoney is here, along with City Councilman Michael Jones and architects with Baskervill and Timmons Group. Over the next two years, the city plans to spend $20 million revamping the community center, playground and adjacent athletic courts. After a series of meetings, a plan will be introduced later this summer, with construction getting underway perhaps early next year. The mayor says the new community center will help rejuvenate a long-forgotten neighborhood after years of neglect. “I think there’s been some clear negligence on behalf of our government when it comes to South Richmond,” he says. “The neglect, it becomes almost cultural. It gets into bloodstream, [and] folks start to believe that we don’t matter.” A new community center should help

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change that, he says. “I think this is a start.” Over the next few years, Richmond plans to spend half of its $155 million allotment, or $78 million, from the federal American Rescue Plan Act on parks and recreation projects, including improvements to three community centers — Smith, Southside Community Center on Hull Street and the Calhoun Center near Gilpin Court — and a new community center at Lucks Field playground in Church Hill. The community centers, located in low-income areas of the city, will get the lion’s share of that funding, $64 million. The goal is to use the funds to focus on neighborhoods that have been devoid of investment and work toward social equity, says Chris Frelke, Richmond’s director of Parks and Recreation. The size of this year’s capital infusion will allow the department to begin projects that have been on the books for years, Frelke says. “This helps us invest and really transform.”

But there are potential downsides. Infrastructure improvements such as parks and trails can lead to rising property values, which in turn can lead to displacement, says Ben Teresa, an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University who specializes in housing policy. “This can place displacement pressure [on an area], sometimes in the form of gentrification, where rising rents and property values are felt by elderly homeowners, homeowners of color and Black homeowners,” Teresa says, who recommends policy protections such as limiting rising rents or property taxes and investing in affordable housing. The mayor says the city can do both — invest in communities while also creating housing policies to prevent gentrification. At the Smith Community Center in early March, however, few seem too concerned about the potential ill effects of a $20 million makeover. “South Side is always the last one on the ball,” says Juanita Gaines, 75, who has lived on nearby Ryburn Road since 1978. Years ago, she says, the neighborhood was vibrant, the playgrounds and basketball courts full of kids playing. Nowadays, not so much. As for the community center project, she says, “I’ve been praying for something like this.” —Leah Hincks and Scott Bass

Mayor Levar Stoney kicks off a community engagement event at T.B. Smith Community Center in early March.

JAY PAUL

PARKS AND RECREATION

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LOCAL

FL ASHBACK

Mayhem on Mayo’s Bridge How an epidemic lockdown in the 1700s nearly sparked a shooting war between Richmond and Manchester

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uring the early weeks of 1795, Richmond suffered an outbreak of the contagious, disfiguring and often fatal smallpox disease. Authorities of the independent city of Manchester across the river barred entry to Richmonders. A unit of more than a dozen weapons-bearing men held the Manchester side. Six others fanned out along the south bank to prevent river crossings either by ferry or Mayo’s (14th Street) Bridge. John Mayo Jr., grandson of William Mayo, a civil engineer who laid out Richmond’s original street grid in 1737, completed construction of the bridge around 1787. The tolls permitted by the state legislature made him wealthy. He needed the money for rebuilding after successive floods and ice floes smashed the ramshackle span. The bridge from the north bank to Mayo’s Island consisted of wood piers supporting planks and then was built over pontoon boats from there to Manchester. The smallpox lockdown stranded citizens, many of whom expressed their displeasure by demonstrating on the bridge. David Patteson, a Revolutionary War veteran, state legislator and commander of the Chesterfield militia, had written to Virginia Gov. Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee (revered Revolutionary commander and Robert E. Lee’s deadbeat dad), suggesting the use of the militia to control the bridge. Lee agreed. James Hayes lived in Richmond

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A view of Richmond from Mayo’s Bridge in 1822 by French watercolorist J.L. Bouqueta

with his wife, Ann, their 4-year-old son and attendant slaves, though the Hayes family also operated the Falls Plantation, which was situated along a bend of the James River east of Manchester. Hayes, an English immigrant and publisher, served as official printer for the commonwealth and postmaster of Richmond. On Saturday, Jan. 25, he endeavored to place his family and enslaved workers away from the infection. But the move nearly sparked a shooting war. A few weeks later, Hayes wrote a letter to Gov. Lee to explain what had happened on Mayo’s Bridge. After Hayes made a crossing by canoe, the Manchester Guard seized the craft. Then two of Hayes’ slaves went into Richmond, “desirous of seeing their fellow-servants,” wrote Hayes. Upon their return to the Falls Plantation, guards ambushed the men and hauled them to the Manchester end. “They were there cruelly treated,” Hayes informed Gov. Lee, “one in particular by Thomas Goode, who after having beaten him in a most violent and inhuman manner” returned the enslaved man to Richmond. Hayes sought justice. He gathered five witnesses, who armed themselves and paid a visit to the Manchester Guard. Hayes wrote that he left his weapon with the posse and approached the Manchester toll house, calling for the captain. Goode emerged, whereupon Hayes “complained of his treatment of the negro.” Unremorseful, Goode declared

that he’d do it again. Hayes threatened to prosecute Goode, prompting a vulgar response that Hayes deemed unnecessary to repeat. The party turned to leave when Goode, Hayes claimed, “called out vehemently for the guard to turn out and put every man to death. A scuffle then ensued.” Hayes recounted how “after a good deal of severity, repeated insults and threats,” three of the men were forced onto a beach beneath the bridge. They all then went before Chesterfield County epidemic enforcer “magistrates.” The Manchester Guardsmen served as prosecutors and witnesses, and the Hayes gang received a bond of 50 pounds to appear at the next court session. But Hayes finagled a return to Falls Plantation. This caused an altercation with Patteson on Hayes’ property. He ultimately thought it “advisable to make my escape in a canoe.” The guards pursued. Lee, meanwhile, sought to quell the consternation along Mayo’s Bridge by negotiating a compromise to reopen the span to North Siders. The crisis was averted. Mayo’s Bridge, however, wasn’t so lucky. It suffered at least eight destructions, including detonation by retreating Confederates on April 3, 1865. Following the 1910 union of Richmond and Manchester, the city in 1913 completed a concrete bridge, somewhat resembling the Pont Neuf in Paris. The bridge is presently due for some form of renovation. R

COURTESY VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF HISTORY & CULTURE

By Harry Kollatz Jr.

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“Love what you do and do what you love.” —Confucius I am passionate about the health care services we deliver in our community from expectant mom’s to seniors. Our patients’ lives are our lives and because of the trust they place in us, I get to do what I love. When patients are feeling better, moving better and improving their quality of life, it makes it all worthwhile for us! Thank you to all of the Greater Richmond practitioners for the recognition and honor.

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LIVING

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

Chained Rock. You’ll see a chain linking two giant boulders instead of a waterfall on the latter hike, but the epic views are as good as any in the area. When you tire of hiking, you can play 18 holes at the park’s Wasioto Winds Golf Course, a links-style course in the mountains that regularly ranks among the best of Kentucky’s public golf courses. If you’re looking for more history, drive a few minutes south into Tennessee and check out Lincoln Memorial University’s Abraham Lincoln Museum and Library (lmunet.edu/abraham-lincoln-library-and-museum) in Harrogate, Tennessee, where exhibits highlight an enormous collection of Lincoln and Civil War material. After the museum, it will be worth your time to cross the street to Haymaker Farms restaurant, where locals praise the barbecue and fried catfish.

TRAVEL

GOING WEST

ABIDE AWHILE

By Jeff Yeates

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o maybe you’ve seen a lot of sights in Virginia, but have you ever traveled to the dagger-like western tip of the commonwealth that juts into Kentucky and Tennessee? This marks the famous Cumberland Gap, and when you head in that direction, you’ll be following in the footsteps of nearly a quarter-million early American settlers, including Abraham Lincoln’s parents and Daniel Boone, who trekked west along the Wilderness Road to the rich farmlands of Kentucky and Ohio. Its glory days as a major settlers’ route are now in the past, but the Cumberland Gap area today offers scenic beauty, hikes galore, camping, golf and, of course, plenty of American history.

STATES OF TOURISM I’m a bit of a national park geek, and it pleases me to share that Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (nps.gov/ cuga/index.htm) is one of a select few

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National Park Service units that encompass three states. You can celebrate this rare distinction by hiking two hours round-trip to Tri-State Peak. Have fun taking photos of each other standing in three different states simultaneously. Next, try navigating the multiple hairpins of Pinnacle Road to Pinnacle Point, where you will enjoy spectacular views over the Gap and, in the distance, shimmering Fern Lake straddling the Kentucky and Tennessee border. Time this drive around sunset for an epic experience. Be sure to also stop by the park visitors center, where you can view documentary films about the area, peruse history exhibits and get all your questions answered by the helpful park rangers. Just 20 minutes north of the Gap, you’ll find Kentucky’s first state park, Pine Mountain State Resort Park (parks. ky.gov/pineville/parks/resort/pinemountain-state-resort-park). Among its many activities, Pine Mountain features two scenic hikes: Honeymoon Falls and

You’ll find many good lodging options at Pine Mountain’s 30-room lodge, as well as cabins and cottages for rent. Cumberland Gap National Historical Park and Virginia’s Wilderness Road State Park (dcr.virginia.gov/stateparks/wilderness-road) in Ewing both have campsites available for reservation.

SAVE THE DATE May 26-29: Kentucky Mountain Laurel Festival in Pineville, Kentucky WHAT TO EXPECT: Since 1931, Kentucky has hosted this event, which now features a carnival, a 5K race, live country music, fireworks, the coronation of the Mountain Laurel Queen and more. LEARN MORE: kmlf.org

Wasioto Winds golf course

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FROM TOP: MICHAEL SPEED; COURTESY KENTUCKY STATE PARKS

History and recreational opportunities abound around the Cumberland Gap

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T O P

D O C S

2 0 2 2

Doctors in the House Richmond’s Randolph family exudes excellence By Don Harrison

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ere’s a pitch for the perfect feel-good TV show. Call it “Meet the Randolphs.” The show follows an African American family made up largely of distinguished, respected physicians. The 6-foot 7-inch patriarch, David, answers to “Poppy.” He and his middle child, David II, or “Little David,” lead a respected oncology clinic. They could be mistaken for twins, except dad is 3 inches taller. Mom, Renita, is a top-rated dentist who graduated with honors from dental school while raising two small children. While the two Davids are often in the spotlight in local and national media — the former high school cheerleader prefers to rah-rah from the sidelines. Eldest sister, Jessica, is a retinal surgeon married to Joe, a mechanical engineer. They have adorable 18-month-old twins. One running gag has Jessica playfully bickering with Little David, her college roommate, about the relative importance of their chosen fields — “I restore

sight,” “But I cure cancer,” and so on. Little David’s wife, Morgan, works in oncology too, as a pediatric clinical pharmacist, assisting with young cancer patients. They have a son, David III, and a daughter on the way. Morgan hails from Tennessee and, at 5-foot-3, stands many inches shorter than the rest of the family. There’s a younger brother, too, Doug, who is kind of an Alex P. Keaton character. Everyone in the family is athletic — Little David played basketball for the University of Richmond, Jessica was a University of Virginia high-jumper. Financial advisor, Doug, 28, was a college football standout at Notre Dame. He turned his back on medicine, even though dad thought he was a natural for it. Along the way, the Randolphs have endured, and prevailed against, long hours, difficult cases and racist roadblocks. Sounds like a can’t miss show, right? I didn’t even get to the part where Poppy stops the runaway Cadillac with his bare hands.

PHOTO BY JAY PAUL RICHMONDMAG.COM

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“I was always a sickly kid,” says Dr. David Randolph, a radiation oncologist at the Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute at Johnston-Willis Hospital. “I had congenital hip dysplasia, where the hips don’t form properly, I walked pigeon-toed and had asthma and I did not get medical care.” It was a cultural thing, he says. His parents didn’t believe in doctors. “So basically, I was allowed to suffer.” Growing up the sixth of 13 siblings in rural Charlotte County, near Appomattox, Randolph, 62, attended Randolph Henry High School, “Named after the slave owner that freed my relatives,” he says. His father had a fourth-grade education and swung a 15-pound sledgehammer at a foundry. “He was an incredibly powerful man and I wanted to be like him. I would pray, ‘Please God, let me be big and strong.’ “ He grew tall but skinny, he says, and had poor nutrition. “It was only when I went to VCU and got on the meal plan and started lifting weights that I began to bulk up.” He graduated high school in three years and did the same at Virginia Commonwealth University. “I was dirt poor,” he says. “I didn’t pledge fraternities and I didn’t go to parties. I studied.” He also worked multiple jobs, including one at the VCU Computer Center, mentoring underachieving students. One night, in the throes of his last exams, Randolph looked out his window and saw a vision, he says. “There was a step show in front of my apartment, and in the crowd I saw the most beautiful woman I ever saw in my life. I went outside and walked in her direction, but she drove off.” But it didn’t end there. “We were introduced by a mutual friend in the Pantry Pride on West Broad Street,” recalls Dr. Renita Randolph, a dentist at Grove Avenue Family Dentistry. “We did not hit it off. I thought he was rude.” The Thomas Jefferson High graduate was then attending Virginia Union University on a full academic scholarship; her mom was an accountant, and the family owned a North Side general store. She did not suffer fools. “I wasn’t trying to be rude, I was too nervous to speak,” David Sr. explains. A short time after he started medical school at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, they met again. “After he settled down and actually talked to me, we hit it off,” Renita says. After a long-distance romance — Renita was not allowed to marry until she finished school — the newlyweds lived in Norfolk’s Ghent area, where David built their furniture and finished medical school. “I was 2 weeks old at his graduation,” says daughter Dr. Jessica Randolph, an 0phthalmology specialist and vitreoretinal surgeon at the VCU School of Medicine. “We’ve always been exposed to medicine,” she says. “Even when we were young, we’d be out at grocery stores or church and people would recognize our parents from their offices and early on it affirmed the importance that health care had on other people’s lives.”

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David II was born in Lynchburg, where the Randolphs moved for Poppy’s family practice residency. His goal was to be a family doctor. “But I was frustrated,” he says. “I had an idealistic view that everybody would flock to the doctor, and I’d make everyone feel better. But I couldn’t make the inroads. I couldn’t get people to exercise, eat right, or improve their situation. No, if they wanted to lose weight, or to lower their blood pressure, they just wanted me to give them a pill.” He found inspiration in a charismatic father figure, Peter Hulick, then the radiation oncologist at Lynchburg General Hospital, who was laser-focused on treating cancer. “We had these optional one-month rotations and I did a month with him, and I was so impressed with the difference he made in people’s lives. I wanted to be like him,” David says. The family returned to Richmond so that David could do his radiation oncology residency at VCU. These were hectic, sleepless times. “We made it because I was board certified in family practice,” he recalls. “So, I would work two 12-hour shifts in the emergency room, and that was enough to pay for childcare.” Renita enrolled in VCU School of Dentistry, eventually graduating with honors. “I did it with a whole lot of prayer and gumption,” she says. “My classmates were twentysomethings and footloose and fancy free, and when I got home, I was mom. Our children have always come first. I didn’t start studying until they were in bed.” “She’s amazing,” Jessica says. “She had two small children at home and was still first in her class. And that was at a time when dental school wasn’t very friendly to Black people.” “My whole family, we’ve worked very hard and achieved a whole lot despite racism, sexism and all the isms,” Renita says. “I experienced it. But I had the wherewithal in dental school to stand up for myself.” Before moving the family to Roanoke, where he and Renita each set up practice, Big David became the first African American to finish VCU’s radiation oncology program. He’s more vocal than his wife about the racism he endured. “One day my chairman looks at me and laughs out loud. He was German and said in a thick accent, ‘You’re blecch. You’ll never get a job.’ “ An earlier department head had accused Randolph, apropos of nothing, of pimping women and selling drugs. “All but one of the chairmen there were a--holes,” he says today. “But they could not intimidate me.”

BELOW AND OPOSITE PAGE: JAY PAUL

T HE B A C K S T OR Y

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Healing societal ills, one person at a time By Tharon Giddens

EVEN AS THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC is abating, hopefully fading into endemic status, another, long-term malady continues to impact our everyday lives. It’s an angry, polarized world out there, and that’s hazardous to health. Doom scrolling, political polarization, road rage, conspiratorial thinking, misinformation and mistrust feed the flames of anxiety and, in turn, anger. Anger is a primal instinct. You feel it, and you vent; you don’t first reflect on why you’re feeling angry, says Dr. Salmaan A. Khawaja, a clinical neuropsychologist with Bon Secours Mercy Health System. And if you confront someone when they’re angry and argue with them, you further fuel their anger. Khawaja says increased anger, anxiety and stress may

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lead to problems at work and home, substance abuse, depression and suicide. Anger shortens the lifespan, and it is a culprit in a range of conditions, including obesity and neurologic diseases. Anxiety and stress are directly linked with heart attacks and strokes. Anxiety may also trigger tremors or dizziness. It can lead to mood swings or problems with memory or attentiveness. The pandemic seems to have exacerbated societal anger, and medical professionals have found themselves the targets of abuse. “Many physicians, nurses and other health care workers lost their lives to COVID-19 while caring for patients with COVID-19,” says Dr. Jonathan Foote, a gynecologic oncologist with Bon Secours Commonwealth Gynecologic Oncology.

ABOVE: CARSON MCNAMARA

Angry World

“However, there is now a large portion of the U.S. population who look down on health care workers, and in fact seem to think that we are not working in their best interest, which is against the Hippocratic oath that we all took in medical school.” The pandemic presented the perfect storm of angst and anger: a deadly infectious virus, invisible and evolving unpredictably, that people had little control over and that caused an array of reactions in seemingly similar people, Khawaja says. It is easier to deny the existence of something that is scary and invisible than it is to acknowledge its existence. The impact of the pandemic on physical and mental health has been profound. People have died unnecessarily, Khawaja says, because of their anger and belief in misinformation. “I am seeing more patients with signs of dementia, more adults with cognitive and emotional changes, and more children with mood and cognitive problems than ever before,” he says. “I am seeing

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TO P D OCS 2022

more patients who have developed cognitive and emotional problems directly related to the anxiety caused by fear of the COVID vaccine; debilitating symptoms that have lasted for over a year in some people, all because of anger, fear and anxiety.” It’s a problem that cuts across the belief spectrum. “The numerous patients that I have who are members of QAnon, the anti-vaxxers, the ultra-conservative, the ultra-religious, the ultra-liberal, the extreme left and the extreme right patients all have the exact same characteristics of anxiety, which stems from a sense of lack of control [or that control is being taken from them], and the resulting anger that ensues, all projected outward,” Khawaja says. “There are inpatients dying of COVID in hospital that tell me they do not have the disease that is killing them, and instead are angry that I am part of a global conspiracy of some sorts. After they die, their angry family members still hold similar sentiments. These delusions stem from anger, which stems from anxiety.” It’s not just anger: “Just about any of the negative emotions that you would put on your short list seems to be up,” says Dr. Edward Peck Jr., a Richmond-based neuropsychologist with Neuropsychological Services of Virginia. The depth of the problem is hard to gauge; standard measures relied on by mental health professionals may not be useful in the current situation, according to Peck. Questions typically asked to assess anger in an individual may not apply to societal situations, feeling angry because you perceive yourself as helpless in the face of family situations, your income, the environment or your body. Peck notes that people like to believe the rules they follow are universal, sort of a personal golden rule. We tend to believe that how we handle ourselves in a situation is the logical way of proceed-

ing, and that others similarly perceive a situation. “Unfortunately, people follow different sets of rules,” he says.

P R IM AL E MO T IO N S

Negative, intense emotions affect other aspects of life, from how you sleep and eat to how you interact with others. Stress leads to anxiety, and prolonged anxiety breeds feelings of anger and hostility, says Dr. Michele Cosby, assistant professor of psychiatry for VCU Health and a licensed clinical psychologist with the Virginia Treatment Center for Children. “Anger is often an emotion that is easier to feel because it usually drives us to some form of action and a desire to

“I am seeing more patients with signs of dementia, more adults with cognitive and emotional changes, and more children with mood and cognitive problems than ever before,” — Dr. Salmaan A. Khawaja, clinical neuropsychologist, Bon Secours Mercy Health System

take control,” she says. “Sometimes that control leads to unhealthy and negative behaviors like aggression, substance abuse, self-injury and so on.” Khawaja notes that most anxiety disorders stem from control issues; the less one’s sense of control, the greater the anxiety, and the greater the anxiety, the greater the anger. “Because we don’t feel like we did this to ourselves, our increased anger increasingly projects outwards until we hit the target that we believe is responsible for our anger,” he says, “not realizing, of course, that the source of anger is ourselves.” People who have suffered the most

during the pandemic had fewer supports, says Dr. Rajinderpal Singh, a Glen Allen psychiatrist. He notes that patients with church communities did well through the pandemic, while many “who were on their own journey, they are suffering.”

H E AL ING T H E WO R L D

Peck says it’s up to each of us to do what we can to heal ourselves. Look first to your own physical and mental health, and then you can have the energy to help the next person. “Heal yourself so you can heal others,” he says. But there’s no quick fix. “It will be years before we can recover from our current state of affairs, if we are able to recover at all,” according to Foote. “It will be a shame if our country cannot recover from the societal decline we have seen in the last six to seven years.” Foote says a key to recovery is restoring the concept of fully respecting one another as a basis of society — “recognizing that we don’t all have to agree, that we need to see one another for whom each of us is, that we are all human and that we are all living life as best we can.” Singh is upbeat; he believes that there’s always an opportunity behind every difficulty. He sees a need for mustering resources to drown out misinformation, a job that entails an outpouring of accurate information from sources ranging from local social services to media outlets. Debate will not defuse anger; it hardens a person’s viewpoints, according to Khawaja. We need to listen to one another, which won’t necessarily lead to agreement, but will allow us to gain empathy, to realize that people with whom we disagree may likely have more in common with us than they realize. “We should speak less and listen more,” he says. “Healing, as individuals and as a society, is going to require us to learn how to listen and learn how to stop yelling long enough so that we can listen.” R

RICHMONDMAG.COM

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For these Richmond health care professionals, a pandemic has brought insights into living life and practicing medicine By Dina Weinstein

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ABOVE: MONICA ESCAMILLA; OPOSITE PAGE: JAY PAUL

Lesso ns Learn ed

THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC has lingered over the medical community for more than two years, bringing an array of challenges, hardships and grief. So, when Richmond magazine asked our Top Doctors 2022 survey participants to reflect on life lessons learned over the course of their work, many shared how they were affected by the horrors wrought by the novel coronavirus, professionally and in their personal lives. Some reflected on patients who left lasting impressions, others recounted recent horror scenes of lives taken too soon and threats to their own health and well-being. The force of medical teams was a theme in many of the responses. The mindset that it is a sacred honor to serve and heal came through strongly in many stories, as well as the crucial role compassion and listening play in treating patients. Here is a sampling of Richmond-area health care practitioners’ pandemic stories and insights gained.

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TEAMWORK IS ESSENTIAL Dr. Atul Aggarwal, director of nuclear medicine, Radiology Associates of Richmond

Aggarwal acknowledges the importance of medical teams in providing excellent quality health care, from hospital volunteers and patient transport staff to therapists, nurses, technologists, physician assistants and nurse practitioners, IT

staff, doctors and administrators. Personal experience drove that home. “Watching my mother pass away from colon cancer within two years, despite surgery and chemotherapy, provided a very personal view into our own mortality and helplessness,” Aggarwal wrote for the survey. “Also, it gave me a deep appreciation for palliative care medicine and hospice. I will be eternally grateful to all the people involved in my mother’s care, especially near the end-of-life care.”

LESSON FIVE

HOPE IS AN INSPIRATION AND A HEALING ELEMENT Dr. Harpreet Reeba, board certified in child, adolescent and adult psychiatry, Virginia South Psychiatric and Family Services, Midlothian office

When Reeba treats children and adolescents with emotional or psychosocial issues including ADHD, PTSD or schizophrenia, one of the first things she does is apologize to them for what they’ve been through. She also expresses a message

LESSON SIX

“I bore witness to the bond of ‘the team.’ thicker than blood, that would not let nurses abandon one another in the midst of a once-in-alifetime pandemic.”

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THE POWER OF NURSES Dr. Vincent Schuler, trauma and emergency general ICU surgeon, HCA Forest Hospital

In the ER, Schuler saw tremendous human suffering and the power of physicians and other health care workers to help to heal even before COVID-19. The anguish of medical teams pushing far beyond normal demands inspires him. He says he saw, “The nurses who cried tears of exhaustion, tears of sorrow, the tracks of which streamed into the

“Everybody deserves equal importance and respect. I often notice that many doctors forget the importance of this.”

of hope and faith while describing the disease to a patient saying: “You are going to be given all the help you need. The healing process starts right here.” “[The] most important life-changing experience is that as a child and adolescent psychiatrist, I am able to get the information from children which they have not told anyone, I have the opportunity to start the healing process right there. I never let that opportunity go.” She looks to her patients’ strengths, and it helps them move forward with treatment.

furrows cast into their faces by masks. Nurses who, when a young boy’s father died, found the strength to compose themselves in a show of strength as I walked him to see his father for the last time. Nurses who worked around the clock in the emergency department and, after their shift was over, returned to help their comrades because the sick just kept coming. Nurses who gave morphine and held the hands of the dying, and whispered into their ears, ‘Your family loves you so much’ as a last act of compassion and closed their eyes when their long struggle finally ended.”

LEFT AND OPOSITE PAGE: JAY PAUL

LESSON FOUR

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TO P D OCS 2022

LESSON EIGHT

LIFE IS FRAGILE AND PRECIOUS Dr. Salman A. Khawaja, clinical neuropsychologist, Bon Secours Neurology Clinic at Westchester Emergency and Medical Center

LESSON SEVEN

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED Dr. Stephanie Arnold, primary care physician, InnovAge PACE-Richmond

Arnold had just settled into a new job at InnovAge PACE, which stands for Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly and provides healthcare and social services to seniors without moving them into a nursing facility, when COVID-19 hit her and her patients particularly hard. “Not only are they at increased risk of complications, but the social isolation and staffing shortages have been particularly difficult to grapple with,” Arnold wrote in response to a survey. She had recently finished a residency in New York, where many of her friends and colleagues were in the hardest-hit areas. “It has been surreal,” Arnold says. “I felt like my friends had gone to war without me.” When the pandemic started, she was working at Patient First and caring for her 2-year-old daughter. Being pregnant in the summer of

2020 made Arnold feel more vulnerable. “I thought having my first baby during residency was hard, but navigating the pandemic first pregnant, and then with two small children has been surreal,” she describes. “Surreal” is also how Arnold describes entering a locked unit for elderly with dementia before COVID19 vaccines, where she was struck by the patients’ inability to wear masks. “I felt like I was in a bubble that no one wanted to be with because of my profession,” Arnold remembers about her stressful pregnancy, only feeling happiness when at seven months she was vaccinated. The pandemic was hard on the elders in her care because of the diminished socialization and lack of physical touch. Patients couldn’t leave their rooms and facilities couldn’t offer activities. Arnold still feels left behind with small children who are too young to be vaccinated. “I see people with vaccinated kids out in the world,” she says. “I haven’t eaten out since the pandemic started. I feel like I am in two different worlds.”

Khawaja is often called to see patients at the end of their lives, to look at them with a cognitive lens when they do not recognize they are dying, as well as cases that pose complicated medical dilemmas. He notes that COVID-19 has presented long-term cognitive issues for patients as well as changing a lot for the medical community, because there was not a template to follow when “ridiculously healthy people were dying,” he says. Watching patients who didn’t believe they had the disease, then die has shown Khawaja how fragile and ironic life is and how powerless people — and even healers — often are. He experienced some COVID-19 patients who resisted the reality of their diagnosis to the point of spitting and attacking him. Such actions disrespected his life and were contrary to his pledge to work to save his patients’ lives. “Sometimes we feel just as helpless as our patients and their families do,” Khawaja says. “They are looking to us. It’s very emotional.” Having seen so much death throughout the pandemic and simply continuing to treat patients shows him the resiliency, humility and humanity of medical professionals. But it’s not all heavy, Khawaja says, there are light moments and sometimes gallows humor to survive the challenges. R

“I have lost more patients and colleagues to suicide since COVID than I have in my entire career.”

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TOP DOCS 2022 WINNERS Julia Nunley VCU Health, Massey Cancer Center, Stony Point 9109, 9109 Stony Point Drive, 804-828-9361

Suzanne Peck

Richmond Dermatology and Laser Specialists, 9816 Mayland Drive, 804-282-8510

Georgia Seely

Dermatology Associates of Virginia, 10800 Midlothian Turnpike, Suite 309; 201 Concourse Blvd., Suite 110, Glen Allen; 804-549-4040

Laurie Shinn

Commonwealth Dermatology, 7001 Forest Ave., Suite 400, 804-282-0831

EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Charles Deverna HCA CJW Medical Center, JohnstonWillis Hospital Emergency Department, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, North Chesterfield, 804-483-6000

Harinder Dhindsa VCU Health, 1213 E. Clay St., 800-762-6161

Jeff Mason

Richmond Emergency Physicians, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital Emergency Department, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 210, 804-287-7066

Peter Moffett

VCU Health, 1213 E. Clay St., 800-762-6161

Robert Powell

Richmond Emergency Physicians, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital Emergency Department, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 210, 804-287-7066

Deborah Vinton

Systems medical director, HCA Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 1602

Skipwith Road, 804-289-4500

1471 Johnston Willis Drive, 804-320-1333

VCU Health, Emergency Center at New Kent, 2495 Pocahontas Trail, 800-762-6161

Family Physicians, division of Commonwealth Primary Care, 1800 Glenside Drive, Suite 110, 804-288-1800

Shannon Walsh

ENDOCRINOLOGY, DIABETES AND METABOLISM Allen S. Burris

Virginia Diabetes & Endocrinology, 348 Brown’s Hill Court, Midlothian, 804-272-2702

Robert P. Castellucci 8921 Three Chopt Road, Suite 102, 804-282-9899

Francesco Celi

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St., 804-828-2161

Douglas Johnson Bon Secours Richmond Diabetes and Endocrinology, 8266 Atlee Road; Medical Office Building II, Suite 332, Mechanicsville; 804-764-7686

Ben D. Phillips

Virginia Endocrinology, 3460 Mayland Court, Henrico; 2384 Colony Crossing Place, Midlothian, 804-423-3636

Kelsey Salley

Virginia Endocrinology, 2384 Colony Crossing Place, Midlothian; 804-423-3636

Edmond (Trey) Wickham

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 2305 N. Parham Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE J. Rand Baggesen

Executive Health Group, by referral only, executive.md

Caroline Cella

Primary Health Group – Johnston-Willis,

Richard L. Gergoudis

Giancarlo Pierantoni VCU Health at Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court, 804-527-4540

Bradley J. Rolfe

Commonwealth Primary Care Ridgefield, 2200 Pump Road, Suite 100, 804-741-7141

Jennifer B. Humberson UVA Pediatric Specialty Care, St. Mary’s Hospital Campus, 5875 Bremo Road, Suite 500, 804-297-3055

Ray Lewandowski

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804828-CHOR (2467)

John Quillin

VCU Massey Cancer Center, 401 College St., 800-762-6161

GASTROENTEROLOGY

GERIATRIC MEDICINE

Gastrointestinal Specialists Inc., 6602 W. Broad St., Suite B, 804-285-8206

VCU Health Center for Advanced Health Management, 2116 W. Laburnum Ave., 804-254-3500

Souheil Abou-Assi

Stephen Bickston

VCU Health Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St., 804-828-4060

Ramy Eid

Gastrointestinal Specialists Inc., 201 Wadsworth Drive, 804-285-8206

Howard O. Haverty Jr. Richmond Gastroenterology Associates, 169 Wadsworth Drive, 804-560-9852

Robert Mitchell

Mitchell Endoscopy Center, 27605 Forest Ave., Suite 211, 804-282-3114

Bimaljit Sandhu

Richmond Gastroenterology Associates, 169 Wadsworth Drive, 804-560-9852

George Smallfield

VCU Health at Stony Point 9109, 9109 Stony Point Drive, 804-828-4060

GENETICS

Hind Al Saif Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Peter Boling

Sarah Hobgood

VCU Health Center for Advanced Health Management, 2116 W. Laburnum Ave., 804-254-3500

GYNECOLOGY/ OBSTETRICS (GENERAL) Alice J. Hirata

Bon Secours Richmond OB-GYN, 1501 Maple Ave., Suite 100, NW Bldg. 1, 804-320-2483

Christine Isaacs

VCU Health, Stony Point 9105, 9105 Stony Point Parkway; Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St.; 804-828-4409

Nicole Karjane

VCU Health, Stony Point 9105, 9105 Stony Point Parkway; Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St.; 804-828-4409

Thomas Mead

Dominion Women’s Health, Dominion Medical Park, 8239 Meadowbridge Road, Suite A, Mechanics-

(cont’d)

ville, 804-730-0800

Vienne Murray

West End Obstetrics and Gynecology, 7601 Forest Ave., Suite 100, 804-282-9479

HEMATOLOGY AND ONCOLOGY Elke K. Friedman

Virginia Cancer Institute, 6605 W. Broad St., Suite A, 804-287-3000

M. Kelly Hagan

Virginia Cancer Institute, 7501 Right Flank Road, Suite 600, Mechanicsville, 804-559-2489

James T. May III

Virginia Cancer Institute, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 100, 804-330-7990

Rachna Raman

Bon Secours Cancer Institute at St. Mary’s Hospital, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 209, 804-287-7804

Will Voelzke

Virginia Cancer Institute, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 100, 804-330-7990

HEPATOLOGY Hannah Lee

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804-828-4060

Arun Sanyal

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804-828-4060

Mitchell L. Shiffman Bon Secours Liver Institute of Richmond, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 509, 804-977-8920

Mohammad S. Siddiqui

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804-828-4060

Richard Sterling

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804-828-4060

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

Oncology, Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute, 7607 Forest Ave., Suite 200, 804-200-7062

Jori Carter

Women’s Cancer and Wellness Institute, 9101 Stony Point Drive; 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 1100, North Chesterfield; 804-323-5040

Johnny Hyde Jr.

Bon Secours Commonwealth Gynecologic Oncology, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite G-7, 804-288-8900

Stephanie Sullivan

VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-9080

Randal J. West

Women’s Cancer and Wellness Institute, 9101 Stony Point Drive; Johnston-Willis Hospital, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 1100, North Chesterfield; 804-323-5040

HOSPICE CARE Erin Alesi

VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-5116

Marc William Flickinger

Medical director of Bon Secours Hospice and Palliative Care, 8580 Magellan Parkway, Suite 200, 804-627-5360

Cara Jennings

Bon Secours Palliative Medicine, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB North, Suite 403, 804-288COPE (2673)

Danielle Noreika

VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-7999

Cecelia H. Boardman Virginia Gynecologic Yellow highlight denotes top vote-getter in category.

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TOP DOCS 2022 WINNERS Leanne Yanni

Diane S. Sinnatamby

Vice president, medical affairs, Bon Secours Richmond

Bon Secours Laburnum Medical Center, 8220 Meadowbridge Road, Suite 203, Mechanicsville, 804-764-2200

HOSPITALISTADULT Margaret Guy

VCU Health, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-2161

Brian Hanrahan

System medical director, HCA Richmond; HCA Chippenham Hospital (CJW Medical Center), 7101 Jahnke Road, 804-483-0000

Ahmed Kardar

Facility medical director of hospitalist medicine, Bon Secours Southside Medical Center, Petersburg, Alteon Health

Muktak Mathur

Sound Physicians, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospitalist Program, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-285-2011

Philip Rizk

Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Hospitalist Program, 7700 E. Parham Road, 804-521-5317

HYPERBARIC MEDICINE

Joseph V. Boykin Jr. Medical director, wound healing program, Section of Plastic Surgery, Central Virginia VA Health Care System, 1201 Broad Rock Blvd., 804-675-5000

INFECTIOUS DISEASES

James W. Brooks Jr. Infectious Diseases Specialists P.C., 7605 Forest Ave., Suite 302, 804-285-1833

David M. Rowles

Infectious Diseases Specialists P.C., 7605 Forest Ave., Suite 302, 804-285-1833

Michael Stevens

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St., 804-828-2161

Sarika S. Tripathi

Commonwealth Infectious Diseases, 804-833-5765

INTENSIVIST Lisa Brath

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St., 800-762-6161

Ken Haft

Pulmonary Associates of Richmond, 6600 W. Broad St., No. 300, 804-320-4243

Feras Khan

Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 1602 Skipwith Road, 804-289-4500

Sarah K. Kilbourne Chippenham Hospital, 7101 Jahnke Road, 804-483-0000

Rajiv Malhotra

Chippenham Hospital, 7101 Jahnke Road, 804-4830000; Henrico Doctors Hospital, 1602 Skipwith Road, 804-289-4500

Kristin B. Miller

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St., 800-762-6161

Robert Ratzlaff

Sound Physicians, system director of critical care, Bon Secours Richmond

John Sentz

Pulmonary Associates of Richmond, 6600 W. Broad St., No. 300, 804-320-4243

417 N. 11th St., 804-828-9357

Amelia Grover

VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St.; Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804-628-3111

Christophe P. Hayes

Bon Secours West End Internal Medicine, 7001 Forest Ave., Suite 2500, 804-282-7857

Sidney Jones

Bon Secours West End Internal Medicine, 7001 Forest Ave., Suite 2500, 804-282-7857

Jeff Kushinka

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St., 804828-9357

Anand Lothe

Virginia Physicians Inc., Innsbrook Primary Care, 4900 Cox Road, Suite 150, Glen Allen, 804-346-1780

Jonathan Schaaf

Executive Health Group, by referral only, executive.md

MATERNALFETAL MEDICINE/ HIGH-RISK PREGNANCY James Taylor Christmas

Commonwealth Perinatal Services, Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 7601 Forest Ave., Suite 336, 804-289-4972; Commonwealth Perinatal Services, Johnston-Willis Hospital, 1051 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 110, 804-560-5827

Susan Lanni

INTERNAL MEDICINE

VCU Health, Stony Point 9105, 9105 Stony Point Parkway; Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St.; 804-828-4409

VCU Health,

VCU Health,

Amanda George

Ronald Ramus

(cont’d)

Stony Point 9105, 9105 Stony Point Parkway; Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St.; 804-828-4409

Todd Gehr

Amandeep Sangha

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St.; Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804-828-2161

Bon Secours Neurology Clinic at St. Mary’s, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 207, 804-893-8656

VCU Health, Stony Point 9105, 9105 Stony Point Parkway; Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St.; 804-828-4409

Jason Kidd

Edward H. Springel

Lisa R. Troyer

Commonwealth Perinatal Services, Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 7601 Forest Ave., Suite 336, 804-289-4972; Commonwealth Perinatal Services, Johnston-Willis Hospital, 1051 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 110, 804-560-5827

NEONATALPERINATAL MEDICINE Jenny Fox

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9956

Ann Heerens

Director of neonatology, Bon Secours Richmond; Pediatrix Medical Group of Richmond; Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital NICU, third floor, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-282-8082

Karen HendricksMunoz

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9956

Russell Moores

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9956

Art Shepard

Neonatologist and medical director, HCA Henrico Doctors’ Hospital

NEPHROLOGY

Walid Abou Assi Nephrology Specialists, 8400 North Run Medical Drive, Suite B, 804-559-6980

VCU Health at Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St.; 804-828-2161

Srikanth R. Kunaparaju

Richmond Nephrology Associates, 7001 W. Broad St., Suite A, 804-673-2722

Brian Peppiatt

Richmond Nephrology Associates, 671 Hioaks Road, Suite B, 804-272-5814

NEUROLOGY

Matthew Boyce Neurological Associates, 1101 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 200, 804-2882742; 7607 Forest Ave., Suite 300, 804-288-2742

Stacey Epps

Bon Secours Neurology Clinic, 8266 Atlee Road, MOB II, Suite 330, Mechanicsville, 804-325-8720

Warren Felton

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St., 804-828-9350

Kelly G. Gwathmey

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St., 804-828-9350

Mary Beth Ramsey

Neurological Associates, 7607 Forest Ave., Suite 300, 804-288-2742

Mary Ransom

Bon Secours Neurology Clinic at St. Mary’s, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 207, 804-893-8656

Scott A. Vota

Bon Secours Neurology Clinic, 8266 Atlee Road, MOB II, Suite 330, Mechanicsville, 804-325-8720

NEUROSURGERY

Peter A. Alexander Neurosurgical Associates, 1651 N. Parham Road, 804-288-8204

R. Scott Graham

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; 804-828-9165

Kathryn Holloway

VCU Health, Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; 804-828-9165

Matthew T. Mayr

Neurosurgical Associates, 1651 N. Parham Road, 804-288-8204

Richard H. Singleton Neurosurgical Associates, 1011 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 100, 804-330-4990

NURSE PRACTITIONER Annabel Britton

HCA CJW Medical Center, 7101 Jahnke Road, 804-483-0000

Caylee Cook

Richmond Pediatric Associates, 7521 Right Flank Road, Suite 100, Mechanicsville, 804-559-0447; 9900 Independence Park Drive, Suite 100, 804-747-1750

Tim Ford

VCU Health, 1300 E. Marshall St., 800-762-6161

Yellow highlight denotes top vote-getter in category.

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TOP DOCS 2022 WINNERS Amy Foster

D. Michael Rose

Virginia Cancer Institute, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 100, 804-330-7990

Virginia Surgical Institute, 10710 Midlothian Turnpike, Suite 138, 804-348-2814

Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists, 7611 Forest Ave. Suites 100 and 100-A, 804-288-4827

James Gill

Bon Secours Surgical Specialists at St. Mary’s Hospital, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB North, Suite 506, 804-893-8676

Sound Physicians, Critical Care, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital

OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPHTHALMOLOGIC SURGERY

Andrea (Andi) Funai

Sarah Ro

BetterMed Urgent Care, seven sites in metro Richmond, 804-386-0200

Charlotte Roberts

VCU Health, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-628-4327

Chelsea Snead

West End Foot & Ankle, 7650 E. Parham Road, Suite 215, 804-346-1779

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE Joseph Andriano

HCA Occupational Health; Retreat Doctors’ Hospital, 2621 Grove Ave., 804-254-5467; HCA CJW Medical Center, 7153 Jahnke Road, 804-483-1708

ONCOLOGIC SURGERY

Leopoldo Fernandez VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St.; Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804-628-3111

Amelia Grover

VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St.; Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804-828-7739

Brian Kaplan

Formerly VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center

Michael White

William Benson

VCU Health, Stony Point Medical Office Building, 8700 Stony Point Parkway, 804-828-9315

Vikram Brar

VCU Health, Nelson Clinic, 401 N. 11th St.; Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; 804-828CHOR (2467)

Joseph D. Iuorno

Commonwealth Eye Care Associates, 3855 Gaskins Road, 804-217-6363

Jessica Randolph

VCU Health, Stony Point Medical Office Building, 8700 Stony Point Parkway; Nelson Clinic, 401 N. 11th St.; 804-828-9315

Evan Silverstein

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health Stony Point Medical Office Building, 8700 Stony Point Parkway; 804828-CHOR (2467)

OPTOMETRY

Patricia A. Daylor Family Vision Care of Richmond, 4114 Innslake Drive, Glen Allen, 804-217-9883

Kyra Dorgeloh

VCU Health Stony Point Medical Office Building, 8700 Stony Point Parkway, 804-828-9315

Shawn H. Hobbs

Commonwealth Eye Care Associates,

3855 Gaskins Road, 804-217-6363

Jeff Michaels

Family Vision Care of Richmond, 4114 Innslake Drive, Glen Allen, 804-217-9883

Gerald Neidigh Jr. Grove Eye Care, 3601 Grove Ave., 804-353-3937

Ashley Parsons

Grove Eye Care, 3601 Grove Ave., 804-353-3937

Lenna Walker

VCU Health Stony Point Medical Office Building, 8700 Stony Point Parkway; Nelson Clinic, 401 N. 11th St.; 804-828-9315

ORTHOPEDICSGENERAL Greg Golladay

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; 804-828-7069

Mark M. Jones

OrthoVirginia, 1400 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite A, 804-379-8088

Stephen L. Kates

VCU Health, Adult Outpatient Pavilion, 1001 E. Leigh St., 804-828-7069

Paul G. Kiritsis

OrthoVirginia, 1400 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite A, 804-379-8088

William E. “Bill” Nordt OrthoVirginia, 7650 E. Parham Road, Suite 100, 804-288-3136

OTOLARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLARYNGOLOGIC SURGERY Brian Fishero

Commonwealth Ear, Nose and Throat Specialists, 5875 Bremo Road, South Medical Building, Suite 212, 804-525-4231

Julie Kerr

Commonwealth Ear, Nose and Throat Specialists,

5875 Bremo Road, South Medical Building, Suite 212, 804-525-4231

James T. May

Virginia Ear Nose & Throat, 3450 Mayland Court; 7485 Right Flank Road, Suite 210, Mechanicsville; 161 Wadsworth Drive, Midlothian; 4700 Puddledock Road, Suite 100, Prince George; 804-484-3700

Evan Reiter

VCU Health Nelson Clinic, 401 N. 11th St.; VCU Health at Stony Point 9109, 9109 Stony Point Drive; VCU Massey Cancer Center, 1300 E. Marshall St.; 804-762-6161

Wayne Shaia

The Balance and Ear Center, 10200 Three Chopt Road, 804-288-3277

PAIN MANAGEMENT John Barsanti

Commonwealth Spine & Pain Specialists, Medical Office Building Northwest, 1501 Maple Ave., Suite 301, 804-288-7246

Andrew W. Chapman VCU Health, Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St., 800-762-6161

Peter Duke Crane

CJW Pain Management, 1011 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 230, 804-267-6820

Yaoming Gu

National Spine & Pain Centers, 1630 Wilkes Ridge Parkway, 804-270-7262

Stephen P. Long

Commonwealth Spine & Pain Specialists, Medical Office Building Northwest, 1501 Maple Ave., Suite 301, 804-288-7246

Benjamin G. Seeman

Integrative Pain Specialists, 6900 Forest Ave., Suite 310, 804-249-8888

(cont’d)

PALLIATIVE CARE Erin Alesi

VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-5116

Virginia Boothe

Bon Secours Palliative Medicine, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB North, Suite 403, 804-288COPE (2673)

Amy Foster

Virginia Cancer Institute, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite 100, 804-330-7990

Cara Jennings

Bon Secours Palliative Medicine, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB North, Suite 403, 804-288COPE (2673)

Kelly Lastrapes

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-2467; medical director, Bon Secours Noah’s Children, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 703; 804-287-7686

Danielle Noreika

VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-7999

Meera Pahuja

VCU Health, VCU Massey Cancer Center, North Hospital, 1300 E. Marshall St., 804-828-7999

Vidya Raghavan

Bon Secours Palliative Medicine, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB North, Suite 403, 804-288COPE (2673)

Leanne Yanni

Vice president, medical affairs, Bon Secours Richmond

Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, Monument Pathologists, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-281-8100

Woon Chow

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 800-762-6161

Dharam M. Ramnani Virginia Urology, 9101 Stony Point Drive, 804-330-9105

Kimberly Sanford

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 800-762-6161

Steven Smith

VCU Health, 1200 E. Marshall St., 800-762-6161

John W. Turner

Forward Pathology Solutions, Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 1602 Skipwith Road; Johnston-Willis Hospital, 1401 Johnston Willis Drive; 804-483-5146

PEDIATRIC ADOLESCENT MEDICINE

Stephanie Crewe Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Mayland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804828-CHOR (2467)

An Pham

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Maryland Medical Center, 3470 Mayland Court; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Charles Terry

RVA Pediatrics, 10410 Ridgefield Parkway, 804-754-3776; 7000 Patterson Ave., 804-282-9706; 14400 Sommerville Court, Midlothian, 804-379-5437

PATHOLOGY

PEDIATRIC ALLERGY/ IMMUNOLOGY

Department chair for pathology, Bon

Allergy Partners of Richmond, 7605

Cliff Lee Bridges

Michael Blumberg

Yellow highlight denotes top vote-getter in category.

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TOP DOCS 2022 WINNERS

(cont’d)

Brad McQuilkin

Anil R. Kumar

Juan Villalona

Clifton C. Lee

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Bremo Road, 5855 Bremo Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Bon Secours Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Associates, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 306, 804-281-8303

Pediatric Gastroenterology of Richmond, The Highland II Medical Office Building, 7229 Forest Ave., Suite 106, 804-888-7337

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-828-0951

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Chesterfield Meadows, 6433 Centralia Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 2305 N. Parham Road, 804-828CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY/ ONCOLOGY

RVA Allergy, 7229 Forest Ave., Suite 104, 804-285-5000 Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Richmond Emergency Physicians, medical director, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital Pediatric Emergency Department, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 210, 804-287-7066

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Chesterfield Meadows, 6433 Centralia Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Richmond Emergency Physicians, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital Emergency Department, 5855 Bremo Road, Suite 210, 804-287-7066

Forest Ave., Suite 103, 804-288-0055

Anne-Marie Irani

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Santhosh Kumar

Kelley von Elten

Brant Ward

Wei Zhao

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY Douglas Allen

UVA Pediatric Cardiology Richmond, 5875 Bremo Road, Suite 500, 804-297-3055

Kerri Carter

Robin Foster

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9111

Randall Geldreich

Chris Johnson

Frank Petruzella

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9111

Jonathan Silverman Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9111

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Ridgefield Parkway, 2200 Pump Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Chris Woleben

Children’s National Hospital Cardiology Richmond, 7603 Forest Ave., Suite 401, 804-285-1611

Anshu Gupta

Mary L. Falterman

Scott D. Gullquist

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; VCU Health at Ridgefield Parkway, 2200 Pump Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1213 E. Clay St., 804-828-9111

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 2305 N. Parham Road, 804-828CHOR (2467)

Elna Kochummen

Bon Secours Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Associates, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 306, 804-287-7322

Bryce Nelson

Mareen Thomas

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 2305 N. Parham Road, 804-828CHOR (2467)

Francis Tintani

Bon Secours Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Associates, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 306, 804-281-8303

Edmond (Trey) Wickham

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St.; Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 2305 N. Parham Road; 804828-CHOR (2467)

Madhu Gowda

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, Massey Cancer Center, Children’s Pavilion, 1000 E. Broad St., 804828-CHOR (2467)

Jordyn Griffin

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-CHOR (2467), VCU Massey Cancer Center

Mariekea Helou

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-CHOR (2467), VCU Massey Cancer Center

Gita V. Massey

David Marcello

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-828-0951

Matthew Schefft

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-0951

Ashlie Tseng

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-0951

PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE

Jeffrey Donowitz Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

David J. Friedel

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-CHOR (2467), VCU Massey Cancer Center

India Y. Sisler

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Bon Secours Pediatric Gastroenterology Associates, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 605, 804-281-8303

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-CHOR (2467), VCU Massey Cancer Center

William C. Koch

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC HOSPITALIST

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Carl B. Rountree Jr.

Praveen K.C. Selvakumar

Bon Secours Pediatric Gastroenterology Associates, 5855 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 605, 804-281-8303

Flora Szabo

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Narendra Vadlamudi Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Elizabeth Aarons pediatric hospitalist, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-281-8222, clinical faculty of Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU

Christine Cook

pediatric hospitalist, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-281-8222, clinical faculty of Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU

Emily Godbout

Suzanne R. Lavoie

Beth C. Marshall

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC INTENSIVIST

Arif Syed Alam HCA Chippenham Hospital Sheridan Children’s Healthcare, 7101 Jahnke

Road, Suite 735, 804-483-2720

Kara D. Greenfield Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-828-0951

Eric Jarandeh

HCA Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, 1602 Skipwith Road, 804-289-4500

Oliver Karam

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-828-0951

Mark Marinello

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1250 E. Marshall St., 804-828-0951

Michael Miller

Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital PICU medical director, 5801 Bremo Road, 804-281-8222; clinical faculty of Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU

PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY

Timothy Bunchman Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Megan Lo

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

Winslow J. Borkowski Jr. Bon Secours Pediatric Neurology Clinic, 5875 Bremo Road, MOB South, Suite 303, 804-281-8303

Amy Harper

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Lawrence D. Morton Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

Yellow highlight denotes top vote-getter in category.

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TOP DOCS 2022 WINNERS SURGERY (ORTHOPEDIC)

N. Douglas Boardman VCU Health, Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; Stony Point 9000, 9000 Stony Point Parkway; 804-828-7069

Greg Golladay

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; Stony Point 9000, 9000 Stony Point Parkway; 804-828-7069

Mark M. Jones

William E. “Bill” Nordt

Jed Vanichkachorn

Rachit Shah

Adrian Cotterell

OrthoVirginia, 7650 E. Parham Road, Suite 100, 804-288-3136

Bon Secours Tuckahoe Orthopaedics, 1501 Maple Ave., Suite 200, 804-285-2300

VCU Health, Stony Point 9000, 9000 Stony Point Parkway, 800-762-6161

VCU Health, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804-828-4104; Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828CHOR (2467)

SURGERY (SPINE) Brian Cameron

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St.; 804-828-9165

Adam Crowl

OrthoVirginia, 13801 St. Francis Blvd., Suite 200, Midlothian, 804-379-2414

Matthew T. Mayr

OrthoVirginia, 1400 Johnston Willis Drive, Suite A, 804-379-8088

Neurosurgical Associates, 1651 N. Parham Road, 804-288-8204

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St, 804828-7069

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St., 804828-7069

Stephen L. Kates

(cont’d)

Rick J. Placide

SURGERY (THORACIC)

Graham Bundy Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates, 7611 Forest Ave., Suite 250, 804-282-8777

Anthony Cassano VCU Health, Stony Point 9000, 9000 Stony Point Parkway; Ambulatory Care Center, 417 N. 11th St.; 800-762-6161

Leo Gazoni

Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates, 7101 Jahnke Road, Suite 500, 804-320-2751

Daniel Woolley

Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates, 7101 Jahnke Road, Suite 500, 804-320-2751

SURGERY (TRANSPLANT) Kenneth Brown

Richmond Surgical Group, 7611 Forest Ave. Suite 300, 804-968-4435

David Bruno

VCU Health, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, 1200 E. Marshall St., 804828-4104; Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804828-CHOR (2467)

Ralph E. Layman

E. Marshall St.; 804828-4104; Stony Point 9109, 9109 Stony Point Drive, 804-828-4104

SURGERY (TRAUMA)

Michel Aboutanos VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St., 800-762-6161

Richmond Surgical Group, 7611 Forest Ave. Suite 300, 804-968-4435

Stanley Kurek

VCU Health, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, 1200 E. Marshall St.; Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, 1000 E. Broad St., 804-828-4104

Ralph E. Layman

TIE Marlon F. Levy

TIE Amit Sharma

VCU Health, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, 1200

Extant Trauma Surgery, 7101 Jahnke Road, Suite 260, 804-716-7758 Richmond Surgical Group, 7611 Forest Ave.; Suite 206, 804-968-4435

Stephan Walter Leichtle

VCU Health, 417 N. 11th St.; Short Pump Pavilion, 11958 W. Broad St., 800-762-6161

Yellow highlight denotes top vote-getter in category.

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