Richmond magazine - July 2021

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LOCAL

Q&A

AT WHAT PRICE? Virginia Council on Problem Gambling President Carolyn Hawley runs down the possible social costs of a Richmond casino

Richmond magazine: What is problem gambling, and how is it different from gambling addiction?

Carolyn Hawley: If we want to be strict,

gambling disorder is the specific disorder [with criteria including] increasing financial problems related to gambling, lying about your gambling, and an inability to cut back or stop. When we look at these criteria, we know it’s very similar to substance use disorder. Now, for problem gambling … it could be somebody maybe isn’t exhibiting these criteria, but they’re still having problems related to their gambling, and they may be developing a gambling disorder, so we use it [as] an umbrella for people with gambling disorders and people who may be on the road toward having a gambling disorder.

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Carolyn Hawley, president of the Virginia Council on Problem Gambling

RM: Have resources for problem gambling prevention and treatment been effectively bolstered in proportion to the growing effort to bring casinos into Virginia?

Hawley: The sports betting and casino legislation that [was] passed [by the General Assembly in 2020] also had a provision for the Problem Gambling Treatment Fund, so a portion of revenue from sports betting and casinos will be designated towards prevention, education and treatment for gambling disorder. As more funds become available, this is what’s going to be the impetus, which I’m really excited about, with regards to providing treatment resources for individuals in the state because we are limited right now. RM: Virginia’s expansion into legalized gambling ramped up over the past year, with state lawmakers opening the doors to sports betting and casino resorts. What would a Richmond casino mean for city residents who struggle with problem gambling?

Hawley: I certainly understand the push in the state, especially for citizens and in those communities that are looking at casinos and gambling as an economic panacea. However, if the state is going to do that, people have to recognize there are going to be individuals who develop problems related to gambling, and the best thing we can do is prevent those problems before they happen. That means we need to have increased awareness and prevention activities so that somebody who is

starting to crave gambling more [and] may be starting to have some problems … understands that these are the early signs of an addiction and that they need to pull back. … We have to balance the economic costs with those social costs, and the sooner a person receives help for gambling addiction, the easier it is to stop that progression of the illness.

RM: Urban One has agreed to spend up to $200,000 annually on resources to prevent and treat problem gambling in Richmond. How should those funds be directed to mitigate potential harm from this casino project?

Hawley: Certainly toward prevention efforts, and starting … within our schools, teaching children about the risks of gambling. We need more awareness within our faith communities [on] how to work with parishioners who may be having problems, our primary care providers have to recognize that if somebody is starting to have some symptoms … associated with gambling disorder, that they start asking about their gambling so that we’re correctly identifying some of the causes. That requires a significant effort of awareness and prevention [to be] put forth. I want to catch people before they develop a problem because the problem is so devastating. —Rodrigo Arriaza Virginians struggling with gambling disorder can call the Virginia Council on Problem Gambling’s 24-hour toll-free help line at 888-532-3500.

ASH DANIEL

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ith Richmond City Council approving media company Urban One’s proposed ONE Casino + Resort project on June 14, the South Side casino proposal appears to be headed toward a Nov. 2 voter referendum, pending approval from the Virginia Lottery Board and Richmond Circuit Court. Richmond officials say the sprawling 2.9 million-squarefoot development will generate more than $170 million toward the city’s general fund in its first five years, including a $25 million upfront payment to the city if the referendum succeeds. Ahead of this fall’s vote, Virginia Council on Problem Gambling President Carolyn Hawley shares her thoughts on the potential social costs associated with opening a casino in the city, as well as how gaming revenues should be spent to minimize possible harm in the community. The VCPG is a nonprofit advocacy group focused on education, prevention and treatment for those struggling with gambling disorder.

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LOCAL

A COMING SURGE? Local and state groups fear a housing crisis after the CDC eviction moratorium is lifted

H

ousing advocates say the end of the Centers for Disease Control’s eviction moratorium on June 30 puts tens of thousands of people in the Richmond region at risk of homelessness. The moratorium, which delayed eviction proceedings for those struggling financially because of COVID-19, had been in effect since Sept. 4 of last year. While it’s not clear how many people may be evicted, statewide data on the Virginia Rent Relief Program (RRP) shows that payments from June 2020 to May 2021 totaled more than $195 million, with 41,744 payments processed to 34,914 households statewide. This figure does not include Chesterfield County, which opted to administer its own rent relief programs. Christie Marra, director of housing

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advocacy at the Virginia Poverty Law Center (VPLC), is concerned that landlords also will no longer be required to provide tenants with information about how to apply for rental assistance, nor will they be obligated to apply for rental assistance on behalf of their tenants. To access the current RRP funds, which come from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, renters must present documentation affirming that they have lost income or had increased medical expenses because of COVID-19 and, as a result, they cannot pay their rent. “If they give that form to their landlord, the landlord cannot physically evict them,” Marra says. VPLC is lobbying Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam to issue an executive order that will keep the budget language in place that requires landlords to provide

information and assistance to tenants applying for rent relief funds, in order to keep people housed and avoid rental roadblocks in their futures. “Many landlords use third-party vendors to get rental history and look at prospective renters’ court records to look at payment records from prior landlords,” Marra says. “Most will not rent to someone who has any kind of eviction activity on their record. It’s a ‘Scarlet E’ on the tenant’s record and makes it difficult for that tenant to get good quality housing.” In 2016, Richmond made national news when the Eviction Lab at Princeton University found that the city had the second highest eviction rate in the country at 11.4%. The latest study from the RVA Eviction Lab at Virginia Commonwealth University on 2021’s first quarter shows the highest concentration of evictions in Richmond were found in ZIP codes in the East End, Southside and North Side — neighborhoods hit hard by the pandemic. During that time period, there were 128 evictions in Richmond, 108 in Henrico and 75 in Chesterfield through the courts, despite the moratorium; some people did not fill out the required paperwork to qualify. Ben Teresa, RVA Eviction Lab’s co-director, believes the CDC moratorium simply delayed an inevitable surge of evictions that he expects will occur upon its expiration. Marra and Teresa say having fewer evictions during the pandemic doesn’t tell the whole story because courts were closed for extended periods. Marra adds that these figures also don’t include those who moved when they couldn’t pay their rent or after their first eviction notice, nor do they show how far behind people are in their rent. Teresa says other harmful trends like leases not being renewed continue to be a problem. “The long-term issues like the lack of affordable housing and high levels of unemployment still haven’t been addressed,” he says. —Dina Weinstein

VICTORIA BORGES

HOUSING

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

— at VCU in 2003. Her main focus of practice is dentures, implant restorations and cosmetics. Dr. Ward is certified in oral conscious sedation and speaks Spanish fluently. She also has a special interest in sleep apnea. Dr. Ward has held a parttime faculty appointment at VCU since 1999 and lectures locally and regionally. She is the current president of the Richmond Dental Society, and secretary for the Richmond Association of Women Dentists, holds memberships in the American Dental Association, American Association of Women Dentists, Academy of Osseointegration, American Association of Dental Sleep Medicine, International College of Dentists, Spear Education Faculty Club and Pierre Fauchard and Omicron Kappa Upsilon Honors Societies. She has also been a member of the Board of Advisors for the General Practice Department at the VCU School of Dentistry. advanceddentistryva.com or 804-270-7940

Medical GASTROINTESTINAL SPECIALISTS, INC. Forty-five is the new 50. Someone born in 1990 has twice the risk of developing colon cancer and four times the risk of developing rectal cancer as someone born in 1960. It’s a scary statistic, and processed foods may be the underlying cause. It’s why the American Cancer Society and others now urge Americans to get their first colonoscopy at age 45. It’s fully covered by insurance most of the time. We specialize in finding — and removing — growths before they become cancer. If you are between the ages of 45 and 50, or if you are older than 50 and have never been screened, please call us at 804-285-8206 to schedule your screening colonoscopy. Thank you from the physicians and staff of Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc.

GROVE EYE CARE Grove Eye Care’s mission statement is to make it our goal and policy to treat our patients as we would treat our families. We offer a high-quality, friendly service in a gentle, caring atmosphere. Our patients are the heart of our practice and the reason we are here. The optometrists at Grove Eye Care use the latest technology and stay on the cutting edge of optometry to ensure the highest quality eye care for all our patients. We provide routine vision care, specialty contact lens fits, low-vision services, and treatment of

eye diseases and ocular emergencies. Drs. Kiraly, MacMillan, Neidigh, Parsons, Levy, and our entire staff, pledge and guarantee that we will always do our very best to serve you. groveeyecare.com

HAMPTON UNIVERSITY PROTON THERAPY INSTITUTE One-third of all brain tumors are malignant. Proton therapy is a viable option to treat brain cancer because the charged particles used in this modality allow the beam range to be controlled — this results in the treatment of approximately 70% less healthy surrounding, extremely sensitive tissue. The ability of proton therapy to be targeted in such an extremely precise manner enables physicians to attack malignancies while limiting risk to healthy brain tissue and sensitive spinal nerves, which significantly reduces side effects, including neurological dysfunction. After recently celebrating its 10-year anniversary, Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) has treated more than 3,500 patients for prostate, breast, lung, brain and spine, GI, pediatric, and other cancers. Ask your oncologist about proton therapy today. hamptonproton.org

SHELTERING ARMS INSTITUTE — A COLLABORATION WITH VCU HEALTH Sheltering Arms and VCU Health have taken the best of themselves to create something new – a physical rehabilitation hospital unlike any other in the world. We’re reinventing rehabilitation for life beyond limits by combining the best technology, research, and clinical care to create the most advanced rehabilitation and healing environment to help patients get better, faster. The 212,063-square-foot facility is constructed specifically for physical rehabilitation with features including all private patient rooms, multiple specialty units, four therapy gyms, research space, state-of-the-art patient care technology and rehabilitation equipment, and more. Sheltering Arms Institute is conveniently located just west of Short Pump near the intersection of Broad Street Road and Route 288. For more information, visit ShelteringArmsInstitute.com or call 804-877-4000.

SHELTERING ARMS PHYSICAL REHABILITATION CENTERS Are you in pain? Have you had surgery? Do you want to get back in the game? Sheltering

Arms is the #1 choice for physical rehabilitation in central Virginia (in Virginia Living Top Hospitals, OurHealth Richmond, and Richmond Magazine Top Docs). From a pulled muscle to back pain, concussion to stroke, and any other illness or injury, we can help you get your life back. Sheltering Arms’ expert clinicians utilize advanced technology including robotic exoskeletons and anti-gravity treadmills to treat a wide variety of orthopedic and neurological conditions. We offer a complete range of outpatient physical rehabilitation and wellness services at many locations to conveniently serve you. To learn more, visit ShelteringArms.com, call 804-764-1000, or visit us on Facebook.

VIRGINIA ARRHYTHMIA CONSULTANTS We are the only medical practice in Central Virginia devoted entirely to management of heart rhythm disorders. Our goal is to provide compassionate, state-of-the-art and high-quality care to patients with cardiac arrhythmias. With latest advances in cardiac electrophysiology, essentially all heart rhythm disorders are amenable to treatment and many are permanently cured. Our highly experienced physicians utilize the latest tools and techniques and have performed hundreds of ablations and device surgeries to improve our patients’ quality of life and extend their life expectancy. Our mission statement is “Providing excellence in arrhythmia treatment with the highest quality and safety, through expert knowledge, stateof-the-art treatments, and individualized care.” Our professional staff aim to provide the same service to our patients as we would want for our family members. Your heart is in skilled hands. 804-410-9749 or vaheartbeat.com

VIRGINIA ORAL & FACIAL SURGERY For over 35 years, the VOFS goal has always been simple — to bring excellence in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery to the greater Richmond community. Drs. Niamtu, Keeney, Harris, Dymon, Wlodawsky, Watson, Agnihotri, Wheeler, Phelps, Herrera & Gardner are dedicated to patient safety, predictable outcomes and great communication. Procedures range from dental implants to facelifts, wisdom teeth to bone grafts and everything in between. All of the doctors here are committed to their profession and truly love what they do. Visit oralfacialsurgery.com.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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A&E

Datebook FILM | SCREENING

TELL ME MORE This month, fans of the iconic movie “Grease” can be transported back to when jukeboxes, Studebakers and poodle skirts reigned. The successful 1978 musical stars leather-clad Danny Zuko (John Travolta) and Australian exchange student Sandy Olsson (Olivia Newton-John), who fall in summer love but find themselves in separate cliques at their high school. This showing is the first of Venture Richmond’s Movies on the Island, which will feature four films on Brown’s Island this summer, beginning July 10. Attendees can enjoy refreshments from several vendors. Gates open an hour before the 8:30 p.m. showtime, with blankets and chairs recommended. $5. venturerichmond.com —Ryan Hudgins

MUSIC | CONCERT

For the past decade, Fitz and the Tantrums have been an impressive hit machine, churning out singalong pop-soul nuggets with co-vocalists Michael Fitzpatrick and Noelle Scaggs at the fore. You’ll still find disgruntled fans who think that the L.A.based band has yet to fulfill the promise of their grittier 2010 indie debut, “Picking up the Pieces,” but it’s hard to deny the blissful melodic power of recent radio staples like “The Walker” and “HandClap.” Last year, Fitzpatrick released a solo debut, “Head Up High,” that rivals the band’s 2019 effort, “All the Feels,” for high-energy, groove-driven spectacle. The forces will reunite on Brown’s Island on July 11 at 7 p.m. $15$239.95 (pod seating). thebroadberry.com —Don Harrison 76

JULY

TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY VENTURE RICHMOND; RHYS ASPLUNDH

ALL THE FEELS

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LIVING

FITNESS/WELLNESS

GETTING IN STEP Fitness and wellness nonprofit Sports Backers adjusts its offerings as pandemic restrictions ease By Tharon Giddens

A

COURTESY SPORTS BACKERS

s the masks come off, we need mond for Dominion Energy Riverrock, to get moving. which was held May 14-16. Four out of 10 AmeriBecause of the pandemic, last year the cans pre-pandemic were Monument Avenue 10K was delayed until overweight or obese, September, and Riverrock was not held. and 42% of adults who participated in a Sports Backers also transformed many survey released in March by the Ameriactivities into virtual classes or events can Psychological Association said they and has modified other activities. For had gained unwanted pounds over the example, this year, the 10K was not held course of the pandemic, with an average along Monument Avenue, the street that gain of 29 pounds. gave it its name; instead it was staged over If you’re looking for outlets to burn three days in Byrd Park and at Henrico off some calories, Sports Backers is here County’s Dorey Park. to help. The nonprofit promotes fitness Even in the face of such challenges, outand wellness with programs and events in door, active sports are thriving right now, metro Richmond including Kids Run RVA, but there’s “potentially still going to be a Fitness Warriors and the Ukrop’s Monuroller coaster” of COVID-19-related activity ment Avenue 10K presented by that requires vigilance and being Ukrop’s 10K participants Kroger, which was staged June ready to react to maintain safety, in Byrd Park (left) and 3-6 this year. Sports Backers also says Jon Lugbill, Sports Backers’ along the Capital Trail in Dorey Park (right) partners with Venture Richexecutive director.

People are feeling more secure, and that’s showing up in event registration, such as for the VCU Health Richmond Marathon, which is set for Nov. 13. Runners have been signing up at pre-pandemic levels since January, when vaccines began to roll out, Lugbill says. Being vaccinated “changes your perspective — you start to feel there’s a safe way” to take part in the event. As it stands, the Monument Avenue 10K will return to its namesake route for 2022, serving as a symbol of an end to the darker days of COVID-19. “It’s going to be a huge celebration in putting the pandemic behind us,” he says. Programs at Sports Backers have evolved in accordance with safety guidelines. Fitness classes were canceled, then some returned virtually, then as outdoor offerings, and as of July, indoor instruction returns, Lugbill says. Virtual instruction proved to have its niche, and some of those classes will likely continue, as will some outdoor classes. As concerns about social distancing outdoors ease, there will be less need to hold events over multiple days, but open start times may remain, Lugbill says. “It makes it convenient for people and kind of makes it fit different people’s needs.” R

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Celebrates Virginia’s Finest

MEET OUR 2021 RICHMOND HONOREES RICHMOND-BASED HONOREES

JAMES GIUDICE

Williams Mullen, Attorney

Served 4 years active duty and 8 years reserve as an Officer in the U.S. Marine Corps Current Board of Directors Member of Goodwill Services, Inc., and the Advisory Board for Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia CF Inspiration: the wife of one of the marines he served with

ALAINA YUHAS

Walgreens, Specialty Staff Pharmacist

Opened a new Walgreens Specialty Pharmacy in Norfolk, VA in 2017 First-time mom to baby Eli in April 2020 CF Inspiration: the patients she works with at Walgreens Mom to Eli who was born in April 2020

SETH SCHEMAHORN

The Pace of Richmond at Keller Williams Realty, Realtor & Sales Director

His real estate team served 107 families in 2020 Has played guitar for 21 years, and toured with a band full-time for several years Enjoys mountain and road biking, camping, travel, and investment

CASEY GRUBBS

EMILY JANTO

MEGHAN WRIGHT

KATHERINE WHITTON

A Founder of the ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation Ambassador Program Graduate of the 2019 RVA MENTOR Richmond Program Small Business Owner

Chair of Junior League of Richmond Special Events Committee Member of the Young Professional Board for the Virginia Home for Boys and Girls Has visited all 48 contiguous United States

Sports Backers Presidents Council Committee Leader Finished an Ironman, Triathalon, and 4 Marathons CF Inspiration: friend (and former VA Finest CF Ambassador) Ella Balasa

Bon Secours RVA Health Care Foundation Volunteer Safety Coach for Bon Secours Richmond Radiation Oncology Departments, 2017-2020 CF Inspiration: High school classmate Lucy Saladino

Dominion Payroll, Accounting Specialist

University of Richmond, Gift Entry & Record Coordinator

Diversified Oil & Gas, Manager, Commercial Midstream

Galen College of Nursing, Healthcare Partnerships Manager

ANDREA MOLZHON

MASON LITTLE

KAYLA WILLIAMS

Former Board Member of the Museum District’s Woman’s Club Holds PhD in Developmental Psychology Proud fifth generation Richmonder

Also works part-time at Agecroft Hall & Gardens University of Richmond (B.A.), Virginia Commonwealth University (M.A.) First in his family to receive a master’s degree

Recently hosted an art drive for ChildSavers at Ironwood Automotive Freelance social media manager First-time mom and new business owner in 2020

RACHEL ADAMS

NIGEL WILLIAMS

DR. CHRISTOPHER DOERN

Former Associate Trustee, Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs Former Head Coach, Girls on the Run of Greater Richmond A Massachusetts native and diehard New England sports fan

Art Teacher/Mentor at Bon Air Juvenile Corrections Facility 2019 Finalist for Richmond Times-Dispatch Making a Difference List Played professional football for both the Buffalo Bills and Arizona Cardinals

Primary focuses of research include better understanding the diagnosis of infectious diseases in children, and developing methods to understand the impact of new technology on patient care 2014 Winner of Young Investigation Award, Mass Spectrometry: Applications to the Clinical Lab Co-Founder of the Medical Microbiology Question of the Day

VCU Health System, Project UPLIFT Manager & CF Study Coordinator

ThompsonMcMullan, Associate Attorney

BrownGreer PLC, Claims Examiner

AGILI, Portfolio/Investment Administrator

Ironwood Automotive, CoOwner; Marketing & Social Media

NATHAN LUKESON

Vaco, Sr. Associate, Business Development Technology Member of Richmond Cycling Association Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Proudest Accomplishment: raising his daughter to be a kind and impactful citizen

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Director of Clinical Microbiology

ADDITIONAL VIRGINIA’S FINEST HONOREES from Charlottesville, Hampton Roads and Roanoke

DR. MATTHEW BERNENS • ROB CAMPBELL • LENNY CRAIG • DANNY FLAD AMANDA GRACE • STEVE HARRISON • CHELSEA HOLT • ALEX JACOB DIERDRE JENNINGS • AMANDA SOVIK-JOHNSTON • WILL STEPHENSON ERICA THARRINGTON • HILLORI WALSH • COLLIN WILSON

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DIRECTIONAL: GETTY IMAGES PHOTO CREDIT

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Celebrates Virginia’s Finest

MEET OUR 2021 RICHMOND HONOREES RICHMOND-BASED HONOREES

JAMES GIUDICE

Williams Mullen, Attorney

Served 4 years active duty and 8 years reserve as an Officer in the U.S. Marine Corps Current Board of Directors Member of Goodwill Services, Inc., and the Advisory Board for Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia CF Inspiration: the wife of one of the marines he served with

ALAINA YUHAS

Walgreens, Specialty Staff Pharmacist

Opened a new Walgreens Specialty Pharmacy in Norfolk, VA in 2017 First-time mom to baby Eli in April 2020 CF Inspiration: the patients she works with at Walgreens Mom to Eli who was born in April 2020

SETH SCHEMAHORN

The Pace of Richmond at Keller Williams Realty, Realtor & Sales Director

His real estate team served 107 families in 2020 Has played guitar for 21 years, and toured with a band full-time for several years Enjoys mountain and road biking, camping, travel, and investment

CASEY GRUBBS

EMILY JANTO

MEGHAN WRIGHT

KATHERINE WHITTON

A Founder of the ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation Ambassador Program Graduate of the 2019 RVA MENTOR Richmond Program Small Business Owner

Chair of Junior League of Richmond Special Events Committee Member of the Young Professional Board for the Virginia Home for Boys and Girls Has visited all 48 contiguous United States

Sports Backers Presidents Council Committee Leader Finished an Ironman, Triathalon, and 4 Marathons CF Inspiration: friend (and former VA Finest CF Ambassador) Ella Balasa

Bon Secours RVA Health Care Foundation Volunteer Safety Coach for Bon Secours Richmond Radiation Oncology Departments, 2017-2020 CF Inspiration: High school classmate Lucy Saladino

Dominion Payroll, Accounting Specialist

University of Richmond, Gift Entry & Record Coordinator

Diversified Oil & Gas, Manager, Commercial Midstream

Galen College of Nursing, Healthcare Partnerships Manager

ANDREA MOLZHON

MASON LITTLE

KAYLA WILLIAMS

Former Board Member of the Museum District’s Woman’s Club Holds PhD in Developmental Psychology Proud fifth generation Richmonder

Also works part-time at Agecroft Hall & Gardens University of Richmond (B.A.), Virginia Commonwealth University (M.A.) First in his family to receive a master’s degree

Recently hosted an art drive for ChildSavers at Ironwood Automotive Freelance social media manager First-time mom and new business owner in 2020

RACHEL ADAMS

NIGEL WILLIAMS

DR. CHRISTOPHER DOERN

Former Associate Trustee, Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs Former Head Coach, Girls on the Run of Greater Richmond A Massachusetts native and diehard New England sports fan

Art Teacher/Mentor at Bon Air Juvenile Corrections Facility 2019 Finalist for Richmond Times-Dispatch Making a Difference List Played professional football for both the Buffalo Bills and Arizona Cardinals

Primary focuses of research include better understanding the diagnosis of infectious diseases in children, and developing methods to understand the impact of new technology on patient care 2014 Winner of Young Investigation Award, Mass Spectrometry: Applications to the Clinical Lab Co-Founder of the Medical Microbiology Question of the Day

VCU Health System, Project UPLIFT Manager & CF Study Coordinator

ThompsonMcMullan, Associate Attorney

BrownGreer PLC, Claims Examiner

AGILI, Portfolio/Investment Administrator

Ironwood Automotive, CoOwner; Marketing & Social Media

NATHAN LUKESON

Vaco, Sr. Associate, Business Development Technology Member of Richmond Cycling Association Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Proudest Accomplishment: raising his daughter to be a kind and impactful citizen

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Director of Clinical Microbiology

ADDITIONAL VIRGINIA’S FINEST HONOREES from Charlottesville, Hampton Roads and Roanoke

DR. MATTHEW BERNENS • ROB CAMPBELL • LENNY CRAIG • DANNY FLAD AMANDA GRACE • STEVE HARRISON • CHELSEA HOLT • ALEX JACOB DIERDRE JENNINGS • AMANDA SOVIK-JOHNSTON • WILL STEPHENSON ERICA THARRINGTON • HILLORI WALSH • COLLIN WILSON

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