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Contents

mar/apr 2011

58

D E PA R T M E N T S

16

features 36

BALCONY BLISS

A second marriage and a new lifestyle at the Vistas on the James

44

FEB JAN/

R TCHAPTE THENEX

MOVING

ERE TO A DIFF AHE AD

16

Experts

18

The Hunt

22

At Home

24

Favorites

28

Harry’s History

52 58

72

SHARED SYMPATHIES

PASSOVER CELEBRATION

One family’s seder recipes

An unassuming exterior disguises the surprise inside.

The Goods

30

The owners of Rattle & Roll make three generations at home.

A TUSCAN VILLA IN GLEN ALLEN

13

Plus: Resource Listings on Page 66

76 78 80

Fresh florals

Ken Roeper makes your chandelier shine. Closet envy

Home is where the heart is — mostly Designer David Barden and his well-traveled Southern style

The birth of plastics on Grove Avenue

Gardening

An interview with Susie Coelho of HGTV

Occasions

The VCA hosts the Virginia Society AIA’s 2011 Awards for Excellence in Architecture.

Calendar

A few of our favorite events

Q&A

Leigh Burke explains the best way to downsize.

The Back Page

A grab bag of websites, books and products

2011

E AND SPAC D OF LIFE NT KIN

ABOUT THE COVER: Barry Fitzgerald photo CL A SSICS

Dougie Bowman and Bob Scudder found a new NewDITIONALS perspective and a new life together. TRA

Plus: ion Celebrat Passover ens lho Gard Susie Coe Villa Tuscan Fantasy erations Roof Three Gen Under One

Dreams HIC | Spring UE GOT Super Bowl UMENT AVEN Southern | MON Design erware Craft + -Kind Dinn One-of-a

TWIST WITH A

rhome

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L e f t : B e t h F u r g u r s o n p h o t o ; R i g h t : Ja m e s D i c k i n s o n p h o t o

rhomemag.com

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R I C H M O N D

L I V E S

from the publishers of richmond magazine President/Publisher Richard Malkman Editor-in-chief Susan Winiecki MANAGING editor Brandon Fox senior editors H O Andrews, W R I CTina HM OND LIVES Kate Eshleman Contributing Writers Elizabeth Cogar Batty, Courtney Crane Dauer, Maureen Egan, Valley Haggard, Katherine Houstoun, Susan Howson, Sara Jackson, Harry Kollatz Jr., Megan Marconyak, Kris Spisak

R I C H M O N D

H O M E

&

EDITORIAL INTERN Meredith Rigsby

G A R D E N

CREATIVE Director Steve Hedberg Contributing Photographers Kip Dawkins, Barry Fitzgerald, Beth Furgurson, Jay Paul, Sarah Walor, Jeff Saxman, Todd Wright CONTRIBUTING Stylist Jonathan Janis Contributing illustrator Bob Scott Sales Director Rich Malkman SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Scott Bunce, Steve Coffield, Martha Hebert, Kelly McCauley AD GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rebecca Boarman

Marketing and circulation director Debbie McCaffrey

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Telephone 804-355-0111 Main Fax 804-355-5442 Editorial and Art Fax 804-355-8939 E-mail editor@rhomemag.com Subscription Rate: $14 per one year (6 issues R•Home and 12 issues Richmond Magazine). Single copy price is $3.95. Allow 4 to 6 weeks to begin delivery. R•Home, published bimonthly; Richmond Magazine, published monthly; and Richmond Surroundings Magazine are products of Target Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.

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Editor’s Letter

Transformations

W

EXTRAS

CORRECTION In the last issue, Don Cully of Grandfather’s Chair Shop was our expert, but we failed to include contact information. You can reach him at (804) 262-7694.

e all are forced to change the way we live, from time to time. You might get a new job in another part of the country or find yourself in too large CLARIFICATION Interior designer a house now that your children are Gary Inman, now director of gone. You might even find someone hospitality and residential design new and decide to start a life together for Glave & Holmes Architecture, — from scratch. collaborated on the interior In this issue, we’re taking a look décor of the Monument Avenue at three different ways people reconowned by Joe Hill and Jim Gunn figured where they lived to accommoand featured in the last issue. date a new phase in their lives. Dougie Bowman lived in a tradiLee Aulick and Brandon Fox tional home in the West End until she THOSE PATTERSON HOUSES, met Bob Scudder. When they decided CONTINUED Mary Carolyn to marry, they chose a different way Harrison called to tell me that to begin again. They renovated and moved into a brand new condo. Now, we inadvertently reversed the with friends in the building and a vibrant social life, wine on a balcony overaddresses on the photographs. Her great-uncle and looking the James and downtown Richmond is the new normal. great-aunt, J. Wirt and Rosie Basham downsized from a big house in Raintree to a Laura Hancock, lived at small condo — but she hated it. So instead, she bought a house HOUSE 6512 Patterson Ave. smaller than her first one, but with room for visiting children and TOUR! She recalls that Wirt grandchildren. Her enormously talented cousins, Norman and Sunday, Hancock partnered in Diane Edwards, transformed what started as a basic white boxMarch 20 at the grocery business with 1 p.m. RSVP like house into an extravagant Italian villa. Harrison’s grandfather, to tour@ Ellen McDonald and her mother, Ann Butler, took a different W.N. “Willy” Korb. rhomemag. approach. They decided to live together. They found a house in com. Story Carolyn Wiltshire on Page 36. Mooreland Farms that provided both ample space for McDonald, Webb, who grew up her husband, John, and daughter Stella, and that also had an at 6514 Patterson from 1942 to 1955, wrote that English basement easy to convert into a full apartment for Ann. Rives Wiltshire — identified as the She has a separate entrance, her own parking and a complete kitchen — son of Ellsworth Wiltshire in the but Ann and her family are only a staircase apart. column — was not his son. — HK Here at R•Home, there have also been changes. Our indomitable managing art director, Lee Aulick, was able to transform her vision for what she wanted our magazine to express into color, lines and form. She gave R•Home a whole new look and feeling; her tireless hard work is on every page of the publication you hold in your hands now. The job’s not over — it’s always evolving, and you’ll see Lee’s perfectionism and creativity continue to shine in upcoming issues. I couldn’t be more grateful — or more lucky to have a partner as talented as Lee to bring our ideas to life. 6512 Patterson Ave.

BRANDON FOX brandonf@rhomemag.com

Don’t forget the R•Home Reader Favorites Awards!

We want to know what local businesses you think do the best job. Go online to rhomemag. com/rhomesurvey to fill out the ballot and let us know!

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Contributors

Jonathan Janis

Jonathan Janis is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University’s MFA program in interior environments. Passionate about all aspects of design, he believes in the power of a good floor plan as well as the power of good clothes. He studied political science and theater as an undergraduate, and that makes him uniquely suited to a career as an interior designer: one part diplomat to two parts showman. He has worked at Barbara Barry Inc., the Kennedy Center and the Walt Disney Co.

Elizabeth Cogar Elizabeth Cogar developed a love of domesticity as a child, rearranging the furniture in her dollhouse on a daily basis. As a grown-up, she has edited and written stories about everything home-related — furnishings, collections, additions, restorations, termites, treehouses, colors, textiles, gardens, vacuums, lighting, eco-building and much more.

Katherine Houstoun

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Beth Furgurson Beth Furgurson, a Richmond native, studied photography at the Art Institute of Atlanta. While in Georgia, she worked for clients such as Atlanta magazine and Nordstrom. Since moving back to Richmond, Beth has built her portrait photography business and worked for clients such as the Virginia Tourism Corp. and the State Fair of Virginia. 

For a complete list of newsstand locations, visit richmondmagazine.com

10

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Freelance writer Katherine Houstoun has been covering style, shopping and design in Richmond for almost six years. Her experience renovating a historic 1870 home in Church Hill taught the Houston native three things: It’s better not to know what you’re getting into. (She didn’t.) It always takes longer than you expect. (Way longer.) When tempers rise, grab a beer, sit on the porch and realize it’ll all be OK one day. (And it was.)

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The Goods

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1 Faux bois mirror by Stray Dog Designs,

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2 Square tray, $50 from The Cordial Cricket; with

handmade notecard by Paper Garden, $3

3 Fleur-de-lis key chain, $9 from Francesca’s Collections

4 Jardin de Rochelle amaryllis porcelain diffuser by Zodax, $46

from Posh

5 Painted elm cabinet with crackled white finish, $1,180 from Vive

6 Large tote in linen and chenille by Glenda Gies, $248 from YOU! Boutiques

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The Goods

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Cherry Blossom Chandelier, $1,000

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Peacock 2010, acrylic on canvas, $1,000 by Suzanna Fields

Danish modern chair,

$75 from Blue Elephant; with seat cushion upholstered in floral fabric, $27 per yard at Williams & Sherrill

Embrace your inner Flower Child. This spring, flash your florals.

Darling Octopus Décor

$65 from Taylor Hirsch Designs

Fabric-covered double switch-plate cover, $12 from

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Lime green vase,

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The Expert

Roeper’s antique printer’s cabinet provides storage in his studio for his extensive inventory of vintage crystal prisms and lamp parts.

INTERVIEW

R•HOME: How long have you been cleaning and repairing lighting?

Ken Roeper: I’m in my 14th year, and the company has evolved over the whole time. I did lighting-cleaning in the early years — pieces that were just hard to clean KEN ROEPER AND THE or hung in hard-to-reach places — a lot of ladder BUSINESS OF CHANDELIERS work and sometimes scaf By Elizabeth Cogar Batty folds. I started learning about crystal lighting, the nuances of how they’re Ken Roeper’s Fan District home is exactly 100 years made and assembled. older than the house he left in the suburbs, and it’s The electrical part fitting that he moved into an old house. Roeper, (I learned) … from owner of Crystal Details, spends his days working classes, reading You can contact in a historical context — his specialty is cleanand talking to Ken Roeper electricians on ing and restoring vintage chandeliers, lamps and at Crystal some of my lightDetails, sconces, many of them in desperate need of his 658-1555 ing jobs. I learned expertise. He’ll also assemble, install, pack, store or crystal to have a stylistic details@ and deliver them as needed. approach to wiring comcast. Stepping into his 1893 home, visitors find themnet. — sometimes the selves beneath a Spanish chandelier, solid brass wire needs to be and decorative, with crystal prisms dangling from invisible — there’s its arms. This chandelier and fi xtures in places like a signature way to how I Virginia Executive Mansion and The Jefferson Hotel have finish pieces, and I know it been brought to life through Roeper’s efforts. when I see it … I can look up and say, ‘I did that.’

Shining Light

R•HOME: Where do you fi nd your own projects?

1 A solid brass Spanish chandelier, with full-cut almond prisms

16

m a r - a p r 2 011

2 Mantel lamps with glass bodies and clear teardrop crystal prisms.

3 A brass sconce with teardrops and pearshaped crystal prisms.

Roeper: I purchase many of them at auctions or flea markets. Often, they’re in dreadful condition ... filthy, with prisms missing. I restore some of them, and sometimes I cannibalize the parts to use on other pieces of mine.

R•HOME: What are the basic steps involved in restoring a chandelier in your studio?

Roeper: First, I hang it or “stage” it so that I can work on the entire piece. I photograph it so that I’ll have a record of where everything goes. Then, I totally undress it — remove prisms and store them, remove old wiring, dismantle whatever needs replacing or refinishing, take old sockets off to clean them....wash, polish and maybe rebuild. The frame is washed and probably not buffed, but left with its natural patina. I might do a swap on the chain. Each prism is washed, dried and buffed by hand. I tell people to never ever spray a chandelier — water and electricity don’t mix, and they can short it out and cause corrosion. Replacing any swags, I’ll reposition them, tweak them to hang exactly as they should. After it’s dressed, I pack it for transport. Sometimes it’s better to work on location so that I don’t have to transport the piece and worry about damage. I can stage a room in a house and do all the work there. To read more of our interview with Ken Roeper, visit rhomemag.com.

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The Hunt

Donna Spurrier’s closet is both spacious and well organized. BELOW: Donna Spurrier

Most Organized Closet in Richmond DONNA SPURRIER CREATES HER DREAM CLOSET  By Kris Spisak

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F

or many people, the thought of having any closet at all might seem like a fantasy. For instance, Fan District residents have been known to use wardrobes, privacy screens and even extra bedrooms to create spaces for organizing shoes, clothes and other accessories. These closetless souls came to mind when our hunt discovered Donna Spurrier’s closet in Short Pump. It’s a showcase of meticulous organization and style possibilities. The Spurrier master bedroom once had two modest his-and-hers closets. These were functional but were “organized without a luxurious feel,” says Spurrier, 

Beth Furg urson photos


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The Hunt

Organized Closet cont’d

A marble-topped counter adds luxury, and the glassfronted cabinet allows Spurrier to see handbags at a glance.

“I can now walk into my closet and know exactly what I’m in the mood for that day.”  DONNA SPURRIER

owner of the Spurrier Media Group. Realizing that there was room for expansion over the downstairs kitchen nook, Spurrier took out the back wall, more than doubling the room’s size. “Most people call us with limited space, wanting to maximize their storage,” says Sue Pike, the senior design consultant at the Closet Factory. Spurrier’s closet was essentially a blank slate. Adjustable wooden shelving was installed to allow for flexible organization and a marble-topped counter added the luxury Spurrier was looking for. Above the countertop of the fi nished closet, glass doors now show off handbags and below, velvet-lined drawers are full of scarves and accessories. Hooks for long jewelry hang on the walls just before the closet opens up to more shelves, shoe cubbies and spaces for clothes. Matching hangers provide a visually appealing touch of consistency, dangling evenly and within arm’s reach. There, Spurrier has arranged her clothes from white to black with a rainbow of colors in between. “I absolutely love color,” says Spurrier. “I use color to decorate, and I use color to organize.” “I can now walk into my closet and know exactly what I’m in the mood for that day.” The ease of being able to view possibilities with the simple pull of a drawer or glance around the shelves is her favorite part of her new closet. Not everyone may have the magnificence of Spurrier’s closet, but its systems can be used by anyone. “Color coding and having a specific place for everything are steps people can take on their own,” Pike says. No matter what the size of your storage area, from a redesigned bedroom with custom-built shelving to an old, scratched-up armoire, thoughtful organization makes getting dressed every day easier and more enjoyable. Ask Donna Spurrier. She defi nitely thinks so.

Next issue’s Hunt: Best back porch in Richmond

Honorable Mentions Ona and Herb King’s closet (top); Connie and Ray Hughes’ closet (bottom)

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Send in your nominations or nominate yourself today! E-mail TheHunt@richmag.com or direct message us on Twitter @RHomeMagazine. P.S. Thank you for all of your organized-closet nominations!

Top: Beth Furg urson photo


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At Home

Heading Home Finding a place wherever you go  By Maureen Egan

F

or someone who’s such a staid, dull homebody, I’m promiscuous with the word “home.” A word so fraught with meaning, so weighted with emotion, so omnipresent on needlepoint pillows — I throw it around like one of those pillows, calling any old place I lay my head for a night, ever so casually, home. I could be travelling anywhere, but when it’s time to freshen up or take a nap, inevitably I say, “I’m going back home.” When I do, I’m not throwing a fit and calling the whole trip off. I only mean that I need to go back to the hotel or rental or relatives’ house. Tu casa really es mi casa. I’m just not sure if my overuse of the word means I’m well-adjusted and flexible, or unstable and unhinged. I’ve called dingy hotels in Costa Rica, questionable B&Bs in Ireland and creepy cabins in the woods “home” after just a few hours there. It’s not that I intended to stay there indefinitely, believe me. Perhaps it’s an attempt to feel at home precisely where I am not. At any rate, my loose language makes my family look at me funny. But they do that anyway. Plenty of times when we were far from

home, at Disney World, say, and my children were heading to the Dumbo ride with grandparents and I was aiming toward Space Mountain with siblings, upon parting ways I’ve said, “See you back home.” Did they hear, “See ya! You can hitchhike back to Richmond — I’m outta here?” I’m not sure. All I meant was I’ll see you back at the room, I swear. They don’t seem to have abandonment issues. It’s not that home isn’t where my heart is. I can be as pang-prone and sentimental as any guitar-plucking singer. I get gooey-eyed warbling along to Karla Bonoff or Bonnie Raitt singing, “Home sings me of sweet things. My life there has its own wings …” But the idea of what that home is and where it might be is a bit of a moving target. Maybe it’s all the moving I did in my 20s and 30s, but my current home is only part of what makes up my idea of home. Home is everywhere I’ve ever lived — the good, the bad, and the ugly — and everyone I’ve ever had fun there with. I take all of them with me wherever I go. Maybe that’s why it’s getting a little crowded here. Maybe that’s also why I am largely unsentimental about driving up I-95 this morning to help clear out the house that my family moved into when I was 10. I resisted that move as mightily as a punk kid could, but eventually I learned to feel at home there. For years, even after I lived happily ever after elsewhere with my husband and young children, arriving at my childhood home for a visit felt like a respite, a warm, happy place — aaahhh. It hasn’t been like that of late though; it’s an albatross — an ugh! would be more like it — a place I barely remember to pay the taxes on while worrying about the pipes freezing. Going there isn’t about heading home anymore. It’s a place I���m happier visiting in my memory than in my car. Maybe it will hit me hard sometime in the future that someone else will call it home, but right now I’ve already moved on. What unsettles me more is when I hear my oldenough-to–live-other-places children say, ever so casually, “Gotta get home,” knowing they’re referring to a dorm room or an apartment somewhere other than here. It’s my turn to look at them a little funny. Nobody wants them living here at home ad infinitum (I mean that in the nicest possible way), and of course I want them to feel at home wherever they lay their heads, but to hear them refer to some other place as home, no matter how many homey touches I might have supplied them with over the years, sounds decidedly jarring. When did that switch get flipped? Exactly on schedule, of course. And as long as they still want to come here now and then, as long as they carry family stories along with their stuff, it’s OK with me that they have another home away from home.

Home is everywhere I’ve ever lived — the good, the bad, and the ugly — and everyone I’ve ever had fun there with.

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Bob Scott i l lustration


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2

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Metropolitan Southern Charm DAVID BARDEN FINDS STYLE EVERYWHERE  By Megan Marconyak

As a residential and commercial interior designer, David Barden specializes in turning his clients’ visions and desires into reality. When decorating his own home, Barden combines a Virginia hunt-country look that reflects his own upbringing on a horse farm. He adds to that traditional style a cosmopolitan vibe that reminds him of the years he spent living in New York. “I like comfortable (but) formal stuff,” he says. “I want people to walk into a room and feel like they can kick back with a glass of wine or bourbon.” When decorating his home and those of others, Barden fi rmly believes in making quality and sentimental pieces work in new places. “Why buy things you might already have when you can reuse things in new ways?” he says, adding that he’s also a bargain hunter. He’s always keeping his eye out for deals that can add style to his or his clients’ homes. 

4

DAVE’S FAVES

1 2

LAMPS When clothing store Monkeys was closing, Barden snagged two glass lamps that he uses in his living room. SOFA Barden got his sofa

from Thomas-Hines, where he worked as a junior designer after graduating from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. “I’ve re-covered it three times. It’s all down and is like sitting on a big cushion.”

3

ORIENTAL RUG When

Barden moved into his new house, he took his old Asian rug to Amir and traded it for the one he has today. He says many people don’t realize that if they have a fine Oriental rug, and it’s in good condition, they can take it back and get money toward a new one.

4

WHALE WALL ART This

piece that Barden and Adams picked out at an art show in Myrtle Beach, S.C., is made from old shutters.

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S a r a h Wa l o r p h o t o s


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Metropolitan Charm

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STUDIO When Barden closed his store on Grove Avenue about two years ago, he converted his two-car garage into a studio. He replaced the garage door with French doors, added carpet and painted it with nautical colors reminiscent of the beams in the ceiling.

BRONZE STATUE Purchased at an

auction in Ashland. “I liked that it had references to drama and music,” he says.

DAV ID ’ S FAVO R ITE S H O PPIN G S P O T S

West End Antiques Mall

“I have a booth there, but there are so many vendors. You can fi nd ’50s lamps, ’60s coffee tables, English tapestries, whatever you’re looking for.”

Barden’s home in Britton Hills Farm is a brick colonial built in 1948. When he found an ad for it, he was living in Church Hill with his partner, Blaise Adams, and wasn’t even thinking of moving. But he and Blaise fell in love with the house and its central location, so they decided to move. In typical colonial style, the house is fi lled with lots of small rooms, making for plenty of space for Barden to spread his cosmopolitan tastes. “I’ve got French mixed with Asian, African, Chinese, Middle Eastern, English and American in two rooms alone,” he says. “My look is New York meets world-traveled.”

JAPANESE CABINET

When he lived in New York, Barden was heading home one night and found this cabinet on the street. He snagged it and dragged it on the subway to take it home.

Three Swallows

Barden shops here for Asian pieces. “I think every room should have a little Japanese influence.”

Shops along Lakeside Avenue

“I go here for funky pieces at good prices,” he says. AMERICAN INDIAN FIGURE

Adams has American Indian heritage; as a result, the two have incorporated American Indian pieces into their decor.

Shades of Light

Barden always hits sales at Shades of Light and shops the outlet location, The Decorating Outlet. “You can get really good deals on nice things.”

ENGLISH WRITING DESK FROM 1850 Barden was

drawn to the beautiful box that opens into a desk. He found it at the Beacon Hill Showroom in New York.

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Sara h Wa lor photos


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Harry's History

Just Passing Through A striking Queen Anne on Grove Avenue  By Harry Kollatz Jr.

W

hen 2823 Grove Avenue was built on the corner of Colonial and Grove avenues, Camp Lee, the home for aged, pension-less Confederate veterans was across the street (where the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts sits now). This was the city’s West End, burgeoning after the 1906 annexation from Henrico County and ease of transit by the electric streetcar. This jewel of a Queen Anne house, with its curving front porch and long front sunroom, was occupied by World War I veteran and Harvard graduate Prescott Foster Huidekoper from 1918 to 1919, according to the Richmond City Directory. Huidekoper’s father was for a time an engineer on Virginia railroads, but his son came to Grove Avenue after returning from overseas. He went into plastics a half-century before

28

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the famous advice given to Dustin Hoffman’s character in The Graduate. Huidekoper ultimately ran American Insulator of New Freedom, Pa., where, according to his 2004 induction into the Plastics Academy’s Hall of Fame, he pioneered “the production of the first plastic-molded circuit breaker bases” and “myriad new applications” in home appliances and automobiles. During 1920 to 1924, the residence was home to the family of Richmond industrialist Carter N. Williams Jr., who with wife Hattie had six children. Williams was chairman of Richmond Structural Steel. His affiliations were typical of Richmond men of mark: member of the Chamber of Commerce, Commonwealth Club, the Joppa Masonic Lodge and Second Baptist Church. From around 1930 to 1954, Caroline V. Morton, widow of William Smith Morton, vice president of the

Home Beneficial Association, lived in the house. Their daughter, Mary Morton Parsons, established the foundation that gave funds to build the wonderful William Smith Morton Library at Union Presbyterian Seminary. From at least the mid-1950s, 2823 served as either a rooming house or an apartment building. Tenants included a C&P telephone operator, Medical College of Virginia nurses and technicians, teachers and car salesmen. In the late 1960s, librarian Dorothy M. Fuller lived there. She worked for 23 years at the Library of Virginia as public library consultant and later directed the Library Development Division. Fuller advocated for public library service throughout Virginia, but particularly in her native Southwest Virginia. The present owner bought the house in 1987, and it’s continued to be a rental property ever since.

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Gardening

Personal Space A wa k e n yo u r i n n e r ga r d e n i n g di v a with S u si e C o e lho  By Sara Jackson

Susie Coelho is many things: garden designer, entrepreneur, restaurateur, TV personality, lifestyle guru. But she has a design philosophy that is less about imposing her vision on her clients’ outdoor spaces and more about helping them uncover their own. It’s at the heart of what she has done for years, she says, on TV shows like HGTV’s Outer Spaces and Surprise Gardener, as well as her books, Secrets of a Style Diva: A Get-Inspired Guide to Your Creative Side and Style Your Dream Wedding. “It’s about empowering people and pushing them to make choices they like,” she says. “Many people think they don’t have the ‘design gene,’ but my job isn’t to make their decisions for them. It’s to help them find the creativity they have that they probably don’t know they have.” To many clients, that concept can be intimidating, she admits. They’re looking for guidance and suggestions, and even direction from a gardening designer. And finding their own gardening styles can take some time and thought. But Coelho has a process to get them there, and it goes something like this: GARDENING 101

1

Start with you. Pictures from a magazine, ideas from other gardens — all are great, she says. But the real work begins with finding your own sense of style. Don’t worry if you’re not an experienced gardener or don’t know the names of particular plants. Look at your lifestyle, she says. Do you entertain frequently? Spend most of your time with your family? How much of your leisure time do you spend outdoors? These questions all determine what type of garden will work best for you — formal, casual, open, intricate, etc. “Let your garden speak to you. It will tell you what it needs,” she says. For example, the genesis for the French courtyard garden she created in her own front yard was a hedge she had put in place simply to block a view of her neighbor’s driveway. Also, think carefully about what the space needs to do for you and your family. A structured, formal garden space probably isn’t ideal if you need a place for children to run and play, she points out.

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2

Look inside. Let your interior sensibilities guide your exterior ones. “You want a flow from the indoors out,” she says. Look around the inside of your home. What colors do you gravitate toward? What textures appeal to you? What patterns or themes have you used in your decor? “If you’ve got French country decor inside, you [could] try a Provence-style outside, with blues and yellows, [and] a daybed with toile pillows,” she says.

3

Find your vision and name it.

Giving your style a name helps it become more concrete and easier to visualize, she says. “Give it a name, even if it’s one that no one else understands,” she says. One of her favorites is “French laundry,” a moniker she gave one client’s breezy, French-provincial outdoor style. The design even included clothesline strung on one side of the client’s patio, with white sheets and a few pieces of vintage clothing pinned to it, enclosing the space while adding a sense of whimsy. “It could be anything. Tropical, Japanese/Zen, contemporary. Or it can be much more personal, like ‘Grandma’s garden,’ or the garden from a villa in Tuscany that you visited,” she says. What’s important is that once you’ve given it an identity, it will take on a life of its own. 

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Identify the key elements to your final design. Once you have a style,

you can determine what plants, props and other materials you’ll need to bring it to life. For example, with a tropical style, you first have to determine what kind of tropical, she says: “Some people think tropical and think Hawaii and tiki torches. Others think of the jungle.” From there, consider a color palette that appeals to you. Again, with tropical themes, most prefer bright, vivid colors, but you have to determine which two or three to focus on. Then decide if you need other style elements such as a water feature or furniture to completely capture your vision. “With a tropical theme, you’ll probably want a natural feel, like a waterfall or a fountain. Look for something that has that sensibility” rather than a contemporary statue or modern art, she says.

“Many people think they don’t have the ‘design gene,’ but my job is to help them find the creativity they have that they didn’t know they have.”

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32

Personal cont’d

 Susie coelho

Don’t compromise your vision.

The vision is the heart of any gardening design. You can compromise on everything else — what plants to use, how much space to cover, which hardscape materials are appropriate and how much money to spend, Coelho says. Even if your budget is tight, don’t give up on your style ideas. Look for low-cost options at swap meets or flea markets. And don’t be afraid to barter for gardening skills you don’t possess yourself. “Have your friend work for four hours in your garden, then you spend four hours painting her house. You have fun, drink some wine, have a barbecue at the end of the day ... and you get it all done together,” she says.

Susie Coelho will speak at the Extraordinary Women’s Exchange on March 3. The luncheon will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel at 555 E. Canal St. To register, call 783-9368 or visit grcc.com/View/Page/ events_ewx.


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The condo was designed for easy, open and graceful entertaining. The white leather Incanto sofa, fronted by a low sculptural Noguchi table, treats guests to the spectacular view. Bob and Dougie installed the Solistone copper-hued mosaic tile on the island themselves.

BalconyBLISS A NEW M A R R I A G E L E A D S TO A N EW WAY O F LI V I N G

BY KATHERINE HOUSTOUN | PHOTOS BY BARRY FITZGERALD 36

m a r - a p r 2 011


WHEN BOB SCUDDER AND DOUGIE BOWMAN EMBARKED ON A NEW LIFE TOGETHER IN 2005, THEY BOTH MADE SOME BIG CHANGES. Bob, a Navy man turned executive coach, moved to Richmond from his home in Newport News, while Dougie traded a traditional house in the West End for condo living in downtown Richmond. They found their new environs suited both of them perfectly.

rhomemag.com

37


Curvaceous architectural lines, skillfully realized by contractor Chris Trommer of People’s Choice Builders, add movement to the space, creating an easy flow throughout the condo. The diagonal Brazilian cherry floorboards draw one’s eye immediately to the outside view.

B A LCO N Y S C E N E

Skyline view from corner to corner


M

oving downtown was a way for us to start a new life, totally different from the past,” says Bowman, who has spent more than 30 years in the securities industry. “I did need to stay in Richmond because my career was here, and Bob was working out of the home, so he could live anywhere. We started condo living, and we haven’t looked back.” They created a home from scratch, gutting two units at Vistas on the James and combining them into one 2,600-square-foot space. The couple wanted to focus on two things in the design of their new home: making a comfortable space for entertaining and highlighting the spectacular view from the 15th floor. “That view struck all of us as something you cannot ignore,” says Andy Scudder (no relation) of Johannes Design Group, who was enlisted to translate their vision into reality. “In the beginning, all of our sketches and ideas revolved around how you access that view when you open the front door.” They started by eliminating the front hallway and opening the entryway with gently curving walls. Diagonal floorboards draw your eye through the 10-foot windows to the panorama beyond, where rocky James River rapids, stair-stepping downtown rooftops and the historic East End stretch into the distance. Clever design tricks maximize the view. In the master bedroom, a mirrored wall of closets faces the bed, allowing the couple to view the sunrise, while a mirrored backsplash above the kitchen sink gives guests a view of the Richmond skyline even if their backs are turned as they watch Scudder cook at the island. As it happens, their robust social calendar

Scudder in particular enjoys mid-century-modern design, as seen in the 1960s reproduction Nova Lighting lamp, and contemporary art, including this “Transformation” stainless steel sculpture by Artisan House.

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“It was very important to make sure that everyone felt warm and comfortable here.”  Dougie BOWMAN


The couple is not afraid of light; they didn’t use a single window covering in the entire space. Their office hides behind the half-wall abutting their streamlined Italian-made bed. The balcony off the living room faces west for sunset views over the James.

often finds Scudder, the resident chef, preparing meals on his Wolf induction stovetop. “We have somebody over for dinner at least once a week, whether it’s a planned dinner for several couples or just inviting a neighbor over to eat with us,” Scudder says. “We probably have more cocktail parties than the average couple. We love to entertain.” With condo living, spur-of-the-moment guests are always just a door or floor away. “There are times when we have too much food,” Bowman says, “and we’ll just go knocking on people’s doors and have impromptu dinner parties.” To create a welcoming space for their guests, they dedicated one unit to an open living area, delineating

spaces – dining room, living room, etc. – by varying the ceiling heights rather than putting up walls. The effect is paradoxically airy, but cozy. “We refer to our home as ‘warm contemporary,’ ” Bowman says. “It was very important to make sure that everyone felt warm and comfortable here.” She happily gave up her traditional furnishings and Oriental rugs in favor of Bob’s more streamlined aesthetic, finding serenity in the simplicity. The condo’s overall palette is mostly neutral, save for the brightly hued artwork that injects vibrant color into the space. “Nothing is busy,” she says. “Now I go back and look at pictures of my wingback chairs and heavy wood furniture and ask, ‘What I was thinking?’ ” Bowman also left behind some of the headaches that home ownership can incur. “In my lifetime I’ve cut enough grass and raked enough leaves,” she says. “Here, it’s zero-maintenance.” The couple enjoys the condominium’s amenities, including four parking places in the garage — a boon in downtown Richmond — and a large storage room that Scudder uses for working out. When grandkids visit — the

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The Italian cherry wood dining room table and chairs from La Différence are representative of the contemporary look the couple enjoys. The plush imported Indian silk shag rug adds texture, while defining the dining room area.

“IT'S AMAZING. I MOVED DOWNTOWN, AND ALL OF A SUDDEN I GOT IN TOUCH WITH NATURE.”  DOUGIE BOWMAN

Mini hanging lights by LBL Lighting add a warm glow, courtesy of clustered amber Swarovski crystals.

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younger ones refer to the condo as “the hotel” — Scudder and Bowman reserve the large clubroom on the canal level where kids can play pool and safely romp around. They take advantage of their location, enjoying long walks around Belle Isle, musical evenings on Brown’s Island and neighborhood restaurants like Bistro Bobette and the Urban Farmhouse, where Scudder occasionally meets clients. They also spend plenty of time taking in the city from their three balconies. “We’ll come out here [on the master bedroom balcony] on the weekends and sit and watch the sunrise, and then swing around to the west balcony in the afternoon and watch the sun set,” Scudder says. Frequently, they’ll have sightings of blue herons, which soar by their windows at eye level as they make their way to the rookery on the James, as well as snowy egrets, purple martins and occasionally a pair of eagles. “You can almost touch them,” says Bowman. “It’s amazing. I moved downtown, and all of a sudden I got in touch with nature. Bob had always said that he could never be more than 100 yards from salt water. I couldn’t give him salt water, but the James River is sufficing very well.”  See Resource Listings, Page 66.


The powder room is a sharp yet tasteful contrast to the rest of the home. Local painter Janell Rhee created a vivid scarlet faux finish for the walls. The slick black vanity and tempered glass vessel sink boost the glamour quotient.


The crown molding in the dining room came from the Bull and Bear Club.

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ATuscan Villa in Glen Allen Downsizing for space

By valley haggard | Photos by kip dawkins | styled by jonathan janis

Rosie Basham in her home office. The computer nook was created from a Miller & Rhoads display.

From the outside, there’s little to differentiate Rosie Basham’s house from the others in The Townes at Crossridge, a gated community for active adults 55 and older in Glen Allen. But then you open the door. Elaborately detailed Romanesque columns, a reproduction of the Mona Lisa, and cherubs and griffins greet the eye amid a warm golden-yellow Tuscan glow. It didn’t always look like this. When Basham first saw her home-to-be, she was underwhelmed. But she recognized the potential. “It was your basic little retirement home with white walls,” she says. “I thought, ‘Look at this now, because it’s not going to look like this for long!’” 

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N LEFT: In the master bath, the vanity was made from an antique sideboard. RIGHT: The ironwork detail in the shower came from a bordello in Petersburg.

“IT WAS YOUR BASIC LITTLE RETIREMENT HOME WITH WHITE WALLS. “I THOUGHT, ‘LOOK AT THIS NOW, BECAUSE IT’S NOT GOING TO LOOK LIKE THIS FOR LONG!’”  ROSIE BASHAM

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ow 60 and a GED teacher for Henrico County who works full time but plans to retire in two to five years, Basham decided to simplify her lifestyle when it came time to care for her elderly mother and stepfather, and then to settle their estate. After living in Raintree near her sister for 20 years while raising her two sons, she moved to a condo at 5100 Monument Ave. in June 2008. “Moving from a big West End barn to a small condo — I was unsettled,” she says. So she kept looking for something else, finally choosing a home in Crossridge, once again near her sister who had moved there four years before. She was attracted to this particular home because of its floor plan — 2,200 square feet with a sunroom, an outdoor patio and a second-floor bedroom, with most of the living space on the first floor. “It fit my lifestyle perfectly,” says Basham. “It’s a good thousand square feet smaller than my home in Raintree. It’s clean, and it feels safe. It’s nice not to have to mow the lawn or keep up with a yard. And, ironically, there are a lot of old Richmond names here that our family knew growing up who have also downsized.” And there was never any question about whom Basham would choose to head up the renovations. “Team Basham,” the husbandand-wife duo of Diane and Norman “Cookie” Edwards, a retired manager with Liberty Mutual and a former Henrico County Police officer had remodeled their own home in Old Church in the French-provincial style. Basham, though, had another European country in mind. “When she said she wanted a Tuscan villa, that put me on the search,” says Cookie Edwards, who now works part time for Governor’s Antiques. “I like to go through various antique shops and salvage yards. I knew where to go.”


Edwards found the bed’s headboard in a French cemetery.


The walls are painted a deep Tuscan gold. The Lalique vase dates from the 1920s to the ’30s and was handed down to Basham. Edwards found the fireplace broken under a trailer, restored it and added a bank teller’s screen. The griffin pattern of the screen is echoed in the stencils above the arching windows.


scan it

Get free app at gettag.mobi See pg. 8 for info


The mosaic behind the stove is from Lebanon.

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ABOVE: The unassuming exterior of Basham’s house gives no hint of its extravagant interior. RIGHT: Diane and Norman “Cookie” Edwards transformed the interior of Basham’s Crossridge house.

“Cookie knows I love anything with a story behind it,” says Basham, whose home was recently featured in the community’s open-house tour. “Everything he does is oneof-a-kind. You’ll never see it again in anyone else’s house.” Edwards got to work at 5 a.m. the morning Basham closed on the house in December 2009; Basham moved in three months later. “It was always a transformation,” she says. She liked to stop home on her lunch break to see how the renovations were going. “Whenever I would open the door I would scream. It was magnificent … breathtaking!” While four generations of Basham’s family dating back to her great-grandmother are represented in the furnishings of the house, many others are the product of Edwards’ gift for transforming salvaged materials. “I like to go over the top,” says Edwards, who hired jackof-all-trades Joe Watkins to help him but did the lion’s share of the labor and remodeling himself. “I wouldn’t say it comes naturally, but it is fun.” After completely gutting and remodeling the bathrooms and kitchen with modern fixtures, Edwards installed 100year-old stained glass above the kitchen entrance, offset by a mosaic backsplash from Lebanon. The dining room columns — newly stripped and repainted — date back to the 1800s, while the dining room’s crown molding was salvaged from renovations of the Bull and Bear Club. Edwards restored a broken fireplace he found underneath a trailer, adorning it with a bank-teller’s

screen from New York. He transformed an antique display from Miller & Rhoads into a computer nook in Basham’s office and built the entertainment center with refurbished wood from an antique bed and a church organ. On a recent trip to Florida, Edwards used three panels from a fence in French cemetery to make Basham’s headboard. Heather Beck of Beck Estates LLC, who helped Basham sell her mother’s estate, dropped by to visit Basham at her new home. “After she opened the door, my eyes could not believe what they saw,” says Beck. “Her home was truly transformed into a masterpiece.” Basham admits that while she adores her home, the transition to a retirement community has been a big adjustment. “It’s different here,” she says. “It’s just a different stage. It’s so quiet. I was used to doors slamming and kids playing. I’m just so sentimental. It was hard to leave everything because of the memories. Intellectually I understand that, but emotionally, it’s been hard.” Nonetheless, Basham isn’t planning to move. “It’s just jaw-dropping. I get up at 3 a.m. and walk around and say, ‘Oh my God! I live here!’ ”  See Resource Listings, Page 66.

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Subdued color contrasts with bold graphics in the master bedroom provide a bright, functional setting where McDonald can relax with her husband and daughter.

shared Sympathies A moth e r a n d d a ug h ter r e c o n f i g u r e a hou se to a c c o mmo dat e t he m bot h. By Susan Howson | Photos by todd wright | styled by jonathan janis

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In the living room as well as in the rest of the house, Ellen mixes family antiques with local art and vintage finds of her own such as this glass coffee table.

Ann Butler and Ellen McDonald could easily go on tour as a mother/daughter comedy act. Joint proprietors since 2005 of children’s boutique Rattle & Roll, the two have spent enough time together to perfect their fond eye rolls, quick rejoinders and ability to complete each other’s sentences. But it wasn’t until February of last year that they took their relationship to a level that would strike fear in the hearts of most mothers and daughters — they became housemates. “My husband and I always joked about my mother moving in with us,” says McDonald, “And I always said it would be over my dead body!”  rhomemag.com

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LEFT: Soft red linen wall coverings and antique pieces that have been with the family for generations add classic brevity in the dining room to the house’s cheerful palette. above: Stella’s room gets the royal treatment with lime-green, pink and white furnishings against a hand-painted backdrop of a flower garden in bloom. below: The master bath

ON THE EVE OF ONE PARTICULARLY BRUTAL BLIZZARD, MCDONALD LOOKED AT HER HUSBAND AND SAID, “LET’S GO GET MAMA.” “But here we are,” Butler says as she gestures around the 1962 house in Mooreland Farms. It’s home to McDonald and her husband, John, along with their 5-year-old daughter, Stella, with a separate apartment for Butler. It was during the heavy snows in early 2010 that the family truly began to take the idea of consolidation seriously. On the eve of one particularly brutal blizzard, McDonald looked at her husband and said, “Let’s go get Mama.” At that moment, an idea began to take shape that resulted in the purchase of a larger house right in their neighborhood. After closing on the home in February, the two had aggressive renovation goals and agreed that the house should be ready for a family wedding in July. Joe Silvus of Bella Construction took on the challenge; he had done great things for the family’s river property and was willing to move into the house during the renovation process in order to 54

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tackle the project head-on. Butler cheerfully refers to her basement apartment as her “dungeon,” but with a living room, bedroom, master bath, private entrance, brick patio and full kitchen — all illuminated by natural light — it’s anything but. Different, but not at odds with the brightly colored décor of the house above it, the space is painted in muted greens, blues and yellows with 18th-century botanical prints and silhouettes dotting the walls. A custom mantelpiece designed by McDonald balances the living room’s off-center fireplace with built-in shelves. Similar shelves line the walkthrough beyond, an area that had once been gray cinderblock. The trick of opening up unexpected spaces to allow some freedom of movement within hallways is echoed in several places upstairs. The effect is one of light and space, transforming what had once


The airy breakfast nook’s carpet, based on vintage French posters, and a shiny red 1950s diner table indicate a strong commitment to color.


Red bistro chairs add McDonald’s signature splash of color to the renovated kitchen, which acts as the house’s social center.

“I LOVE IT. I CAN GO DOWN TO HER PLACE AND GRAB SOMETHING FROM HER FRIDGE OR BORROW A PAIR OF SHOES.”  ELLEN MCDONALD been a house full of predictable passages into one where a bright nook lies around every corner. In an attempt to keep the renovations both economically and ecologically sound, mother and daughter discovered talents for repurposing cabinetry and hardware in different parts of the house — for example, the built-in drawers in Stella’s bedroom were salvaged from John’s upstairs office. And, though their palettes and preferences differ, the two are both drawn to color. McDonald studied art in college; it’s inspired her to feature local artists like Karen Blair and Eldridge Bagley wherever possible. “I’ve never been afraid of color,” says McDonald, as she gestures around her vividly colored living room. “I want it everywhere. I want people to feel happy when they come here, just like when they walk into my store.” A shared respect for history also unites the two different styles. Butler’s great-great-great grandmother, captured in an enormous oil portrait, looks over the cozy basement living room from above a chest that once belonged to her. In almost every room of the house, Butler and McDonald point 56

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to different antiques and talk about each piece’s lineage. The staircase leading down to Butler’s quarters is lined with family photos that span decades, and the walls of her living room boast paintings of the residences of past generations — homes that were as cherished as this one is. “This way it feels like the family is here with us,” says McDonald, as she points out a grandfather clock in the front foyer that her late father crafted years ago. At an age where the prospect of living closer to family becomes more attractive with each passing year, Butler enjoys independence while knowing that help is close by should she need it. “A lot of people are like, ‘Gosh, living with your mother and working with her?’” says McDonald. “But I love it. I can go down to her place and grab something from her fridge or borrow a pair of shoes.” “And Ellen is my best friend,” says Butler. “I sincerely value her input and I think she values mine.” “When I ask for it,” her daughter adds, without missing a beat.  See Resource Listings, Page 66.


ANN’S NOOK

ABOVE: Butler jokingly refers to her basement apartment as her “dungeon,” but her naturally lighted kitchen invites family visitors to trek downstairs and catch up over coffee. BELOW LEFT: While other parts of the house are alive with artfully and colorfully combined artifacts, a harmonious collection of antique bottles creates a moment of tranquility in Butler’s bedroom. BELOW RIGHT: Butler’s great-great-great grandmother’s portrait hangs above a chest that once belonged to her.

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MATZO BALL SOUP

CHAROSES

BEEF BRISKET

PASSOVER Celebration

SED E R RE CIPE S FRO M T HE FE L DS T E IN FAMILY BY BRANDON FOX | PHOTOS BY BETH FURGURSON FOOD PREPARATION, STYLING AND ADDITIONAL RECIPES BY RACHEL ZELL

PASSOVER PRIMER, a

collection of Jewish terms and definitions, on page 64.

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TZIMMES

Marsha Feldstein and her mother Judy

WINE SPICE CAKE

MATZO TOFFEE

HOLIDAYS ARE WHEN FAMILY RECIPES COME OUT AND BLOOM. They can come from all kinds of places. There are the ones that are passed hand to hand, scribbled on stained index cards or folded pieces of paper. Others can be ancient clippings from newspapers or magazines — or might have been torn decades ago from the back of a package. Wherever they come from, adjustments are made, ingredients added or taken away over the years, and all become specific to the family who makes them. ďƒ¨

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Matzo Ball Soup INGREDIENTS  3 quarts of homemade or purchased chicken broth*  2 tablespoons of chicken fat or vegetable oil  2 eggs, beaten  1/2 cup of matzo meal  2 teaspoon salt  1 tablespoon of seltzer water  1 tablespoon of vodka  3 quarts of water DIRECTIONS Beat together the chicken fat or vegetable oil and eggs. Add the matzo meal and salt. Mix well. Blend in the seltzer water and vodka. Place the mixture in the refrigerator for at least one hour or overnight. Bring 3 quarts of salted water to a rolling boil. Wet your hands with cold water and gently form balls about the size of walnuts (they will expand a lot). Reduce the heat so that the water simmers and then carefully drop the balls into it. Simmer, covered, for about 30 to 40 minutes. Heat the chicken soup. When hot, pour into bowls. With a slotted spoon, remove the matzo balls from the water and place in the soup. Recipe by Rachel Zell * To see Rachel Zell’s recipe for homemade chicken soup, visit rhomemag.com.

F

or the Feldstein family, Passover wouldn’t be as meaningful if the food they have come to love wasn’t on the table. However, as Conservative Jews, they make changes in the way they cook the rest of the year to keep the Seder meals kosher. Dairy is not an option and leavening is out. That means the matzo becomes a key ingredient. Matzo, an important part of the Passover ritual, represents the flat bread the Jewish slaves made as they fled Egypt (they left before the bread could rise). For the meal itself, it becomes a way to make

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desserts and hold the dumplings together in matzo ball soup. Marsha Feldstein invited me over for coffee in her large kitchen lined with lots of cabinets to talk about how her family celebrates the holiday. “We get rid of all the bread, put away the pasta and cookies. We try to eat all of it the week before” the holiday, Feldstein says. “Then the kosher food comes in.” For the first Seder, the women in the family start cooking. “The first night is for 60 people,” she says. “We actually rent a place where the whole family can sit together. Some people from the


BEEF BRISKET

INGREDIENTS  3 Granny Smith apples  3 red (Red Delicious, Gala, or Fuji) apples  2 tablespoons of cinnamon  1/2 to 1 cup of Manischewitz wine (or to taste)  1/2 to 1 cup of walnuts (or to taste)

DIRECTIONS Peel and chop apples. Toss in a bowl with the cinnamon, walnuts and wine. Refrigerate overnight before serving.

CHAROSES INGREDIENTS  1 7- to 10-pound beef brisket  1 large onion, chopped  2 stalks of celery, chopped  2 carrots, peeled and chopped  1 14-ounce bottle of ketchup  1 8 ounce can of tomato sauce  1 package of onion soup mix  2 to 3 tablespoons of horseradish (or to taste)  Garlic salt and pepper to taste  1 cup of water

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In foil-lined roasting pan, scatter half of the chopped onion. Place the brisket, fat side down, on top of the onions. Season the brisket with garlic salt and pepper, and top with the remaining onions, carrots and celery. In a small bowl, mix the ketchup, tomato sauce, onion soup and horseradish. Pour the mixture over the vegetables and brisket. Add one cup of water to the pan. Roast for 2 hours; remove and slice brisket across the grain. Place the sliced brisket back in the pan and cook for another 2 hours. Place brisket on a platter, and spoon vegetables and pan juices on top.

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INGREDIENTS  3 pounds of sweet

potatoes  1 pound of carrots  1 cup of grated

Granny Smith apple  1/2 cup of orange juice  1/2 cup of pineapple

juice  1/4 cup of brown sugar  4 tablespoons of parve

margarine (1/2 of a stick)  1 teaspoon of cinnamon  1 teaspoon of nutmeg  1 teaspoon of allspice  Salt and pepper to taste Topping  2 matzo, crushed  1/4 cup of brown sugar  1 teaspoon of cinnamon  2 tablespoons of melted parve margarine

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix topping ingredients and set aside. Peel carrots and sweet potatoes, and then cut into quarters. Add to a pot of boiling water and cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain, place in a bowl and mash. Fold in the juices, sugar, margarine, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings. Scoop mixture into a casserole dish and bake for about 30 minutes. Sprinkle with the topping and bake for another 5 minutes or until the topping bubbles. This dish can be prepared ahead of time. Recipe by Rachel Zell MATZO TOFFEE

TZIMMES INGREDIENTS  1 cup of parve margarine (1 stick)  1 1/2 teaspoons of vanilla  1/2 cup of sugar  1 cup of sliced almonds  1 box of matzo

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DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In one layer, line a nonstick cookie sheet with matzo. Sprinkle with almonds. Place the margarine, vanilla and sugar in a saucepan over low heat. Stir until margarine is melted, and the sugar is dissolved. Drizzle the mixture over the matzo and nuts. Bake until bubbly. Remove from the oven. Cool and break into pieces. Keep in an airtight container.


Wine Spice Cake INGREDIENTS  12 eggs, separated  2 cups of sugar  2 teaspoons of cinnamon  1/4 teaspoon of ground cloves  1/8 teaspoon of nutmeg  1/8 teaspoon of ground ginger  1/3 cup of Manischewitz wine  1 1/2 cup of matzo cake meal  1 1/2 to 2 cups of chopped almonds  1 1/2 cups of raisins DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat the yolks and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the spices, wine, nuts, raisins and matzo cake meal. Mix well. In another bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form. Fold into the yolk mixture. Bake in large, ungreased angel food cake or Bundt cake pan for one hour. Cool upside down. When completely cooled, carefully remove pan.

community will be invited, but by and large, we’re all related somehow.” “My mother, my aunt and some of the cousins will come in and set the table first — everyone gets a job. I’ll do the charoses, and someone else will bring the gefilte fish or drinks. It’s food for a lot of people.” Her aunt will bring her special matzo ball soup, the recipe for which is a secret from the rest of the family. “That’s an all-day affair,” says Feldstein. “She must make, I don’t know, 125 matzo balls.” “But,” she is quick to point out, “it’s not a dinner party. It’s a Seder. The food is symbolic and

there’s a protocol, an order to it.” It’s an important part of family, but more significantly, it’s also a religious ceremony practiced each year at home. Feldstein and her immediate family also celebrate the second night of Passover — which not every Jewish family does. “We either have it here or at my cousin’s, and that’s only about 20 to 24 people. My cousins have written their own Haggadah” — the text that codifies the Passover ceremony — “and it’s very beautiful, very spiritual. In some ways because of that, it’s the night that is most meaningful to me.” 

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E O ste pe s ni At ng h l Sp e t ic r in C g en 20 te 11 r

Discover Your Path

A PASSOVER PRIMER

Passover, also called Pesach, is April 19 to 25 this year. It’s a time when Jewish families come together to remember and celebrate the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt.

SEDER A ceremony on the fi rst night of Passover celebrating the Exodus symbolically. Some families celebrate a second night as well.

HAGGADAH A retelling of the Exodus (it details each of the 15 steps of the Seder ceremony).

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A platter holding the symbols of Passover Karpas: Generally parsley. It’s dipped in salt water, which represents tears. Zeroa: A lamb shank bone to symbolize the lamb’s blood that was put over the doors of Jewish homes on the night of the 10th plague — the slaughter of the first born — in Egypt. God is said to have “passed over� the houses marked in this way. It’s also a symbol of the lamb sacrificed at the Temple after the Exodus. Baitzah: A roasted egg to represent mourning for the loss of the two Temples (one destroyed by the Babylonians and one by the Romans). It also represents springtime, renewal and the strength of the Jewish people.

Charoses (also called charosets): Apples, nuts and wine to symbolize the mortar between the bricks of the structures the slaves were forced to make. Maror: Bitter herbs (generally horseradish or perhaps parsley) to symbolize the bitterness of slavery. Chazaret: Romaine lettuce to also represent bitterness. Matzo: On a separate plate and covered. It represents the fl at bread the Jews took with them as they fl ed.

parental !NNE3OFFEES

rites

If you'd like to learn more, Rabbi Andrew Goodman teaches Jewish cooking classes at Beth Ahabah on West Franklin Street. Call 358-6757 for more information.

Parenthood changes everything. magazine

magazine

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Resource Listings Balcony Bliss PAGES 36-43

Architecture, The Johannes Design Group, johannasdesign.com. Building contractor, People’s Choice Builders, peopleschoicebuilders.com.

Pages 36-37 Cattelan Italia table and Chicago chairs, La Différence, ladiff.com. Lighting, Lutron Electronics, lutron.com. Black Galaxy and Extra Classico granite countertops, Classic Granite and Marble, virginiagranite.com. Wall color, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Stone Wall, Buckingham Stone and Brick, 897-5533. Faux Painting, Janell Rhee.

Pages 38-39 Bartoli couch and Tribeca table, La Différence, ladiff.com. Cabinetry, Moser Originals, moseroriginals.com. GE Monogram dishwasher and refrigerator, Wolf induction cooktop, oven and microwave, Cosby Appliances, 2648356. Brazilian cherry flooring, Lumber Liquidators, lumberliquidators.com. Orbit metal tile, Solistone, solistone.com. Page 40 Entryway table, Binswanger Glass

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Page 42 Cattelan Italia table and Chicago chairs, La Différence, ladiff.com. Lighting, Lutron Electronics, lutron.com. Pages 43 Bathroom fixtures, Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery, ferguson.com.

Shared Sympathies PAGES 52-57

Page 52 Wall color, Benjamin Moore White Heron; wall trim, Benjamin Moore Dill Pickle, benjaminmoore.com. Curtains, Serena and Lily Navy medallion scarf print, piped in grass trellis, and bed linens, Serena and Lily Navy medallion scarf print and Sprout/Navy Diamond, constructed by Roomers, roomersdesign.com. Side-table lamp, Target, target.com. Rug, Metzger Floors, metzgerfloors.com. Bed, La Différence, ladiff.com. Page 53 Lamps, Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com. Couch, Crate and Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Company C pillows and rug, Roomers, roomersdesign.com. Coffee table, Virginia Wayside, vawaysidefurniture.com. Page 54 Upholstered chairs, former Printer’s Alley, now Artee Fabrics & Home, 285-9591. Window treatment, former Printer’s Alley, now Artee Fabrics & Home, 285-9591, constructed by Roomers, roomersdesign.com. Lamps, Interiors by Nan Lagow, 282-8901. Chandelier, Atlantic Electric, atlanticelec.net. Custom needlepoint rug, Carey Burke, careyburke.com. Custom bed, Interiors by Nan Lagow, 282-8901. Lamp, handmade by Anne Walker. Rug, Metzger Floors, metzgerfloors.com. Wall color, Benjamin Moore White Heron, benjaminmoore.com. Custom bedding, Interiors by Nan Lagow, 282-8901. Comforter, The Company Store, thecompanystore.com. Bratt Décor bedside table, Rattle & Roll, rattleroll.com. Little Castle 

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Resource Listings chair, Rattle & Roll, rattleroll.com. Mural, Gwen Campbell, gwensgarden.net. Sky Mix glass bathroom tile, The Tile Shop, tileshop.com. Towels, Abyss & Habidecor, abysstowel.com. Wall color, Benjamin Moore Dill Pickle, benjaminmoore.com.

Page 55 Everything But the Kitchen Sink light fixture, Shades of Light, shadesoflight.com. Custom wall color, Sunny’s Goodtime Paint, sunnyspaint. com. Yorkshire curtains, Country Curtains, countrycurtains.com. Rug, Home Decorators Collection, homedecorators.com. Page 56 Thibault Green Santa Cruz Stripe wallpaper, Roomers, roomersdesign.com. Appliances, Frigidaire, frigidaire.com. Chairs, Pier 1 Imports, pier1.com. Page 57 White Kraft Maid cabinets, Lowe’s, lowes.com. Blended Palms glass tile, Morris Tile Distributors Inc., morristile.net. Estonia summer stripe window treatment, fabricated by Roomers, roomersdesign.com. Appliances, Frigidaire, frigidaire.com.

A Tuscan Villa in Glen Allen PAGES 44-51

Designer, contractor and faux-finish painters, Norman and Diane Edwards, (804) 426-7874.

Page 44 Desk, Governor’s Antiques Ltd., governorsantiques.com. Custom nook with panels, fabricated by Norman Edwards with salvage from Miller & Rhoads and oak church pews.

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Page 45 All furniture, mahogany family pieces, circa 1930. Persian Rug, Amir Rug Exchange, amirrugexchange.com. Light fixture, Governor’s Antiques Ltd., governorsantiques.com. Medallion, Wishihadthat Inc., wishihadthat.com.

Page 46 Vanity, circa 1900, eBay, ebay.com. Light fixture, Elephant’s Toe Antiques, 282-5550. Vanity top, BBG Brazilian Best Granite, bbggranite.com.

Page 47 Headboard, Victoria’s Antique Warehouse, victoriasantiquewarehouse.com. Maitland Smith lamps, eBay, ebay.com. Bedding, Williams & Sherrill, williamsandsherrill.com.

Page 48-49 Fireplace, Governor’s Antiques Ltd., governorsantiques.com. Rug, Amir Rug Exchange, amirrugexchange.com. Light fixture, Leo Burke Furniture, leoburke.com. Floor Lamp, Governor’s Antiques Ltd., governorsantiques.com. Sconces, ebay, eBay.com. Furniture, Ethan Allen, ethanallen. com. Moon vases, Alexander’s Antiques & Auction, alexandersantiques.com. Mona Lisa reproduction, Miller & Rhoads, circa 1960. Mirror, Williams & Sherrill, williamsandsherrill.com. Page 50 Cabinets, KDW Home, kitchen-design works.com. Countertop, BBG Brazilian Best Granite, bbggranite.com. Rugs, Amir Rug Exchange, amirrugexchange.com. Antique Lights: Governor’s Antiques Ltd., governorsantiques.com; Elephant’s Toe Antiques, 282-5550; and Caravati’s Inc. Architectural Salvage, caravatis.com. Curtains, Williams & Sherrill, williamsandsherrill.com.


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The Shoppes at Westgate, across from Short Pump Town Center

11737 W. Broad St. 804.360.8049

© Thibaut

W i n D o W T r e aT m e n T S

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furniTure

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Stepping Stones Women’s Center For the Support You Need

... Every Step of the Way.

Breast Forms • Bras • Wigs • Soft Hats Lymphedema • Swimsuits • Gifts Whether you were diagnosed recently or decades ago, you have more choices! We accept Medicare, Anthem BCBS, Cigna, Aetna, Southern Health and Tricare

Please Call for an Appointment

We are an ABC accredited facility with private fitting rooms and impeccable service.

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Spend an hour a day! We’re Celebrating our 10thorAnniversary!

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Occasions ď&#x192;¤

Photographs of the winning projects at the VCA.

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Awarding Excellence AN EXHIBITION OF WINNING PROJ ECT S AT T H E V I RG I N I A C EN T ER FO R A RC H I T ECT U R E  By Brandon Fox

On Jan. 6, the Virginia Center for Architecture hosted the opening of the Virginia Society AIA’s Awards for Excellence in Architecture. “This year’s crop [of entries] was particularly strong in spite the economic downturn and serious challenges that firms have had to face in the last 24 to 36 months,” says curator William Richards, and former editor-in-chief of Inform: Architecture and Design in the Mid-Atlantic. Projects were submitted in three categories: architecture, historic preservation and interior design. Richards explains that members of the out-ofstate jury asked themselves two questions: “How does each project advance the practice of architecture, historic preservation or interior design? How does each project compare to the other projects within its category?” Large, striking photographs of 

Graphic designer Christopher Hibben and architect Olanrewaju Ajibola

Ja y P a u l p h o t o s

rhomemag.com

73


Occasions

Excellence cont’d

Margaret Hancock and new daughter Evelyn

It was a chance for architecture lovers and folks in the industry to get together.

the projects lined the walls in two of the Branch House’s long galleries. Local winners included Glavé & Holmes, which won an historic-preservation award for the Newcomb Hall renovation at Washington and Lee University. Richmond firm SMBW won for its design of the new Luck Stone corporate headquarters, as well as for its contribution to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ expansion wing. “If there is a common factor among the winning designs,” says Richards, “it is a rigor and inventiveness in thinking about the design problem at hand.”

“If there is a common factor among the winning designs, it is a rigor in thinking about the problem at hand.”  WILLIAM RICHARDS Lu Wallace, Andrea Levine, Stephanie Caperton

For more photos, visit

RHOME MAG .COM

Rice University project by Hopkins Architects with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company

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Jay Paul photos


When the Quality Shows it Must be Franco’s. Thanks to our customers, whose loyalty for 38 years has made us the best menswear store in Richmond.

Franco’s Footwear at Franco’s Lakeside store location. A unique, full service Men’s shoe store, featuring dress & casual styles. Franco’s footwear specializes in a large range of sizes and widths and hard to fit sizes are welcome.

Mark Ambrogi, Jim Norwood and Kevin Reardon

Fine American & Italian Brands including Allen Edmonds • Alden • Mephisto • Neil M. • New Balance • Romano Martegani

5321 Lakeside Avenue

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804.264.2994

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2/10/11 3:05:31 PM


Calendar

This Pocahontas Road home will be on the Westmoreland Place/ Windsor Farms portion of the Historic Garden week tour.

3.11

TO 3.13 THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY CRAFTSMEN’S CLASSIC ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL This annual

Flinging into Spring SOME OF OUR FAVORITE HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN

event will feature more than 350 artists and craftspeople from across North America. Demonstrations and one-of-a-kind treasures, both traditional and contemporary. 3/11, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; 3/12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; 3/13, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Richmond International Raceway, Exhibition and Commonwealth Buildings, 600 E. Laburnum Ave. Visit gilmoreshows.com for more information.

 By Meredith Rigsby

4.16

to 4.23 Historic Garden Week in Virginia In celebration of 78 years of preserving Virginia’s heritage, attendees will have access to 250 of Virginia’s most spectacular gardens, homes and historic landmarks spanning the state during the Garden Club of Virginia’s annual garden week. Historic Garden Week is the oldest and largest statewide house-and-garden tour event in the nation, with each day offering tours of five to six local houses and gardens, most of which will be opened to the public for the fi rst time. Richmond’s tours will take place on 4/19 (Hampton Gardens/Cary Street Road), 4/20 (Monument Avenue) and 4/21 (Westmoreland Place/ Windsor Farms). Advance tickets $35 per day, $40 per day on the day of the tour; $20 for single-site admission. Children ages 6 to 12, $20; children 5 and under, free. Statewide passes are $175 per person or $300 for two. Daily tours 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (check for times in other localities). The Garden Club of Virginia, 12 E. Franklin St. Call 644-7776 for more details; e-mail gdnweek@verizon.net or visit vagardenweek.org.

4.9 TO 4.10 TIPTOE THROUGH THE TULIPS: HERITAGE WEEKEND Tour the Bloemendaal House and enjoy highlights from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s past with the help of garden guides and costumed interpreters while experiencing the magnificence of tulips in full bloom. 4/9, noon to 3 p.m. and 4/10, noon to 4 p.m. $10; members free. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, 1800 Lakeside Ave. Call 2629887 or visit lewisginter.org for more details. 76

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3.26 to 4.2 CURTAIN CALL Richmond’s annual consignment sale of highend furniture, drapery, bedding, artwork and home accessories is still going strong after 14 years. Consignment receiving: 3/4 to 3/6; 3/11 to 3/13; 3/18 to 3/20, 1 to 5 p.m. or by appointment. Private sale for consignors, 3/25, 5 to 8 p.m. Sale begins 3/26, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 3/27, noon to 5 p.m.; 3/30 and 3/31, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 4/1 and 4/2, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Final day, 30 percent off, 4/7, noon to 5 p.m.; Last call sale, 4/8, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Shops at Willow Lawn, 1601 Willow Lawn Drive. Call 282-3333 or visit curtaincallrichmond.com for more details. Top: photo courtesy Garden Club of Virg inia; bottom rig ht: photo courtesy Curtain Ca l l


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Q&A

Downsizing: A Prime| S e n ior - mov e ma n ag e r L e ig h B ur k e bri n gs calmi n g guida n c e to a str e ss f ul situatio n  By Katherine Houstoun

Moving is emotional at any age. But when you’re also sifting through decades of memorabilia with an eye on getting rid of half of it or more — that can create a great deal of pressure, both on the one making the move and the family members assisting it. Enter Leigh Burke, a senior-move manager who provides helping hands and an objective eye. “We serve as a pivot to keep everybody happy,” says Burke. She’s been downsizing and moving seniors for 16 years, most recently with Transitions with Leigh. In addition to helping ease familial tension, third-party helpers can prove instrumental when a senior’s loved ones live out of town or have full-time jobs and limited time. Burke and her team of six will pack, hire movers, supervise on moving day, hand-carry art and accessories of high value, unpack and set up the new residence. They also drop off donations, ship furniture to family, arrange for appraisals and sale, and empty the former home for the real estate closing. “We can do anything that needs to be done to make their move a gentle transition,” she says. Here are her tips for preparing for a seamless downsizing experience.

DOWNSIZING TIPS

Scout out your living options. Visit different residential communities and start to visualize your new home. “Richmond is blessed with so many options of retirement communities,” Burke says. “Go see what’s out there and what will fit your needs — financially, emotionally, socially and physically.” Consider putting yourself on a waiting list. Start downsizing early. Burke suggests planning six months to one year ahead of time. Use the time before your move to look at your current space and evaluate your needs. “Make decisions as to what you really use and what you love,” Burke says. “Then start getting rid of the rest.” Dig through the attic and basements first. “Start in places where you don’t live on a daily basis,” says Burke. “Strive to empty them.” Ask family members for help or hire a junk man. She advises taking one small project and completing it before moving on to the next one. Once you finish with your storage areas, move on to the guest room, hall closets and office. Plan to use furniture in new ways. “Think creatively about furniture,” says Burke. “A chest of drawers can have multiple uses. Think functional, attractive and safe.” Your corner cabinet does not have to be for fine china, for example; you can display collections, books or photos instead.

Leigh’s List To see Leigh Burke’s Rolodex of trusted service providers for help with the extras, visit rhomemag.com

Whittle down your collections. A good rule of thumb is to plan on taking one-third of just about everything, including books. “People who read love their books,” Burke says. “But it’s very expensive to move a lot of books, and there’s never enough shelf space. I advise clients to keep the classics [like] the leatherbound books but give away your contemporary fiction.” Donate the unwanted books to churches, libraries or retirement communities. Less kitchen. Get rid of the bread maker, the unused waffle iron and the coffee mug collection. Donate large casserole pans and extra glassware. Throw out the spices and start from scratch — you’re only supposed to keep spices for six months anyway. Organize your photos now. You won’t do it after you move, says Burke, despite your best intentions. If you don’t feel like sorting through boxes, consider using a photo organization service, which will scan all of your photos or slides and put them onto compact discs.

Start giving away the rest. Antique furniture, crystal, china, silver and other family heirlooms make for great wedding and christening gifts, and children would be thrilled to take unneeded pieces off your hands. Donate or sell the rest.

“Think creatively about furniture. A chest of drawers can have multiple uses.”  LEIGH BURKE

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S a r a h Wa l o r p h o t o


Your Loss... Is Her Gain. Join the Pound for Pound Challenge! Imagine if you could take off the pounds you don’t need and give them to someone who does. Well, you can! During this season’s “Biggest Loser,” for every pound of weight loss you pledge, General Mills will donate 11¢–enough for a pound of food–to fight hunger in our community.

Take the Pound for Pound Challenge. It’ll be good for you, and even better for your neighbors in need! Local Sponsors

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Pledge today at pfpchallenge.com. For details, call 549.5668. You can also support a friend or family member who’s taking the Challenge.

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Back Page

Comfort comes to the West End A s e c o n d L aDiff o p e n s i n S h o r t P u mp  By Brandon Fox and Meredith Rigsby

NEW BOOKS

NEW PRODUCTS

 The new Short Pump La Différence

What made you decide that this was the right time to open another store? Sarah Paxton (owner): We wanted to become more convenient to our growing West End customer base since coming downtown regularly is not always an option. Also, as other businesses retrench, we want to continue to grow.

Will you be carrying most of the same merchandise as the downtown store? SP: The vibe will be generally the same, but since the space is one-seventh the size (7,000 vs. 50,000 square feet), there will naturally be a whole lot less product in the showroom.  What product in your new store is the most exciting to you? SP: I’d have to say it’s our newest introductions from McCreary Modern. It’s not “sexy” but it’s so comfortable, livable and easy, like a great pair of jeans. The Thomas sofa in a super blue fabric is so soft and comfy, I would stay there all day. La Différence at Short Pump, 2436 Old Brick Road.

+ Laura Santtini’s Taste No. 5 Umami Paste Tomatoes,

mushrooms, parmesan, meat. They all have a deep, satisfying taste that isn’t salty, sweet, bitter or sour. This fifth taste is called umami. Laura Santtini, a food entrepreneur and a cookbook author, manages to pack an explosion of it into a small tube. Just a smidge will enhance and deepen every savory dish you make ($6). laurasanttini.com.

Thoughtful Gardening by Robin Lane Fox. Basic Books, 2010. A deliciously odd hybrid of gardening how-to, history and memoir, this book can tell you about irises, Plato, Aldous Huxley and hallucinogenics — all in one chapter. Robin Lane Fox’s attitude toward squirrels is absolute: His solution to the problem is to provide a creamed squirrel recipe for the reader. “Readers,” he says, “testify that the meat is superior to rabbit and is preferable to the supermarkets’ apology for steak.” Lots of solid gardening advice is woven throughout, but it’s the author’s crackling wit that makes this book such a great read. Charlotte Moss Decorates: The Art of Creating Elegant and Inspiring Rooms by Charlotte Moss with Mitchell Owens. Rizzoli, 2011. In her seventh book, Richmond native Charlotte Moss gives readers a glimpse of her design process, using projects for 12 designer houses as examples. Her inspirational collages (postcards, pictures torn from magazines, scraps of fabric) and storyboards show how Moss brings her signature Southern-inflected style from conception to reality — beautifully.

Websites to Check Out

1

DIY projects and baby love along with cute shoes thrown into the mix — that’s what Boots and Totty is all about. A local couple shares experiences with their newborn son, and the trials of renovating an old house in Richmond. bootsandtotty.com 80

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2

For those of us who can’t get enough of beautiful flowers and animals, Clay and Limestone is the site to visit. Large photos of plants and the wildlife that visits them are featured on this go-to gardening blog. clayandlimestone.com

3

Lovely Listing is a site full of odd finds in real estate listings, and boy, are they odd. From rainbow-colored houses to rooms full of mounted animal heads, you will be both entertained and horrified. lovelylisting.icanhas cheezburger.com

T o p : Ja m e s D i c k i n s o n p h o t o


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R•Home Mar/Apr 2011