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Mounties have released a CCTV image of a man they believe is connected to the kidnapping in broad daylight of a man and his five-year-old son.

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A2 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

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T H E

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A3

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Waterfront rezoning bid fails to win support INTERACTIVE PRINT

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City staff to examine Onni’s Imperial Landing development further

BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

The city’s planning committee is not ready to drop anchor on a developer’s bid to re-zone it’s vacant commercial holdings along the Steveston waterfront. On Tuesday afternoon, councillors voted to have city staff look more closely at what types of businesses can hang out their shingle at Onni’s Imperial Landing development. Currently, the site is zoned Maritime Mixed Use, meaning part of the 65,000-square-feet of retail be dedicated to those operations supporting the maritime industry. Onni has tried on other occasions to loosen the conditions with other re-zoning requests, hoping to bring in some non-maritime-focused tenants. Currently, they have interest from businesses including TD Bank and Nesters Market. But several councillors balked at okaying the request. One the most vociferous in opposition was Coun. Harold Steves who called the re-zoning bid the worst in Richmond’s history — a close second, he said, was council’s decision Monday night that gave the nod to Smartcentres’ development. “As far as I’m concerned, no damn way,” Steves told a group representing Onni at the meeting.

PHILIP RAPHAEL/RICHMOND NEWS

The commercial space of the Onni development in Steveston sits vacant as council fails to support the developer’s rezoning bid. Steves then went on to say, “If you want to buy me, don’t do it for $1.5 million,” referring to the amount Onni is willing to provide to the city’s Leisure Fund if the zoning change was granted. Other councillors were concerned about how a shift away from the maritime mixed use designation would increase traffic and parking needs in the area, especially if Onni makes good on its talks with potential tenants like Nesters Market, a niche grocery chain that could cover just

under a third (20,000-square-feet) of the total retail area. Beau Jarivs, Onni’s vice-president of development, told the committee a traffic study it commissioned showed the existing parking and loading facilities, plus proposed improvements would be able to accommodate new commercial uses. Jarvis added there have also been inquiries from businesses that fit into the mixed maritime zoning, such as a kayak rental firm. “We’d be more than happy to fill

all of the retail with maritime mixed use tenants. It’s important you understand that,” he told the committee. But as it currently stands, Jarvis said there is a hesitancy for maritime-focused enterprises to make a commitment when there is limited boating activity in the area. Coun. Chak Au said adhering to the maritime mixed use designation is just window dressing, while Coun. Evelina Halsey-Brandt categorized the decision made by a previous council as one of silliest she’d ever come across. “It hasn’t worked for the developer or the city,” she said, adding she wanted to refer the re-zoning request back to staff in part to allow more time to consider the city’s plan to possibly establish a marina at the site. Speaking in favour of keeping the current zoning intact was Iqbal Lada, longtime owner of Steveston Marine & Hardware. Lada told the committee he was against any changes that would undermine the viability of current businesses in the village core. “Steveston will become a vacuum,” he said, adding that only recently the community’s businesses are starting to “make a go of it.” see Van der Tas page 4

Police seek third kidnapping suspect BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

The Richmond RCMP is asking for the public’s help in identifying a third suspect For thought to be two videos involved in a kidnapping of a man and his five-yearold son back in August. Police released a series of photos and a video clip Wednesday morning of the suspect who was caught on a security surveillance camera in the lobby of the kidnapping victim’s condo building.

He is described have been charged as having short, dark with kidnapping. hair, a beard and RCMP spokesmoustache. person Cpl. Police were Stephanie Ashton called to the 3000told a group of block of Corvette media gathered Suspect Way at around 2 at the Richmond p.m. on Aug. 11 detachment’s headafter a passerby witnessed a quarters Wednesday that group of males approach a during the course of the man and force him at guninvestigation video of a third point into the back seat of suspect was obtained. his own car where his young Anyone with information son was strapped into a child about the suspect is asked seat. When police arrived to email at richmond.ediv_ on the scene they arrested lmd@rcmp-grc.gc.ca. If you two suspects — 27-year-old wish to remain anonymous, Ryan Stalker, and 19-yearcall Crimestoppers at 1-800old Raymond Truong — who 222-8477.

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A4 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

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sure is when I hear terms like ‘serviceresistant’ applied to teenagers,” said Turpel-Lafond. “Well, are there actually services in place that they’re resisting? People have this bias against teenagers, they think they’re difficult. We need to change that conversation, there are some serious reasons for youth addiction and we need to have the whole family involved.”

Self-medicating

Both Turpel-Lafond and Rick Dubras, executive director of RASS, point to self-medication as one of the main reasons youth take substance use beyond experimentation. “It raises some significant questions about access to a good mental health care system and community support,” said Turpel-Lafond. Last year, the RASS Youth and

Family counseling program saw 266 Richmond youth clients, amounting to 680 sessions. Alcohol and marijuana are the most common substances among Richmond youth. “It cuts across all schools, all ages, all ethnicities,” said Dubras. “They can find it helps with their depression or anxiety, or any other low-lying mental health issue. Alcohol makes friends.” Addiction is usually found once school counselors start addressing other problems, such as sleeping all the time or slipping grades. Of RASS’ 266 youth last year, 201 of them were referrals from schools. “Addiction is a bad word,” said Dubras. “We want to make the distinction between substance use and substance misuse, so kids don’t see it as a medical disorder and so there’s nothing in the way of somebody getting help. see Community involvement page 5

Van der Tas: Stop saying ‘no’ Continued from page 3 “Now, Onni is trying to change the game.” Also speaking against the re-zoning request was Steveston resident Ralph Turner who said he’d like to see the $1.5 million offer from Onni retained for use in Steveston, and lamented the developer had not included any green space as part of the deal. Jim van der Tas, president of the Steveston Merchants Association said some of his members have a distinct distrust of Onni’s intentions when it comes to re-zoning, but added the community has to stop being the one that says “no” to all development ideas.

“Is there a compromise out there? Is it a matter of splitting up the 65,000-square-feet of space?” Van der Tas said, adding it is not beneficial to have Onni’s completed commercial space remain empty. Coun. Au then floated the idea that one of the compromises could involve having the city lease a portion of the retail area to establish a maritime museum rather than allowing a zoning change he likened to “rescuing” the developer. Planning committee chair Bill McNulty said the referral back to city staff could take several months to complete but was necessary given the need to get the zoning right.

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2ND ANNUAL Gary Hollick Publisher Richmond News

The challenge is on! VOTE for your favourite moustache by donating to the Richmond Hospital Foundation! Visit www.lansdowne-centre.com to vote and donate, and watch this space each Friday in November for moustache progress. All donations go directly to the Richmond Hospital’s Urology Department.

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A5

News Community involvement: Strong network helps youth Continued from page 4 “Rarely will a young person be diagnosed with an addiction, but instead it’s substance use disorder.”

YVONNE ROBERTSON RICHMOND NEWS

Mary Ellen TurpelLafond, B.C. youth advocate, spoke about addictions in Richmond Wednesday night. She was introduced by Rick Dubras, executive director of Richmond Addiction Services Society.

It’s a family affair

Turpel-Lafond explored the effects of stigma from addiction on families. Many times Dubras has seen situations where parents are reluctant to join the counseling session due to their own biases or expect a counselor to “fix the problem.” However, both Turpel-Lafond and Dubras emphasize the importance of having the whole family involved, as it affects that whole group. “Substance use goes beyond the child and includes upbringing, certain stresses in the household they might be dealing with, there are a variety of things,” he said. Dubras encourages parents to look at their own habits and reasons they turn to substances whether it be a glass — Mary Ellen of wine at Turpel-Lafond dinner, to celebrate an event or to mourn a loss, as the child picks up on these behaviours. All substance use has the potential to be problematic, and the child needs to under-

“Childhood is only 932 weeks....We need to seize the moment.”

stand the distinction between use and misuse. “Helping the family function is the most important thing,” said Dubras. “If there’s a strong relationship, there’s more trust and influence.”

Building a network

The community also has a role to play in ensuring youth addiction is prevented. If a youth becomes more involved in their surrounding community, they’re less likely to try substances, according to Turpel-Lafond. It delays the age of exposure to substances. “If experimenting starts between 12-13, the outcomes are severely compromised and leads to other risky behaviours like cigarette smoking or driving under the influence,” she

said. “They are also more likely to become dependant on the substances.” Studies indicate meaningful community engagement, family connection and friends with healthy attitudes about substance use are protective factors from youth addiction. “Participation in organized sports, especially for girls, is a huge factor,” she said. “So let’s look at these girls, and maybe push them to join the school’s volleyball team.” Communities should devise low-cost programs for youth to engage them and help if there’s a problem, rather than get outside help. “You can have a strong family with an addiction, if they’re accessing community support,” said Turpel-Lafond. “As long as the family has a pathway to support when

SCHOOL REGISTRATION f o r S e p t e m b e r 2 014 Commencing January 13th, 2014 registration for September 2014 will be accepted at Richmond Elementary Schools. Children who will be five (5) on or before December 31, 2014 are eligible for entry into Kindergarten. The school district offers parents the following program options for their children: ; 6a)d%>' `WN& -a<@^ K< ^D9@ GK<G'c-a< >G'DDdP ; 6K@d^ 4@-aG' Zcc-@>%Da `WNH -a<@^ K< ?aE-@>DaO =@%E)-O 8%3DaO _%dcD@-O ]DccKO T%<G'-ddO /'%<->%E-P ; VK<- 4@-aG' Zcc-@>%Da `_@M ( -a<@^ K< 8%-+-aIK!-@O TGS--d^O /'%<->%E-P ; TDa<->>D@% `WN, -a<@^ K< _K@E-a :%<^O TGW%aa-^O 1<-7->P HP W%aE-@)K@<-a @-)%><@K<%Da DGG9@> K< <'- GK<G'c-a< >G'DDd I-<5--a XKa9K@^ H. C .HO FJH,M 2-)%><@K<%Da +D@c> c9>< I- GDcBd-<-E in person I^ <'- BK@-a< D@ d-)Kd )9K@E%KaM ?+<-@ XKa9K@^ .HO FJH, Kdd @-)%><@K<%Da> 5%dd <K!- BdKG- K< <'- 1G'DDd 8%><@%G< :-a<@Kd 2-)%><@K<%Da RYG-M FP Z+ KBBd^%a) +D@ 6K@d^ D@ VK<- 4@-aG' Zcc-@>%Da D@ TDa<->>D@%O <'- BK@-a< D@ d-)Kd )9K@E%Ka c9>< Kd>D DI<K%a +@Dc <'GK<G'c-a< >G'DDdO K< <'- <%c- D+ @-)%><@K<%DaO Ka ?d<-@aK<Q@D)@Kc> ?BBd%GK<%Da 4D@cM 0'%> +D@c c9>< I- E@DBB-E D[ in person K< <'- 1G'DDd 8%><@%G< :-a<@Kd 2-)%><@K<%Da RYG`&$HH _@Ka7%dd- ?7-a9-P I-<5--a <'- 'D9@> D+ $e.J Kc KaE ,eJJ Bc XKa9K@^ H. C .HO FJH,M ?GG->> <D <'- 4@-aG' Zcc-@>%Da KaE TDa<->>D@% B@D)@Kc> %> <'@D9)' K E%><@%G<N5%E- E@K5 B@DG->> 5%<' >%Id%a) B@%D@%<^ (siblings must be in the same program at the same school and at the same time).

Information meetings for parents will be held as noted below: KINDERGARTEN PARENT EVENINGS: 09->EK^O XKa9K@^ & K< &eJJ Bc K< Alfred Dixon Elementary and R.C. Talmey Elementary EARLY FRENCH IMMERSION KINDERGARTEN / GR.1 PARENT EVENING: TDaEK^O XKa9K@^ H. K< &eJJ Bc K< William Bridge Elementary LATE FRENCH IMMERSION (GR.6) PARENT EVENING: 0'9@>EK^O XKa9K@^ " K< &eJJ Bc at Kathleen McNeely Elementary MONTESSORI KINDERGARTEN - GR.4 PARENT EVENING: 09->EK^O XKa9K@^ H, K< &eJJ Bc at James McKinney Elementary KINDERGARTEN EVENING FOR PARENTS OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: 0'9@>EK^O XKa9K@^ H( K< &eJJ Bc at William Cook Elementary For further information, please consult the district website at

www.sd38.bc.ca

things go sideways, they can be perfectly functional.” Many school programs employ fear tactics over information-based approaches, according to Turpel-Lafond. Youth become frightened by the images of addicts they see and are less likely to seek help if they think they have a problem.

Concern over liquor laws

Of particular worry for the youth advocate is the current debate on liquor laws in B.C, which looks to make alcohol accessible in grocery stores. Studies conducted by the provincial health officer, Dr. Perry Kendall indicate a positive relationship between alcohol availability and consumption. However, as one attendee pointed out, availability might increase consumption, but there are more systemic issues that cause addiction. Hunger (looking for appetite-suppressant drugs), disability and homosexuality (looking to cope with isolation) are some of the reasons youth turn to substances. Agreeing with the response, TurpelLafond emphasized the importance of a strong community network. Increased availability could encourage those youth with a tendency towards addiction. “We need to have a discussion on the impact this can have on youth and addiction,” she said. “It could be pretty devastating to young people who live in communities without a strong network and access to services. “We need a provincial mandate to protect our youth. Childhood is only 932 weeks, it’s short. We need to seize the moment.”

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A6 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

Notice of Alternative Approval Process

Proposed sale of park land (relocation of Cambie Field at 3651 Sexsmith Road)

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

Alternative Approval for Cambie Field—Sale of Park Bylaw 8927 Council may proceed with the adoption of Bylaw 8927, the Cambie Field—Sale of Park Bylaw, unless at least 10% (13,108) of the eligible electors of the City of Richmond sign elector response forms indicating their opposition to the proposed land exchange.

The Proposal The proposed sale of park land (relocation of Cambie Field at 3651 Sexsmith Road), as shown on the attached diagram will benefit the City by the creation of a larger, better situated park in the immediate vicinity of the existing location. As

part of the rezoning conditions (RZ 11-591985) for the proposed development, Polygon would purchase 3651 Sexsmith Road whilst simultaneously selling to the City an equal area of land subdivided from 8331, 8351, and 8371 Cambie Road. In addition to this proposed exchange of land, rezoning

The proposed bylaw and related records are available for public inspection at the City Clerk’s Office, Richmond City Hall, 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding statutory holidays, from Nov. 20, 2013–Jan. 17, 2014.

conditions also require Polygon to transfer 8311 Cambie Road and other portions of 8331, 8351, and 8371 Cambie Road for consolidation with the new aforementioned park area. The net result will be a larger park (over 38% more area) with increased street frontage for access and parking.

City Disposition

Originally signed elector response forms must be received at City Hall by 5:00 p.m., Jan 17, 2014. Photocopies of signed forms can not be accepted.

What is an Alternative Approval Process? An Alternative Approval Process allows a council to proceed with an action unless at least 10% of the electors state their opposition within a prescribed period.

www.richmond.ca

Sexsmith Rd

8371 Cambie

8351 Cambie

8331 Cambie

If opposed, sign an AAP Form Elector response forms must be in the form provided by the City and are available at the Information Counter on the first floor of City Hall, 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC., 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., from Nov. 20, 2013– Jan. 17, 2014. Elector response forms are also available on the City website at www.richmond.ca or by calling the City Clerk’s Office at 604-276-4007 during regular business hours.

New Cambie Field Park Location 8311 Cambie

Hazelbridge Way

3651 Sexsmith

Cambie Rd

Who is eligible? Only electors of the City of Richmond are eligible to sign an elector response form. Qualified electors are those persons meeting all of the following qualifications: • is a Canadian citizen; • an individual who is age 18 or older; • has been a resident of British Columbia for at least six months; • a Richmond resident or owner of property within Richmond for at least the last 30 days; and • is not disqualified from voting by the Local Government Act or any other act. A non-resident property elector who meets the following criteria is also an eligible elector: • is not entitled to register as a

• • • •

resident elector for the City of Richmond; an individual who is age 18 or older; is a Canadian citizen; has been a resident of British Columbia for at least six months; has been a registered owner of real property within the City of Richmond for at least thirty days; and, is not disqualified from voting by the Local Government Act or any other act.

Note: Corporations are not entitled to vote nor is land held in a corporate name eligible to vote. In the case of multiple owners of a parcel, only one person may vote as a non-resident property elector. David Weber, Corporate Officer, City Clerk’s Office


The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A7

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A8 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Gary Hollick ghollick@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Yvonne Robertson yrobertson@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Shaun Dhillon sdhillon@richmond-news.com Stephen Murphy smurphy@ richmond-news.com Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Georgia Storey gstorey@ richmond-news.com Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support: Kelly Christian kchristian@ richmond-news.com Administration:

Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

T

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Bring on the leaks

he Richmond News received more than a dozen letters Wednesday concerned over news that Canadian officials are negotiating proposed new regulation of the Internet in closed door trade talks in Salt Lake, Utah this week. We won’t be publishing what are essentially form letters, but applaud the effort being mobilized by OpenMedia to throw a spotlight on a series of secret bureaucratic meetings allegedly driven by U.S. interests. OpenMedia has previously engaged Canadians in campaigns such as StopTheMeter.ca and StopSpying.ca. Last week, Wikileaks released documents that, according to Open Media, confirm an Internet censorship plan is being negotiated as part of a Trans-Pacific Partnership that, if signed, would require Canada to alter its copyright laws. If it wasn’t for Wikileaks, precious little would be known about what is at stake here; even members of Parliament have been denied access to information about the treaty talks while, according to Knowledge Ecology International, some 700 U.S. corporate “advisers” have been cleared to see the texts. KEI claims the U.S. is pushing hardest for regulations that benefit industry ahead of the consumer, and that other countries are prepared to compromise in the hopes of a trade deal with the United States. KEI also claims the treaty would limit competition and raise prices for drugs. OpenMedia’s online petition calls on Prime Minister Stephen Harper to pull Internet censorship provisions from the TPP agreement. How about he just tells Canadians what is going on first?

CHOICE WORDS

New voices dispel old myths The Editor, It was as good as graduation night for 11 ESL creative writers at a workshop with Nancy Lee, writer-in-residence at Richmond Public Library Wednesday night. Public readings were cheerfully received by family, friends and members of the community. But the best part of the event was the birth of a meaty, newly-published chapbook, which challenge some traditional beliefs, such as: 1. Good writing must be weighty or lengthy; not so, be concise, to the point, and, most importantly, interesting for modern readers, who spare very little time on reading. 2. Adults telling stories of their lives tend to be navel-gazing: not so, the pen can transform dusty memories into sparkling prose with a message of hope. 3. Words are dull because they are not visual: a good picture is worth a thousand words? Yes, yet a composition with a sense of lively drama may be even better because it invites readers to rekindle their sleeping imagination. Go to Richmond’s Brighouse Branch, and dip into the freshly-minted New Voices II. Next year, enrol in a class, and you’ll be given a new lease on life! Let me conclude by listing the benefits for any interested individual: 1. You’ll grow passionate, positive and pen-itching (meaning desiring to pick up a pen or sit with a computer any time of the day and create good, interesting stories on short notice.) 2. You’ll feel surrounded by people and community and capable of doing good for yourself and others. 3. The desire to read other writers grows by the minute. If you let the desire to have a good read or to write on a creatively disappear, it will be an irredeemable loss; you only have yourself to blame! Ling (James) Hung Richmond

There’s not quite enough inequality yet A Walmart in Canton, Ohio, made headlines when it was revealed, a week before American Thanksgiving, that it was holding a food drive. Nope, not for the less fortunate members of its own community. For some of its own staff members. Walmart has defended this, saying it shows how wonderful it is that its associates (as it classily dubs its low-paid employees) care about one another. Yeah, I’m sure it’s not demoralizing at all to work at a company that rewards its CEO with $20.7 million last year, while giving many of its workers so little that they need charity to put food on their tables. McDonald’s, meanwhile, has started offering its employees odd advice, including to eat their food in small bites, so they feel fuller quicker. That’ll help keep their stomachs from rumbling if their only source of income is the Golden Arches. Of course, McDonald’s doesn’t expect you to just work for them. Their own budget calculator, to “help” their employees, includes a second job. The company’s McResources line was also recently recorded advising a 10-year employee — who still makes minimum wage, of course — to apply for food stamps and other government programs to keep her head above water. Studies show that, in the United States, one in five

Matthew Claxton PA I N F U L T RU T H

families of fast food workers live below the poverty line, and 52 per cent of them rely on government programs like Medicaid and food stamps. That’s bad compared to the 25 per cent of the workforce that uses government programs — but that simply makes me wonder why 25 per cent of working Americans also can’t make ends meet. In the past couple of years, there have been rumblings from the world of fast food and the frontline retail sector. Low-paid workers have been trying sporadically to organize into unions, have staged walkouts, and are starting to demand a living wage. So far, their demands have been largely ignored. This is stupid. If you’re the CEO of a large company, you should be sharpening your pencil and slashing your own salary and distributing it among your employees. Maybe you don’t want to do this unilaterally — maybe you’re worried it will cut into your profits too much if you actually pay your workers a living wage, something that allows them to cover rent and food and save up a little.

In that case, millionaires of the world, I would advise you to start lobbying for higher minimum wages and stronger union laws. I’m serious. Because there are a couple of ways this can go, and not all of them are good for the super-rich. About the least-bad scenario (from the perspective of the private jet class) is that eventually, once the middle class has been ground down to a fine powder, the poor will simply vote for new politicians who will cram living wage laws down the throats of the business elite. Most of the other scenarios involve torches and pitchforks, or angry guys with beards and AK-47s. Those don’t tend to end well for anyone, rich or poor. I know that most of the super-wealthy CEOs have their empathy surgically removed around the first time they occupy a corner office, but this is about pure self-interest. What’s going on now is partly about wages, but it’s partly about respect, too. It doesn’t matter if you call your workers associates or partners or friendly-buddies. If you treat them with disdain, and foist their problems on the taxpayer, neither the workers nor the other taxpayers will mind one bit if you fall from your great height. Matthew Claxton writes for the Langley Advance.


The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A9

Letters

AMRON’S GOURMET MEATS LTD.

Gov’t hopes to bury jet fuel decision

The Editor, The proposed 80-million-litre jet fuel facility is getting closer to reality. The government has announced it will make a decision by Dec. 24 as to whether it passes their so-called “environmental review.” Even more alarming than the huge tank farm (for which Richmond does not have adequate fire protection facilities in the case of an explosion), there is the even bigger concern with the panamex super tankers that will ply the South Fraser. As you walk, jog or bike along the Fraser, you will have your view obstructed by these huge tankers carrying their toxic and highly flammable cargo up the Fraser to the off-loading

facility, which will be just off Silver City. The proponent’s own documentation promises there will be spills, that they are inevitable. So why make an announcement so close to Christmas? Of course they are hoping we all won’t notice. That is a common trick for disseminating bad news. It is a widely unpopular proposal: in a Vancouver Sun poll on Jan. 6, 2012, 79 per cent were outright opposed; in a Georgia Strait poll Jan. 19, 2012, 83 per cent were opposed. We are not hopeful the government will make a decision that protects the estuary, with the pitiful record of the BC Environmental Assessment Office (BCEAO).

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

In an article about the BCEAO, the Vancouver Sun reported, “Since 1995, the office has rejected outright only one project.” The Auditor General at the time, John Doyle, noted in his report, “Rather than meet its mandate to oversee the implementation of such approved projects, B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Office often delegates that role to other ministries and does not formally track certified project conditions and commitments for compliance.” Can we trust this government with safe guarding the Fraser Estuary? I think not. I think there is big business involved and little players like salmon take back seat rows. At this point, we continue to ask the public to make

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

their voices heard, either through your local MLA, or to the Minister of the Environment, Mary Polak. It is our only hope that common sense will prevail. Polak’s contacts are mary.polak.mla@leg.bc.ca or 604-514-8206. Barbara Huisman Director of VAPOR

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A10 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

the

Friday Feature PUTTING THE SQUEEZE ON CHARITY

Shoring up the last line of defence Richmond’s charities cope, but creaking under weight of spiraling demand for their help

“As charities step in, instead of government saying ‘we better do something,’ they just let us get on with it,” said Richmond Food Bank’s executive director, Margaret ichmond has the second highest Hewlett. poverty rate in the country, and one “(The government) even used to deny in nine people lucky enough to hold sending families to food banks. Now, their down a job in the city pocket less than written policy is to actually tell people to go $20,000 a year. out and use other resources in the commuMore and more sad stories are told of nity first.” children going to school hungry The city, Hewlett believes, as low-income families struggle to To sponsor would like to respond, but don’t, put food on the table. a Christmas out of fear of being downloaded Throw in government funding Fund family onto on a permanent basis. cuts, precarious employment and Wayne Duzita, community the spiraling cost of living and you chair of the Richmond Christmas have serious downward pressure Fund, remembers getting involved as managputting the squeeze on the last line ing director of the PNE’s food bank back in of defence — the charity. 1984. To keep up with the demand and stay “Was it a Band-Aid solution back then? ahead of the “competition” — new nonprofits pop up every year as new community Yes, and I’d agree, unfortunately, food banks have become part of everyday life,” said needs are identified — charities are having Duzita. to be creative to simply survive. “I’m not sure it will ever go away. Who The symptoms of a community in need knows? Unless we totally solve the poverty — pervasive fundraising at your supermarproblem, then it’s always going to be there. ket checkout and soaring demand for help “What I do know is that there’s a need for — surface at unfortunate venues such as the help in the community food bank, where an astonand I have the capability ishing 1,500 Richmondites to do something about it.” swallow their pride every Hewlett said both week so they can feed provincial and federal themselves and their famigovernments have, for too lies. long, taken charities for Hundreds more, many of them families and working — Margaret Hewlett granted and allowed them to paper over the poor, turn out to get their cracks of their social only fresh meat of the week at a growing number of church volunteer-run policies. “Not everybody can get a job, hold that community meals. job and look after themselves or their famDecades ago, a number of the charities ily,” added Hewlett, who said demand has now feeling the pinch of modern day pressoared at the food bank from 130 households sures, were seen as temporary solutions to a week in the early ’90s to 650 nowadays. fleeting problems — a Band-Aid for the “And as much as we respect people’s pricommunity’s social wounds. vacy when they come here, we started asking However, they’ve now become a permawhy they were coming, just to try and undernent thread in the fabric of the city, forever stand more of what was happening out there. expected to sew up the holes worn out by “They were temporarily employed hotel years of government neglect. BY A LAN C AMPBELL

R

acampbell@richmond-news.com

“Not everyone can get a job, hold that job and look after themselves.”

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Christmas Fund chair Wayne Duzita, far right, with, from left, Grant Bryan, of O’Hare’s GastroPub, Elizabeth Specht, Volunteer Richmond executive director and Lois Hourston at the Steveston Beer Fest. The event raised $13,500 for the Christmas Fund.

ALAN CAMPBELL/RICHMOND NEWS

Richmond Food Bank’s executive director, Margaret Hewlett, sorts through a delivery of Costco bread. It’s such a donation that helps the bank cope with increasing demand.

“There was about five people here trying to do everything,” said Duzita. “I wanted to create something very different and, instead, created an army of volunteers. I thought it was better to ask a very little from a lot of people.” The Christmas Fund, which helps out needy families over the festive season with ver at the Gilmore Park United grocery vouchers and gifts for the kids, now Church — where volunteers have has about 54 individuals or companies helpbeen running next week’s charitable Dream Auction for 20 years — spare seats at ing out. And as for getting the public’s attention, its weekly community meal are a rare sight. the span of which decreases every year, “Seven years ago, about 60-70 people Duzita and his team have to continue to tap would show up, usually seniors,” said into their creative juices. retired church administrator Gail Nichols, “The Canada Line parking lot event, for who explained about $8,000 of the $30,000 example, was a great success last year,” he raised at the Dream Auction goes towards said. “And we have to continue to come up the $20,000 it takes annually to lay on the with stuff like that each year.” weekly community meals. Inventing new ways “Now we have between to lure people back 140 and 160; many young to the Dream Auction families, many are new year after year has immigrants from Asia become second nature and many are the working to Nichols and Brady, poor.” who were both busy Gilmore’s community this week cataloguing meal is now maxed out, items for the silent and it’s the same over at auction. Bethel (a partner church to — Jan Brady “It started 20 years Gilmore, which also runs a ago in the old building weekly meal). “People often ask me, ‘Who in Richmond as a fun event in the church’s basement,” said Nichols. has to go for that meal?’” added the Dream “It’s now in its 12th year in a new buildAuction’s Jan Brady, a part-time nurse/office ing and has grown every year. Most years we manager. “They would be surprised what they see.” sell out our 300 tickets and have raised more than $340,000 in those years. Such people are Richmond’s inconspicu“But this year, we’ve sold just over 200. ous poor, hiding in plain sight, only becomWe’re hoping to push the last 100 in the final ing visible when appearing at aforemenweek.” tioned food banks and community meals. The Dream Auction has leaned heavily on “Just because we don’t have pockets of the local business community since its inceppeople physically living on the street doesn’t tion. Which is just as well, considering the mean the poverty isn’t there.” frosty response from the bigger corporations, no doubt inundated by similar requests from nother stresser for local charities is charitable organizations. getting enough volunteers to share “We have great support from the local the load. business community when it comes to aucWhen Duzita took over as chair of tion items and other donations and we have Volunteer Richmond Information Services’ tried to attract support from the bigger corRichmond Christmas Fund, he quickly realporations,” said Brady. ized there were a lot of charities out there, but many had the same volunteers. see Food bank page 11 workers, retail workers, people on really low wages. It wasn’t just people who had lost their jobs.” “The most concerning ones are the seniors, whose pensions are not enough to cope with things such as health care costs.

O

“Just because we don’t have pockets of people...living on the street, doesn’t mean the poverty isn’t there.”

A


the

Friday Feature

The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A11

PUTTING THE SQUEEZE ON CHARITY

Corporate donations help, but self-serving BY YVONNE ROBERTSON & ALAN CAMPBELL

N

acampbell@richmond-news.com

o one wants to look a gift horse in the mouth, but the issue of corporate charity still needs a check-up, according to poverty activists. Generous donations are appreciated. However, some are concerned about what they see as a movement away from corporate taxes, which are used to support social services, to a reliance on corporations to voluntarily “give back” to the community. While many corporations and wealthy philanthropists do indeed give back by making significant donations to hospitals and other

worthy causes, those donations usually come at a price — the expectation of publicity. Corporations tend to want their charity recognized to promote their brand name and earn the moniker of “good corporate citizen.” Hence, they’re inclined to give to organizations that have the resources to pro— Trish vide that kind of exposure. “The concern is the organizations that get left behind, which are also increasingly not covered by the government, are the less PR-friendly ones and also overrepresented in poverty,” said Trish

Garner, the community organizer for the B.C. Poverty Reduction Coalition. “This includes things to do with disability, mental illness, refugees and First Nations.” Misconceptions further perpetuate the uneven distribution, according to Garner. “People divide it into Garner the deserving versus the undeserving,” she said. “With health issues, it’s not people’s fault, it’s not their responsibility. However, poverty still comes with negative stereotypes. People think those living in

“People divide it into the deserving versus the undeserving.”

Food bank: First port of call

Continued from page 10 “But we got next to nothing, sometimes we don’t even get a reply.”

F

or the Richmond Food Bank’s Hewlett, one of the biggest frustrations is knowing how much more could be done. “We have a microcosm of need coming in here.” “There’s people new to the community; people shocked by the price of housing; people in precarious employment; struggling seniors and people with addictions. “We’re often the first port of call for people in need. And that’s when we discover that people need more than a tin of soup,” she said. “We try to connect them to other resources and agencies or provide it ourselves. But we don’t have adequate facilities for what we’re doing or trying to achieve. “There are other services we’d like to offer people without having to send them to another building, because that’s when we tend to lose them.”

poverty are lazy and all they need to do is get a job to work their way out of it, whereas poverty issues are quite complex.” With that logic, large charities that support health issues become the most popular targets for donations, whereas food banks, for example, miss the mark. However, the greater concern is that decisions about what agencies should be supported and how wealth should be reallocated — decisions that some say should be in the hands of the people via elected representation — are increasingly in the hands of corporations: entities that make decisions that serve their own corporate interests. see Lanzinger page 12

Sponsor a family through the Richmond Christmas Fund

The Richmond Christmas Fund is hoping you’ll make room on your shopping list for a family you’ve never met, but for whom you could make a world of difference. Registration to sponsor a family closes Nov. 29. To receive a sponsorship, a family must first register with the Christmas Fund. This year, Christmas Fund registration takes place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14. Sponsors can expect to be matched with families any time between those two dates. For more information on getting sponsored or becoming a sponsor, call 604-2797035 or visit www.volunteerrichmond.ca.

Buy Dream Auction tickets

ALAN CAMPBELL/RICHMOND NEWS

Gilmore Park United Church’s Dream Auction volunteers, Jan Brady, left and Gail Nichols, are hoping to push the event’s last 100 or so tickets in the next few days.

The 12th Annual Dream Auction lunch takes place Saturday, Nov. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Delta Vancouver Airport Hotel, 3500 Cessna Drive. Tickets are $40 for adults, $15 for children aged four-12 and free for children under four. As well as the silent auction, live auction and door prizes, there is the return of the popular Air Canada Runway Landing Competition — land your paper airplane on the runway and you’re eligible for the grand prize draw for two tickets anywhere on Air Canada’s North American routes, including Hawaii, Mexico and the Caribbean. Proceeds go to: Richmond Food Bank; Bethel Community Meal; Gilmore Park Community Meal and CHIMO. For tickets, call Gilmore Park United Church at 604-277-5377.


A12 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

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Continued from page 11 “I’d like to see the government step in and make some real policy change,” said Garner. As far as what corporations can do, she suggests adopting a minimum living wage policy, for example, in an effort to redistribute the wealth. That would go much further towards lifting people out of poverty — if that’s one’s genuine objective. Ultimately, giving to charities is not a bad thing, says Garner, but it helps fix the symptom of a broken system, rather than the cause. Adopting a living wage, as

••••••• • • • • • • • • •••••• s TodAy! open

opposed to minimum wage, is something the BC Federation of Labour has been lobbying the provincial government to introduce for many years. The federation is acutely aware of the trend of the “working poor” turning up at the doors of charities for food and clothing. “We need a poverty reduction strategy in B.C.; it’s not just about people without a job,” said Irene Lanzinger, the federation’s secretarytreasurer. “We waited eight years to see a rise in the minimum wage and, even working full-time, it’s not enough to

lift people above the poverty line. “There are so many people working two and three jobs to make ends meet and many of those jobs are precarious. That group of people has increased over the last 10 years.” Lanzinger said the current strategy of expecting corporations to be responsible enough to look after their workforce is not enough. “It’s a race to the bottom and not all corporations act responsibly. That’s where the government has to take more of a role in making sure workers are looked after by introducing a poverty reduction strategy.”

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A13

Community

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Groups help typhoon victims

or a

Natural Smile?

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The Richmond Delta Youth Orchestra will perform this Saturday to raise money for victims of Typhoon Haiyan.

“Love Without Borders,” a free fundraising concert for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. at Aberdeen Centre’s Central Atrium on Sunday, Nov. 24. The event was orgaFor a nized by the Fairchild video Media group and variof the ous media, together with orchestra Friends of the Victims of Typhoon Haiyan. Aberdeen Centre visitors will be encouraged to donate during the three-hour, multicultural song and dance numbers from local Filipino artists. There will also be a chance to win a smart phone and a silent auction of donated items will be held. Cash and cheques will be collected during the event and donated to the typhoon victims through Canadian Red Cross and Rose Charities, a registered non-profit group offering aid to the Association of Medical Doctors in Asia (AMDA), which has sent some volunteer doctors already to the Philippines. The death toll in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan is up to 4,000, while nearly 13 million, including more than four million dis• FUN

placed and 2.5 million in need of food aid, are badly affected. For more information about the event, visit www.fairchildtv.com, www. aberdeencentre.com, www.fm961.com and Rose Charities at www.rosecanada.info or contact 778-891-1336 or 604-345-2118.

Youth fundraise

The Richmond Delta Youth Orchestra will also be hosting a fundraising concert this Saturday, Nov. 23 at the Richmond Cultural Centre. The concert is by donation and all proceeds go to help victims of Typhoon Haiyan through the Canadian Red Cross. Many of the orchestra’s members had connections to the Philippines, according to Jonathan Der, associate conductor and chamber music director. “Music can touch peoples’ hearts. It can communicate and provoke meaningful purpose about life.” The event features music from Vivaldi as well as Filipino songs. Organized by Der and Stephen Robb, music director, the performance begins at 2 p.m. and is sponsored by Richmond Cultural Centre and Long & McQuade Richmond.

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As a resource teacher at William Bridge elementary, Sara Raouf watches mental illness hang over a child’s expression, whether dealing with their own or taking on the stresses of a family member. It’s ever-presFor a ent, yet words are video of rarely spoken. Green “It’s tough seeThumb ing kids going Theatre through challenging times, the community supports are out there, but I’m not sure we’re reaching the families we need to,” said Raouf. “As teachers, we have concerns about kids, there are so many unanswered questions about where they’re coming from. We don’t always have the whole picture.” After seeing many kids struggling, Raouf approached her sister at the Canadian Mental Health Association to see what can be done to raise awareness about mental illness in schools. And a year later, things are underway. Raouf, through the help of several community organizations, has brought Vancouver-based Green Thumb Theatre to Richmond to perform People Like Vince at 20 elementary schools from Nov. 26-Dec. 6. Green Thumb produces original plays for younger audiences about contempo-

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Sara Raouf is starting the discussion about mental health at schools. rary issues such as bullying, immigration and substance abuse. People Like Vince tells the story of a young girl, Myrtle, who learns to understand her uncle’s bipolar disorder. The play is for Grades 4-7. There will also be activities to facilitate discussion in the classroom and dispel misunderstandings about mental illness. “I’m hoping this will be the first step in opening up a door to a safe space for kids to talk about this,” said Raouf. “It’ll be a starting point to open the conversation and reach out to those families. ” Raouf, with two young children herself, grew up with a father who had bipolar disorder. Back then, even less awareness surrounded mental illness. “We knew there was an issue at

schools,” said Dave MacDonald, executive director at Richmond’s Pathways Clubhouse, one of the community partners. “[Raouf] mentioned how mental illness is considered a taboo, which I’ve always felt is the same for adults, too. We always felt we needed to do something, but didn’t know what.” The McCreary Centre Society recently released a report stating one-third of parents and caregivers in B.C. indicated they had not had access to support services to help them cope. Although not the whole reason, stigma plays a role in preventing access to services, according to Roz Walls, who runs Supporting Families Affected by Parental Mental Illness and/or Addiction. “There is a fear of what will happen, people don’t know how they’ll be judged, if kids will still be allowed to play with their kids,” Walls said. Raouf approached MacDonald with her idea, and he drafted a grant proposal for Pacific Blue Cross’ Community Connections program. Walls and the Richmond School District included letters. The project received $12,800 to cover the expense of Green Thumb Theatre’s play. Anxiety is one of the more common illnesses these days, as kids today face more pressure and live in a “world that is becoming an increasingly complicated place,” according to Raouf. There’s an increased access to information, but little to help kids process it. see Play page 17 Most major vision plans accepted

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A17

Play: Accessible avenue

Community

Continued from page 16 “There are so many different factors,” she said. “Some kids see how hard their families work to make ends meet. One in four kids live below the poverty line and come to school without lunches. It’s not exactly a

healthy culture.” People Like Vince provides a light-hearted interpretation that is an accessible way for kids to be exposed to such a hard and complicated topic, according to Raouf. Other organizations involved in the proj-

ect include Touchstone Family Association, BC Schizophrenia Society, Vancouver Coastal Health, CHIMO Community Services, Richmond Addiction Services Society, as well as countless teachers and school counsellors.

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A19

Around Town

Friday

Gateway Theatre holds its 28th Annual Christmas Concert on Friday, Nov. 22 at 8 p.m. The concert celebrates 40 years of playing music in Richmond and includes guests Vancouver Thunderbird Chorus. Tickets are $20 for adults, $17 for seniors/students. For more information, visit www.gatewaytheatre.com.

Saturday

The Richmond Delta Youth Orchestra will put on a performance to raise funds for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan this Saturday, Nov. 23 at the Richmond Cultural Centre at 2 p.m. All proceeds will go to the Canadian Red Cross. The show is by donation and features music by Vivaldi. The Richmond Walk for Love takes place on Saturday, Nov. 23 from 9-11 a.m. to raise money for the Philippines. The walk is organized by Coun. Chak Au and MP Alice Wong. It starts at the Thompson Community Centre and makes its way along the trail on Railway Avenue to Williams Road

and back. Those who can’t make it, can donate by writing a cheque to Rose Charities and mailing it to Wong’s office.

The Cross-Cultural Temple Tour will be held on Saturday, Nov. 23 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Richmond Public Library, Steveston Branch, 4111 Moncton St. It includes a lunch for $39 and a visit to a Sikh temple, Hindu temple, Muslim mosque, Buddhist temple and a Jewish synagogue. It’s for all ages. Call Multicultural Ministries at 604-8974224.

Sunday

Love Without Borders is a free fundraising concert for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan at Aberdeen Centre on Sunday, Nov. 24 from 1-4 p.m. It’s organized by the Fairchild Media and various other media. All money goes to the Canadian Red Cross.

Monday

The Richmond Chinese Community Society will host a Super Typhoon Haiyan Disaster Relief Fundraising Dinner on

Monday, Nov. 25 at 6 p.m. (dinner at 7 p.m.) at Continental Seafood Restaurant, 105-11700 Cambie Rd. Tickets are $50. All proceeds go to World Vision, Lions Clubs International Foundation and Canadian Red Cross.

Tuesday

The Richmond Public Library will be offering Kids’ Book Club meetings at the Brighouse (Main) branch. The first club (ages 7-8) takes place on Tuesday, Nov. 26 from 4-4:45 p.m. The second club (ages 9-12) takes place on Tuesday, Dec. 3 from 4-4:45 p.m. Registration is required. Books will be provided. For more information, call 604-231-6412 or visit www.yourlibrary.ca/progs.

Wednesday

The Richmond Public Library, the Bayit and Vancouver Kollel will offer a free Family Hanukkah Party on Wednesday, Nov. 27 from 6-7 p.m. at the Brighouse Branch, 7700 Minoru Gate. To register, visit any branch, call 604-2316413, or visit www.yourlibrary.ca/progs.

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A20 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

Arts&Life

Please fill

ETYMOLOGY

More names into words

In an earlier column I wrote about words that perpetuate the names of historic figures. Since then, I’ve read a book mentioning others that I’d never suspected. Before I knew it, I’d woven them into a silly story. Can you spot the 10 words that originated with names? “The woman wearing a leotard and clutching a doily dozed on the chesterfield. A shadow crept across her face and woke her. When she opened her eyes she saw the silhouette of a man. Galvanized by the sight, she groped behind the cushion for her derringer, but it wasn’t there. As the man inched forward, the woman noticed nicotine stains on his fingers and a belcher around his neck. ‘A hooligan,’ she thought. Suddenly, the man stamped his foot. ‘Darn! I forgot my shrapnel device.’ ‘Whew!’ said the woman as the man fled.” The list starts with leotard, a one-piece costume covering the torso, worn by gymnasts and dancers. It takes its name from Jules Léotard (1838-1870), the French acrobat who popularized the outfit (he also invented the flying trapeze).

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Sabine Eiche IN OTHER WORDS

Next comes the doily, a small ornamental napkin sometimes used as a mat. Originally, it signified a type of fabric sold in London by the linendraper Doyley (17th century). The chesterfield, often incorrectly called a couch, divan or sofa, is believed to be named after Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield (1694-1773), who first commissioned such a piece of furniture. Its distinguishing feature is the buttoned upholstery. Silhouette, which we use to describe a solid dark shape seen against a light background, was the name of an 18th century French finance minister. The severe economic measures introduced by Silhouette during the Seven Years War led to his name being linked to things done cheaply. By the 19th century, silhouette became the term for a profile portrait cut with scissors from black paper, an inexpensive form of portraiture. Luigi Galvani (17371798) was an Italian physician, physicist and philosopher, famous for his pioneering work in bioelectricity. The verb galvanize is used figuratively to mean to stimulate, prod. The American gunsmith

Henry Deringer (17861868) designed a small pocket pistol that became known as the derringer. Easy to hide in a stocking or muff, it was the pistol preferred by ladies. It was also the weapon used to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. In 1828 scientists isolated the poisonous alkaloid in the tobacco plant, which was given the name nicotine after Jacques Nicot (1530-1600), the French diplomat who brought tobacco plants from Portugal to France in 1560. The belcher, a blue and white polka-dotted neckerchief, is named for the famous pugilist Jim Belcher (1781-1811). Conan Doyle included Belcher in his boxing novel Rodney Stone. According to the Oxford English dictionary, the word hooligan, a street rowdy, is based on the name of the 19th century Irish Hooligan family living in south-east London, who were known for their ruffianism. Shrapnel was the term given in 1803 to a particular kind of ammunition invented by Henry Shrapnel (1761-1842), officer of the British Army. It now refers generally to fragmentation from an explosive device. Want more? Try words based on names from ancient history. They’re tantalizing. Sabine Eiche is a writer and art historian (http:// members.shaw.ca/seiche/).

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A21

Arts&Life

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Carol Smiley is the knowledgeable hostess at the Sanduz Estate Wines.

Berry nice wines tickles palate Carol Smiley lives up to has a wine for that! Blueberry her name as she pours me is an obvious choice, but a Sanduz Blackcurrant fruit there’s blackcurrant, blackwine and beams with pride at berry, raspberry, cranberry, how delicious it is. gooseberry, crabapple and a Smiley is the friendly sweet cherry port. and knowledgeable hostess Taylor prefers to leave in the Sanduz Estate Wines’ enough residual sweetness in SIPS HAPPEN tasting room at Blundell and the fruit wines to lift the aroSidaway. mas and flavours. Founded in 2007, Sanduz Estate Wines Smiley pours me a glass of Sanduz is the largest fruit winery in B.C. Local Blackcurrant. The bouquet reminds me of the blueberry farmers, Dave and Neeta Sanduz, cassis you sniff from a Cabernet Sauvignon. harvest pesticide-free fruit from their own There is also a whiff of cloves and cinnaproperty as well as from other growers. mon to add some delicious spice. It’s amazSmiley explains the reasons why fruit ingly rich, smooth and dry with a kiss of tartwineries and their wines are becoming more ness and a long finish to savour. For $14.70, popular than ever. a great match for rack of lamb with garlic “One of the biggest killers of new winerand rosemary! ies is overhead. It takes months, if not years, Smiley also recommends the Sanduz for grape wines to mature. It only takes 10 Gooseberry wine which is $14.70. Much weeks for fruit wines to be bottled and ready like a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, it has to drink,” she said. a prominent gooseberry nose and flavour, Unlike grape wines, fruit wines have along with a herbal quality and crisp acidity. fewer tannins and sulfites, which appeal to Here’s a wine for grilled halibut or curried consumers with food allergies. mussels! Ron Taylor is the winemaker and a pioTo take away the winter chill, Smiley sugneer in the B.C. wine industry. Back in the gests heating up the sweet cranberry wine 1980s, he was one of the first to produce and adding cinnamon and cloves to make the Okanagan wines from premium grape variet- holiday season bright and tasty. ies like Riesling and Gewurztraminer. Sanduz Estate Wines is open seven days Now at Sanduz, Taylor produces a large a week from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 12791 variety of fruit wines in a range of styles Blundell Rd. in Richmond. Call 604-214from dry table wines to sweet dessert wines 0444 for more fruitful information. and ports Eric Hanson is a life-long Richmond resiThink of any fruit and chances are Sanduz dent and a retired teacher and wine educator.

Eric Hanson

The family cottage – be careful how you transfer it In 1981, our Federal government abolished the ownership of two properties by a couple, with the principal residence exemption on both properties. Now, people can claim only one property as a principal residence. The problem for many Canadians today is how to minimize the tax impact, especially considering the large increases in property values over the past 30 years in many parts of the country. One way to cope with the possible tax impact is to buy life insurance, since the benefit will be paid tax-free, and depending how much insurance you buy, it may cover most or all of the tax liability. But the main question is whether to transfer title while the owners (typically parents) are alive, or just wait until they pass and leave it to the Estate. There are several answers. One is that, if two parents are registered owners and title is registered in both names, if one passes, the tax on any gain is deferred until the death of the second parent. But there is no one answer that fits all families, so you need to do some planning, and understand that even if the property ends up falling into the Estate, it won’t necessarily be catastrophic. Make sure to get some advice!

Visit our website (www.WillPowerLaw.com) or call us at (604) 233-7001 to discuss your Wills, Estates and Seniors’ questions.


A22 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

Sports

T H E

Awards roll in for Clarke’s freshman year

Richmond’s Summer Clarke has been recognized for her impressive freshman season at Louisiana State University. The Richmond soccer standout was named to the AllSoutheastern Conference (SEC) Second Team, as well as the SEC All-Freshmen Team. The talented striker emerged as one of the SEC’s top goal scorers in her debut season. She led the Tigers in scoring with 23 points, including 10 goals, in 20 matches. She scored eight goals in SEC play to finish tied for third among the conference leaders. Her total includes three multi-goal games with a hat trick at Arkansas on Oct. 4 and two goals each at Alabama on Oct. 6 and Texas A&M on Oct 31. Clarke was honored as the SEC Offensive Player of the Week and TopDrawerSoccer.com National Player of the Week after scoring five of LSU’s eight goals in a weekend sweep at Arkansas and Alabama in early October, including both game-winners. She was joined on the All-SEC Second Team by freshman teammates Emma Fletcher and Megan Lee, marking the first time in conference history three rookies from one school were selected. Clarke, Fletcher and Lee helped form the nucleus of LSU’s Class of 2013 that received consensus recognition as one of the top 15 recruiting classes in the country heading into the 2013 season. Fletcher is also from B.C. and played with Clarke on provincial select teams, as well as the Whitecaps Girls Elite Program. The attacking midfielder managed a goal and 12 assists. The Tigers’ season concluded with a 1-0 overtime loss to Auburn at the SEC Tournament.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No.3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-998-3615 (ext: 3615) Fax: 604-270-2248 Email: mbooth@richmond-news.com

GORD GOBLE/RICHMOND NEWS

Richnond United battled the Delta Coastal Selects in recent U13 Metro Selects League action. Richmond won this game 2-0 and currently sit in second spot in the league standings with a 6-1-3 record.

Seafair grad cracks roster of Team Pacific

Forward Glenn Gawdin named to B.C./Alberta squad for upcoming World U17 Hockey Challenge

Former Seafair Minor Hockey standout Glenn Gawdin has been named to the Team Pacific roster for the 2014 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, slated for Dec. 29-Jan. 4 in Cape Breton NS. Team Pacific is comprised of 13 players from B.C. and nine from Alberta. Hockey Alberta and B.C. Hockey each identified 23 U17 male athletes to take part in the Team Pacific Summer Camp that was held in July in Calgary. These players were then evaluated during the first part of their club’s team season by a Team Pacific evaluation group. Gawdin is currently in his rookie season in the Western

Hockey League with the Swift Hamilton. “We think this is a Current Broncos. The 6-foot-1 very deep team with a good com180-pound centre has a goal and bination of skill, size and characeight assists in nine games. ter – all the elements needed to After a stellar career play a versatile game.” with Seafair, Gawdin The 2014 World enjoyed a productive U17 Hockey Challenge season in the B.C. Major brings together the top Midget Hockey League players in the world with the Greater born 1997 or later. The Vancouver Canadians. tournament is made up He was the Broncos first of 10 teams; five from round selection in the Canada – Quebec, 2012 Western Hockey Ontario, Pacific League Bantam Draft. (Alberta, British “The selection proColumbia, Northwest Glenn Gawdin cess for this team was Territories, Yukon), very in-depth and the coaching Atlantic (New Brunswick, staff feels very positive about the Newfoundland and Labrador, roster that’s been assembled,” said Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Team Pacific Head Coach, Steve Island) and West (Manitoba,

Saskatchewan, Nunavut) and five international teams. Team Pacific will be competing in Group A with Team West, Team Quebec, Sweden and Czech Republic. Group B will comprise of Germany, USA, Team Ontario, Team Atlantic and Russia. Team Pacific will play an exhibition game against Russia on Dec. 28 before they play their first preliminary round contest against Team Quebec on Dec. 29. “In such a short-term competition, we’ll want to play a high-paced game, requiring contributions from every player. I feel confident in the depth and talent of Team Pacific,” added Hamilton.

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A23

Sports

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Greater Vancouver Canadians defeated the first place Okanagan Rockets 4-3 in B.C. Major Midget Hockey League action last Sunday at the Richmond Olympic Oval.

Rapids show excellent early season form at Langley Olympians short course invitational The Richmond Rapids Swim Club sent 75 swimmers to the Fraser Valley last week to compete at the Langley Olympians Short Course Invitational. For the first time this season, the Rapids were in a championship-style, heats and finals environment. The top eight swimmers in each event and age group returned in the evening to race again. This is the set-up for nearly all major meets, including B.C. AA and AAA Championships and Age Group Nationals. And like those meets, it took good swims in the morning to come back at night. The Rapids had to be on their game, and they were. The team racked up 136 finals swims over the two-day event. So what makes the difference in finals swims? Coach Drew McClure looks for things the athlete can change. “In this kind of setup, I’m looking for improvement of an aspect of their race from the morning,” explained McClure. “I’m not expecting to see anything like an increase in fitness or technical ability — there hasn’t been enough time. What I want is for the athlete to fix a mistake from their first swim, whether technical or tactical, that they have control over. New mistakes are also very welcome.” This was also the first event of the year with a full order of events, with many the Rapids hadn’t swum yet this season. Head Age Group Coach Dennis Silva was satisfied with much of the skill con-

version from practice to performance. It’s great to start out strong and controlled in practice, but it matters little if that attribute can’t be deployed during a race. The Rapids swimmers did a solid job of applying their work. “This is about the best I’ve ever seen our athletes look at this point in the season. The work they’ve put in on technique was certainly showing,” said Silva. Top three finishers are listed below. Coming up soon for the Rapids is their annual FastSwim Classic, hosted at Watermania. For more information on the Richmond Rapids Swim Club, visit richmondrapids.com. 50 Freestyle: Nini Weng - 1st, Alex Ball - 1st, Michael JakacSinclair - 1st, David Ng - 3rd. 100 Backstroke: Adrian Hsing - 1st, Matthew Crawford - 2nd, Cecilia Soroco - 3rd, RunQian Gong - 3rd, Ethan Chan - 3rd. 100 Breaststroke: Michael Ge - 1st, Brandon Crawford - 2nd. 200 Breaststroke: David Ng - 1st, Michael Ge - 2nd, Tony Zeng - 2nd, Rich Rakchtis - 3rd. 100 Butterfly: Benjamin Zhou - 1st, Cecilia Soroco - 2nd, Lionel Han - 2nd, Will Dekker - 3rd, Nic Qu - 3rd. 100 Freestyle: Cecilia Soroco - 2nd, Alex Ball - 2nd, Nini Weng - 3rd. 200 Butterfly: Dini McIver - 2nd, Matthew Crawford - 2nd, Arvin Chua - 2nd, Jeremy Fung - 3rd, Ben Zhuo - 3rd. 50 Breaststroke: RunQian Gong - 2nd. 200 IM: RunQian Gong - 2nd, Ethan Chan - 3rd, Rich Rakchtis - 3rd, Max Schaffler - 3rd. 400 Freestyle: Ethan Chan - 2nd, Adrian Hsing - 3rd. 200 Backstoke: Matthew Crawford - 2nd, Adrian Hsing - 2nd, Jerry Liu - 2nd. 200 Freestyle : Adrian Hsing - 2nd. 50 Butterfly: Jean-Paul Low - 3rd.

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Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ‡, § The Number One Dodge Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after November 1, 2013. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pric includes freight ($1,595–$1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (2 only and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2014 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiat price before taxes. ‡4.29% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package model to qualif customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package w a Purchase Price of $19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash and Ultimate Bonus Cash Discounts) financed at 4.29% over 96 months with $0 down paym equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $114 with a cost of borrowing of $3,644 and a total obligation of $23,642. §2014 Do Grand Caravan Crew Plus shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $31,790. ¤Based on 2014 EnerGu Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). ❖Real Deals. Real Time. Use your mobile device to build and price any model. TM SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group L


A26 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News November 22, 2013 A27

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A28 November 22, 2013 The Richmond News


Richmond News November 22 2013